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Lyr Req/Add: Platonia / Patanio

DigiTrad:
PATTONIO, THE PRIDE OF THE PLAIN


GUEST,gknighting@codenet.net 18 Jan 01 - 10:49 PM
Sorcha 18 Jan 01 - 11:02 PM
Sorcha 18 Jan 01 - 11:29 PM
kendall 18 Jan 01 - 11:34 PM
Sorcha 18 Jan 01 - 11:47 PM
Dale Rose 18 Jan 01 - 11:50 PM
Dale Rose 19 Jan 01 - 02:11 AM
GUEST,Gene 19 Jan 01 - 02:21 AM
Dale Rose 19 Jan 01 - 11:21 AM
Sorcha 19 Jan 01 - 11:28 AM
GUEST,gknighting 19 Jan 01 - 12:27 PM
kendall 19 Jan 01 - 02:04 PM
Dale Rose 19 Jan 01 - 03:49 PM
Dale Rose 19 Jan 01 - 03:53 PM
GUEST,Gene 19 Jan 01 - 05:53 PM
cowboypoet 19 Jan 01 - 06:19 PM
cowboypoet 19 Jan 01 - 06:27 PM
kendall 19 Jan 01 - 07:51 PM
GUEST,nomadman 19 Jan 01 - 11:10 PM
Dale Rose 19 Jan 01 - 11:56 PM
GUEST,Gene 20 Jan 01 - 12:04 AM
Sourdough 20 Jan 01 - 04:20 AM
GUEST,dan evergreen 22 Jan 01 - 09:36 AM
dick greenhaus 22 Jan 01 - 10:36 AM
Dale Rose 22 Jan 01 - 11:01 AM
GUEST,Ken Aliff (architectureone@iline.com) 14 Aug 02 - 11:10 AM
GUEST,MK 31 Aug 06 - 12:43 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Sep 06 - 08:49 AM
GUEST,Dale 01 Sep 06 - 11:22 AM
Jim Dixon 04 Sep 06 - 08:30 PM
GUEST,John M. Uscian 05 Feb 09 - 04:02 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Feb 09 - 04:15 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Feb 09 - 05:05 PM
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Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Feb 09 - 12:03 AM
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Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Mar 14 - 07:15 PM
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Subject: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,gknighting@codenet.net
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 10:49 PM

I'm looking for the lyrics to a cowboy song about a horse called variously "Patanio (or Patonio, or Platonia), the Pride of the Plains." I remember the tune but not all of the verses. Any help will be most gratefully appreciated. (I figure if none of the regulars at this web site knows it I musta imagined it altogether.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Sorcha
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 11:02 PM

Sorry, everything I can find has to do with lions, but there was a movie in 1944 of the same name, starring Bob Livingston and Smiley Burnett. It was a western, and maybe what you want is in it? See Here for a little more info.....no lyrics, tho.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Sorcha
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 11:29 PM

None of your "words" show up in a Spanish dictionary. Patagonia means UnKnown land, Paisan/o means friend/countyman, platono/platonio would have roots in the Latin, meaning platonic, or non sexual. I think you are going to have to find the exact word here. It almost has to be something meaning "friend", maybe "horse friend"? Or "friend of horses"? Sorry, but "Whatever" does just not cut it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: kendall
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 11:34 PM

I know the whole song, met the author many years ago, a guy called himself Big Slim. He called it potanio, but, I believe the correct name was Plantonio. Let me know if you dont find the words and I'll send them to you.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Sorcha
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 11:47 PM

Still nothing on search, kendall. I guess you have to post them. Plata can mean plate, wide, silver or river or all of the above depending on context.......so I think "platonio" could be "friend of......." maybe?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Dale Rose
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 11:50 PM

I've got it somewhere, just have to look.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PLATONIA (from Glenn Ohrlin)
From: Dale Rose
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 02:11 AM

PLATONIA
transcribed from The Hell-Bound Train, A Cowboy Songbook, Glenn Ohrlin,University of Illinois Press, 1973

You gaze at this picture with wondering eyes
And then at the arrow that hangs by its side.
You say, "tell the story," you know there is one,
"Of the beautiful creature with eyes like the sun."
That name ever haunts me wherever I go.
I'll tell you a story, 'twill thrill you, I know,
Of the famous cow pony I rode on the range,
We called him "Platonia, the pride of the plains."

