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Belfast Street Songs

Fiddlin' Sid 21 Apr 01 - 02:29 PM
Scuttlebutt 21 Apr 01 - 07:27 PM
GUEST 21 Apr 01 - 08:05 PM
GUEST,Billy J 21 Apr 01 - 08:09 PM
toadfrog 21 Apr 01 - 08:10 PM
alison 22 Apr 01 - 02:32 AM
alison 22 Apr 01 - 02:41 AM
Joe Offer 22 Apr 01 - 04:42 AM
GUEST,Mike Ireland 22 Apr 01 - 04:59 AM
Fiddlin' Sid 22 Apr 01 - 07:22 AM
MARINER 22 Apr 01 - 08:48 AM
GUEST,Philippa 22 Apr 01 - 03:41 PM
MARINER 22 Apr 01 - 03:49 PM
Jimmy C 22 Apr 01 - 06:58 PM
Seamus Kennedy 22 Apr 01 - 08:21 PM
paddymac 23 Apr 01 - 01:21 AM
Big Tim 23 Apr 01 - 06:02 AM
GUEST,Reiver 2 23 Apr 01 - 03:44 PM
GUEST 22 Nov 02 - 11:56 PM
GUEST,Tony 26 Sep 09 - 12:00 AM
GUEST,Eugene 01 Oct 09 - 06:30 AM
Owen Woodson 01 Oct 09 - 07:17 AM
GUEST,AMQ 12 Nov 09 - 10:35 AM
Young Buchan 13 Nov 09 - 04:32 AM
GUEST,Shaneo not logged in 13 Nov 09 - 12:28 PM
GUEST,Guest; Linda Hall 09 Aug 10 - 07:18 PM
GUEST 18 Aug 12 - 04:38 PM
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Subject: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: Fiddlin' Sid
Date: 21 Apr 01 - 02:29 PM

A mate of mine is doing some work on Belfast street songs. Any suggestions? Songs? reference points?


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: Scuttlebutt
Date: 21 Apr 01 - 07:27 PM

What about Molly Malone ?

Jan L


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Apr 01 - 08:05 PM

Actually Molly Malone is set in Dublin. You could try "I'll tell me Ma" or "My Aunt Jane" which has the same melody. "My Lagan Love." I'll try to come up with some more later when I have a bit more time. Den


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Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: I'LL TELL MY MA^^^, BELFAST^^
From: GUEST,Billy J
Date: 21 Apr 01 - 08:09 PM

I'll tell me ma
I'll Tell Me Ma

Chorus

G C G D G
I'll tell me Ma when I get home , the boys won't leave the girls alone,
G C G D G
They pull my hair, they stole my comb but that's all right till I get home.
G C G D
She is handsome, she is pretty, she is the belle of Belfast City,
G C G D G
She is a courting, one two three, Please won't you tell me who is she

G C G D G
Albert Mooney says he loves her, all the boys are fighting for her,
G C G D G
They rap at the door and they ring at the bell saying 'Oh my true love are you well'
G C G D G
Out she comes as white as snow, rings on her fingers, bells on her toes,
G C G D G
Old Johnny Murray says she'll die if she doesn't get the fellow with the roving eye.

Chorus
G C G
Let the wind and the rain and the hail blow high,
D G
And the snow come travelling from the sky
G C G D G
She's as nice as apple pie and she'll get her own lad by and by.
G C G D G
When she gets a lad of her own, she won't tell her Ma when she gets home,
G C G D G
Let them all come as they will, but it's Albert Mooney she loves still.

Chorus.......................



Belfast
Belfast Barnbrack
G Dm G F C G etc

G Dm G F C G
Of all the places I have been, there's only one that fills my dreams,
G Dm G F D
The place that lingers in my mind, is the town I've left behind.
G C
I've been away now for too many years,
D G D
I've read all the papers, they've told of your tears.
G C
Though I've left you, with a heart that's been torn,
D G D
I'm coming home now, to the place I was born

Chorus

G- Em C- Am D- D7 G D
That's Belfast, you call to me, when I am far away, I think of thee
G - Em C - Am
Your Black Mountain, Cave Hill, City Hall,
D - D7 G D
Shaw's Bridge, River Lagan, I'm going home to them all

G C
I'll meet friends and relations,each one I'll embrace,
D G D
We'll pass round the pictures, which time can't erase.
G C
And it won't be long now, till I see them all,
D G D
And I'll walk round the old streets and good times I'll recall

Chorus

G - Em C - Am D - D7 G D
In Belfast, you call to me, when I am far away, I think of thee.
G - Em C - Am
Your Black Mountain, Cave Hill , City Hall,
D - D7 G D
Shaw's Bridge , River Lagan, I'm going home to them all..
G - Em C - Am D - D7 G
I'm going home to them all


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: toadfrog
Date: 21 Apr 01 - 08:10 PM

I'd be very curious about what you come up with. "Black Velved Band" is set in Belfast-I'm sure you already know that. Is it a street song?


