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Opinionated Civil War Music Article

katlaughing 09 Mar 01 - 12:55 AM
kimmers 09 Mar 01 - 01:23 AM
Banjer 09 Mar 01 - 01:48 AM
Liam's Brother 09 Mar 01 - 01:54 AM
Sorcha 09 Mar 01 - 02:04 AM
GUEST,Devil's Avocat 09 Mar 01 - 08:39 AM
LR Mole 09 Mar 01 - 09:00 AM
Troll 09 Mar 01 - 09:03 AM
katlaughing 09 Mar 01 - 09:21 AM
JedMarum 09 Mar 01 - 09:33 AM
GUEST,Pete Peterson 09 Mar 01 - 09:42 AM
catspaw49 09 Mar 01 - 09:44 AM
SINSULL 09 Mar 01 - 09:44 AM
GUEST,Pete peterson 09 Mar 01 - 09:50 AM
pattyClink 09 Mar 01 - 09:59 AM
katlaughing 09 Mar 01 - 10:11 AM
Grab 09 Mar 01 - 11:47 AM
Rick Fielding 09 Mar 01 - 11:50 AM
Kim C 09 Mar 01 - 11:55 AM
katlaughing 09 Mar 01 - 11:58 AM
Rex 09 Mar 01 - 12:47 PM
Lonesome EJ 09 Mar 01 - 12:58 PM
Kim C 09 Mar 01 - 01:05 PM
JedMarum 09 Mar 01 - 01:23 PM
GUEST,Les B 09 Mar 01 - 01:33 PM
Kim C 09 Mar 01 - 01:56 PM
katlaughing 09 Mar 01 - 01:57 PM
kimmers 09 Mar 01 - 02:23 PM
Dave Wynn 09 Mar 01 - 06:01 PM
Banjer 09 Mar 01 - 07:49 PM
JedMarum 12 Mar 01 - 02:46 PM
Kim C 12 Mar 01 - 05:52 PM
Hollowfox 12 Mar 01 - 06:38 PM
artbrooks 12 Mar 01 - 08:34 PM
GUEST 12 Mar 01 - 08:34 PM
Kim C 13 Mar 01 - 09:35 AM
JedMarum 13 Mar 01 - 12:19 PM
JedMarum 13 Mar 01 - 12:30 PM
Bert 13 Mar 01 - 12:41 PM
kimmers 13 Mar 01 - 12:47 PM
katlaughing 13 Mar 01 - 12:48 PM
GUEST 13 Mar 01 - 01:00 PM
katlaughing 13 Mar 01 - 01:03 PM
GUEST 13 Mar 01 - 01:08 PM
GUEST 13 Mar 01 - 01:15 PM
GUEST,Les B. 13 Mar 01 - 01:25 PM
Kim C 13 Mar 01 - 01:51 PM
Rex 13 Mar 01 - 02:03 PM
Rex 13 Mar 01 - 02:10 PM
GUEST,Blind Desert Pete 13 Mar 01 - 02:17 PM
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Subject: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 12:55 AM

Some of this seemed pretty harsh to me, in just scanning it, and I was wondering how some of you, who do the reenactments, feel about what this person has to say. Thanks, kat

How Authentic Should Period Music Be?

The following comments, written by period music researcher Jon Isaacson, have been excerpted from The Watchdog (vol. 1, no. 4, and vol. 3, no. 2) , a publication dedicated to helping War Between the States reenactors perfect their period impressions. (Subscriptions to The Watchdog can be obtained by writing to PO Box 4582, Frankfort, KY 40604-4582.) Although intended primarily for living history interpreters and event sponsors, Isaacson's views may be of use to listeners who wish to acquire recordings that adhere to certain strict, occasionally exacting standards of authenticity.

What To Look for in a Period-Correct Performer

Perhaps the greatest obstacles the quality-minded living history enthusiast will encounter when dealing with music of the period are the myths which have been perpetuated primarily by folk musicians. For the most part, these groups and individuals came into prominence during the folk music revolution of the 1960s, when performers such as Burl Ives, Pete Seeger, The New Christy Minstrels, Tennessee Ernie Ford, the Smothers Brothers, and a plethora of others brought back to public memory music from the "olden days." This music genre usually carries the moniker "old-timey," and to these performers the beauty of everything "folk," whether it be tales, art, or music, is supposed to be the fact that it was orally transmitted, to be taken at face value or without question. Whether amateur or professional, living history interpreters should never under any circumstances allow this to suffice as "research" on any topic. Folk musicians were not historians; they were out to make money, and anyone involved in history knows you can't make money in this gig. They cared not for accuracy, documentation, research, or context, and thousands of their devotees followed avidly. Unfortunately, there are still many, many of these devotees, and many are involved in reenacting. True historians must learn to deal cautiously with these "folkies," or avoid them altogether. Here are some warning signs to look for. Bad personal impressions.--Contrary to the old saying, you CAN judge a book by its cover. Typically, any musician who has a bad impression quite likely has not done research on the music he or she is performing either. These individuals may be quite talented, but they are mere pirates preying upon the reenacting public. They don funny clothes to get an invitation to events, and unwitting event sponsors are duped into hiring them. These bad impressions range from women wearing uniform items, to poorly constructed clothing, to modern eyeglasses.

