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Irish Mudcatters?

GUEST,Claymore 14 May 01 - 05:51 PM
Sabine 14 May 01 - 03:13 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 12 May 01 - 06:06 AM
mike putt 11 May 01 - 05:17 PM
GUEST,Claymore 11 May 01 - 12:43 PM
alison 11 May 01 - 10:08 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 11 May 01 - 08:26 AM
Fibula Mattock 11 May 01 - 07:45 AM
Bawn 11 May 01 - 06:30 AM
sian, west wales 11 May 01 - 05:38 AM
GUEST,yum yum 11 May 01 - 05:22 AM
alison 10 May 01 - 11:01 PM
alison 10 May 01 - 10:55 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 10 May 01 - 08:42 PM
GUEST,Claymore 10 May 01 - 05:39 PM
sian, west wales 10 May 01 - 12:01 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 10 May 01 - 11:07 AM
Bawn 10 May 01 - 09:33 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 09 May 01 - 08:00 PM
Jimmy C 09 May 01 - 06:56 PM
mooman 09 May 01 - 05:56 PM
Philby 09 May 01 - 05:48 PM
GUEST,Claymore 09 May 01 - 11:46 AM
Fibula Mattock 09 May 01 - 05:00 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 08 May 01 - 02:17 PM
Fibula Mattock 08 May 01 - 07:53 AM
GUEST,Claymore 07 May 01 - 05:24 PM
sian, west wales 07 May 01 - 02:36 PM
sian, west wales 06 May 01 - 04:49 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 04 May 01 - 10:11 PM
sian, west wales 04 May 01 - 03:17 PM
sian, west wales 04 May 01 - 08:48 AM
GUEST,Yum Yum 03 May 01 - 09:21 PM
GUEST,Claymore 03 May 01 - 03:23 PM
Shall 03 May 01 - 02:00 PM
NSC 02 May 01 - 05:09 PM
GUEST,JTT 02 May 01 - 04:37 PM
Les from Hull 02 May 01 - 11:45 AM
Kim C 02 May 01 - 11:38 AM
sian, west wales 02 May 01 - 05:16 AM
Sabine 02 May 01 - 05:03 AM
Fibula Mattock 02 May 01 - 04:57 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 01 May 01 - 09:23 PM
GUEST,Fleadh's 01 May 01 - 11:27 AM
Fibula Mattock 01 May 01 - 10:15 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 01 May 01 - 10:12 AM
GUEST,Claymore 01 May 01 - 09:28 AM
sian, west wales 01 May 01 - 08:56 AM
Les from Hull 01 May 01 - 08:19 AM
Big Mick 01 May 01 - 07:53 AM
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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 14 May 01 - 05:51 PM

Sabine, Thank you for your graciousness. I suspect that at some point, we will be able to write the definitive tour guide "Irish Pub Crawl for 'Merican Musicians" with a specific chapter comparing Northern California with Northern Ireland.

Fionn, I would not have envied your decision, even as you made it. Yosemite is sort of a Denali in a box, and it was probably better that you took Cal One north, as it gave you a more varied view of the western portion of the US. But Yosemite is a god awful close second, though I can't imagine biking in or out. I doubt if you could have enough rubber on your brakes to make it down, or enough chain to make it up (tractor gears or not). In the old days, we would have to pressure bleed the cars radiator twice going in or out. (If you had a bad radiator cap, your hoses would go, and we would use the old rule of bleeding our caps, when our ears popped). An old mans memory says that of the two ways I can recall, coming in by Chinese Camp is screaming drop, whereas going out along the Merced River is a longer, but gentler grade through the Sierras.

Brawn, While playing for another wedding at O'Hurleys, I brought up your idea to the proprietor, and he likes the concept. We'll pass it around at our Thursday night jam, and see what percolates up.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Sabine
Date: 14 May 01 - 03:13 AM

Mike, I'll contact you during the following days as well as mcmoo. Sorry folks, I'm not lazy but very, very busy at the moment...