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: alison
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 02:32 AM

there have been threads in the past... children's songs, street songs.. try doing a search forthem...

I do have a great book.... called "keep the kettle boiling- rhymes from a Belfast childhood" by Maggi Kerr Pierce, published by Appletree Press, 1983.

ISBN 0-86281-116-3

see if you can get a hold of a copy....

but yes.... "I'll tell me ma", and "My Aunt Jane" are definately Belfast.

other ones that springs to mind are "Wee Willie's lost his marley"
"one two three o'Leary"
"the big ship sails down the illy, ally-o"
and a lot of the skipping (jump-rope) ones.. there have been threads on these too......

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: alison
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 02:41 AM

couldn't find the jump rope thread... maybe someone else remembers the title of it

children's street songs

children's singing games

dark Irish kids tunes

have fun

slainte

alison


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Subject: Jumprope Archive ?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 04:42 AM

Alison, were you looking for the Jumprope Hypertext Archive?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: GUEST,Mike Ireland
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 04:59 AM

Hi Dom, There is a CD of Belfast Street songs. I listened to it last year. I'll see If I can find the name, singer, title etc.

Mike


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: Fiddlin' Sid
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 07:22 AM

Thanks everyone!


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: MARINER
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 08:48 AM

Dominic Behan and I think, Ewan McColl recorded an album back in the sixties of Belfast street songs called, once again if my memory hasn't deserted me,"Streets Of Song". I think it may have been on some of the "real" folk labels, like Transatlantic.


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 03:41 PM

Look for recorded and printed works of Davy Hammond and Maurice Leyden ("Belfast, City of Song"). also the McPeake family. and there's a book about the mill workers and their songs, Betty Messenger: "Picking Up the Linen Threads"


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: MARINER
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 03:49 PM

Oh yeah, almost forgot, The Glenfolk Four recorded some of that type of stuff.Back in the 60s as well, perhaps they're on C.D. by now.


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: Jimmy C
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 06:58 PM

David Hammond has the following on his album " Belfast Street Songs", not all are Belfast born, some are from Scotland and England but all were popular in Belfast. I list them here along with the liner notes.

Gallant Forty Twa - The song of an old Belfast itinerant. The regiment referred to is the Scottish Black Watch.

Green Gravel, Green Gravel - A child's rationalization of a death and burial scene with equivalents throughout the British Isles. Green Gravel is the subsoil thrown up by the grave diggers.

Johnny Todd - A simple song describing a sailor's problems when beset by his wife's infedelity. Known in Belfast as well as Liverpool.

All Round the Loney-o - A local version of a classical ballad "the Cruel Mother"

Fan-A-Winnow - A song from the linen industry - a spinner avows her love for Barney, the band tier. Set basically to the melody of a hymn common in the 19th century.

You might easy know a doffer - When specialization developed after the linen industry had evolved from a domestic environment, rivalry erupted among the various trades. Here is a "Rover's" derisive direction about how to recognize a "doffer".

Roddy McCorley - A comparatively modern commemoration of one of the ordinary people hanged for their part in the 1798 rebellion.

I am The Wee Falorie-man - The song of a braggart travelling man. Belfast version of a song that is known to children throughout the British Isles.

The May Queen -A relic of the pastoral tradition associated with May Day in Ireland. It is still sung through the streets of Belfast by bands of children during the month of May.

Early Early in the Spring - Irish Variant of a well known English song collected by Cecil Sharpe under the generic title " I died for Love"

King billy Was A Gentleman - A song which records children's delight in the revered memory of William, Prince of orange, later King William III, who is regarded by a large section of Ulstermen as being the greatest king in history.

The Doffin Mistress - A traditional Doffer's farewell to an overseer. This song was sung by girls as they swung through the cobbled streets in great lines, arms linked and shawls thrown back. They vow love and loyalty to their old boss, and threaten the "upstart" who has succeeded her with their contempt.

The Belfast Mountain - The song commerates the memory of Henry Joy McCracken, leader of the United Irishmen in Ulster during the 1798 rebellion. The tune is a variant of the pervasive " Banks of Claudy".