Modern amplification devices

Groups or individuals using modern amplification devices are nefarious to say the least. Not only is it unjustified on historical grounds, it is also quite annoying to the ambience of an event. Nothing can be more irritating than to be taking a nap in a campaign style camp, when a loud B-Z-Z-Z-Z-A-A-A-A-P crackles through the air as the band "powers up" for their performance. The only thing worse is being in the same camp when the shrill sound of feedback rips through the air...or was that a 10 pound Parrott shell?? Presumably, if they can't "out-authenticity" others, they are determined to "out-volume" them with their gear.

Modern (or more modern) instruments

If the instruments look like they came from the local music store, you can pretty much bet they did. Obvious giveaways are plastic mountings and hardware, but there are more subtle differences between period instruments and modern. Among these are steel strings, elaborate pearl inlay work, plastic drum and banjo heads, to name but a few. Large "Gene Autry: or "Western Style" guitars, Marine Band harmonicas, mandolins, dulcimers, high school band instruments, and bagpipes should be left at home as well.

Use of the word "traditional" on tapes or in ads

The word traditional implies, "Well, it's always been done that way, so it must be right." The learned know that this type of mentality spells disaster with a capital "D." When combined with the word "Appalachian," drop the tape and run away quickly. The bluegrass music so popular at some reenactments has its roots in the 1930s -- it may be "traditional," but it ain't traditional to the 1860s.

Use of non-accurate songs

This one will take some work to be proficient at spotting. Ask around or spend some time in libraries to seek out the dates of many of these pieces of work. You might be surprised at what "old favorites" are actually post-war songs. Examples include "I'm a Good Ol' Rebel," "Cripple Creek," "Old Joe Clark," and "Ashokan Farewell." Mark these and know them well, but, more importantly, don't indulge in them at Civil War events.

Use of Hillbilly Descriptive Words

Surely the reader has seen these words used to describe a tape or a band, "Have a knee-slappin', hog-chasin', rip-roarin', foot-stompin', rootin'-tootin' good time with this band." Usually the performer has a big safety pin in his hat, too, right? This is not to say that a group which uses lively, festive wording for their ads is not accurate, but the red flag should go up when seeing this type of corny language. As mentioned above, the popularity of "hillbilly" or "Appalachian" music dates from the 1930s, not the 1860s.

Documentation.--The bane of the charlatan.

The next time you see one of these folks, ask them what sources they use to do their research. More likely than not, they will not be able to answer -- or will mumble something about being graced from above -- or will claim to be obscenely talented, or something along that line. Talent does not equal research.

The sound of performers' voices

Vocals as performed by males in the 1800s should be a "booming" (not necessarily "deep") resonant voice with lots of projection. Falsetto should be reserved for operatic pieces, and the high-pitched (from the throat) bluegrass/folk singing voices are wrong (Bill Monroe impersonators be-no-more). The soft "quivering" (Tremolo) voice exemplified by Peter, Paul, and Mary is also incorrect for the period -- leave those for the herb-gathering 60s burn-out street musician.

Notes on Period-Correct Instruments

While some instruments have changed very little in the last 150 years, others have been very dynamic in their evolution. Just as it would be totally inappropriate to use a British Mark III Lee-Enfield bolt action rifle at a Civil War event, so too would it be inappropriate to use a Gibson banjo with steel strings circa 1935. There is absolutely no difference in the comparisons. Steel strings were not used in the time period we portray; instruments were strung with catgut (sheep intestines) which, truthfully, are extremely difficult to find today. Instruments strung with catgut are the best option, but another option for those short of cash is the nylon classical guitar strings. These sound extraordinarily like gut string and although they are not "authentic looking," they are closer than steel strings. In speaking of stringed instruments as used today, there are three "problem children," which should be avoided by reenactors. These are guitars, dulcimers, and mandolins. Although all three instruments existed in some form during the time we portray, they are not suitable for most living history encampments. The dulcimer, although popularly believed to have its origins in the Appalachian Mountain region early in the 19th Century, was really popularized much later. During the 19th Century, the dulcimer looked nothing like the so-called "mountain" or "hammered" dulcimers popularized during the 1960s folk revolution. In addition, their use in the mid-19th century seems to be confined to very small areas of Pennsylvania, and even old Appalachian musicians will tell you they didn't know about dulcimers until the early 20th century. The dulcimer was considered to be a "feminine" instrument, certainly not an instrument to be found commonly in military camps being played by men.

The 19th century guitar, smaller than modern guitars, was used primarily as a parlor instrument. Some references can be found, and, indeed, some photos exist, showing Civil War soldiers playing guitars, but care must be taken that the instrument is played in Civil War period style, not strummed like Gene Autry. For a good period reference to 19th century guitar playing styles, check the guitar arrangements that Stephen Foster wrote for his songs. Finally, mandolins did not become popular until the large influx of Italian immigrants later in the 19th century. Excellent discussions of these instruments are available in scholarly works on popular music in the antebellum/Civil War period.

Isaacson's Recommendations If you're looking for musicians to play at a period event or just interested in hearing how your favorite song would have sounded 130 years ago, try the following:

Amoskeag Players

c/o Bob Kilham 3 Appletree Road Auburn, NH 03032 (603) 483-5989 [tapes, bookings]

This New Hampshire-based group is directed by Robert Kilham, who also reproduces 1840s fretless banjos (all banjos until the late 1860s were fretless). The Amoskeag Players perform music from the antebellum and Civil War years, and their repertoire includes music from minstrel shows, New England sea chanteys, patriotic music, and popular music. Their ensemble is composed of instruments that are correct for the period portrayed, and Mr. kilham is able to play an endless variety of instruments...For live performance, this is a first rate group.