Fionn and Claymore,

no problem at all *g*. It was interesting *giggle* Maybe I'll make a new thread of it.

Blessings

Sabine


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 12 May 01 - 06:06 AM

Claymore, seems we might have driven poor old Sabine out of her thread anyuway *G*, so I'll just take the creep a bit farther to say it was indeed the Russian River, but I'd no idea about the connection with Alaska, where I'd just been. In Alaska I was always close to people who knew the territory, but I was entirely on my own in California, and the few people I got talking to didn't know much about their own surroundings. Wish I'd had your number! (I'd been planning to go out from SF to Yosemite, but a cyclist in the hostel where I stayed persuaded me to do the coast instead. I guess I'll never know how the two rides compare, but surely Yosemite could not have been more spectacular than the ride I actually did.) The gradients were tough, but nothing like coming down from Fairbanks to Haines. (But then bikes these days have insanely low gears that allow people like me to potter along at 0.001 mph.)

Sorry to hijack your thread again Sabine - maybe we should be having this chat under a slightly more appropriate subject heading, Claymore!


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: mike putt
Date: 11 May 01 - 05:17 PM

Sabine I am here in Limerick, and would love to meet you and your family either in Doolin or Limerick. Let me know more about your timetable, you can mail me on mikeputt@iol.ie


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 11 May 01 - 12:43 PM

Fionn, The wild and beautiful river you pedaled along was the Russian River, named for a Russian fur trapping settlement in California, that was bought out as part of the Alaska Purchase. It means you definitely got past Bolinas, past Drakes Bay (where Sir Francis Drake's engraved lead plaque was discovered, claiming California for England) and past Bodega Bay (where Hichcock's movie "The Birds" was filmed). To pedal all of that is a tribute to your physical shape, because even if the views are breath taking, so are the hills.

And for now I must stay a Guest, as my job allows me frequent access, as long as no emergencies intrude (I do the disaster relief/NBC Weapons of Mass Destruction deployments as one of the interfaces between FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) and DoD (Department of Defense). And I share all your missives with my fellow travelers to be.

Brawn, as far as I know, the "twining" involves providing housing and sponsoring alternating visits between the groups. Since Morris dancers tend to run in packs, they are frequently either leaving for England, or sponsoring a trip to the States, en masse.

As for the Border Morris, they tend to be the personality types whom I characterize as those who should be watched through a small hatch in the door, while they sleep. (Are the Welsh like that?)


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: alison
Date: 11 May 01 - 10:08 AM

Bawn... I was in Hamiltonsbawn last year when I was home.. my paternal great grandfather's family (Emerson's)are buried in Edenavase churchyard which is at Hamiltonsbawn..... I was doing some family tree research.............

small world eh???

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 11 May 01 - 08:26 AM

Bawn, I'll be staying near Moira (don't let that put you off!) around the end of June and probably again in August, expecially if they go ahead with the Ulster GP. will your club be running during the summer, and what night/day?


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Fibula Mattock
Date: 11 May 01 - 07:45 AM

Ahh, the Lough road down the Ards Peninsula... on a November evening when the sun is low and the shadows are long... sigh. Mind you, I am so happy here in Bristol at the mo, as the sun has been shining all week and I've been picnic-ing on the Downs and having loooong lunches in beer gardens!


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Bawn
Date: 11 May 01 - 06:30 AM

The village in question is called Hamiltownsbawn that's quite close to Markethill that is on the main road from Newry to Armagh. I live near Portadown, which is about six miles from Hamiltownsbawn.

Our Club is really quite young and probably quite amateurish compared to what's about but we enjoy it. We are learning and more importantly wanting to learn and, probably not terrible knowledgeable about the folk world in general.

"I'm not sure what you're proposing, but our Morris Dancers are "twined" with a group in England, and our Border Morris with a group in Wales. As the local saying goes "Get particular, and we'll talk". "

I'm not sure either what I'm proposing on the "twining issue" it was just a thought.

How does it work with the dancers ?