The South Down Militia - A fulsome. boastful, military song exalting the fine qualities of a famous Irish Regiment, the South Dowmn Militia, eventually known as the Royal Ulster Rifles. Dom, the record is on the Request Label - RLP 8059. It may be difficult to find. If you want the words or a casette of the songs listed please contact me by Personal Message.


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 22 Apr 01 - 08:21 PM

Songs of Belfast, a book edited by David Hammond - published 1978 by Gilbert Dalton, 25 Shenick Rd. Skerries, Co Dublin, Ireland.
Irish Street Ballads (contains some Belfast Songs) collected by Colm O Lochlainn - published 1978 by Pan Books, Cavaye Place, London SW10 9FG.
Maggi Peirce, Yellow Moon Press, PO Box 1316, Cambridge,MA 02238. I have a great wee tape of Belfast Children's street songs and games, but there's no address on it. It was reacorded by the teachers and kids of St. Mary's Primary School in Belfast. I'll send you a dub of it. if you PM me here.

All the best. Seamus


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: paddymac
Date: 23 Apr 01 - 01:21 AM

"William Bloat" is a Belfast street song, allegedly popular with kids. Rather a nasty solution to domestic strife, but kids see such things with different eyes.


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: Big Tim
Date: 23 Apr 01 - 06:02 AM

Try also the CD "Welcome to Northern Ireland" (Various artists) on Outlet Records, a bit tweeish but also some decent songs included.


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: GUEST,Reiver 2
Date: 23 Apr 01 - 03:44 PM

I have a casette tape by David Hammond and Judy Mayhan, that includes a lot of Belfast street songs including "Green Gravel", "The Doffin Mistress", and others. It also includes songs that are not really "street songs", such as "The Gallant Forty-Twa" and "Will Ye Go, Lassie, Go" (at least I don't think these would be regarded as "street songs.") Incidently, what is the accurate definition of a "street song? In my mind they've been songs sung primarily by children. Is this correct?

When Reiver 1 and I were actively singing we put together three of the songs on this casette and sang them as a "Belfast Street Songs" medley: "The Wee Falorie Man", "Fan-a-Winnow" and "Johnny Todd" -- they worked well together. We also did a medley of "Glasgow Street Songs" that I think we learned from a Corries record. It included "There Is A Happy Land" (that's the first line... don't know what the actual name is), "Ye Cannae Shove Your Grannie Off a Bus" and one called "Oh Then, Oh Then" or "The World Must Be Comin' Tae an End." I can provide words for most of the songs I've mentioned here, if you can't find them elsewhere.


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Nov 02 - 11:56 PM

I first saw this song mentioned in the Little House on the Prarie Books--it was one of the songs Pa would play on his fiddle for Ma and the Ingalls girls. I've played it at church services, especially memorial services for children that have died, and its simplicity and hopefulness always draws a positive response


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Subject: RE: BELFAST STREET SONGS
From: GUEST,Tony
Date: 26 Sep 09 - 12:00 AM

I taught with Brendan Colgan in Hastings Street PS in the early 70's and he had an album and a documentary producd by local TV...have a look


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Subject: RE: Belfast Street Songs
From: GUEST,Eugene
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 06:30 AM

We sing this to our grandaughter An old Belfast skipping song
W starting singing it in Belkfast one night and everyone knew it

On the hillside stands a lady
who she is I do not know
Allshe wants is gold and silver
All she wants is a nice young man

Lady lady tip the ground
Lady Lady turn around
Lady lady show your shoe
Lady lady run right through


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Subject: RE: Belfast Street Songs
From: Owen Woodson
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:17 AM

FS. When you say street songs, are you talking about children's rhymes, games etc., or Belfast broadside songs?

If the former, probably the best starting point is Songs and Sayings of an Ulster Childhood, by Alice Kane, edited by Edith Fowke. Wolfhound. 1983. 0 86327 005 0.

AK was born in Belfast bt emigrated to Canada aged 13. Hence the Edith Fowke connection.

Also, Picking Up The Linen Threads by Betty Messenger. Blackstaff. 1980. ISBN 0 85640 210 9. This is about the folklore of the Northern Ireland linen industry, but I'd be surprised if there are no street rhymes in there.

There are some children's songs in Belfast, City of Song; Maurice Leyden, ed. Brandon. 1983. ISBN 0 86322 110 6. Plus there's plenty of songs that would have been sung by adult street singers.

Finally, there's All In, All In by Eilís Brady. Comhairle Bhéaloideas Éireann. 1984. ISBN 0 901120 85 5. As far as I rememebr, this entirely comprises street games and rhymes of Dublin children. But I'll bet there's a lot of material in there which overlaps with Belfast.