The country was new and the settlers were scarce,
The Indians were savage, bloodthirsty, and fierce.
We sent out our scouts, but we got no report.
They were lost, for they never came back to the fort.
The captain spoke up and said, "Someone must go
Get help from the border of New Mexico."
A dozen brave cowboys at once answered, "Here!"
But the captain saw me, I was standing right near.

Platonia beside me, his nose in my hand,
The cap knew my horse was the best in the land.
He said, "If there's any one soul can get through
And outrun the redskins, my boy, it is you."
Proudly I looked at my pony, I know
Platonia and I are both ready to go.
They all shook my hand, as I leaped he dashed forth,
We swung down the trail, I headed him north.

The black strikes a trot and he keeps it all night.
And just as the horizon's beginning to light,
Not very far back there arose up a wail,
I knew that the Indians were hot on our trail.
I stroked his black neck and I called him by name,
He answered my call by shaking his mane,
His dark body lengthened as faster we sped,
And my rifle kept popping as onward we fled.

The Indians surround us, I swung his head west.
The arrows keep falling, a blow to my chest.
I speak to my pony, the best on the range,
"Steady, Platonia, the pride of the plains."
Bloody the froth flowing down o'er his bit,
The arrows all marking where he has been hit.
Platonia, poor feller, I knew he was hurt,
But he dashes right onward and up to the fort.

I give them the message, there's a dull haze around.
My cow pony stumbles and then he goes down.
Though wounded and weak, I'm feeling right bad
For the best pony comrade that man ever had.
But before very long we are both pulling through.
Of his death years later I'll not tell to you,
Oh, many good horses I've handled the reins,
But none like Platonia, the pride of the plains.

I'll add more about the song tomorrow, or as soon as I can get around to it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,Gene
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 02:21 AM

Play RealAudio of Plantonio at by Slim Clark at:

Rose The Record Lady Website-Page 8

* CLICK TO: RECORD LADY *

OR:

http://members.spree.com/entertainment/recldy/page8.htm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Dale Rose
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 11:21 AM

In his book, which by the way contains the transcriptions and music for 73 cowboy songs with notes, Glenn Ohrlin stated that this was one of the earliest songs he learned. He says, "This is the tune as Powder River Jack sang it, though I may have the words a bit different. "Platonia is spelled several different ways; Margaret Larkin reports it as "Plantonio," and I have heard it as "Patonio." The story runs about the same in most versions." He does not mention authorship, though many of the songs in his book are attributed.

I also have Powder River Jack and Kitty Lee's Songs of the Range, Chart Music Publishing House, 1937. This book does not list authorship either, only "Arr. by Powder River Jack Lee." The differences are indeed minor, as Glenn suggests ~~ typical are Lee's use of red devils and redskins where Ohrlin uses Indians, swung his head North instead of headed him north ~~ perhaps the greatest change is I have rode many ponies, I've held many reins in Lee's version, while Ohrlin says Oh, many good horses I've handled the reins. In other words, no differences worth quibbling over. In my opinion, you can put the Slim Clark version linked to by Gene in the same category, with few important differences.

Now a version I have that does have quite a few differences is Patanio, The Pride Of The Plains, Hank Snow, 1952, from the Thesaurus Transcriptions, with authorship attributed to Harry McAuliffe.

I have the music from both Ohrlin and Lee, in addition to the Snow recording, which I could transcribe. In the past, I have posted recordings and sheet music on my web site, but often these seem to go unnoticed, so I will only post these upon request. Now I don't mean to say that is true in every case, or that I am unwilling or less than eager to post them, just that I don't see a reason for it if no one wants them.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Sorcha
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 11:28 AM

Dale and Gene, amazing there! e mail sent to Guest.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,gknighting
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 12:27 PM

