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Lyr Add: Holy God, You Raise Up Prophets

Haruo 14 Jan 01 - 02:30 PM
Haruo 14 Jan 01 - 02:35 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 14 Jan 01 - 04:57 PM
Zebedee 14 Jan 01 - 05:30 PM
Zebedee 14 Jan 01 - 05:45 PM
katlaughing 14 Jan 01 - 06:51 PM
Rick Fielding 14 Jan 01 - 06:59 PM
Lox 14 Jan 01 - 07:39 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 14 Jan 01 - 08:03 PM
McGrath of Harlow 14 Jan 01 - 08:27 PM
Jeri 14 Jan 01 - 08:29 PM
GUEST,CraigS 14 Jan 01 - 09:36 PM
GUEST,Jeremy J Woodland 14 Jan 01 - 11:13 PM
mg 14 Jan 01 - 11:24 PM
CarolC 15 Jan 01 - 12:40 AM
Haruo 15 Jan 01 - 03:14 AM
Haruo 15 Jan 01 - 03:27 AM
blt 15 Jan 01 - 03:37 AM
mg 15 Jan 01 - 11:20 AM
Mrrzy 15 Jan 01 - 01:17 PM
GUEST,voyager 15 Jan 01 - 03:09 PM
Haruo 15 Jan 01 - 07:00 PM
NightWing 15 Jan 01 - 07:15 PM
GUEST,Trish - webmistris.com 15 Jan 01 - 07:15 PM
Haruo 15 Jan 01 - 07:41 PM
Jeri 15 Jan 01 - 08:51 PM
catspaw49 15 Jan 01 - 08:51 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 15 Jan 01 - 09:42 PM
mg 15 Jan 01 - 10:12 PM
Allan C. 15 Jan 01 - 10:15 PM
Haruo 15 Jan 01 - 11:04 PM
Peter Kasin 15 Jan 01 - 11:41 PM
bseed(charleskratz) 16 Jan 01 - 01:17 AM
Jon Freeman 16 Jan 01 - 02:45 AM
McGrath of Harlow 16 Jan 01 - 01:55 PM
Haruo 16 Jan 01 - 06:34 PM
Haruo 16 Jan 01 - 07:08 PM
Guy Wolff 16 Jan 01 - 07:35 PM
Lox 17 Jan 01 - 12:40 AM
Gervase 17 Jan 01 - 07:03 PM
McGrath of Harlow 17 Jan 01 - 07:53 PM
Lox 17 Jan 01 - 09:34 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HOLY GOD, YOU RAISE UP PROPHETS
From: Haruo
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 02:30 PM

HOLY GOD, YOU RAISE UP PROPHETS
This is a hymn prescribed in the Episcopal Church (USA), the American constituent of the Anglican Communion, for the feast days (Jan. 15 and Apr. 4) of Blessed Martin (Luther King, Jr.), Pastor, Prophet, Martyr. It is sung to MARTIN'S SONG by Carl Haywood. The music is in Lift Every Voice and Sing II, 1993, and Wonder Love and Praise, 1998, and a simple melody-line-only MIDI is at this page. The lyrics are by Harold T. Lewis, who has written hymns for the feast days of a number of Black Saints; © 1992
  1. Holy God, you raise up prophets;
         Praise and honor do we sing
    For your faithful, humble servant,
         Doctor Martin Luther King.

         Refrain (after each stanza):
    Blessed Martin, pastor, prophet,
         you the mountaintop did see;
    Blessed Martin, holy martyr,
         Pray that we may all be free.

  2. Moral conscience of his nation,
         Reconciling black and white,
    Dreamed he of a just society,
         We must carry on his fight.

  3. Teacher of Christlike nonviolence
         To the outcast, poor and meek;
    Greater weapon 'gainst oppression
         Is to turn the other cheek.

  4. Preacher of Christ's love for neighbor,
         He won Nobel's prize for peace.
    Peoples, beat your swords to plowshares,
         Wars 'twixt nations all shall cease.

  5. Champion of oppressed humanity
         Suff'ring throughout all the world;
    He offered pride and dignity:
         Let Christ's banner be unfurled!

  6. So, when felled by sniper's bullet,
         Under heavens overcast,
    He could cry, "Thank God Almighty,
         I am free, I'm free at last!"

I have mixed feelings, as a Baptist, about seeing one of our boys glorified by our competition, but heck, they're right, the man was a Nobel laureate and a martyr, and it's kind of fun to pray to a Baptist saint... ;-)

Liland
Eve of the Birth Feast of Blessed Martin


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Haruo
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 02:35 PM

Searching for "Martin Luther King" in the DT turns up only Martin Luther King for President, and the notes to American Pie. The one that says "Abraham, Martin and John" in it (I'm blanking on the incipit) doesn't come up with a search for "Martin and John".