Saxton's Cornet Band

406 Mark Avenue Danville, KY 40422 (606) 239-0037 [tapes, bookings]

This is the creme de la creme of brass bands in this modern age. Saxton's Cornet band gives top quality performances whether on the battlefield or in the ballroom. The members are all professional musicians whose personal impressions and instruments are prime quality.

Tuckahoe Social Orchestra

c/o Joe Ayers Box 146 Bremo Bluff, VA (804) 842-3573 [tapes, bookings, banjo manual reprints]

Joe Ayers and his Virginia-based group (primarily composed of his family) is perhaps most famous for doing much of the soundtrack for the 125th Anniversary of Gettysburg video. This group incorporates banjos, violins, tambourines, flutes, accordions, and a plethora of other instruments documentable to period performance practice...For string bands, the Tuckahoe Social Orchestra is top notch.

Stonewall Brigade Band

c/o Gary Funk, President 2391 Highview Circle Staunton, VA 24401

A continuation of General Stonewall Jackson's original brigade band, the modern-day band still has the group's original instruments, which General Grant allowed them to keep when they were paroled at Appomattox.

Civil War Music Collectors Edition

This selection from Time-Life Books has proven to be a landmark set for the individual seeking a wide variety of entertainment. Except for a few selections by John Hartford...that are historically off base, most of the selections have been researched and performed in a fairly authentic fashion. For just plain all around entertainment, this set can't be beat.

Heritage Americana

Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., Inc. 713 South Third Street West Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 549-8488 [tapes, CDs]

One fad in the 1960s was to reproduce Civil War brass band music using professional musicians with original arrangements and instruments. Regardless of why this fad occurred, it has been to our benefit, because the recordings of Heritage Americana set high standards for accurately reproducing Civil War era brass band music. Recordings are still available.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks to Lee Canaday of Russellville, Alabama, for sending us the Watchdog articles from which the information presented above was taken.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: kimmers
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:23 AM

Kat, I'm a fairly new re-enactor, but here goes.

I'm familiar with the Watchdog; it professes to be the Bible of the "Hard-Core" (Authenticity is Everything) re-enactor. To be fair, sometimes one can find some great helpful information in its pages.

Most of the facts in this article have the ring of accuracy, and the author has apparently researched the subject matter well. That said, the *tone* of the article is inexcusably rude (and rather poorly written). I help to edit the newsletter for our company (116th Pennsylvania Company "B") and I recently rejected an article about civilian clothing just because it was rude in a similar way. Reading this sort of things makes people mad, unless they are the very few who can come up to the standard.

None of the musicians I have met or heard at reenactments would come up to these standards, yet most are enjoyable. I don't expect musicians who are guests or hired for a reenactment to be totally authentic; I do expect them to provide atmosphere and feeling.

I don't yet own an authentic looking guitar, so I only bring mine out in the evening after the public has gone. If people seem receptive, then I play for a while. If not, I put it away. I try not to play or sing non-period songs, but I don't mind when others do so.

Amplification? I don't have a problem with it for large events where the public expects a show. For small gatherings, it's inappropriate.

kimmers


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Banjer
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:48 AM

SPeaking as a reenactor I pretty much agree with Kimmers, above. Most reenactors cannot afford (nor would they want to risk damage in the field) true period instruments. We must adapt a bit to what is available. I take my banjo (nylon strung), and dulcimer to many events. Most of our playing is done after the camps are closed to the public. There have been occasions when we have been sitting around playing our instruments and spectators have asked the usual barrage of questions;
'Is that a real dulcimer?'
'Was that banjo around during the civil war?'

We usually cover a multitude of questions with a few simple answers.,
'Yes, it's a real dulcimer, no it probably would not have been found in a period camp.' 'Yes, the music we play is a close to period as we can produce it'
We take the time to explain the differences between the music of the period and that which groups such as Time-Life attempt to pass off as authentic. I feel we give the spectator enough knowledge that if they are truly interested they will go and research more on their own.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:54 AM

No case, kat, could be made for this article being unopinionated.

Theatrics aside, the simple matter is that reenactors and folksingers revere different pictures of perfection. History is not art and art is not history (unless, of course, we're talking about Art History). I understand a copy of Folk-Legacy's latest CD, Irish in America" is winging it's way to you, so this is timely. There are 2 Civil war songs on "Irish in America." Before recording them, I had a conscious choice to make whether to perform them circa 1861-1865 or as of some other (later) date. I chose the latter for a few reasons.

First, the period text of the recruiting song "The Irish Volunteer" had a word, revere that was used repeatedly as a rhyme. I changed the phrase "Here's to brave McClellan whom the Army now reveres" to "Here's to brave McClellan whom the Army now does steer." I believe I improved the song without changing the meaning and I believe that, if the late lyricist was still treading this green earth, he would agree with me.

Second is the case of "Pat Murphy of Meagher's Brigade." The song exists both as a period piece and as a traditional song. The folk song, which my wife, Bonnie, and I sing, is succinct, heart-wrenching and uplifting. The orginal is, simply, dated.

I don't mean any of the above to say that there is something wrong with the "warts an' all" approach of repeating the original verbatim. Quite the contrary, I want to know what the original was like and I believe that there is a great danger in taking too much liberty with history... but art is art.

