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History: Roll me over in the Clover

DigiTrad:
ROLL ME OVER


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Roll Me Over in the Clover (15)
Desp. need tune Roll Me Over in the Clover (8)
Lyr Req: Roll Me Over in the Clover Rover (12)
(origins) Origins: Put Yer Shoulder Next to Mine & Pump Away (12)
Lyr Req: Come Roll Me Over (9)


GUEST,Phillip Nicholl 22 Feb 01 - 06:30 AM
GUEST,Roll&Go-c 22 Feb 01 - 09:18 AM
Superdad 22 Feb 01 - 09:45 AM
Phil Nicholl 22 Feb 01 - 11:44 AM
SINSULL 22 Feb 01 - 01:55 PM
GUEST,kakers@chivalry.com 22 Feb 01 - 02:41 PM
SINSULL 22 Feb 01 - 02:48 PM
SINSULL 22 Feb 01 - 02:51 PM
Joe Offer 22 Feb 01 - 02:52 PM
SINSULL 22 Feb 01 - 03:12 PM
Phil Nicholl 23 Feb 01 - 05:40 AM
Harold W 24 Feb 01 - 12:38 AM
katlaughing 24 Feb 01 - 01:00 AM
Lighter 23 Feb 09 - 04:29 PM
dick greenhaus 23 Feb 09 - 10:41 PM
Rowan 23 Feb 09 - 10:57 PM
GUEST,Marianne Smits-Jansen 16 Dec 10 - 08:25 AM
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Subject: Roll me over in the Clover
From: GUEST,Phillip Nicholl
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 06:30 AM

Could anyone help with information on the origins of the popular song 'Roll me over in the Clover'. Is it traditional?

Click for lyrics


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: GUEST,Roll&Go-c
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 09:18 AM

Hard to resist this one, given the name of our group. According to my source, the Oak publication ROLL ME OVER, the song in question became popular in WWII and can be traced back to traditional pumping shanties such as "Put Your Shoulder Next to Mine and Pump Away"; it also may be related to "Shove It Home." I'm sure someone else can provide even more background. Do you need verses?


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Superdad
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 09:45 AM

From a book that I have on Songs from the Canadian Servicemen from WWII, the song of "arousal not about the transformation of a demure lady into a willing woman. If she knows the fun's begun, he has a good idea of what she's getting into..."

There are of course ten verses.

David aka superdad


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Phil Nicholl
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 11:44 AM

Superdad and Roll & Go,

Thanks very much for the info.

Other sources seem to confirm that in its current form it was a soldiers' song popular in W W II.

I found eleven verses on the Cantaria site, but no copyright info. How does one establish that something from W W II is trad?

Phil


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 01:55 PM

AggieBeth did an admiral job of this on Paltalk. Quite a juxtaposition - that sweet clear soprano voice and the raunchy lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: GUEST,kakers@chivalry.com
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 02:41 PM

Just by coincidence, I'm investigating "Roll Me Over in the Clover" and another song called "The Bastard King of England" for Cantaria. Oscar Brand recorded both of them on his "Bawdy Songs" albums, but I haven't been able to find out if he wrote either of them. I've sent inquiries via his web site and hope to hear something soon.

If anyone has a copy of the Oscar Brand albums, could you look at the credits and see what it says for either of these songs?

Thanks! Kate Akers www.chivalry.com


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 02:48 PM

Both are in the DT. And I meant "admirable". Doesn't require a salute.


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 02:51 PM

Oscar Brand wrote neither. "Bastard King" may be Kipling. Don't know if anyone claims "Roll Me Over..."


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 02:52 PM

You'll find lots of threads on this song with a search for roll me over. It IS difficult to prove that lots of songs are traditional, or that they're in the public domain. If you can find a printed source prior to 1923, I think you're home safe. For songs published after 1923, my understanding is that the copyright can be extended for up to 120 years, which is ridiculous. It seems that anybody can stick a copyright on anything, and then it's up to others to disprove the claim of copyright.