Other suggestions welcome.

I haven't dug through the Civil Rights Song threads very deeply yet.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 04:57 PM

Just 30 minutes ago I came home from a concert featuring my chorus. We sang around a speaker, who wove his words around our songs:
Siyahamba (We are marching in the light of God)
This Little Light of Mine
Freedom Train
Freedom is Coming

A good time was had by all. I was especially moved by the speaker's story of Jonathan Daniels who stepped in front of a young woman and took the bullet meant for her in Alabama in 1965.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Zebedee
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 05:30 PM

Liland,

I hope you are joking when you talk about a different Christian denomination as being the 'compitition'

As I'm sure you're aware, certain secular views have caused many deaths here in the UK.

You all claim the believe in the same God, ask him what he thinks about denominations, and which one is 'best' On second thoughts...

Ed


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Zebedee
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 05:45 PM

Despite my comments, I wouldn't want this thread to become one about secular agruments.

Go to this site, ignore the horrid midi file, and listen to and read the 'I have a dream' speech.

It still moves me to tears

Ed


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 06:51 PM

Here is a synopsis of what we, in Casper, Wyoming will be doing tomorrow to honour Rev. King. I am proud to say one of the orgs. I work with is sponsoring it:

CASPER MLK CELEBRATION SCHEDULED

Jan. 11, 2001, CASPER -- Martin Luther King, Jr.'s dream and actions will be remembered in Casper on Monday, Jan. 15. The community is invited to the 1 p.m. program in Room 198 of the Casper College Administration Building.

East Junior High School's REACTS class will show "A Time for Justice," a 38-minute video about the Civil Rights movement from 1954 to 1965. After the video discussion, Becky Junge, a 5th grader from Verda James Elementary School, will talk about the "Make Kindness Cool" theme at her school and share her vision of 1,000 acts of kindness.

"'A Time for Justice' is an outstanding video that documents everything from Rosa Parks to the nine Black youth at Little Rock Central High to the Birmingham 16th Street Baptist Church bombing to Bloody Sunday," says REACTS teacher Holly Thompson.

REACTS stands for Reading Education and Community Teamwork Service. The program is in its fifth year at East Junior High. It is a one semester, two-period (block) elective. It is also the only formal service learning class and curriculum in the state of Wyoming. It has received over $50,000 in grants from the Corporation for National Service in Washington D.C. and the Natrona County School District. The program has received numerous recognitions for its work: J.C. Penney Golden Rule Award for Education for the state of Wyoming, Northern Life's Unsung Hero Award for Education for the state of Wyoming, 1996 winner of Do Something's Kindness and Justice Contest for the state of Wyoming, two Governor's Awards for Volunteerism, and special recognition from the City of Casper. In addition, teacher Holly Thompson, earned the James Reeb Award for Wyoming for the two-year oral histories project of Casper's African American community conducted by four REACTS and Thompson. Those oral history video tapes are in the Casper College Goodstein Library historical archive.

In recognition of Dr. King's message of service to others, community members are asked to bring new toiletry items, such as soap, shampoo, toothbrush, etc., as the "price of admission" to the program. These items will be donated to the Life Steps Campus, a collaboration of 14 human service agencies.

Event sponsors include the Casper College Diversity Committee, East Junior High REACTS class, and Natrona County Grassroots Project. All members of the community are welcome.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 06:59 PM

Hi folks. I've heard (perhaps incorrectly) that there may a State or two that refuse to honour his memory with a day. What's the scoop?

Rick


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Lox
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 07:39 PM

You would have to have a heart of stone to listen to that speech without being profoundly moved.

Do you dare to dream?

(see the "what is God?" thread for Mahatma Gandhis quote)

lox


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 08:03 PM

Rick, I believe my fair state of New Hampshire was the last officially to call the day "Martin Luther King Jr. Day". Before that we had a holiday on the same date but called it "Civil Rights Day". It's been MLK day only for the past year or two.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 08:27 PM

Our parish priest, any time he gets a chance, he'll bring Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi or Nelson Mandela into the sermon. Remembrance Day he brought in all three. I'll let him have this hymn.

And Zebedee "competition" doesn't imply enmity. In fact in a sense, if you see people as competitors you aren't seeing them as enemies. The word itself tends to turn it into something more like sport, where you need the competition in order to have game in the first place..


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Jeri
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 08:29 PM

I'm fairly sure Animaterra's right - New Hampshire was the last hold-out.