Thanks to all! This group is amazing! The version I learned as a kid was from a recording by the late Hawkshaw Hawkins, a country singer who included a lot of cowboy songs in his repertoire. He is unfortunately best remembered as having died in the same plane crash as Patsy Cline. I'm thinking the Hank Snow version might be similar to that since they were contemporaries and it's possible one may have learned the song from the other or they may have got it from the same source. One clue is that the Hawkshaw Hawkins version was also called "Patanio". Dale, if you would be so kind as to do the transcription from the Hank Snow set I'd be most grateful.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: kendall
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 02:04 PM

I met a man named Big Slim many years ago. He claimed he wrote it, but, I cant know. I dont even know his real name.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PATANIO, THE PRIDE OF THE PLAINS (H Snow)
From: Dale Rose
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 03:49 PM

Originally, I wanted to preserve the 8 line format as above, but that didn't work too well, as the Hank Snow version adds some elements and subtracts others, so I resorted to a 4 line grouping. Glad to be of help ~~ if you want the RA recording, I will Email it to you.

PATANIO, THE PRIDE OF THE PLAINS
as sung by Hank Snow, The Thesaurus Transcriptions, Bear Family 15488, 1991 (original release, 1952)

You look at this picture with a wondering eye,
And then at the arrow that hangs by its side.
"Say tell a story for you know there is one."
With the name of Patanio, the story begun.

I'll tell you a story that will thrill you I know,
Of a horse that I owned down in New Mexico.
Swift as an antelope and black as a crow,
And a star on his forehead as white as the snow.

His hair like a lady was glossy and fine.
He was restless and proud, but so gentle and kind.
His arched neck was hidden by a thick flowing mane,
And they called him Patanio, the pride of the plain.

The country was new and the settlers were scarce,
And the Indians on the warpath were savage and fierce.
Scouts were sent out every day from the post,
But they never came back so we knew they were lost.

One day said the captain, "Someone he must go,
For help to the border at New Mexico."
A dozen brave fellows right away answered, "Here!"
But the captain he spied me and standing right near.

Patanio beside me, his nose in my hand.
Said the captain, "Your horse is the best in the land.
You're good for the ride, and the lightest man here,
On the back of that mustang, you've nothing to fear.

So proud of my horse, that I answered, "You know
Patanio and I both so willing to go.
For speed and endurance, I'll trust to the black.
Patanio will carry my life on his back."

Then they all shook my hand and I mounted my horse,
Rode down the dark pathway and turned his head north.
Black struck a trot and he kept it all night,
'Til just as the East was beginning to light.

He answered the touch with a toss of his head,
His black body lengthened and forward he sped.
We were beating the redskins and the story was plain,
When the arrows fell 'round us like showers of rain.

We were leaving the redskins and the story was plain,
When suddenly in my leg that I felt a great pain.
The blood it gushed forth from Patanio's side,
But he never once shortened his powerful stride.

Patanio, poor fellow, I knew he was hurt,
But still he dashed forward and into the fort.
For many a fine horse I've clasped on the reins,
But none like Patanio, the pride of the plains.

Kendall, it could be that Slim Clark is the Big Slim that you remember. At first, given the fact that Powder River Jack Lee had it in his 1937 songbook, I questioned the claim of authorship. But when I discovered that Slim Clark first began singing in 1931 (though he did not start recording until the early 40s), I conceded that it was possible. Another thing that makes it somewhat likely that they are the same person is that Slim Clark lives in St. Albans, Maine, so you could easily have run into him. Info about Slim Clark and his recordings here According to the site (copyright 1998), Slim Clark is still alive and still performs. There are several pictures of him on the page, so you might want to check them out. Of course, if you have met Slim Clark too, then that throws out my theory.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Dale Rose
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 03:53 PM

Oh, I should have included that this version is attributed to Harry McAuliffe, who also wrote Sunny Side Of The Mountain, but now you can read it here or up above where I mentioned it the first time!


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Subject: Lyr Add: PATANIO, THE PRIDE OF THE PLAIN (Hawkins)
From: GUEST,Gene
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 05:53 PM

Thanks to Dale for the Hank Snow Lyrics
Especially for GKNIGHTING, a FAN of THE HAWK
Via a Country Music Fan and Net Buddy in Ireland...


