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Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?

GUEST,Waterlilys@aol.com 07 Feb 01 - 02:21 AM
MartinRyan 07 Feb 01 - 12:03 PM
GUEST,Waterlilys@aol.com 07 Feb 01 - 04:10 PM
GUEST,mg 09 Mar 07 - 01:38 PM
mg 09 Mar 07 - 09:22 PM
GUEST,Maggie Ferriter Campbell 15 Jan 12 - 03:55 AM
Jim Carroll 15 Jan 12 - 04:24 AM
GUEST,999 15 Jan 12 - 11:53 AM
GUEST 15 Jan 12 - 12:04 PM
GUEST,999 15 Jan 12 - 01:49 PM
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Subject: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST,Waterlilys@aol.com
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 02:21 AM

I was told there was a song referring to Ballyferriter, co Kerry, Ireland that came from a poem by Peter Golden - the title of the poem was something like "I Dreamt a Dream" or "Dream of Country Life" The original poem has 12 verses at about nine lines per verse.

These may be some of the lines:

The trip is o'er, the storm is past,
And we are safe arrived at last,
And far from thee, a shore, I stand
Once more upon a foreign land,
But though the seas between us roll
I love thee still, my Soul, my Soul,
And dream my dream of better,
You take me home and
Marry me at Ballyferriter.

Thanks in advance,
Mary
Host Co Kerry IrelandGenWeb
http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlker/index.html


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 12:03 PM

No sign of the poem but a genealogy site (which you may well have see) came up with this:

Sometime after the St. Vincent church in Ballyferriter was built, a Peter Golden wrote a poem about it, titled, "Marry me in Ballyferriter". A Connie Foley put the words to song. Does anyone out there know the words? Thank you. Margie Murphy Monihan

There was no reply to the query.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST,Waterlilys@aol.com
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 04:10 PM

FYI: I checked with a Peter Locke of Tralee who is known to be an expert on singer Connie Foley and he is unaware of this song or lyrics on any of Connie Foley albums.


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 09 Mar 07 - 01:38 PM

Hello..is anyone still looking for the song? I don't have it but that is where my great grandfather and his three brothers came from (Garveys, Tim, Pat, Dan and John. Sister Mary stayed behind and married John Fitzgerald). I would like to know about the song too. mg


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: mg
Date: 09 Mar 07 - 09:22 PM

Come on....someone must know something. mg


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST,Maggie Ferriter Campbell
Date: 15 Jan 12 - 03:55 AM

I think its time we write new lyrics if no one can come up with the original lyrics. Ballyferriter = a hard word to rhyme in English! But I can hear it sung without having heard the original.


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Jan 12 - 04:24 AM

A story we recorded from Traveller Mikeen McCarthy who was born in Cahersiveen which mentions Ballyferriter - can be found on the double CD 'From Puck to Appleby'
Jim Carroll

Go For The Water: Told by Mikeen McCarthy.
Mikeen's story, set in his own native Kerry, is widely travelled, both as a tale and as a ballad. The same tale, from India, is described as claiming "the highest possible antiquity" and is included, as part of a longer story, in Straparola's "Most Delectable Nights" (Venice 1553).
In Britain it is popular in ballad form, best known in Scotland as GET UP AND BAR THE DOOR and in England as JOHN BLUNT.
Mikeen has a large repertoire of stories, at least half a dozen of them having for hero and heroine, Jack and Mary.   

There was a brother and sister one time, they were back in the west of Kerry altogether, oh, and a very remote place altogether now. So the water was that far away from them that they used always be grumbling and grousing, the two of them, now, which of them'd go for the water. So they'd always come to the decision anyway, that they'd have their little couple of verses and who'd ever stop first, they'd have to go for the water. So, they'd sit at both aides of the fire, anyway, and there was two little hobs that time, there used be no chairs, only two hobs, and one'd be sitting at one side and the other at the other side and maybe Jack'd have a wee duidin (doodeen), d'you know, that's what they used call a little clay pipe (te). And Jack'd say:
        (Sung)
        Oren hum dum di deedle o de doo rum ray,
                Racks fol de voedleen the vo vo vee.

So now it would go over to Mary:
        (Sung)        
        Oren him iren ooren hun the roo ry ray,
                Racks fol de voedleen the vo vo vee.

So back to Jack again:
        (Sung)
        Oren him iren ooren hum the roo ry ray,
                Rack fol de voedleen the vo vo vee.

So, they'd keep on like that maybe, from the start, from morning, maybe until night, and who'd ever stop he'd have to go for the water.

So, there was an old man from Tralee, anyway, and he was driving a horse and sidecar, 'twas? they'd be calling it a taxi now. He'd come on with his horse and sidecar, maybe from a railway station or someplace and they'd hire him to drive him back to the west of Dingle. So, bejay, he lost his way, anyway. So 'twas the only house now for another four or five miles. So in he goes anyway, to enquire what road he'd to take, anyway, and when he landed inside the door, he said: "How do I get to Ballyferriter from here?" and Mary said:

(Sung verse)

So over he went, he said, "What's wrong with that one, she must be mad or something", and over to the old man. He said, "How do I get to Ballyferriter from here?"

(Sung verse)


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST,999
Date: 15 Jan 12 - 11:53 AM

Some info at the following link. Might be a poem we're looking for, and that will somewhat change search parameters.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/IRL-KERRY/2003-10/1065114080


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Jan 12 - 12:04 PM

Seems according to the link below that it's part of a longer poem.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/IRL-KERRY/2000-08/0966221211


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Subject: RE: Help: Marry me in Ballyferriter?
From: GUEST,999
Date: 15 Jan 12 - 01:49 PM

TO IRELAND

HE [sic.] trip is o'er, the storm is past.
And we are safe arrived at last.
And far from thee, asthore, I stand,
Once more upon a foreign land,
But though the seas between us roll
I love thee still, my Soul, my Soul.

from


http://www.archive.org/stream/voiceofireland00gold/voiceofireland00gold_djvu.txt

It is #92 or 93 on the page, so waaay down.


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