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Help: New Hampshire Song

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BORSCHT CIRCUIT WHOOPIE
MAKIN' WHOOPEE (UNION VERSION)
MAKING WHOOPEE
UKULELE LADY


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GUEST,Jeff Warner 10 Feb 01 - 11:32 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 11 Feb 01 - 07:51 AM
Judy Cook 11 Feb 01 - 05:29 PM
Uncle Jaque 11 Feb 01 - 10:19 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 12 Feb 01 - 07:23 AM
Jeri 12 Feb 01 - 05:21 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 13 Feb 01 - 06:57 AM
GUEST,JHiker 15 Feb 12 - 11:09 PM
GUEST,Oh, one more thing 15 Feb 12 - 11:10 PM
Joe Offer 16 Feb 12 - 02:54 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 17 Feb 12 - 05:47 AM
GUEST,999 17 Feb 12 - 09:47 PM
GUEST,999 17 Feb 12 - 09:50 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 18 Feb 12 - 01:07 PM
GUEST,999 18 Feb 12 - 01:18 PM
GUEST 15 Apr 12 - 02:34 PM
GUEST,amy conley 19 Nov 12 - 10:25 PM
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Subject: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST,Jeff Warner
Date: 10 Feb 01 - 11:32 PM

I learned a song from Tony Saletan, that he learned in Newton, MA, ca. 1960, from a teacher who got it from an old newspaper. Any help on it's source (or additional text) would be appreciated. Here it is:

New Hampshire Song (Purple Lilacs)

I want to wake up in the morning
Where the purple lilacs grow
Where the sun comes a-peepin' into where I'm a sleepin'
And the song birds sing, "Hello" (Hello)
I want to wander through the wild wood
Where the fragrant breezes blow
And drift back to New Hampshire
Where the purple lilacs grow

Thanks,
JFW


Also see: Where the Morning Glories Grow


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 11 Feb 01 - 07:51 AM

I want this song too!!!


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: Judy Cook
Date: 11 Feb 01 - 05:29 PM

In 1963 or 4 I was taught a parody of the song as theme song for GS Camp Bay Breeze. The main differences were the second line "Where the old bay breezes blow"; "seagulls" instead of "songbirds"; and of course the ending was "...Camp Bay Breeze, The greatest camp I know".

We also sang a parody of THAT featuring things like mosquitoes & poison ivy and ending with "It's a wonder I'm alive."

Cheers, Judy Cook


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 11 Feb 01 - 10:19 PM

I was born & raised in the Old Granite State, and yet do not recall ever hearing that one - or even hearing about it, for that matter!

I would check with the NH State Library / Museum in Concord; they might be able to turn you on to some clues. In the meantime I'll keep an eye out for it whilst scrounging about in the archives.

Those lillacs are apt to make me sneeze, but I do love 'em, don't ye know!


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 12 Feb 01 - 07:23 AM

Judy, is there any way Jeff or I could get you to either post a midi of the parody melody, or sing it to one of us over our answering machine, or send a tape of you singing it via snail mail, or??? It's worth a batch of the World's Best Chocolate Chip Cookies to me! PM me, or I'll PM you later today (can't log onto the Mudcat at work right now, too many thread titles that could get me in real trouble!)


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: Jeri
Date: 12 Feb 01 - 05:21 PM

The song is at the Bow Elementary School home page. There are no links from this page to the song, and I can't figure out why the song is there, unless they use the page for lyrics to actually sing the song. Maybe they have the music somewhere. There are phone numbers to the school on this page.

Where the Purple Lilac Grows
is here. The words are pretty much as Jeff posted them. No music though.


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 13 Feb 01 - 06:57 AM

Thanks, Jeri. I think I'm going to get the tune from Judy. Now Jeff and I will both be happy (great place, innit?)


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST,JHiker
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 11:09 PM

This song was (and is likely still) sung almost everyday at Interlocken/Windsor Mountain Camp in Windsor, NH. The founder and previous director, Richard Herman was good friends with Tony Saletan. Very very fond memories of the song and all around it.


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST,Oh, one more thing
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 11:10 PM

That Newton, MA teacher was Richard Herman.


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Feb 12 - 02:54 AM

Searching for "where the purple lilacs grow" brings up a lot of hits.

There's a recording here (click), and one by a very young performer here (click).

-Joe-


Camp Walt Whitman Songbook

Purple Lilacs

I wanna wake up in the morning
where the purple lilacs grow
where the sun comes a-peepin'
into where I'm sleepin'
and the song bird says "hello" ... hello

I wanna wander through the wildwoods
where the fragrant breezes blow
and drift back
to New Hampshire
where the purple lilacs grow.





(almost the same as what's posted above in the first message)


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 05:47 AM

Wow, Joe! Talk about a trip down memory lane! Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST,999
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 09:47 PM

Joe, check the following link.

http://news.tbo.com/news/nationworld/MGBINOW730F.html

Song Has Traveled Winding Road

By GRETCHEN PARKER The Tampa Tribune
Published: Apr 4, 2007

WINTER HAVEN - The Lions of Winter Haven file into the clubhouse wearing yellow vests, blanketed with flair collected over decades of community service, and take their folding chairs. They're ready to sing.

