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Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer

toadfrog 21 May 01 - 02:41 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 May 01 - 03:09 PM
Charley Noble 21 May 01 - 06:35 PM
toadfrog 21 May 01 - 06:44 PM
GUEST,Ed 21 May 01 - 06:50 PM
GUEST,Ed 21 May 01 - 06:52 PM
toadfrog 21 May 01 - 07:41 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 May 01 - 08:39 PM
toadfrog 21 May 01 - 09:47 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 May 01 - 09:58 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 22 May 01 - 07:26 AM
Noreen 26 May 01 - 11:11 AM
Noreen 26 May 01 - 11:20 AM
Noreen 26 May 01 - 06:18 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 26 May 01 - 06:39 PM
Noreen 26 May 01 - 06:42 PM
Big Tim 27 May 01 - 04:27 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 20 Jul 01 - 07:43 PM
MartinRyan 22 Jul 01 - 05:27 PM
MartinRyan 22 Jul 01 - 05:29 PM
MartinRyan 22 Jul 01 - 08:26 PM
GUEST,Cruinneas 19 Aug 12 - 12:41 AM
MartinRyan 19 Aug 12 - 03:56 AM
GUEST 26 Dec 12 - 02:58 PM
GUEST,John Moulden 26 Dec 12 - 03:28 PM
MartinRyan 27 Dec 12 - 04:08 AM
Dave Hanson 27 Dec 12 - 10:16 AM
Charley Noble 28 Dec 12 - 10:11 AM
GUEST,John Moulden 02 Jan 13 - 08:51 AM
MartinRyan 02 Jan 13 - 09:01 AM
GUEST,Cruinneas 02 Jan 13 - 09:52 AM
MartinRyan 13 Oct 14 - 05:06 AM
GUEST,Mrr 13 Oct 14 - 09:35 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BOLD TENANT FARMER^^
From: toadfrog
Date: 21 May 01 - 02:41 PM

BOLD TENANT FARMER


Traditional, or author unknown.

One evening of late into Bandon I strayed,
Down by Clonakilty was making my way.
At Ballinascarthy, some time I delayed,
And I wet my old whistle with porter.
So I spit on my fist and I raised up my stick,
And down the coach road like a deer I did lep[?].
I fear neither bailiffs, landlords or Old Nick,
And I sang like the lark in the morning.

Diddly aidel dul daidel dul daidel dul day,
Diddly aidel dul daidel dul daidel dul day,
Darum diddly aidel dul daidel dul day,
And I sang like the lark in the morning.


I scarcely had traveled one mile up the road
When I heard a dispute in the farmer's abode,
The son of the landlord, an ill-looking toad,
And the wife of the bold tenant farmer.
Oh what in the devil come over you all?
When I ask for the rent sure, I get none at all.
At the next sessions you'll pay for it all.
You'll take the high road to Dungarvan.

Oh, hurrah for the bold farmer's wife, she replied,
You're worse than your daddy on the other side,
Our National Land League will pull down your pride,
For its able to brave any storm.
Oh, your husband was drinking in town last night,
Shouting and bawling for bold tenants' rights.
Our plan of campaign it will give you a fright.
For he'll never bear all our storm.

Oh, if he was drinking, what's that to you?
I'd rather he drinks it than gives it to you!
You skinny old miser, you're not worth a chew!
And your mossy old land is no bargain.
Then I shouted, "hooray," and she shouted, "yoo-hoo"!
And across the green fields like Old Nick he then flew.
Crying God help the landlord and old Ireland too.
Agus fagiamis suid mar ata se.

Sung by Joe Heany for Ewan McColl and Peggy Seeger in 1964, not It is a part of the same interview as the recent CD "Road from Connemara," but is not included on the CD

For prior discussion of the song, please see the thread at claque
. A transcript appears at click here
, identified by Malcom Douglas; I have followed the transcript except on one or two points where I think it is erroneous. Noreen believes she has seen a longer version of this song, which she will soon add if it can be located.

JWM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 May 01 - 03:09 PM

There is a broadside copy of The Wife of the Bold Tenant Farmer, printed between 1850 and 1899 by Nugent, J.F. and Co.? (Dublin?) at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads.  The link to the image files does not work at the moment.

There is also a longer version at  Rick's Music Pages:

 The Bold Tenant Farmer  -unfortunately, no source is credited or tune mentioned.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Charley Noble
Date: 21 May 01 - 06:35 PM

Much more complete than what we got from the Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem on their Tradition Records TLP 1042. Thanks!

Landlady's Daughter, not to be confused with Charley Nobel et al


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: toadfrog
Date: 21 May 01 - 06:44 PM

The Bodelian Library site looks fascinating, although it is v. difficult to search. Do they really have images of all those broadside pages that are listed?

My opinion may be jaundiced, but I would say, comparing Heany's version with Rick's is a good indication of how the folk process improves songs.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 21 May 01 - 06:50 PM

Toadfrog,

Don't understand your thinking the Bodlean difficult to search.

It's searchable by more criteria than I could have ever thought of.

What are you having a problem with?

Ed

Yes they do have images of (nearly) all the broadsides mentioned - it's a fantastic resort


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 21 May 01 - 06:52 PM

resort = resource *blush*

a freudian slip as to where I want to spend my holidays?

Ed


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: toadfrog
Date: 21 May 01 - 07:41 PM

ED: As you are a GUEST, I assume you can't be PM'd.