All the best,
Dan Milner


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Sorcha
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 02:04 AM

As an Only Sometimes re enactor I must agree with both kimmers and banjer. The tone of the article was rude, but we do what we can with what we have to work with.

When we do an "Absolutely Period" gig, we dress in period and we play tunes from the Period, but our instruments are Our Own......complete with shoulder rests etc. We do hide the cases, electronic tuners and stuff like that, and we do not do stuff like "Run Nigger Run" even if it is Period. There is plenty of stuff that is acceptable without being nasty about it.......

If you leave out the "tone" I do agree with the article.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST,Devil's Avocat
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 08:39 AM

The author of the article, in addition to being rude, needs to get a life. I've been both a reinactor (18th & 19th C.) and the director of institutions that hosted reinactments. These time-transvestites tend to take themselves entirely too seriously, and the bottom line is that these "re-created events" NEVER repeat NEVER even approach an accurate historical depiction of the period or event portrayed. Nor is it reasonable to expect they would.

Period materials are simply unavailable; yes, they can be approximated, but not cloned.The vast majority of "period reproductions" sold to reinactors are pure crap. People do not talk with appropriate accents/diction of one or two centuries ago. People are entirely too well-fed and healthy looking. Seen any reinactors witl smallpox scars lately? When walking through one of these "encampments", where is the stench and the filth? Do they smell like they haven't bathed for a month? What about the pit privies & the victims of camp diseases lying in their own vomit and excrement? What about those with wounds and amputations with pus-soaked, stinking bandages and suppurating sores in an era before antiseptics? What about the carnage of real warfare- how is a cowboys-and-indians "lawn war" supposed to accurately depict this? Get real. Someone who plays soldier [or camp follower or farmer or whatever] on weekends cannot hope to depict a mid-19th century (or other historical period) infantryman who LIVED the life of a soldier for years in the field. And so on. Some individuals do a better job of apeing the dress, customs, etc. of the period they supposedly represent, but none are at bottom truly accurate.

Despite all the hand-wringing and protestations of "Historical Accuracy", at the end of the day reinactments and reinactors are theme-park theater entertainment for the TV generation- not history. You want history, read a book, or visit a good museum or historic site exhibit- don't watch the video. Honest reinactors will tell you the same.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: LR Mole
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:00 AM

Well. What with Easter coming up, I'd assume the sheep-intestine string market would be booming, but then that would be evidence that a banjo (ladies' instrument that it was) would be about. Such goings-on could alert the Tremelo Police: herb-gatherin' wussies singing over here.. Next someone will tell me that Elvis never,himself, visited the Heartbreak Hotel, or even knew Big Mama Thornton. Difficult enough to be authentically oneself, I find...


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Troll
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:03 AM

The "authentics" were the reason I got out of reenacting. When I was told I had to take the side buttons off my kepi because the men who fought that battle didn't wear them, that was it. The "authenticity police'" reason was that none had ever been dug up on the site, never mind that the kepi (cap) with side buttons was a standard item of wear for soldiers on both sides.
I could go on but you get the idea.
Anal-retentive has a hyphen, right?

troll


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:21 AM

Thank you all for confirming my suspicions. A lot of what the author said just didn't jibe with what I have read here. This is a very interesting discussion thanks to everyone of you.

Dan, just got it, yesterday and I LOVE, esp, Billy the Kid and Portland County Jail, as well as Scovill's Rolling Mill. Your comments and additional background are very much appreciated.

kat


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: JedMarum
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:33 AM

Thanks for posting the article, Kat. Good comments here too, and I guess I don't have much to add. I have been an invited, paid performer to several Civil War memorial events; with and without sound systems. No one has ever asked me to dress in period, play only period music, on period instruments, using someone's best guess at period style. They knew that I sing modern versions of some old folk period folk songs, and some new songs based upon the history of the era. These same groups invited historians, authors to speak - none of whom made any attempt at period style in their dress or presentation. I have always felt welcome and appreciated by those at these events, and never felt a moment of guilt over my lack of 'authenticity.'

Perhaps, Mr Isaacson's complaint is aimed at those who do try to emulate the period, and do so without much concern for detail.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST,Pete Peterson
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:42 AM


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: catspaw49
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:44 AM

Well everyone is covering the bases pretty well and I couldn't agree more. Reenactors can do a good job of transmitting info that is accurate by doing much what Banj mentioned which is have a point of reference and explain that this is the way we can portray it without having a budget in the billions!

And Devil's Advocate states it clearly! There is a limit to the authenticity and a good reenactor will talk about those things. This guy who wrote the article must be absolute hell on reenacted battles! Like where does he find the guys to lie wounded and then burn to death when the brush catches fire and they can't move? Might be a job he'd take on himself.

But there is an element of humor there you know? I particularly liked this statement:

"Folk musicians were not historians; they were out to make money, and anyone involved in history knows you can't make money in this gig."

What is that? First, only a few get very rich in "folk music" OR history, and this guy seems to be saying that he who makes less is the most truthful. On that basis, I am now going to take all my queries about everything to the wino living in the Amana box behind the Deli.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: SINSULL
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:44 AM

I guess if we wanted to keep opera authentic, we would have to go back to 300 lb. MiMis. I understand what he is saying and why he is saying it. I also undestand that he is being rude and condescending. I even agree with him - if your goal is to be accurate to a fault. Wonder if he covers himself with lice before each re-enactment...