PATANIO, THE PRIDE OF THE PLAIN
Hawkshaw Hawkins

You look at the picture with a wondering eye
And at the arrow that hangs by its side.
You say, "Tell the story; you know there is one."
By the name of Patanio, my story's begun.

I'll tell you a story that'll thrill you, I know,
Of a horse I once owned in New Mexico.
He was swift as an antelope and black as a crow,
And the star in his forehead was white as the snow.

His hair, like a lady's, was glossy and fine.
He was reckless and proud, but gentle and kind.
His arched neck was hidden by a thick flowing mane.
They called him Patanio, the pride of the plain.

The country was new and the settlers were scarce.
The Indians on the warpath was savage and fierce,
So scouts were sent out each day from the post,
But they never came back, so we knew they were lost.

One day the captain said, "Someone must go
For help to the border of New Mexico."
A dozen brave fellows straightway answered, "Here!"
But the captain, he spied me a-standing right near,

Patanio beside me, his nose in my hand.
Said the captain, "Your horse is the best in the land.
You're good for the ride; you're the lightest man here.
On the back of that mustang, there's nothing to fear."

"I'm proud of my horse sir," I answered. "You know,
Patanio and I are both willing to go.
For speed and endurance, I'll trust the black.
Patanio shall carry my life on his back."

They all shook my hand and I mounted my horse,
Rode down the dark pathway, and turned his head north.
The black struck a trot and he kept it all night
Till the sun in the east was beginning to light.

When from behind us there came a fierce yell.
We knew that the redskins were hot on our trail.
He answered each touch with a toss of his head.
His black body lengthened and forward he sped.

The arrows fell round us like showers of rain,
And suddenly in my leg I felt a sharp pain.
Red blood gushed from Patanio's side,
But he never once shortened his powerful stride.

Patanio, poor fellow, I knew he was hurt,
But still he dashed forward and into the fort.
On many a fine horse, I've since drawn the reins,
But none like Patanio, the pride of the plain.


SOURCE: Bear-Family Boxset/THE HAWK


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: cowboypoet
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 06:19 PM

Dale, those are the lyrics I was hoping for. At least now we know what some of the country music stars used to do on the bus traveling from nowhere to the back of beyond. Thanks again for taking the trouble to transcribe. I would like very much to hear Hank Snow's version of the song -- he was a much more accomplished guitarist than many of his contemporaries. He recorded a song called "The Rhumba Boogie" in 1951 on which he played some of the most hard-driving rhythm I've ever heard and a couple of pretty good breaks. As I just joined I don't know quite how this site works yet so, taking no chances, my e-mail address is gknighting@codenet.net.

BTW, I also heard that Norman Blake has a version of the song on his new CD.

I'll be playing "Patanio" in my next performance. Dunno if my audience will thank you but I surely do.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: cowboypoet
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 06:27 PM

Thanks also to you, Gene. I knew there were some slight differences. This is amazing, and boy, does it take me back. Guess I'll need to invest in that box set you mention. Does it by any chance include the cover of "Slowpoke" he did with PeeWee King's orchestra, complete with clippety-clop percussion?

I had a chance to see the Hawk in person as a youngster. Along with the music he used to do a bullwhip act that was pretty impressive.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: kendall
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 07:51 PM

Another Hank Snow fan ? He has been one of my favorite pickers ever since I can remember. His break in Honeymoon on a rocketship was a piece of work, eh? the lyrics were almosr moronic, but the pickin' was great!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,nomadman
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 11:10 PM

Just to confuse the authorship issue a bit more - Norman Blake does indeed have a recording of Platonia The Pride Of The Plains on his 1998 Shanachie CD, Chattanooga Sugar Babe, He lists the song as Traditional and his source as Wilf Carter (Montana Slim).

Regards,
John


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Dale Rose
Date: 19 Jan 01 - 11:56 PM

And yesterday, I looked for it by Wilf Carter, but couldn't find it. Even told a couple of guys by message that I was surprised that I didn't find it by Wilf, as I thought it was his sort of song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,Gene
Date: 20 Jan 01 - 12:04 AM

Billy Walker did a great job on it also

and the Willis Brothers did it, I think---


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Sourdough
Date: 20 Jan 01 - 04:20 AM

If I remember correctly, there was someone named Doc something and I think he sang with a woman, whose recording of 'Tatanio' (or at least that's the way I heard it)was often played by "The Coffee Drinking Nighthawk", Lee Moore played in the evenings on clear channel WWVA. I think he sold guitar strings. Was it Doc Williams? Does anyone recall?