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 11 May 01 - 05:38 AM

If you're in a car, just east of the Giant's Causeway is a little place called ... Ballentoi? ...toy? We found it by mistake, really ... but twisting your way down to the old harbour is really worth it! Small, but perfectly formed!

Oh, and what dance group in Wales? You should consider doing the Pontardawe Folk Festival (3rd wk August-ish) some year.

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,yum yum
Date: 11 May 01 - 05:22 AM

ALISON, how right you are. NENDRUM is ALL and MORE! I visit Nendrum quite a lot and never tire of the views and the peaceful feeling it gives me just being there. The history surrounding the site is fascinating. Another moving sight is the Portaferry Road on a summers evening, when the sun is sitting low,reflecting on the tide. Gosh, I'm getting sentimental. Fibula Mattock you must have felt that travelling that road!

Bawn, what is the name of your village, I would love to come to your session some time.

Yum Yum.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: alison
Date: 10 May 01 - 11:01 PM

heading south from Belfast.. the whole of the Ard Peninsula is lovely .... my favourite bit is Nendrum Monastic site... follow signs from just outside Comber....... the Mourne Mountains are worth a look and the road from Hilltown to Carnlough has some fantastic views....

The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum outside Belfast is well done.....

it is years since I have been to the Ulster American one at Gortin near Omagh... but it was always good... there is another one close by it... which does Ireland through the ages... from Stone Age right through... with dolmens and round towers etc... unfortunately they didn't put enough thought into it....... obvious power points and fire extinguishers.... which I'm sure the monks didn't have away back then......

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: alison
Date: 10 May 01 - 10:55 PM

Yes please Jimmy... and if you can't manage rock... a nice bit of potato bread would do too.....

add my vote to the Antrim Coast Road..... the Larne end of it isn't as dramatic as it is at the top.....

take a detour to Glenarriff..... there is a restaurant (Laragh Lodge.. if I remember rightly) before you get to the park.. where you can sneak into the waterfall section... go round the back and follow the "boardwalks"... some beautiful falls........

heading on up.... Carrick -a-rede rope bridge is worth a look.. but a bit of a hike to get to,

Giant's Causeway is fantastic..... it's a hike too.. but there is a bus.....

my favourite place still has to be Kenbane castle just west of Ballycastle, (great butcher on the main street.. wonderful sausages.. look for the trophies in the window)

Kenbane is a ruin at the foot of a cliff on an island.. on a good day you get views to Rathlin Island in the background.........

Dunluce is a great castle.......

Portrush and Portstewart are your usual touristy towns.... but if you go to Coleraine.. go out the other side and head for Castlerock (I lived up there for the last 3 years before I moved to Australia)..... and walk through the "Black Glen" to the "Mussenden Temple"... again superb views over Castlerock and Downhill beaches.. and the whole of the Bann estuary......

and seeing as you're already up there.... take the Bishop's Road.. from the Downhill Hotel.... up over the top of Binevenagh mountain... and head to Derry.....

go through Derry and get to Griannan of Aileach (off the Letterkenny Road).. simply the best celtic site I have ever been to....

that should keep you accupied for a few days.... that's the thing with Ireland.. it looks very small on a map but there is so much to see........

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 10 May 01 - 08:42 PM

Claymore, I got as far as some place where a huge river met the Pacific. I followed that river inland (and upwards) on C116, or was it 118?, to Gurnville(?) and eventually Santa Rosa. I then had to head south as I was right out of time. Forgot to say in the last post that the Golden Gate Bridge was an experience on its own, with a cycle lane totally segregated from motor traffic.

It would be dragging this thread too far off message to recount my extraodinary adventure in San Francisco - I'd send you a personal message if you ever signed up and joined this community. (But maybe you're using someone else's PC?)

I hope you appreciate that everything's on a slightly smaller scale in Ireland? Oh, and the trees don't go quite so high.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 10 May 01 - 05:39 PM

Fionn, You've made my day, and the Antrim Coast Road goes into the itinerary, together with the Giant's Causeway. I now thank God for computers, as they allow me to insert and edit my itinerary.