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST,Pete peterson
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:50 AM

Well that didn't work. Third time lucky? (the computer ate my first and second posts)
Nobody can be completely authentic, no matter how hard they try. When I owned a house built in about 1720 and we were working on rstoring it people would ask "are you going to do an authentic restoration?" I would reply "well, we would like to have indoor plumbing and electricity, neither of which was available in 1720." and go on from there.
Similarly, I use a 1931 Martin 0-18 with steel strings and a 1915 mongrel banjo (Sears Roebuck Supertone) also w steel strings for most re-enactment work and yes, I KNOW it's not authentic, but we change keys a lot and it means you don't have to wait 5' for us to get the gut strings in tune. Then we try to sing songs we know were written before 1865 and there's a lot of them. And try to play songs more-or-less in minstrel "stroke" style on bj and "parlor" style guitar-- thumb and fingers. I think we sound a lot like the old days but since Edison didn't get around to inventing the phonograph till around 1880, we don't know what it sounded like in 1861-65. I do think that Dixie played pretty much as the Skillet Lickers played it comes a lot closer to Dan Emmett's spirit than most of the "modern" versions.
and if pressed I quote Walt Whitman. "Do I contradict myself? Very well, I contradict myself. I am large, I contain multitudes."


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: pattyClink
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 09:59 AM

One large reason why the article is best burned:

It will lessen the amount of music at these gatherings, and one of the things about that time was more people sang and played and recited, so what's accurate or beneficial about that?

The whole thing could have been replaced by a warning to request prospective players to please restrict the playlist to anything known in existence prior to 1860, (and if the author is such a fine scholar, he should replace his critique with a long list of songs known to be okay, along with a list of tapes and and books musicians could use for drawing up a Civil War repertoire)

Here's another way to make events authentic: each participant should sign an affidavit proving that they arrived on site via a 10 day walking or horseback journey, not in that pickup truck or SUV. Then they won't feel so stupid asking guitarists to go find catgut strings.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 10:11 AM

These are great, phoaks! Keep the comments coming!

Spaw, that was one that jumped out and grabbed me, too! Totally absurd!


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Grab
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 11:47 AM

Devil's Advocate, you missed one other obvious thing - teeth. We've mostly got them, and they're all ours and mostly fairly straight following dental assistance. The rich would have their removed and replaced with false one, so they didn't get infected (wasn't Washington famous for his wooden teeth?). So anyone playing an officer, it's tooth extraction time...

Me, I'd rather see the Society for Creative Anachronism go for it. At least there, they recognise that trying to recreate a battle will inevitably fail - for one thing, everyone's got to get up at the end! So if you're not going for total accuracy, you can at least stick to the spirit of it.

Grab.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 11:50 AM

"The problem is not in our stars.....but in THE AUDIENCE"!

How often I've been asked to sing (with an "authentic" band) early Canadian "folk" music.....for filthy lucre, by the way. Often the intended victims (excuse me, the audience) don't even wait for two songs to pass before asking (demanding comes later after a few drinks) for such "Canadian" staples as 'Rocky Top', Ballad of Jed Clampett, Foggy Mountain Breakdown, or if they're really knowledgable..and yes, I'm being sarcastic.."This Land is your Land".

These are "mainstream" folks, but even on a supposedly "folk and blues" forum like Mudcat, many still debate whether folks like Dylan or Paul Simon are folk singers.

I can understand the author's pique (even if he seems to think Gene Autrey is somehow responsible for modern country music....I doubt if he's actually heard much early Gene) but SOMEONE has to pay (in one way or another) for the period instruments, outfits, travel, and even the luxury of rehearsal time...and I guess that's the general public...just don't expect them to sit through ANY kind of music that demands personal involvement.

"Hey youse guys, play that Ashmolian Farewell again...the missus and I just love that Civil war stuff"!

Rick


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Kim C
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 11:55 AM

I have met Jon Isaacson and corresponded with him on a couple of occasions, and believe it or not, he is actually a pretty nice guy. He knows an awful lot of stuff.

I do agree with him on some points. There are some people who think any music described as "old-time" is appropriate for any living history event. It ain't. I don't want to go to a reenactment and hear somebody playing the Beverly Hillbillies theme or Copperhead Road, but believe me, it's happened.

And then there are people who try to pass themselves off as "authentic" who do no research on anything, and the General Public thinks they're getting a history lesson.

Now... that being said... I do think that "authenticity" can go Too Far and be Too Cumbersome for anyone to have a Good Time. Them that's wants it can have it.

As far as instruments are concerned, I can get an 1830s reproduction guitar for about $1500, but do you think I'd take it out camping? No way. The only concession I might make is to fiddle without my shoulder rest, but that depends on how long I have to play. If it's over 15 minutes, the rest stays, and authenticity be damned.

Mister has a cheap classical guitar that we take with us. We are very well aware that there is really no way to duplicate historical music with 100% accuracy. We don't have any recordings and we don't have the instruments. That's just the way it is.

When we made our tape (which, I might add, got a favorable review in the Watchdog last fall) we did not make any claims as to the authenticity of the sound. While we generally perform without amplification, we did use all the modern bells and whistles available to us in the recording process. All the songs are documented. Once in awhile, if we can't accurately document a tune we really like, we'll just say, we're singing this because we like it and we don't really know how old it is.

One interesting thing: Joe Ayers, who is mentioned in Isaacson's article as an authentic musician (and he is quite good, by the way), recorded Cripple Creek on a tape of songs he says come from mid-19th century Virginia. Go figure.