I have, on some CD, a song that was made from Dr King's "I Have a Dream" speech - I think the singer is Mike Agranoff, but I don't know who wrote the song. (I have a vague feeling that Peter, Paul and Mary recorded it.)

There are some songs at this elemantary school site.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: GUEST,CraigS
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 09:36 PM

I'm surprised that no-one's mentioned that Dr King's death was commemorated in true "blues" fashion by Otis Spann, who recorded "Hotel Lorraine" soon after the event.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: GUEST,Jeremy J Woodland
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 11:13 PM

There is also a beautiful classical guitar piece by Frederic Hand called "Elegy For a King," written in memory of Martin Luther King


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: mg
Date: 14 Jan 01 - 11:24 PM

I remember seeing something on TV that I think was in Olympia WA at the state capitol...the participants made it almost into a St. Patrick's Day parade and had Dixieland Jazz and I think a lot of them wore brown...I thought it was a great way to remember him and be happy at the same time...


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: CarolC
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 12:40 AM

My mother marched with Dr. King and was there when he gave that speach. When she came back, she gave us each a little button, black with a white = (equal sign) in the middle, that she got there. I still have that button. Sometimes, around this time of year, I take it out and hold it.

Carol


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Subject: LYR ADD: Keep Your Eyes on the Prize
From: Haruo
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 03:14 AM

My dad marched with Dr. King, too, though I'm not sure if he went to the March on Washington. Columbus, GA, maybe? Possibly Selma. I do recall writing to Dr. King when he was in jail (all of us kids wrote to him).

Incidentally, when I attended the service at St. Mark's (Episcopal) Cathedral at the end of the Justice Conference two years ago, the part of the liturgy that would normally be the (New Testament) Epistle was a passage from a letter of Dr. King's. The preacher was Mel White of Soulforce. And one of the songs, which I can't find in the DT (certainly should be there was "Keep your eyes on the prize":

Paul and Silas bound in jail,
Had no money for to go their bail.
Keep your eyes on the prize, hold on, hold on

Hold on! Hold on!

Keep your eyes on the prize, hold on.


Only thing that we did wrong
Was stayin' in the wilderness so long
Keep your eyes...


Only thing that we did right
Was the day we begun to fight,
Keep your eyes...


Etc. There are other verses, and I don't recall offhand which ones we did two years ago. The version at the Cathedral was not the one I grew up with (to wit the one on Pete Seeger's Carnegie Hall album), but it was recognizably the same song, different version.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Haruo
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 03:27 AM

PS To ZebEdee, don't worry, I was kidding about the denominational competition! That's what the smiley face at the end of the paragraph was supposed to signal. I certainly wasn't trying to encourage the death of British subjects. ;-) And in any event, it's congregations, not denominations, that compete for scarce harvestable soul resources.

Liland
Kidding


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: blt
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 03:37 AM

A friend started me on the practice of listening to tapes of Dr. King's speeches at this time of year. I also checked out a tape of the book "Parting the Waters," which is a beautifully written history (I think it's the first of 3 volumes)of the Civil Rights Movement, focused around Dr. King's life. I keep it in the car and listen on the way to work.

blt


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: mg
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 11:20 AM

isn't eyes on the prize originally keep your hand on the plow? mg


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 01:17 PM

My kindergartners are coming home with stories about MLKJr, whom I think they think was an actual King. Also, they are very confused about these useless skin color differences - apparently (this is per them) white people used to only be allowed to drink out of certain water fountains and were forced to sit at the front of the bus... but here in Ole Virginny I believe, although we have celebrated MLK day on this date for about a decade now, it was ALSO Lee/Jackson day. We had Lee-Jackson-King day for years, gotta love that one. Now I understand Lee and Jackson have been dropped and for the first time it's just plain Martin Luther King Jr. day. Wonder what the old confederates are thinking about that one...


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: GUEST,voyager
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 03:09 PM

Why?(The King of Love is Dead) -

NINA SIMONE

I listen to this song every year.

voyager FSGW Ghetto


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Haruo
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 07:00 PM

Mrrr... Re: King being a real king

Interesting to note that the initials, MLK, are the Hebrew for "king" (pronounced melekh, but in Hebrew vowels are normally not written). He was from a clerical family (at least, his dad was pastor of the same church he later pastored; don't know about his paternal grandfather) so the coincidence may not have been unintentional.

Mary, I don't know exactly what you mean by that? Are you saying there was a song "keep your hand on the plough" that the tune came from, or that there was a song about Paul and Silas that involved ploughs, or what?