Last night, at a jam we hold in a local train station, I passed around a brochure from the Ulster Appalachian-Bluegrass Festival in Omagh, from two years ago, and we all sat around grinning like great apes. I've been given another mission from the group to gather information about the Ulster Festival this year, (even if it's not going on while I'm there). Two years ago, it was held August 31 – Sept 2, which means that it might be possible for the rest of my group to come again next year, catch the Fleadh Cheoil wherever it's held, and then trek north for the Ulster Festival. We would be learning things at the Fleadh, but right at home for the Festival, as that is our music. And if this idea catches on, you could begin to regard Americans like rats with banjos.

And make no mistake, were it not for some folks failing to believe in this year's trip, our group would be larger. (There is the sound of anguished crying in the land, "We coulda been in Ireland").

As for being blown away in Alaska, I was kidding Dave the Gnome that once on a flight to "Gnome," we wheeled in across Norton Sound, and landed in a cross wind so heavy the pilot told us the strip was using a log for a wind sock.

And I hope you got as far up California One as Bolinas, just north of Stinson Beach, where the road comes down through Muir Woods. I spent many happy summers there, during the polio scares of the 50's. I look forward with much anticipation to the drive along the northern coast.

Brawn/Robin A: I repeat Fionn's question; Which village?

My town, Shepherdstown, WV is built around a college, has a population of approximately 1,200 people, and is located some 70 miles up the Potomac River from Washington DC, just up from the confluence of the Potomac and Shennandoah Rivers at Harpers Ferry. We have been gathering at a Thursday night jam for some twenty years at a old general store called O'Hurleys, with a large music room (exposed beam and clinch-nailed random oak floor, with a two-story fireplace from floor to ceiling) attached. We call it the "Great Hall," and there have been three marriages and two funerals conducted there, and several local musical celebrities such as Brian Bowers, Sam Rizzeta, and Maddy O'Neil have held concerts there.

We have solved our version of the Irish Question, by permanently displaying the Irish Republic Flag across from the Northern Irish Flag, with them separated by the Irish Brigade Flag ("Erin Go Bragh"), first flown during the Civil War battle of Antietim, (which was located just across the river). Tommy Sands song, "There were Roses" is a local favorite, and during the Syrian-Israeli peace talks held last year in town, we had both Jewish and Arabic musicians playing at our jam.

I'm not sure what you're proposing, but our Morris Dancers are "twined" with a group in England, and our Border Morris with a group in Wales. As the local saying goes "Get particular, and we'll talk".


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 10 May 01 - 12:01 PM

Touristy or not, I think the Giant's Causeway is absolutely amazining. A guy I know has the concession to do the guided walks from the tourist centre there - and he's a mine of information. That whole trek, from Dunluce Castle eastwards is great! (Pity about the golf courses, but you can't have everything!)

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 10 May 01 - 11:07 AM

So which village is it, Bawn?


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Bawn
Date: 10 May 01 - 09:33 AM

We have started a small folk club in a local village (N.Ireland) and are going now almost a year. Still fairly amateurish but we enjoy it. Whilst following this thread a through it dawned on me, why not twin with another club for mutual benefit.

This was quite popular here a few years ago when towns "twined" with foreign towns to promote each other to encourage business and tourism.

Any Thoughts ?

Perhaps should start a new thread

RobinA


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 09 May 01 - 08:00 PM

No disrespect to Donaghadee and Co Down, Claymore, but scenery-wise they don't come close to the Antrim Coast Road and the near-coast minor roads between Coleraine and Ballycastle.