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,dan evergreen
Date: 22 Jan 01 - 09:36 AM

Don Edwards sings it on "Saddle Songs." His tune is remindful of "Sweet Betsy From Pike." Is this the right tune?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 22 Jan 01 - 10:36 AM

One of the neat things about the DigiTrad database is the fact that you don't HAVE to know how a name is spelled--just look for [pride of the plains] (the square brackets indicate that it's a phrase). It's there.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Dale Rose
Date: 22 Jan 01 - 11:01 AM

Dick, it didn't work for me. Several attempts came up with the old Sorry, no documents were found which match your query. statement. Just now I tried the SuperSearch and got it. I see that the version you added was from Cowboy and Western Songs, Fife and Fife and is somewhat different from any of the above. Did they give any clues as to authorship?

Oh well, it was fun anyway, and I likely wouldn't have gone to the trouble and found out what I did if I had seen it in the DT.

Dan, check the RA that Gene pointed to above.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,Ken Aliff (architectureone@iline.com)
Date: 14 Aug 02 - 11:10 AM

I was surfing the web the other night and came upon a discussion held on this website during January of 2001 regarding the song "Patanio, the Pride of the Plain". It was fascinating to read some of the discussion and speculations regarding the lyrics and origins of the song. I may be able to shed some light in that regard since my father was the "Big Slim" referred to.

I remember this song especially from my childhood. It was one of my favorites since it told a story. The song was recorded by many people, including my father. If you would like to hear the original version of the song it is available in real player format at Rose, The Record Lady's website (http://recordlady.webgcs.com). She has an entire page dedicated to Big Slim.

Anyway the song "Patanio" was written by "Big Slim the Lone Cowboy" and published by Bobby Gregory of American Music Publishing Co. The lyrics posted by Dale Rose of the Hank Snow version are probably closest to the original with only minor changes. I have the original sheet music for the song and could transcribe the lyrics if anyone is interested.

My father's real name was Harry C. Aliff, however he wrote under the name of Harry C. McAulife (why I don't know) and performed under the name of "Big Slim the Lone Cowboy" (no - he is not Slim Clark). His career began in 1929 (he was truly one of the original "rhinestone cowboys") and he performed until the early sixties. There are several albums of his on the Decca and Arc labels. He died in 1966.

Most of the people mentioned in the discussion were friends and fellow performers with him. He was in a band with Doc Williams in the early 1930's and performed on the "Jamboree" at WWVA for many years. Doc probably sang the song as he sang many that my father wrote. I saw Doc and Chickie Williams in 1998 and as far as I know he is still alive and living in Wheeling, W.Va.

My father was also very close to Hawkshaw Hawkins and Hank Snow and both recorded many of his songs. Hawkshaw's recording of another of my father songs – "Sunny Side of the Mountain" became his signature piece.

Well, I hope this helps clear up some of the questions. I would be very interested in hearing from anyone who knew him or has any of his old recordings since they are rare now and very hard to find.

Ken Aliff architectureone@iline.com


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,MK
Date: 31 Aug 06 - 12:43 AM

I'm wondering if anyone originally involved in this discussion is still around or interested anymore. I came across it in my search for the words to a poem I learned as a small girl, called "Plantonio, the Pride of the Plain". The year I found it in one of my older sister's school books was 1952, but I have no idea the year the book was published. I was only 5, but could read well and read anything that came in front of my eyes. As we were quite poor and owned no books to speak of, I knew the only way I could keep this poem I had found and fallen in love with (the common childhood love of horses drove me) was to memorize it.
I repeated it to myself many times through the years, though after all this time a couple of stanzas have become hazy (hence my present search).
It is different in many ways, but the commonality with the songs is obvious. I wonder which actually came first. I didn't bother to learn the author's name, and have not been able to find it.
The first couple of stanzas from the poem are thus:
    "I'll tell you a story, there is one I know
    Of a horse I once owned in New Mexico:
    Swift as an antelope, black as a crow,
    The star on his forehead was whiter than snow.