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: NightWing
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 07:15 PM

Umm, unless I'm mistooken, Arizona has not yet declared MLK Day a holiday. It doesn't mean much in a day-to-day sense. I'm told that the ONLY difference from other states is that state offices are open. Banks close, all federal offices, many businesses. The only difference is that Arizona appears to the rest of the world to be peopled by bigots.

*shrug* Their loss

Back to the original topic: the song. Does the term "Blessed Martin" refer to Dr. King having been beatified by the Episcopals? Possibly to end up sainted? That IS hilarious: that a Baptists minister could end up as an Episcopal saint. (I suppose this might be an example of the ecumenical movement, which I understand the Episcopals are in the forefront of.)

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: GUEST,Trish - webmistris.com
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 07:15 PM

Thanks Ed for posting my site...Get a good sound card, the MIDI file is not that bad. ;-)I plan to put a lot more stuff on that page including some of his other speeches. "From The Mountain Top" and "I See The Promised Land". So come bookmark and come back next year! Thanks!


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Subject: Beatification of MLK Jr?
From: Haruo
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 07:41 PM

I'm not an Episcopalian, and cannot speak authoritatively on their canonization process, but my impression is that they don't have one in the formal sense in which the Romans do. In terms of actually officially naming anybody a newly minted Saint, I don't think they do so, but limit themselves to those who had already been canonized before Henry decided it was high time we had an English pope and besides, who says I can't get a divorce? watch me! (This was intended as 21st century humor, not 16th century diatribe.) However, certain more recent figures get treated as if... King, Bonhoeffer, maybe Mother Teresa? After all, half the time the last few years the Catholics talk like they've decided to award Martin Luther a posthumous cardinal's cap. And as far as the ecumenical implications of beatifying a Baptist preacher, it's worth noting that not one of the people the Anglicans formally venerate as Saints was actually an Anglican. And one of them (John the Forerunner) was a Baptist... [ Oh... it's not? ;-) ]

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Jeri
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 08:51 PM

I think Dr. Martin Luther King was a man - a great man, but still a man. I wonder if we name people such as Dr King saints to honor them, or to separate and raise them above the rest of us. We all have small opportunities in our lives to do good things, and I think it's good if we don't believe we have to be saints or superhuman to do them.

He wasn't given more than anyone else, but he did far more with what he had than most do. I'm glad we honor him with this holiday. I think it's possible he did more work to make this country a better place than anyone else.

I'll always remember Martin Luther King as a man who achieved greatness by having a dream, and by never losing sight of it. I wish I could have met him, even if I wouldn't have had the first idea what to say.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: catspaw49
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 08:51 PM

I can only express my admiration for Dr. King and remember the great sadness and shock I felt at his assassination. Never forget.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 09:42 PM

I ma neck o de woods

We refer to dis hollerday as

James Earl Ray Day


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: mg
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 10:12 PM

I don't have the definitive history of "hand on the plow" song..it was always my understanding that this was an old spiritual and Pete Seeger wrote the "eyes on the prize" line...if people whose song it was prefer it then great, ..but it seems to have stripped 99% of the beauty and meaning of the oriignal song clean away. To each his or her own. Anyway, here is a google search..

http://www.google.com/search?q=keep+your+hand+on+the+plow


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Allan C.
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 10:15 PM

Note to newbies: Let it go. Just let it go.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Haruo
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 11:04 PM

Mary, I am not sure what you're saying. Are you saying that new lyrics to folk tunes should only be sung with the permission of the anonymous authors of the earlier lyrics? I will admit I was barely aware of "Keep your hand on the plow" (most of the stuff the search turned up make it look like a Dylan song to me, and most of the lyrics are those interchangeable Negro Spiritual couplets that can be sung to a hundred tunes and in a thousand combinations) before you mentioned it. But I don't understand why it has to be a replacement situation, or why (or how) one would ask the originators their opinion.

In any event, it was the prize, not the plow, that we sang in the early sixties in Freedom School, and that we sang in 1998 at St. Mark's following the Justice Conference.

In my opinion, both should be in the DT.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Peter Kasin
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 11:41 PM

Speaking of "Eyes On The Prize," if you haven't seen the multi-part documentary of the same name, it's really worth looking into. Your local library might have it in the video section. It was produced in the late 1986 by Blackside Productions (who's founder sadly died just a few years ago), and is a very moving account of the civil rights movement of the 50's an 60's. Not long after, a second part was produced, taking it into the 70's.

BTW, good advice, Allan C.

-chanteyranger


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: bseed(charleskratz)
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 01:17 AM

On my way to my Monday night group I heard on KPFA Dr. King's speech (made in his/his father's Ebenezer Baptist Church) in which he explained why he had recently come out strongly against the Vietnam War--I know I have never heard a more inspiring speaker in my 60 plus years. I wouldn't call him a saint: more like an angel.