-Joe Offer-



Here's what the Traditional Ballad Index has to say about the song:

Roll Me Over

DESCRIPTION: The singer begins with number one, "when the fun has just begun," and progressing to number ten, when "it's time to start again."
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE:
KEYWORDS: bawdy shanty humorous
FOUND IN: Australia Britain(England) US(ubiquitous) New Zealand
REFERENCES (2 citations):
Cray, pp. 325-327, "Roll Me Over" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Randolph-Legman I, pp. 389-392, "Roll Me Over" (4 texts, 1 tune)

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Yo Ho, Yo Ho"
cf. "Drive It On"
cf. "Put Your Shoulder Next to Mine and Pump Away"
ALTERNATE TITLES:
Roll Me Over in the Clover
Notes: This is perhaps the most popular formula song in the English language. - EC
File: EM325

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2000 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Also look at this:

Roll Your Leg Over

DESCRIPTION: In this quatrain ballad, singers hypothecate that if the girls were ducks, rabbits, bricks, etc., they would be drakes, hares, masons, and euphemistically enjoy lustful pleasures.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE:
KEYWORDS: bawdy humorous nonballad animal
FOUND IN: Australia [from an American student] Canada US(MW,So,SW)
REFERENCES (3 citations):
Cray, pp. 301-309, "Roll Your Leg Over" (5 texts, 1 tune)
Randolph-Legman II, pp. 643-647, "Roll Your Leg Over" (2 texts)
DT, ROLYRLEG

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Hares on the Mountain"
cf. "Creepin' and Crawlin'"
cf. "The Twa Magicians" [Child 44]
Notes: This more or less recently composed bawdy song -- the earliest text recovered dates from the second world war -- is ultimately descended from "The Twa Magicians" (Child 44). See Cray, pp. 306 ff. - EC
G. Legman offers extensive notes in Randolph-Legman II. - EC
Paul Stamler suggests that this is a strongly bawdy version of "Hares on the Mountain." The dependence, in lyrics and form, is obvious, but this text apparently has taken on a life of its own in army circles. I must admit that I question the connection with "The Twa Magicians." Cray concedes there are no intermediaries between "The Twa Magicians" and the "Hares on the Mountain/Sally My Dear" complex. - RBW
File: EM301


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Feb 01 - 03:12 PM

hypothecate???? Do that on the subway and you'll get arrested.


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Phil Nicholl
Date: 23 Feb 01 - 05:40 AM

Thanks everyone.

What a great site this is. My first time at Mudcat, but certainly not my last : if I unearth anything more about 'Roll me over' I'll post again.

Phil


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Harold W
Date: 24 Feb 01 - 12:38 AM

The first I heard "Roll me Over in the Clover" and "Roll your Leg Over the Man in the Moon" was in 1942 when the fellows from the 10th Mountain Division stationed at Camp Hale used to come to Aspen on weekend passes and congregate at the Hotel Jerome and sing these songs.


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Subject: RE: Roll me over in the Clover
From: katlaughing
Date: 24 Feb 01 - 01:00 AM

Harold, were you up near Camp Hale at all? My dad built a ski lift there for the troops to practice on while he, my mom, sister and brother lived in a tent for part of the spring and summer. Mom used to tell about packrats running through their tent.

k


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Subject: RE: History: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Lighter
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 04:29 PM

Desmond O'Connor copyrighted the words and music of a song called "Roll Me Over" in London on May 8, 1944.

Can anyone provide the lyrics to O'Connor's song? Is the tune the same as the song discussed here?


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Subject: RE: History: Roll me over in the Clover
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 10:41 PM

Roll Me Over may be fairly recent, but it certainly fits anyone's definition of Trad. Circulation has been at least 99% oral--excepting Brand's recording, which was an Oscar Come Lately, and didn't reach a significant portion of the servicemen and college kids who sang it.


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Subject: RE: History: Roll me over in the Clover
From: Rowan
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 10:57 PM

In Oz, it has been collected with a more explicit chorus;

Roll me over,
in the clover;
put your belly next to mine
and wriggle your bum!

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: History: Roll me over in the Clover
From: GUEST,Marianne Smits-Jansen
Date: 16 Dec 10 - 08:25 AM

I remember the text of this song, at least the first lines, from the time that we were liberated by British troups in September 1944. We had British soldiers quartered in our house, in Helmond (near Eindhoven) in The Netherlands. I was 12 years old at the time, and of course I didnot understand the meaning of the lyrics, and when I sang what I had heard, as well as I could, then the Brits used to laugh. I did learn English from then on very fast, and it has always been my favourite language and England is my favourite country!
Another song that I really loved very much was "Put your arms around me honey", one of the soldiers played the piano (we had a piano because my dad used to be a very good piano player) and he had a sheet with music and lyrics of the last mentioned song. Sadly I lent this sheet to the leader of a Dutch band, this band was regularly to be heard on the Dutch radio, and I listened to those broadcasts very intensely. Although he had promised to return it, he never did. I willl never forget that, nor the lovely time we had with the British soldiers!
Marianne Smits-Jansen
Roermond, The Netherlands
e-mail: ma.smits@hetnet.nl
16-12-2010.


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