    His dark neck was hidden by a long flow of mane.
    They called him 'Plantonio, the Pride of the Plain'.
The whole poem is about 12 stanzas. If there is anyone out there who is interested I'll be glad to tell you the stanzas I know.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Sep 06 - 08:49 AM

Here's an excerpt from

American Cowboy and Western Pioneer Songs in Canada
Edith Fowke
Western Folklore, Vol. 21, No. 4 (Oct., 1962), pp. 247-256

that I mined from Google:
http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-373X(196210)21%3A4%3C247%3AACAWPS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-V
    Swift as an antelope and dark as a crow,
    And the star on his forehead was whiter than snow.

    Up stepped the captain, saying, "Someone must go
    For the aid and protection of New Mexico."
    Up stepped twelve young fellows straight forward, said "Here,"
    But the captain's on me, I was standing close near.

    "You're good for the ride, you're the lightest one here.
    On the back of this mustang you've nothin' to fear."
    They all shook my hand and I nodded my head.
    And down the dark pathway the black turned his head.

    The black struck a trot and he kept it all night.
    On coming till the East was beginning to light.
    Not far behind us we heard a few shout
    And we knew that the redskins were hot on our trail.

    I jingled the bell at the end of his rein
    And spoke his name softly and stroked his dark mane.
    He answered my call with a toss of his head,
    His dark body lengthens the faster he sped.

    The arrows fell around us like torrents of rain,
    Pantanio O Pantanio, the pride of this plain!
    I delivered my message and tried to dismount
    But the pain in my leg was so bad I could not.

    See that arrow hanging there upon the wall
    And through my ankle stirrups and saddle and all?
    For New Mexico I've not ridden in vain,
    Pantanio, Pantanio the pride of the plain!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,Dale
Date: 01 Sep 06 - 11:22 AM

Yes, still around, always interested in such.

I really am sorry that Ken Aliff's post passed unremarked back in 02. It deserved better.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PATONIO (from Don Edwards)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Sep 06 - 08:30 PM

Copied from Cowboy Frank's web site: (You can also play a sound file on that page.)

PATONIO

I'll tell you a story that'll thrill you, I know,
Of a horse I once owned a long time ago.
You will gaze at his picture with wondering eyes,
And then at the arrow that hangs by his side.

Swift as an antelope and black as a crow,
With a star on his forehead as white as the snow.
His arched neck was covered with a dark flowing mane,
I called him Patonio, the pride of the plain.

The country was new and the settlers were scarce.
The Indians on the warpath were savage and fierce.
Though the scouts were sent out every day from the fort,
Yet they never returned and we knew they were lost.

One day the captain says, "Someone must go
Across the dark borders of New Mexico."
A dozen young fellows straightaway answered, "Here,"
But the captain spied me. I was standing right near.

Patonio was by me, his nose in my hand.
Said the captain, "Your horse is the best in the land.
You're good for the ride. You're the lightest man here.
On the back of that mustang, you have nothin' to fear."

Proud of my pony, I answered, "You know,
Patonio and I are both willin' to go.
For speed and endurance, I'll trust in my black."
Then they all shook my hand and I mounted his back.

Turned down the dark pathway, turned his head to the right.
The black struck a trot and he kept it all night.
When far back behind me I heard a shrill wail,
I knew that the Indians were hot on my trail.

I jingled the bells at the end of his rein,
Spoke his name softly, and stroked his dark mane.
Patonio he answered with a nod of his head.
His dark body lengthened as faster we sped.

We were leavin' the Indians. The story was plain.
The arrows fell round us like torrents of rain.
Patonio he stumbled and I knew he was hurt,
But still he raced onward and into the fort.

I delivered the message, then turned to dismount,
But the pain in my foot was so bad I could not.
The arrow you see hangin' there on the wall
Had passed through my foot, saddle, stirrup, and all.