And, period or not, we get a lot of requests for Ashokan Farewell. When we can get away with it, we play it. Also people request my original songs. They sound old. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 11:58 AM

This is great!

Any comments on what he has to say about the dulcimer?


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Rex
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 12:47 PM

I have no argument with the above article. Why not try to get it as close as you can? There's so much info out on this web thing it's pretty easy to document your material. If my group is playing a late 1800's event we will have the parlor guitar and taterbug mandolin. But a mid 1800's gig? The fiddle and banjo are a safe bet. Other string unstruments don't show up in the old journals and photos. And there's no way to make a sound system fit in with 19th century music so I leave it home too. If that limits the size of your croud or setting, so be it.

Rex


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 12:58 PM

I enjoyed the guy's article. It definitely contained a liberal dose of sarcasm, but made some good points. I believe that a re-enaction should aim at accuracy where it can be achieved. Infection, bloodshed and exhaustion is expecting a bit too much. But I for one would enjoy hearing what a fire-side concert during the Civil War might have sounded like, knowing that the instruments, songs, and techniques are authentic.

In the same way, I find Bach concertos performed on period instruments very interesting, even though they lack the brightness and power of modern instruments. There is a certain thrill in knowing that the sound is the same one heard by those long ago.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Kim C
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:05 PM

Other string instruments do show up from time to time... Tee Edmonds, who lived near Paris, VA, during the war, makes a specific reference in her diary to putting new strings on her guitar. A book called The Employments of Women, published 1863, states that women worked manufacturing STEEL STRINGS for guitars and other instruments. Parlor guitars show up in museums hither and yon. Yes, a fiddle and a banjo are safer because they were a lot more portable. But guitars were not unheard of.

Now about the strings --- I contacted Gruhn Guitars here in Nashville, and they told me that while steel guitar strings were available in the US, they did not gain widespread use until late in the 19th century.

It is nice to get as close as you can. Unfortunately, money tends to limit that for some of us.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: JedMarum
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:23 PM

I loved it, Rick. Great comments, I laughed my as* off!!

And I understand the comments from those who think Mr Isaacson makes vaild points, too. My first reading of his article raised the hair on the back of neck, a bit ... but then I realized he was talking about the Civil War re-enactment events, themselves. My experience with these events, is as an outsider. I am there to perform, (and frankly enjoy the events as a spectator), and I am not expected to be a period aficionado. It is true that gatherings that include re-enactors, are not all meant to be entirely period authentic. It is true that songs like "Ashoken Farewell" can be entirely appropriate, under those circumstances, and 'laymen' performers such as myself, can be welcome.

So perhaps in fairness to Jon Isaacson, we may have considered his comments outside the arena at which they were aimed. If a re-enactor's event is meant to be entirely period, it is reasonable to expect the participants to do their homework - and presumably each event should provide guidelines, as someone mentioned above.

I will be playing a Civil War event tomorrow in Cleburn Texas with Eammons Kitchen, and Ed Miller. None of us are period performers, and don't try to be ... but we will have fun, and enjoy the festivities, just the same!

I am also looking forward to participating in the Sperryville Civil War Memorial next June in VA. I played there last year for the first time, and enjoyed it immensely. Any of you Mudcatters out VA, please keep the first weekend in June in mind. This small town event is held in a beautiful, historical setting, and will include some 'real period' performers (ones I believe Mr Isaacson would approve of) as well as some top shelf historian speakers, and some great re-enactment activities. When we get closer to the date, I'll post some more info, if there's any interest.

Kim C; maybe you can get Mr Isaacson to come to the forum and defend his thesis!


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST,Les B
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:33 PM

I ran across the above article about six months ago and accepted it as just another "authenticity" paen (or pain ??). A similar, much longer, more informative and less sarcastically toned piece appeared in one of the "Buckskinner" journals a number of years ago.

I second Kim C's inclusion of guitars. There is at least one Civil War photo of a soldier "band" which includes guitar, fiddle, banjo, bones and triangle.

I've also seen a photo of a civilian African-American group c. 1860 that includes two fiddles, a banjo, and a small bodied guitar.

What I haven't seen a photo of, although they were supposedly common, is someone playing a harmonica. (See other thread, Civil War Harmonicas)


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Kim C
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:56 PM

Oh, no, Jed, I ain't goin to be responsible for startin anything! :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 01:57 PM

Just linking to other harmonica threads:

Civil War Harmonicas

Harmonicas for the Homeless


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: kimmers
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 02:23 PM

I think that authenticity is important mainly as a means to add to the total enjoyment of the reenacting experience. Cooking period foods and wearing period clothes gives me that enjoyment, as does participating in period entertainments. For my husband, using authentic gear and trying to experience the soldier's life is what floats his boat.

The hard-core folks seem to take a perverse joy in their extensive "knowledge" of the details, and even more joy in cutting down the participants who don't measure up. This is too often counterproductive sneering.

Music should be part of the middle ground. We should do the best we can reasonably can, especially if we are both musicians and reenactors. I don't play the banjo, so I'm not about to run out and learn it just so I can plunk a few notes around the campfire. No time for that! I do intend to find a parlor guitar and string it with mostly nylon, not gut. But my experience around here is that folks are grateful for any reasonably competent music to add some atmosphere and to make dancing possible. Wish I could learn to fiddle!