The song leader kicks it off, his wife at the piano, and they do it with gusto. As it has been at their Friday luncheons for more than 50 years, the highlight of song time is a tune called, "I want to wake up in the morning where the orange blossoms grow."

It is their theme song. It's in their songbook, and it's honored with a framed printing on the clubhouse wall.

The music is getting renewed attention, now that there is a push to make a new version of it into the state song. Floridians who were in grade school in the 1950s and '60s are again humming the catchy melody, filling in the words they remember and using the Internet to find the ones they forgot.

For many, the upbeat song about orange groves is a stroll down a sunny Florida lane.

But how far back does memory lane go? A look into where the music comes from reveals a song that has traveled many, many miles. At stake is a claim on a tune that has a chance of becoming Florida's new state song.

The Lions got the tune from Carroll Smith II, a charter member who led the Winter Haven club's song sessions in the 1940s.

With his wife, Billye-Mullins Smith, at the upright piano, Smith started the tradition of playing the song at every Friday luncheon.

Over the decades, members and their winter visitors learned to play the song by ear. Billye-Mullins believes that as Lions flowed in and out of the Winter Haven club from the far corners of Florida, the Northeast and the Midwest, they took the song with them.

Maybe, she says, that's how folks came to learn and sing other versions of it. In New Hampshire, it's a song about purple lilacs. In West Virginia, it's about rhododendrons.

Meanwhile, the Winter Haven club kept singing the Florida song's single verse, about sun and songbirds and orange blossoms - even after Carroll Smith died in 1969.

Eventually, members wanted to include it in their songbook. They approached Billye-Mullins and asked her to copyright it. She agreed and was awarded a copyright by the Library of Congress in 1993.

The sole distributor of the sheet music, along with a CD that Billye-Mullins recorded with her grandson, is Till Office Equipment in Winter Haven.

"I want to wake up in the morning where the orange blossoms grow" is a combination of her late husband's lyrics and her musical arrangement, said Billye-Mullins, who at 87 teaches piano to a full schedule of students out of her home in Winter Haven.

It's a creation of theirs and theirs alone, she says.

Teachers Start Class With Song

The song is perfect for singing by little Floridians, too. That has been the reasoning of schoolteachers over at least two generations.

In 1955, Linda Cope Oliver learned it from her first-grade teacher at Central Elementary in West Palm Beach. She remembers that every day, Miss Julia Todd walked to school with a hibiscus in her hair and started the morning with the song about orange blossoms.

Twenty years later, Oliver visited her old classroom. Todd was still imprinting it in the young minds of her students.

Now, Oliver sings it with her own kindergarten class every morning at Coral Sunset Elementary in Boca Raton. Oliver, 57, plays the autoharp and her kids belt out the happy song. They call it "The Florida Song," and the lyrics include the lines "I like the fresh air and the sunshine/They're so good for us, you know!"

She's taught the song to 20 classes. She never saw any of it written down.

Neither did Patty Swann, a retired elementary school teacher in Sanford who is a past president of the local historical society and now an employee of the Sanford Museum. Without any written music, she sang it for her third-graders, starting in 1967.

"Every once in a while, I'd have a music teacher who would say, 'I know that!' and she'd play it at the piano," Swann said. She used it in student performances as well. She wanted her students to know it, as a piece of Florida history.

Years later, after she finished teaching and was reviewing potential Florida history textbooks, she saw the song in writing for the first time. It was called "Where the Orange Blossoms Grow." The credit line read "Traditional."

Replacing 'Swanee River'

One of the children who soaked up the song was Mary Lynn Ulrey in Dade City in the 1950s.

It came to mind again when she read reports that lawmakers, with the support of new Gov. Charlie Crist, wanted to replace Florida's state anthem - an 1851 song widely known as "Swanee River" that harkens back to the state's plantation era.

She and her husband, Temple Terrace Elementary School music teacher Stephen Ulrey, set about putting the song she remembered to paper. Not finding any written music, they picked out the tune note by note, and Stephen added two new verses.

The goal was to reflect the sunniest side of Florida. The new words are an ode to tarpon, Everglades, gators and live oaks.

He called it the "Orange Blossom Song," recorded it with the voices of his students, began distributing it to lawmakers, and The Tampa Tribune wrote about it.

Soon, those who knew of a pianist in Winter Haven spoke up for her.

Smiths' Version Similar To 1917 Tune

Billye-Mullins Smith teaches her students on two grand pianos in her front room. A block off Lake Elbert, the driveway was designed for Model T Fords, and lush, pink bougainvilleas are the backdrop. A native of Fort Worth, Smith came here straight from music training in New York as a bride in 1944.

Ironically, the song she and her husband performed for the Lions Club spread by ear just as Smith was inventing a style of learning and reading music that shuns playing from memory. Based in math, the system she calls Opus 1 emphasizes structure and encourages students to understand how music is built, so they can improvise and write on their own.

And just as she and her husband wrote their song, Smith says Ulrey should write his own candidate for state song.