With good care and patience, Pat and I were soon well.
Of his death many years later, I will not try to tell.
Of all the fine horses I've rode o'er the range,
There was none like Patonio, the pride of the plain.

[As sung by Don Edwards on "Saddle Songs," Shanachie CD 6025, 1997.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: GUEST,John M. Uscian
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 04:02 PM

I remember the lyrics this way (and clearly I don't remember all of the words... Texs Williams might have sung this one on the record I listened to):

"You may look at that picture with wondfering eyes,
and then at the arrow,
that's hanging close by,

Saying tell me a story,
if there's one I know,
Of a horse I once owned,
in New Mexico.


He was swift as an antelope,
and black as a crow,
with a star on his forehead,
as white as the snow.

The country was new then,
and settlers were scarce,
The Indians on the warpath,
were savage and firerce.

My captaion was a-saying,
That someone must go,
For help to the borders,
of New Mexico.

Patonia was with me,
Her nose in my hand,
Said the captain, Your horse,
is the best in the land."

The tack struck a something (sorry... never did clearly hear or remember these lines),
and he kept it all night, till just as the East,
was beginning to rise,
When back from behind us,
We heard a fierce yell,
And we knew that the Indians,
were keen on our trail.

we were leaving the Indians,
it was only to blame (probably not right words),
When in my left leg,
I felt a sharp pain.

The blood went on through then (again, likely not correct words),
Can't remember words here,
But he never once shortened,
His something stride.

You may look at that picture,
That hangs on the wall,
I was shot through my leg,
Boot, stirrup, and all.

Oh many fine horses,
I met on the plains,
But none like Patonia,
the pride of the plains.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Platonia, the Pride of the Plains (Lee)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 04:15 PM


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Platonia, the Pride of the Plains (Lee)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 05:05 PM

PLATONIA, THE PRIDE OF THE PLAINS
Powder River Jack Lee, 1938

You gaze on that picture with wondering pride,
And then at the arrow that hangs by my side,
You say tell a story you know there is one,
Of the beautiful creature with eyes like the sun.
That name ever haunts me where ever I go,
I'll tell you a story, 'Twill thrill you I know
Of the famous cow pony I rode on the range,
And they called him Platonia, the Pride of the Range

2
He was swift as an antelope, black as a crow-
With a spot on his forehead whiter than snow.
His hair, like a lady's, was glossy and fine;
He was restless and proud yet was gentle and kind.
But the flame in his eyes smouldered fiery and deep.
He would always graze by me where I lay asleep,
With arched neck so graceful, and dark flowing mane,
And I called him Platonia, the Pride of the Plains.
3
Our country was new and settlers were scarce,
The Indians blood-thirsty, savage and fierce.
Our scouts rode away and we got no report,
They were lost, for they never came back to the fort.
The captain spoke up and said someone must go
And get help on the borders of New Mexico.
A dozen brave cowboys at once answered "Here,"
But the captain saw me- I was standin' right near.
4
Platonia beside me with nose in my hand,
The cap knew my horse was the best in the land.
He says if there's any one soul can go through
And out-ride the redskins, my boy, it is you.
Proudly I looked at my pony- I know
Platonia and I are both ready to go.
They all shook my hand, as I leaped he dashed forth,
I rode down the dark trail and swung his head North.
5
The black strikes a trot and he keeps it all night
And just as the horizon started to light,
Not very far back there arose up a wail
And we knowed the red devils wuz hot on our trail.
I stroked his black neck and I called him by name,
He answered the petting by tossing his mane;
His dark body lengthened and faster he sped
And my rifle kept popping as onward we fled.
6
The redskins surround us- I turn his head West,
The arrows keep falling- a blow in the chest.
I speak to my pony- the best on the range-
Steady, Platonia, the Pride of the Plains.
Bloody the froth flowing down o'er his bit
And arrows all marking where he has been hit;
Platonia, poor feller- I knowed he wuz hurt
But he dashes right onward and up to the fort.
7
I gave them the messages, there's a dull haze around,
My cow-pony stumbles and then he goes down.
Though wounded and weak I'm a feelin' right bad
For the best pony comrade that man ever had.
But before very long we are both pulling through,
Of his death, years later, I'll not tell to you.
I have rode many ponies, I've held many reins,
But there's none like Platonia- the Pride of the Plains.

pp. 72-73, with musical score. Powder River Jack H. Lee, Deer Lodge, Montana, 1938, "Cowboy Songs," McKee Printing Company, Butte, Montana.