--seed


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 02:45 AM

I'm not sure I agree with the making of people into saints but he truely was a great man.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 01:55 PM

"A saint" means someone who makes it to heaven. When the pope canonises someone, it doesn't mean they are "made into saints", it means he states publicly that the official view of the Catholic Church is this is someone who has made it to heaven. And they should be taken as good role-models, as the phrase goes these days.

There's no reason Martin Luther King shouldn't be canonised just because he was a Baptist rather than a Catholic - except it'd likely be seen as bad manners towards the Baptists.

Incidentally, there has, I understand, been one person was declared a saint officially by the Anglicans back in the 17th century - King Charles I - but he doesn't get a lot of attention in that context these days.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Haruo
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 06:34 PM

Keep Your Eyes on the Prize is discussed here; it's attributed to, I think they said, one Alice Wine? (Not Pete Seeger.)

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Haruo
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 07:08 PM

Gospel origin - Civil Rights & Labor Songs — this thread has some very pertinent links for MLK purposes.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Guy Wolff
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 07:35 PM

I was so glad to be in Atlanta for Monday.. The love and brotherhood felt in just saying "happy Martin's day" to people you just met was wonderful. There was a very special feeling in his home town that was hard to miss. Has everyone seen the movie Gandi?? What an inspiration Mr Gandi most have been to Dr King.. God talk about optomisum in the site of adversity.. What an inspiration they both are to all men of good will.. All the best Guy


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Lox
Date: 17 Jan 01 - 12:40 AM

I think - unlike gargoyle!

And what I think is that sometimes, very rarely, someone comes along who acts as an inspiration to those who have lost hope.

When someone has the ability to instill faith in peoples hearts, their words continue to do so after their death.

Martin Luther King jr wasn't God, and may or may not be a saint, but when people hear his name mentioned, or even better, hear his voice, they feel inspired and their faith is renewed.

I am moved when I listen to his words, and my faith in humanity and the possibility of change is reaffirmed. That is why I express feelings of profound respect and gratitude towards him.

When you are thinking about the injustices of the world, it is very easy to want to switch off and look elsewhere (selfish denial is usually how this manifests).

But when you think about The people on those marches, their sense of hopelessness, and his ability to turn that around - constructively - you feel a resurgence of youthful passion and optimism that things can change.

He, in his own words, "dramatized" the issue. He did it for a reason, and achieved more than just Black suffrage in the process. He also got through to the hearts and minds of black and white people in a way that noone else (with the possible exception of Bob Marley) has managed to since.

The message in both cases was clear to all who opened their ears long enough to hear him. It was, you don't have to be afraid, colour differences (and any other differences) mean nothing, and if there are enough of you, with enough faith, you will create a new day, and yesterday will become a bad memory.

Are you afraid to be inspired? Well at least recognize who inspired you when you were young.

lox


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Gervase
Date: 17 Jan 01 - 07:03 PM

As a Brit, I have to say that MLK's assassination ws one of those moments that I still remember - along with JFK and, to a lesser extent, Lennon.
When I first signed on to Napster to see what they had, I search for the "I hve a dream " speech and downloaded it - and it had me in floods of tears; call me a honky white liberal, but it is one of the finest, noblest pieces of oratory we have. (I don't like Napster as a concept, but for that one download, I'm grateful)
My best friend at school was black/irish (an amazingly common mix in the UK for some reason) and we spent hours as youngsters trying to learn that speech off by heart - God knows why; it's just that even as kids we recognised its power and its importance.
For the memories of my friendship with Chris, for the poetry and sher power of his words, and despite all his foibles, MLK remains one of my all-time heroes.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 17 Jan 01 - 07:53 PM

black/irish (an amazingly common mix in the UK for some reason

Not that amazing really, there's a lot in common. The only "ethnic insult" I've ever quite liked the sound of is "toasted Irishman", meaning someone from the West Indies. (I put the quotes on "ethnic insult" because I don't think that's an insult, though it was often meant to be.)

And it's fitting that one of the most popular saints in Ireland is St Martin Porres, who was a black slave in Peru.


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Subject: RE: Martin Luther King - in honor/memory of
From: Lox
Date: 17 Jan 01 - 09:34 PM

The Irish and Black people have a lot in common.

They were both put through hell to facilitate British economic development.

In the 50's in London, there were signs outside hostels saying NO BLACKS, NO DOGS & NO IRISH or NO IRISH OR BLACKS NEED APPLY. etc...

And (arguably) - (he he) if you've ever compared a jamaican accent and a Cork accent ...........

I think I'd better stop there!

lox


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