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Dave Wynn
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 06:01 PM

I am completely ignorant of re-enactments and can only imagine them. But I found the article very interesting and informative. Just a little abrasive in tone.

Jed Marum wrapped it up nicely. Just what I thought but far more erudite than I could put it.

Still enjoyed reading it though!

Spot


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Banjer
Date: 09 Mar 01 - 07:49 PM

The reenacting unit which I lead is not politicaly oriented, as some units are. We do not hold monthly meetings, we due not collect dues, and we do not have any elected leaders. I am the leader, I call the shots as far as safety and decorum in my camp go, but beyond that...We are all out to enjoy ourselves. If it means we play a song that wasn't written until the 1880's, what of it? We can tell any one who listens about the song and explain it was not quite period. We enjoy what we do, we enjoy each other's company, and for the brief weekend we have together we try to help our visitors enjoy themselves. Let us not ruin a wonderful hobby with overbearing politics, power struggles and other such nonsense!


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: JedMarum
Date: 12 Mar 01 - 02:46 PM

Good thoughts, Banjer!

We played the Cleburn Memorial event over the weekend, that included some good Celtic, Cowboy and Civil War era music - some re-enactor events/displays - some antique cars show events - several Scottish clan displays - and a demonstartion of new and antique farm tratcors. It was a cold, windy day, but they got a pretty good crowd there, and everyone had a great day.

Ther had been a bit of bitching, apparently, in a local paper about anybody celebrating anything to do with a Confederate General, even if the town was named after him - and the fact that a confederate battle flag or two might be displayed - but in truth, there were no white supremicists there, no neo nazi, just people interested in celebrating their history and enjoying the day. I didn't see any Yankee re-enactors, but all of the town's ethnic groups appeared to be represented in those people attending.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Kim C
Date: 12 Mar 01 - 05:52 PM

All right Banjer, but don't get any bright idears about playing the Beverly Hillbillies theme in my camp! ;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Hollowfox
Date: 12 Mar 01 - 06:38 PM

Sounds like Mr Isaacson got up on the wrong side of the cage that day.*g* That being said, I think it depends on the intended audience, and who is choosing who the intended audience is. Last August I attended a series of workshops at a large Society for Creative Anachronism event. The workshops were on juggling, street performing, stage illusion-type magic, and such related things as they elated to medieval reenactment. They were taught by people who make their living this way (there's not a harder job on earth than being a professional fool), they treat their profession with respect, and they do their academic homework. When the authenticity question came up in the stage magic class, the teacher pointed out that, from what little documentation there is, the magicial chanted for perhaps up to half an hour, and then the illusion was performed. A modern audience would be bored, and losing the audience is not the point of performing. And even if they're dressed in the most authentic reenactment clothes in the world, they're still a modern audience. Then we went on to learn how to modify equipment so it wouldn't clash with the setting (eliminate plastic, etc). The point for musicians is, I guess, that the organizers of the event should decide just how authentic things *have* to be. The musicians should have done their acadmic homework regarding whether the piece is proper for the time period, since the onlookers might ask and learn something. If the intended audience is to be only academics, experts on the time period, than make the music as authentically academic as possible. If the audience is to be those folks who bought an admission to be entertained, then the parameters of repertoire and performance are different.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: artbrooks
Date: 12 Mar 01 - 08:34 PM

I'm not a Civil War reenactor, but I do enjoy Ren Faires...and there is probably very little that's truly "authentic" about them. A character in one of Mercedes Lackey's fantasy novels refers to folks who think that slavish adherence to historical accuracy is more important than having fun as "authenticity Nazies". Did somebody mention gas gangrene and amputation without benefit of anesthesia or even clean hands? Do you really want to stand around in the hot sun in a heavy wool uniform? Don't forget to add a louse or two.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Mar 01 - 08:34 PM

Banjer, I'm not a reenactor, but I think I would be pretty pissed if I invested a thousand dollars in authentic gear and countless hours perfect a civil war image right down to the camping and eating utensils, only to have a farb like yourself drag a dulcimer into camp because you think it's "cool". Have a little respect for the guys (and gals) who take this seriously and just leave the silly dulcimer at home. The banjo on the hand, fits in perfectly, and would really add to the enjoyment of other. Just show a little courtesy to the whole organization please.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Kim C
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 09:35 AM

Guest, you must be a reenactor or you probably wouldn't know the word "farb."


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: JedMarum
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 12:19 PM

Guest - are you saying the dulcimer wasn't in use in 1860? I am not challening your comment, just looking for validation. I had long assumed the dulcimer was around for a very long time, and would have expected to see it in use during the CW era.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: JedMarum
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 12:30 PM

well, I think I've gone off and answered my own question. I found a brief history at Black Mountain Instruments website that says,

"The Appalachian Dulcimer (or Mountain Dulcimer) dates back to the early 1800s. It was developed from similarly designd Medival European instruments, in the zither family. The dulcimer first appeard in Southern Appalachian Mountains, thus the reference "mountain" dulcimer. Today the dulcimer has become one of the most recognizable and popular folk instruments in the United States."

So it seems likely that Civil War soldiers from either side might well have brought along a dulcimer or two. Am I right?


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Bert
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 12:41 PM

Dressing up is fun and not to be taken too seriously. If you're shooting for a certain period then you do some research and get things as close as you can. You modify modern items so that they look the part. But you musty always bear in mind that none of this is REAL. It's all pretend and sure, it's fun to look the part if you can, but no one is ever going to be 'correct' it just can't be done.