As for the road north of the Golden Gate, I've pedalled that, and even wiped the sweat off my brow in a vain attempt to look cool in the trendiest joints in Sausilito (sp?). It was supposed to be the anti-climax after three months in Alaska, and nearly stole the show - which is saying something, because Alaska blew me away like nowhere I've ever been on earth.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Jimmy C
Date: 09 May 01 - 06:56 PM

At last I am off to Ireland tomorrow (10th May) but unfortunately for 2 weeks only. I will be in Belfast and maybe in Co Down and will not have a chance to wander around Clare, Kerry, Cork as I have dome many times. However I am sure to have a great 2 weeks in Belfast. There is a large session planned in my sister's house on Sunday and it will probably go on until Tuesday. Will try to contact Annroi when I am there. I will post again on my return. Alison and Seamus, I will bring you back a rock???.

Slan,


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: mooman
Date: 09 May 01 - 05:56 PM

Dear Sabine,

I can confirm that we will be in Doolin on the 11 July and would love to meet for a chat, music or song if you'd still like to.

Due to my wife joining Mudcat and swallowing my cookie in one gulp and some type of computer weirdness that I don't claim to understand all my earlier posts now bear the name Lady McMoo.

If you'd like to PM me nearer the time with meeting up details, times, etc. I therefore you PM me under my "new" Mudcat identity of:

mooman

All the very best

mooman (TMFKAmcmoo)


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Philby
Date: 09 May 01 - 05:48 PM

Check out the Cork Folk Festival, usually on end August, early September, e-mail whammond@oceanfree.net for details, you'd never know Claymore, you might get a gig.

If you do let me know. I'll make sure to catch it.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 09 May 01 - 11:46 AM

Fibula, Ah Lass, the only Irish I know is the typical solution to any American's problems; the throwing o' the green. And I have no brogue, twang or drawl, but I do have a ready smile, a love of the country, and I "clean up good", so with any luck, you won't catch me backing out of any pub.

And Fionn, thanks for the info on the coast roads. For the little time I had in Donaghadee two years ago, the Irish north coast reminded me of the northern Califiornia coast road, Route 1, north of the San Fransico Golden Gate Bridge, which is used in all the car commercials in the US. (You know, the snake-bend roads, surf spashing, beautiful female passenger looking on approvingly as he pops the clutch, type of ads).

I shall continue to monitor the this thread, as I'm sure Sabine will, and I intend to post a thread (Perhaps "Riverthump in Ireland," after the name I've given the cloggers) prior to leaving, which will warn prescient Irishmen everywhere, that the rumble under their feet means their West Virginia cousins have arrived. Thank you all again.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Fibula Mattock
Date: 09 May 01 - 05:00 AM

Dianna's book is called "Exploring Irish Music and Dance" and is aimed at introducing children to traditional music, but is well worth a read no matter what age you are.

Sessions in Drogheda - try Carberry's (Ni Chairbre's) on the North Quay. They have sessions on Sundays from about midday 'til 2pm, and also on Tuesday nights. It's a great wee pub, and if you speak any Irish you'll get an even warmer welcome.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 08 May 01 - 02:17 PM

Spot on about Geordie, Yum Yum, if not about Newry! He's a great cyclist too, as well as a wizard with fiddle and stained glass.

There's another fined fiddler in Bangor, Dianna Boullier, who you can catch any Friday night, along with other musicians, at 35 High Street. The place is labelled the Ormeau Bar, but is known as Fealty's, as you would expect in Ireland, and is owned by someone else. (Dianna's written a book about Irish traditional - try a search on that peculiar spelling.)

Claymore, you're right to do the Coleraine-Larne bit via the coast, but take a dive inland for a session most Wednesdays and Saturdays at the Skerries, Newtown Crommelin (often includes a piano - don't know if that puts you off). The piano player used to be a regular at the famous Cross Keys, near Toome - now back in business I believe, after last year's fire. The Cross Keys is well worth a visit, but I'm not sure when sessions are since the re-opening. Try a search (two words) - it has a website. (Add words like Antrim or Comhaltas to narrow it down.)