Austin E. and Alta S. Fife, 1969, "Cowboy and Western Songs," called the song "Pattonio," pp. 184-185, with musical score, 11 four line stanzas; a somewhat different version.

Larkin, 1931, "Singing Cowboy," was the first to print a version, "Plantonio," which she got from "a girl in Taos, New Mexico.
The song was fairly widespread- New Mexico, Missouri, Texas, Louisiana, Montana.
The origin is unknown.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Plantonio (Larkin)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 05:46 PM

Margaret Larkin collected the song from Miss Frances Dwire. Larkin speculates that the name, "Plantonio," was the Spanish Antonio, added to for the sake of alliteration.

PLANTONIO
Margaret Larkin, from Frances Dwire.

1
I'll tell you a story,
There is one I know,
Of a horse I once owned
In New Mexico.
2
Swift as an antelope,
Black as a crow,
Star on his forehead
Was whiter than snow.
3
His arched neck was hidden
By a long flow of mane,
They called him Plantonio,
The Pride of the Plain.
4
The country was new
And the settlers were scarce,
And the Indians on the warparh
Were savage and fierce.
5
The captain stepped up,
Said sommeone must go
For the aid and protection
Of New Mexico.
6
A dozen young fellows
Straightforward said "Here!"
But the captain saw me,
I was standing quite near.
7
"You're good for the ride,
You're the lightest one here,
On the back of that mustang,
You've nothing to fear."
8
They all shook my hand
As I nodded my head,
Rode down the dark pathway,
And north turned his head.
9
The black struck a trot,
And he kept it all night,
And just as the east
Was beginning to light
10
Not a great ways behind
There arose a fierce yell,
And I knew that the redskins
Were hot on my trail.
11
I jingled the bells
At the end of his rein,
Spoke his name softly
And struck his dark mane.
12
He answered my call
With a toss of his head.
His dark body lengthened
And faster he sped.
13
The arrows fell 'round us
Like torrents of rain.
Plantonio, Plantonio,
The Pride of the Plain.
14
I delivered my message,
And tried to dismount,
But the pain in my foot
Was so sharp I could not.
15
The arrow you see
Hanging there on the wall,
Had passed through my foot,
Stirrup, saddle and all.
16
With New Mexico saved
We'd not ridden in vain,
Plantonio, Plantonio,
The Pride of the Plain.

With musical score.
Margaret Larkin, 1931, "Singing Cowboy, a Book of Western Songs," Alfred Knopf; reprint Oak Publications 1963.

The story is told of Wild Bill Hickox riding to the fort at one time, and taking an arrow in the foot. The song bears no relation to any event in New Mexico.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Ron Davies
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 09:11 PM

It seems clear that Harry C McAulife did in fact write Sunny Side of the Mountain. His son has told us that he also wrote this song. Given the years involved, including Q's research, this is plausible. Perhaps there is more to the story.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Patanio, Patonio, Platonia, whatever
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 12:03 AM

What year was the sheet music, mentioned by McAulife's son, published? Would guest Ken Aliff please post the information (or someone who has the sheet music?
It would be nice to put an author's name to the song.

It would have to have been 1930 or before (Larkin published the song in 1931, and collected the song in Taos some time before).


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: Platonia/Patanio
From: GUEST,Rodney
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 09:20 PM

I have looked for this poem/song for many years maybe a total of 40 plus. I learned it from my brother and it was in my American lit book in middle school but I lost track of it and did not know the source. Thank you to all who have posted threads.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Platonia / Patanio
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Mar 14 - 05:54 PM

google Patanio (pride of the plains) by Hawkshaw Hawkins or Hank Snow


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Platonia / Patanio
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Mar 14 - 07:15 PM

As posted in the other thread (difficult to keep all the posts in mind), there is no record of McAulife having sung the song before its publication in 1931 by Larkin, but it is possible.


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