Battle reenactors of any period will never, ever get the scale right. They will ALWAYS look silly with a few dozen people running around trying to pretend that they are an army of thousands. So if you have to compromise on such an important issue which everyone can see is plainly ridiculous, it makes little sense to get upset over some trivialities that most people would miss anyway.

The object of the exercise is to learn about the period in a fun environment. Positive comments will make it more fun. It's much better to research and publish the 'real' information so that people will be able to learn and join in, than it is to criticize those who get some details wrong.

So if you see something that is out of place, you say 'Hey didja know, this is how they used to do it' not 'You got it wrong'

Bert.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: kimmers
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 12:47 PM

Personally, when it comes to music at events, I'd rather hear the musicians play on the instruments that they are familiar with. I'd rather hear a good guitarist (or dulcimer-ist!) than a bad banjo player.

Guest, you do indeed sound like a reenactor, and a hardcore one at that. A soldier reenactor can not only choose from some pretty fantastic suppliers for his gear, he can even make some of the gear if he is so inclined to perfection that he must have hand-sewn buttonholes. I think it's a little harder for the musicians. Period-style instruments are available, for a price, but can be difficult to find (and play, and keep in tune).

Hey, you guys can come play the dulcimer in my camp anytime! Any West Coast reenactors (or folks who play at reenactments) here?

Kim Heggen


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 12:48 PM

According to Jean Ritchie's "The Dulcimer Book" they had been around, in her family, as far back as her dad and granddad could remember, which, I am sure, would predate the Civil War.

GUEST, you really ought to do some homework and read up on our Banjer and what he contributes, here and in the 3D world, before you start slinging arrows. It's pretty hard to find many others who command the respect he does.

kat


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 01:00 PM

The dulcimer existed, but was not in popular use during the period of the Civil. And most importantly, was too bulky for an infantry soldier to be carring in his back-pack. Think about it. Considering that banjer, is a capable banjo player, what is wrong with simply sticking to an instrument that WAS in popular use at that time? What is wrong with simply choosing the instrument that best fits? And leaving the one that is out of place at home. Seems pretty simple to me.

Banjer, says he is just interested in having fun, but why invest all that money in the civil war stuff if you're just interest making a lot of noice shotting guns off and in partying with your friends? Why didn't you and your friends just buy some boyscott uniforms, firecrackers and party in your backyard instead? I assume you must have some interest in history. Besided, this is not just about you and your party friends, but about courtesy to all the other camps near you. I don't see how leaving the dulmer at home, but bringing the banjo with you would be that great of an inconvenience? Is this really such a great inconvience to you, that you would prefer to inconvience everyone else?


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: katlaughing
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 01:03 PM

Your ignorance is showing, along with blatant trolling. I, for one, will not respond to this "guest", again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 01:08 PM

Jed, A soldiers belongs traveled on his back. A dulcimer is too big and heavy to be marching with.


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 01:15 PM

Kat, Please explain what is wrong with playing the banjo?


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST,Les B.
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 01:25 PM

Jed - mountain or lap dulcimers were around at that time.

A few years ago I met a musician who proudly showed me a dulcimer built by his great grandfather, who had been in the Civil War and lost an arm. So I've seen on-the-ground proof that dulcimers existed c. 1865.

His dulcimer was quite large, heavy and a bit crude in comparison to today's, but hey, it was built by a one-armed carpenter!

What was interesting was the case, which had been designed to be turned upside down and set on a table, so the dulcimer could be placed on it when playing. It was sort of an acoustic amplifier system.

Jed - by the by, I heard a cut from your CD played on the folk show of our regional Public Radio station in Bozeman. Sounded great !


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Kim C
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 01:51 PM

It's my understanding that while the mountain dulcimer existed, it was largely unknown outside Appalachia until after the Civil War. However the hammered dulcimer was a popular parlor instrument. At least that's what I've read.

A small mountain dulcimer would not be any more bulky to carry than a fiddle and there is documentation for soldiers having those. Banjer, if your grandpappy was from the mountains of Kentucky, you may well have been familiar with the mountain dulcimer. :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Rex
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 02:03 PM

I'm compelled to come to our Guest's defense. But you will find that you are better received here if you give us name to know you by. My greatest concern for an interpreter demonstrating living history is spreading misinformation. So I try to be careful about what I put out there. It is true there were dulcimers at the time of the War Between the States (or whatever you choose to call it). There were guitars too. So far I haven't seen anything to suggest they were likely to be in a camp. It could be argued that they existed at the time and within that part of the country so it is possible they would be found in such a camp. This argument comes up often in the Fur Trade events. It existed at the time so lets use it. I guess I prefer to play it safe. That will leave out some interesting possibilities and narrow what I can present but that's what I will do. I'll get off my soapbox now and hush.

Rex


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: Rex
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 02:10 PM

Well durn it, I left something out. Folks can say they arn't functioning as an interpreter. They are just having fun so what's wrong with that? The public doesn't know the difference. Then they go back home thinking that "Ashcan Farewell" is really a tune from the mid 1850's. As much as I love it and enjoy playing it, we know it ain't so. Now I'll hush.

Rex


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Subject: RE: BS: Opinionated Civil War Music Article
From: GUEST,Blind Desert Pete
Date: 13 Mar 01 - 02:17 PM

Way to go Kat. Stick the knife in, giv it a twist, and then run away. Fits your style.


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