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Fibula Mattock
Date: 08 May 01 - 07:53 AM

There's a car ferry from Portaferry to Strangford. It takes about 5 - 10 minutes, and they run every half hour (on the hour and half hour from Strangford, and at a quarter-past and a quarter-to from Portaferry. I got it to school for 7 years). If you're in Portaferry, have a drink in Fiddler's Green - you'll get a singalong in the evening, but not a hard-core trad session, but it's a very friendly pub and they do B&B too. That's my plug for the day!
I'm ashamed to say that I haven't visited the folk park in Omagh, so I can offer no opinion on it. There's a folk museum near Bangor, Co. Down, which is quite good.
Downpatrick is not the nicest of towns (personal opinion, I was at school there) but I do believe there's good music thereabouts. They have a folk club, and a webpage to go with it - click here. Try to get a drive through the Mourne Mountains as well - a beautiful part of the world.
There's a few sessions to be found in Drogheda (I will get up-to-date details from my Other Half who currently resides there). It's also worth visiting the archaeological sites therebouts, such as the Boyne passage tombs, Monasterboice etc. If you kick over a stone in that place you'll find something of archaeological importance.
If I can think of any more, I'll let you know.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 07 May 01 - 05:24 PM

Fionn, Fibula, Yum Yum,

While not wishing to highjack the thread, I'm wondering if either of you could suggest some high spots in Northern Ireland for a four-five day visit, August 29 to Sept 2, 2001. As I noted in an earlier post, I plan to break away from the Shepherdstown group when they return to the US, and go north.

I'm looking for good music, scenic views (seacoast or inland), and recommendations on B&B's if you have them. I had thought of some form of clock-circle tour involving a drive north from the Dublin area through Drogheda, with an immediate swing way up to Omagh and the Ulster Folk Park (if you think it's worth it). Next to some point near Coleraine to take the coast roads around to Larne and hence to Newtownards (and Bangor, where I will look up Mr. McAdam).

If I'm able, I would want to continue down the Ards Peninsula and cross over towards Downpatrick and Newry, (my map is not clear about the crossing from Portaferry to Strangford), and then sprint south to catch the plane in Dublin. I'm not tied to the mast on anything particular, so if there are places you think highly of, that I've missed, please advise.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 07 May 01 - 02:36 PM

Oh ... and I also have to work, I should add.

Really. I do.

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 06 May 01 - 04:49 PM

Sorry, Fionn (does that mean Foxglove, as in Welsh?)...

Anyway, the Leader II thing is immaterial but, Leader is a European programme for rural community development. One of the better ones, in my opinion. Every 2-3 months, the national networks (i.e. UK) get together to share info about projects they've done, or want to do. I don't work for a group, but I deal with the Welsh Leader network so I get to go to the shin-digs. And I get to go to Ireland ... yippee!

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 04 May 01 - 10:11 PM

Sian, what's a Leader II course.? (I take it everyone else already knows.) And Fib, sorry for my tetchyness. I've heard so many people slagging the place for real, I just assumed you meant it too.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 04 May 01 - 03:17 PM

Damn, meant the South East of course. Heck, TGIF! (Although there is a new air service, Cardiff-Cork)

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 04 May 01 - 08:48 AM

And while we're at it ... any ideas about places/events in the south-west,preferably accessible by public transit? I'm only 45 minutes from the Fishguard-Rosslare ferry and could/should slip across more often...

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Yum Yum
Date: 03 May 01 - 09:21 PM

This time I must agree with you Fib. Newry has always in the past had a good name for sessions (for those who are two sentences behind a conversation)traditional music / singing / boozing /(the odd technicolor yawn - BOKE) but this time the truth has to be told. NEWRY .... has never had much going for it in the way of culture! I know that someone is going to attack me over this, BUT, the last time the Fleadh was held there, They closed the place down! It was a disaster! The only people who attended, were drunks who sang 'Horse-lips tracks' or Danny Boy, sorry, I am not trying to stir things up, but I had to sit through 56 verses of Willie McBride (Finton Vallely you picked the right song to tear a-sunder) anyway..Sabine have a great break and if you find yourself in the North, go to Bangor in Co. Down. and look up a little shop in Grey's Hill,callwd 'Geordies', it's a stained-glass making 'kind of a shop'. He is Geordie McAdam, and he plays the fiddle like you have never heard before!! He plays traditional and Blue-grass, he has played in the USA on many's an occasion and would only be too happy to shut up shop to play you a few tunes. I was a stranger and he did for me. Have a nice time,

Yum Yum


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 03 May 01 - 03:23 PM

Sharro, you disfunctional goddess, it means "good conversation" and is usually given the gaelic spelling of "craic."