"It has to be on his part, to back up and write something original," Smith said.

She won't say whether she'll formally challenge Ulrey if he presses his version. She says she does not want to get involved in a hassle over a song she has fond feelings for.

In Ulrey's mind, the story has since become more complicated and more straightforward at the same time. He looked further back in time and found a song from 1917 that is similar to the Smiths' classic.

Its title is "Where the Morning Glories Grow," and it was written by Gus Kahn and Raymond Egan, along with Richard A. Whiting, a Hollywood composer who wrote film scores and collaborated on dozens of hit songs - including "Ain't We Got Fun."

"Where the Morning Glories Grow" became so popular that Bing Crosby recorded it and sang it on "The Tonight Show" in 1976.

The melody is similar to the Smiths' song; the lyrics of its chorus are nearly the same as the solo verse of the Smiths' song, Ulrey pointed out. Smith maintains she and her husband didn't borrow from any other work.

The copyright on the Whiting song has expired.

Whether Ulrey is borrowing from Whiting or from the Smiths is key to his own quest for a copyright. Whiting's song is considered to exist in the public domain. The Smiths' song is not. Toward that end, Ulrey said he's trying to get in touch with Smith and to negotiate an agreement.

Meanwhile, lawmakers have announced a statewide search for a new song.

And independently of each other, Smith and Ulrey last week had the same thought.

Maybe, each said, they would write something new - from scratch.

Researcher Michael Messano contributed to this report. Reporter Gretchen Parker can be reached at (813) 259-7562 or gparker@tampatrib.com.

Keyword: State Song, to hear audio and read about the current official song, "Old Folks At Home." Keyword: State Song, to hear audio and read about the current official song, "Old Folks At Home."

Article text posted by Joe Offer


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Subject: ADD: Where the Morning Glories Grow
From: GUEST,999
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 09:50 PM

From International Lyrics Playground

WHERE THE MORNING GLORIES GROW
(Music: Richard Whiting / Lyrics: Ray Egan & Gus Kahn - 1917)

Bing Crosby - 1976 (recorded at the London Palladium)

Also recorded by: The Cofer Brothers; Bob Strong; Dan Levinson.



I remember, I remember the place where I was born
Where the morning glories twine around the door at early morn
I've forgotten, I've forgotten how long I've been away
But I'd like to wander back again down the lane to yesterday

I want to wake up in the morning where the morning glories grow
Where the sun comes peepin' in where I'm sleepin' and the songbirds say "Hello"
I long to wander in the wildwood where the rippling waters flow
And go drifting back to childhood, where the morning glories grow

I remember, I remember the schoolhouse on the hill
And I wonder if the tiny folks are climbing up there still
I can picture, I can picture the dear old swimming pool
And the happy days that I spent there when I should have been in school

I want to wake up in the morning where the morning glories grow
Where the sun comes peepin' in where I'm sleepin' and the songbirds say "Hello"
I long to wander in the wildwood where the rippling waters flow
And go drifting back to childhood, where the morning glories grow


**********


ALTERNATE VERSION: Dedicated to the State of Florida, USA:


I want to wake up in the morning where the orange blossoms grow
Where the sun comes creepin' into where I'm sleepin' and the song birds say
"Hello"
I want to wander over yonder, pick the fruit that's hanging low
I want to make my home in Florida where the orange blossoms grow

I want to wake up in the morning where the ocean breezes blow
I want to cast my line on the falling tide where the tarpon swim below
I love the sunshine and the beaches, where the palms sway to and fro
I want to make my home in Florida where the orange blossoms grow

I want to wake up in the morning where the Spanish moss hangs low
Where the gators swim through the Everglades and the grand old live oaks grow
I love the wildwoods and the cities and the friends I've come to know
I want to make my home in Florida where the orange blossoms grow

I want to wake up in the morning where the orange blossoms grow
Where the sun comes creepin' into where I'm sleepin' and the song birds say
"Hello"
I want to wander through the orange groves where we children used to roam
And go drifting back to Florida, the place I call my home


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 01:07 PM

Thanks, 999- that seems to clinch it!


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST,999
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 01:18 PM

You're very welcome. It was an interesting song to look into, and it's funny in a way to see its spread into areas of the US. 'Good line, but obviously s/he meant to say Oregon or Texas, etc.'


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Apr 12 - 02:34 PM

I just cut my only purple lilacs from my one bush in Southern California, which caused me to break into song, this song. I learned it from the music teacher in a school where I taught K-3. That was in the White Mountains, back in 1972. I was grateful for the second verse, which I had forgotten.


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Subject: RE: Help: New Hampshire Song
From: GUEST,amy conley
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 10:25 PM

Fascinating thread, and to hear mention of Richard Herman. I learned the song from his enthusiastic campers at Windsor Mountain when I worked there one summer, and have loved it ever since. I'm talking about the New Hampshire version, that is, and interested to learn where it came from. I watched the Bing Crosby version on youtube and it was the exact same melody and almost same words. I'd be interested to hear what Richard Herman says about how he found it or whether he created the first NH version.


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