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Tune Req: I Know Where I'm Going

DigiTrad:
I KNOW WHERE I'M GOIN'
LICHT BOB'S LASSIE
THE LEABOY'S LASSIE


Related threads:
Meaning: Leaboy's Lassie (28)
Origins: I Know Where I'm Going (40)


GUEST,PBC 07 Feb 01 - 03:32 AM
Wolfgang 07 Feb 01 - 03:50 AM
GUEST,Bruce O. 07 Feb 01 - 01:34 PM
GUEST,Lexyladee@aol.com 07 Feb 01 - 04:52 PM
MMario 07 Feb 01 - 04:55 PM
Snuffy 07 Feb 01 - 05:09 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 07 Feb 01 - 05:38 PM
GUEST,Ewan McVicar 07 Feb 01 - 06:22 PM
GUEST,khughes@monitor.net 07 Feb 01 - 06:49 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 07 Feb 01 - 08:18 PM
Metchosin 07 Feb 01 - 08:59 PM
GUEST,Fred 08 Feb 01 - 12:06 AM
GUEST,Ewan McVicar 08 Feb 01 - 10:35 AM
Seany 08 Feb 01 - 11:48 AM
GUEST 08 Feb 01 - 03:10 PM
MMario 08 Feb 01 - 03:16 PM
Metchosin 08 Feb 01 - 03:17 PM
Mikey joe 09 Feb 01 - 07:51 AM
Seany 09 Feb 01 - 09:36 AM
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Subject: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,PBC
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 03:32 AM

I'm looking for the music score for "I Know Where I'm Going" - any takers??


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 03:50 AM

I know where I'm going

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 01:34 PM

Actually that one's Irish, and is in Herbert Hughes' 'Irish County Songs', I, p. 22 (1909). For related Scots, English, and American songs see "Ay waukin, Oh" in the Scarce Songs 1 file on my website.


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Lexyladee@aol.com
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 04:52 PM

Looking for translation of Aiken Drum, Version 1. ("There was a man who lived in oor toon.") With words like soger?, guide lang kail?, haggis bag?, guid saut meat? Athole brose?, etc. Also looking for any other info on this piece. THANKS! ;-)


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: MMario
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 04:55 PM

here?


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Snuffy
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 05:09 PM

Lexyladee, try these:

soger = soldier
guide = good
lang = long
haggis = a Scottish savoury dish of the sausage family, but more circular
haggis bag = the skin of a haggis
saut = salt
Atholl brose = something edible from Scotland (can't quite remember what at the moment)

Wassail! V


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 05:38 PM

Whoops! That should have been 'Irish Country Songs' in my post above. The song was said by Hughes to be from Antrim.


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Ewan McVicar
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 06:22 PM

Bruce
What do you think of the relationship between I Know Where I'm Going and The Leabob's Lassie, of which there is a nice version in The Scottish Folksinger, collated from Greig Duncan sources?


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,khughes@monitor.net
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 06:49 PM

Hi --

If I remember right, Atholl Brose is a drink made from whiskey, cream and oatmeal. Great stuff.

Kim


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 08:18 PM

Ewan, I've been puzzling over ther relationships between all the related songs on my website for over 30 years. There's barely enough of "I know where I'm going" to identify it with all the others. There are roughly three distinct tunes for all the songs with overlapping verses. Fragments of the song are in Herd's MSS but the earliest tune is that for "Jess Macpharlane", that appeared just before "Ay waukin, Oh" was published in 'The Scots Musical Museum'. C. K. Sharpe said Jess MacPharlane was a celebrated Edinburgh beauty of the 1740s, but I've never seen any note of the song so early (and I looked hard). If he's correct that may have spawned the other songs. (I contributed the song to 'Folk Music Journal' 1968, in response to an earlier note, 1966, that the "Licht Bob' Honey" (Greig collection) was to the same tune as "Ay waukin, Oh". [I have the 7 vols. of Grieg-Duncan, and have vol. 8 on order.]

I just don't know if there was some early ballad, 1750 or earlier, that later songs borrowed from, or whether just a few verses at a time were borrowed for one song from another. Do look at all on my website, were I've given many and noted others.


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Metchosin
Date: 07 Feb 01 - 08:59 PM

this from the Newcomers Permathread might also prove useful click here


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Fred
Date: 08 Feb 01 - 12:06 AM

This is another good source for Scottish, Irish, English and American folksongs. Usually has lots of good historical and other info as well, plus some downloadable midi arrangements of lots of them.

http://www.contemplator.com/folk.html


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST,Ewan McVicar
Date: 08 Feb 01 - 10:35 AM

Bruce, thanks for that. I've looked at much material on your website over the months, but I knew you'd be kind enough to shorten my search this time. I also appreciate your remarks as I recall them that people should buy Grieg Duncan. Volume 8 should with any luck leave the stocks soon. My involvement with the kids songs finished over a year ago, but Emily Lyle and Kath Campbell are still at work. Roll on the day.


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Seany
Date: 08 Feb 01 - 11:48 AM

Bruce,

Can you give the URL for the web-site that has the scarce songs please.

Does anyone know what a 'fail dyke' is, as mentioned in the Twa Corbies (I've read related threads already). I have done dry stane dyking in Glasgows Green Bank Gardens but have no idea what a fail dyke is.

Cheers.


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Feb 01 - 03:10 PM

Bruce Olson's website is in Mucat's Links.


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: MMario
Date: 08 Feb 01 - 03:16 PM

bruce's site

url=http://users.erols.com/olsonw/


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Metchosin
Date: 08 Feb 01 - 03:17 PM

Seany check my link to the glossary of Scottish words above

fail = turf
dyke = wall


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Mikey joe
Date: 09 Feb 01 - 07:51 AM

Seany I think a fail dyke is a broken ditch/wall. It's in Pawkie Paiterson

As for Staney Stewart he's often scacre a stanes And for to mend his auld fail dyke I'll leave him my auld banes

I think anyway

Mj


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Subject: RE: Scottish Traditional Songs
From: Seany
Date: 09 Feb 01 - 09:36 AM

Thanks,

I'm going with turf dyke - don't they still have these on the National Trust owned proposed Culloden battle site ?


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Mudcat time: 27 May 5:43 PM EDT

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