The MacColl, Behan disc, which someone mentioned, is of Dublin and Salford children's songs, not Belfast.


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Subject: RE: Belfast Street Songs
From: GUEST,AMQ
Date: 12 Nov 09 - 10:35 AM

When I sang the skipping song 'On the hillside' in Belfast as a child, in the early sixties, the lyrics were slightly different to those you've recorded here:

On the hillside, stands a lady
Who she is I do not know,
All she wants is gold and silver
All she wants is a nice young beau.

Lady, Lady, touch the ground,
Lady, Lady, give a birl round,
Lady, Lady, show your shoe,
Lady, Lady, run right through.

It suddenly came back to me as I was reading a novel set in Canada, where the word 'birling' was used to describe rolling logs down a river!


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Subject: RE: Belfast Street Songs
From: Young Buchan
Date: 13 Nov 09 - 04:32 AM

Tom Brown's wife Bertha was a child in Belfast. She also used to sing this. I can't prove the two facts are connected since I never heard her do an explanatory introduction to it. But see what you think.

Mary went to a teaparty (x3)
And she came home with a big belly.

What will my mother say to me
When she sees the lump where the dent should be.

Tell your ma to hold her tongue
'Cos she was the same when she was young.

What will my father say to me
When he sees the lump where the dent should be.

Tell your pa to go to hell
'Cos the widow next door's up the spout as well.

The moral of this story is
Keep your knickers on at teaparties.


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Subject: ADD: Mickey Marley's Roundabout
From: GUEST,Shaneo not logged in
Date: 13 Nov 09 - 12:28 PM

Mickey Marley is the title of this Seamus Robinson song.
Alas Seamus passed away 14 September 2009. Songs Of Seamus Robinson

    Mickey Marley ( died 28th April 2005 ) toured Belfast and beyond with his Roundabout for over forty years,
    bringing joy and light to the hearts of countless children.
    For many years his regular "stand" was at High St./Cornmarket corner.



MICKEY MARLEY’S ROUNDABOUT
Seamus Robinson © 1976

Mickey Marley had a wee horse –
Kept it at the back of the house of course.
It wouldn't eat grass and it wouldn't eat hay
But it would eat sugar lumps all the day.
Mickey got some wood and wheels for a start
And then he sat down and made a wee cart.
He hammered and he hammered and he footered about
Until he'd built a Roundabout.

( chorus )
Round and round and up and down,
Through the streets of Belfast town
All the children laugh and shout,
Here comes Mickey's Roundabout.

Mickey goes from street to street
A penny a time and take your seat.
A hobby-horse or a motor car
Just jump on and hold the bar.
The children's faces shine with glee
That's what Mickey loves to see.
If you haven't got a penny and your Ma's gone out
You'll still get on his Roundabout
( repeat chorus )

Then alas to his dismay
The Roundabout was burnt one day.
Mickey lost everything he had
And all the children were so sad.
But Mickey's friends all gathered 'round
From every part of Belfast town.
They hammered and they hammered and they footered about
And built him a brand new Roundabout.
( repeat chorus twice )


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Subject: RE: Belfast Street Songs
From: GUEST,Guest; Linda Hall
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 07:18 PM

When I was a child in Tunbridge Wells in Kent we used to sing a skipping song which started "green gravels, green gravels, your sweetheart is dead". It was sung in the playground of St Mark's C of E Primary School in about 1960-3. We had a long rope with someone at either end turning it and one person skipping. As far as I can remember it went like this:

Green gravels, green gravels,
Your sweetheart is dead,
He sent you a letter
Wrapped up in brown paper [?]

Turn your back you saucy cat
[person skipping turns round to face the other way]
And say no more to me,
I know a boy,
He's double-jointed,
He kissed you
And made you disappointed.
All right [insert girl's name]
I'll tell your mother
For kissing [insert boy's name]
Down in the cellar,
How many kisses did he give you?
[Rope is now turned very fast with everyone counting each successful jump until the person skipping either catches the rope or elects to leave the game.]

Can this be connected to the Belfast song I wonder?


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Subject: RE: Belfast Street Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Aug 12 - 04:38 PM

margaret mck Does anyone know the words to ROUND GOES THE BUN THE MERRY OLD BUN ROUND GOES THE BUN ONCE MORE and STAND UP STRAIGHT UPON YOUR FEET AND CHOOSE THE ONE YOU LOVE SO SWEET NOW WE'RE MARRIED LIFE AND JOY FIRST A GIRL AND THEN A BOY SEVEN YEARS MARRIED SEVEN YEARS AGO ....................


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