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Shall
Date: 03 May 01 - 02:00 PM

NSC, I am very curious about the word CRACK!Dah.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: NSC
Date: 02 May 01 - 05:09 PM

The Aonach Paddy O'Brien festival is on the from 16th to 22nd August in Newtown, near Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. There will be lots of crack and sessions including singing sessions with the Nenagh Singers Circle, in Barry's pub, Newtown.

This is a fabulous festival and it is followed by the All Ireland Fleadh the following weekend.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 02 May 01 - 04:37 PM

Don't forget to call in to Custy's Music in Ennis - I know I sound like their agent, but I've never actually been in the shop, just ordered over the phone and on their website (www.custysmusic.com) and love it.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Les from Hull
Date: 02 May 01 - 11:45 AM

It's not always that easy from this side Kim. The last time we spent 26 hours in Holyhead waiting for the Irish Sea to calm down enough to allow that glorified shoebox they call a ferry out of the harbour. Give me a ship-shaped ship every time!


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Kim C
Date: 02 May 01 - 11:38 AM

I wish I was goin to Ireland. :-(

Mister and I spent 6 miserable hours in the O'Hare airport on our HONEYMOON. Eventually we did get to the cruise ship.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 02 May 01 - 05:16 AM

Fib and Fion, thanks for the info. Talk about plans just missing the mark! The Leader II meeting is supposed to be discussing Culture in Community Development - we should be there 3 days earlier! Hmmm.. this may require some creative rationalisation to The Boss. Memo: "Why I should go to the meeting 4 days early" by S.Thomas, Research & Development.

Works for me!

with thanks sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Sabine
Date: 02 May 01 - 05:03 AM

Back again from an great pub-session-birthday-party-weekend *g*

Les, you're right. That's the way I always did. Just went up to a session (which are indeed mostly paid sessions), a friendly smile and the question: may I join your session? Or something like that. And it works!

I'm counting the days !

Sabine :o)


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Fibula Mattock
Date: 02 May 01 - 04:57 AM

I was only messin'. My Other Half's from Newry (well, he says it's far enough outside Newry to claim no allegiance). Anyway, the Down fleadh is on the 23/24 June in Newry. More details will follow if I hear any!


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 01 May 01 - 09:23 PM

To a woman of the world like Fib (I believe she's a student now!) Newry must indeed be quite a bore. But take her scoffing with a pinch of salt, Sian. The Cove on a good night is as good as any session you're going to find in Dublin - just not Fib's cup of tay, perhaps.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Fleadh's
Date: 01 May 01 - 11:27 AM

Reading this thread reminded me of how much Ireland has changed in a very short time.

My best times there were spent not playing music but wandering the little lanes in the countryside, the mystical silent mornings with only the tree trunks and everything above visible, all else shrouded in mist.

There is a Foot and Mouth scare at this time you may want to ensure before you leave that there are no biohazards in your luggage, that you stay off farms if currently in infected areas etc.

Driving, the left hand shoulder is often used by tractors and cyclists so at night and if there is a fog, stay off of it. Speed - last I knew it was 55 mph max, the new highways are 65 and dualies. They will arrest you if you get caught DUI, don't take any chances, from what I hear these days it is about the same as the UK.

Playing, I think Les made this point very well. Ask.

Tay, lol there is lots of great sessions but great Tay -hmmm has to be sought out.

Sessions in the USA - where?

Co Clare, great for Music.

Listowel, you'd be spoilt there, some of the purest and most original mountain fiddling I ever came across is in the region, but again you'd have to seek it out.

Directions, after a while one gets used to the roads and the most used ones show it, side roads - no a good idea unless you know exactly where they lead lol.

Tunes I still enjoy, When Sick Is It Tea You Want, The Sun Rise, Job of Journey Work, The Farewell. Songs The Sick Note, Finnegans Wake, Paddy Mc Ginty's Goat.

Odd places you'd never think of going lol, Granard still the annual meet for Harp Players from all around the Globe, Kilkenny Town a fascinating city. Co Down in NI - what can I say poke around. The Shannon lakes, still often very quiet and you'd not see many folk there. Sligo Town already mentioned above, look out for some of the old style fiddlers!

Deceptive distances, e-w the Island is less than 300 miles , n-s not a day trip. Think Mountians and driving around them, so a short trip can often end up being a long one.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Fibula Mattock
Date: 01 May 01 - 10:15 AM

hello again yum yum (if that's what you want to be called!). Long time since you've been hanging round Mudcat.
sian - there's feck all in Newry, it's the toilet bowl of Ulster (I'm only half-serious). Still, I'll find out what's happening and let you know.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 01 May 01 - 10:12 AM

Sian, be sure to go to the Cove, a mile or two along the road out of Newry, going towards Hilltown - ie along the non-coastal route to Newcastle. Sessions are on Tuesday nights. Their claim used to be that they never missed a session. It's a good few months since I was there last, but I've no reason to think the tradition has been broken.

Leading supporters/participants include Ben Sands and other members of that revered family.

There's the usual welcome and encouragement from fellow musicians for anyone attempting to play Irish traditional, but those of, for instance, my own modest competence need to exercise a little discretion. Audience expectations are high. The likes of Tommy Makem, Sean Maguire and Cathal Hayden are well-known at the Cove, not to mention the great, the one-and-only, the fabulous (oh for Noreen's grasp of html!) B A R N E Y M c K E N N A.


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 01 May 01 - 09:28 AM

Les, I loved the post, especially about being "within staggering distance". However, in my case, with a body style that my father said "Won Northern Europe" and carrying a 32 pound six string banjo, I tend to lurch rather than stagger, and am plenty of trouble for lorries. (They can bang the dents out, but they'll never get rid of the stain... )

Liam's Bro, I think you put me on to why it was so hard for me to find my way while driving in two countries that I knew at least one dialect of the spoken lanquage. And I thought they were responding to my "Honk If You Want to Know Jesus!" sticker...


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 01 May 01 - 08:56 AM

What's in Newry? When? I'm pretty sure I've got a three-day Leader II meeting in Newry, 26-28 June, and am thinking of hanging around for the weekend ... or maybe just back to Dublin before flying back to Cardiff.

sian


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Les from Hull
Date: 01 May 01 - 08:19 AM

Sabine, Claymore - We've visited the West of Ireland several times with fellow singers and players. Last time there were 22 of us. My experience is that in most pubs walking in with musical instruments means that you HAVE to play. We've had some great times and met some great people.

Most of the pub music is done by artists who are booked to play for that night, but they'll usually ask if anyone in the pub wants to play, and they'll accompany (or not as the case may be - they're still getting paid).

By asking around you'll find out which pubs will let you play. Fortunately jukeboxes are rarer there than in most other places, and the Irish I've met appreciate music more than any other people I've met. Having said that, some of the sessions can be a bit 'precious', so always ask.

It's probably best when you arrive in a new location to send out scouts to each pub within staggering distance and find out exactly what goes on, when it happens and what sort of things are welcome. We're sure that you'll have a wonderful time and want to do it all again straight away. Perhaps you can post some of your experiences here?

Les and Maggie (I wonder if we'll be there again this year?)


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Subject: RE: Irish Mudcatters?
From: Big Mick
Date: 01 May 01 - 07:53 AM

BTW,Dan,I am interested in this as well...............any chance of one being available. Vinyl would be fine with me. My copy is long gone, as well.

All the best,

Mick


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