In an exporatory way, I tried searching for a couple of Norman Kennedy's songs I believed to be on broadsides, and failed to find. Probably because I had the titles somewhat wrong. ("Bold tenant farmer" won't work - it has to be Wife of the bold tenant farmer). The strategy that works on the DT, namely searching with a phrase from the first line, does not seem to work there. I guess with practice there must be a strategy that works.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 May 01 - 08:39 PM

So far as searching at the Bodleian goes, you're likely to get better results through the "browse index" function than the straight "search" (I found the example I mentioned by first line, not by title; titles tend to vary more than first lines) but it helps a lot if you have some idea of possible alternate titles, spellings and likely syntactical variations, too.  Like most search engines, it has its idiosyncracies, and these are best learned empirically.

Since Rick's site gives no information at all about provenance, it's impossible to draw any conclusions from the text given there; the fact that it's longer doesn't in itself imply greater age.  If people took the trouble to acknowledge their sources, the effort they expend in putting the material up on the web might actually help people in the long term, instead of simply adding to existing confusion.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: toadfrog
Date: 21 May 01 - 09:47 PM

Thanks Malcom. The first song I looked for turned out to be "The Merchant's son & the Beggar Wench of Hull," for which I had a nonconforming first line. The Bodellian collection (if the broadsides can actually be read) looks like it will reward a lot of browsing,


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 May 01 - 09:58 PM

Some of the scans are poor, but then, so are some of the originals!  Click on the little "magnifying glass" symbol in the top left corner of the small images that the links from the index take you to initially for a larger, usually legible, image.  It helps if you have image editing software which will allow you to zoom in on a picture once you've downloaded it.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 22 May 01 - 07:26 AM

Malcolm

I've heard the version given in Rick's Pages (or something very like it) sung by Manus O'Riordan, whose family come form West Cork. I'll ask him about its origins when I next meet him.

Can't see the Bodleian image at the moment - so I have no idea what its like?

Regards

p.s. Coincidentally, I saw both Manus and his father Michael (who fought on the Repuplican side in the Spanish CIvil War) at the launch of Frank Harte's Napoleonic CD , just last Friday.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
From: Noreen
Date: 26 May 01 - 11:11 AM

THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
(traditional)

One evening of late as I happened to stray,
Bound for Clonakilty from sweet Timoleague.
'Twas at Ballinascarthy, some time I delayed,
I wetted my whistle with porter.

I kindled my pipe and I spit on my stick,
I kept the coach road, like a deer I did trip
I cared for no bailiff, landlord or Old Nick,
I sang like the lark in the morning.

I scarcely had travelled a mile of the road
When I heard a dispute at a farmer's abode,
'Twas the son of a landlord, an ill-looking toad,
And the wife of the bold tenant farmer.

He said: "What the devil came over you all?
Not one penny of rent at each time I do call?
But on next October I'll settle you all,
For you'll have the high road for your garden."

"You Kaffir," the bold tenant's wife, she replied,
You're as bad as your daddy who's at the other side,
But our National Land League will pull down your pride,
It's able to brave any storm.

Its branches extend to country and town,
Protecting the tenants, their houses and ground,
I owe you twelve months and I'll give you one pound,
If you clear our receipt in the morning."

When she spoke of the Land League his lips they grew pale,
Saying: "What good have you done but be stuck into jail;
All the rent that you owe, you must pay the gale
And believe me we will give you no quarter.

Your husband I saw in the town just last night,
Drinking and shouting for the tenant right,
But the months of October, we'll put you to flight,
To follow your friends o'er the water."

"If my husband was drinking, what was that to you?
I'd rather he'd drink it than give it to you!
Now make up your mind for you won't get a screw
For your wet marshy lands is no bargain.

We all joined the Land League on last New Year's Day,
And I think in my heart we were not going astray,
While the clergy are with us, we'll carry the sway,
Now marshalling all in good order.

"Here's to Father O'Leary, the pride of our isle,
He's the boy that can title you ruffians in style.
Dillon and Davitt who rank in their file,
Take care you don't tramp on their corns."

Then I stepped out from the bush where I lay,
And as he passed by I heard him to say:
"I wish to my God I was ten miles away
From the wife of the bold tenant farmer."

I shouted hurrah and she shouted hurroo;
He showed us his back and like lightning he flew,
I said: "God save the Land League and old Ireland, too. "
Agus fágaimís suid mar atá sé.

Printed in "Ireland's Own", date unknown.

NK


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
From: Noreen
Date: 26 May 01 - 11:20 AM

Sorry- that was not the final version. The following is what I should have posted: (It has the HTML codes for the fadas in the last line).

THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
(traditional)

One evening of late as I happened to stray,
Bound for Clonakilty from sweet Timoleague.
'Twas at Ballinascarthy, some time I delayed,
I wetted my whistle with porter.

I kindled my pipe and I spit on my stick,
I kept the coach road, like a deer I did trip
I cared for no bailiff, landlord or Old Nick,
I sang like the lark in the morning.

I scarcely had travelled a mile of the road
When I heard a dispute at a farmer's abode,
'Twas the son of a landlord, an ill-looking toad,
And the wife of the bold tenant farmer.

He said: "What the devil came over you all?
Not one penny of rent at each time I do call?
But on next October I'll settle you all,
For you'll have the high road for your garden."

"You Kaffir," the bold tenant's wife, she replied,
You're as bad as your daddy who's at the other side,
But our National Land League will pull down your pride,
It's able to brave any storm.

Its branches extend to country and town,
Protecting the tenants, their houses and ground,
I owe you twelve months and I'll give you one pound,
If you clear our receipt in the morning."

When she spoke of the Land League his lips they grew pale,
Saying: "What good have you done but be stuck into jail;
All the rent that you owe, you must pay the gale
And believe me we will give you no quarter.

Your husband I saw in the town just last night,
Drinking and shouting for the tenant right,
But the months of October, we'll put you to flight,
To follow your friends o'er the water."

"If my husband was drinking, what was that to you?
I'd rather he'd drink it than give it to you!
Now make up your mind for you won't get a screw
For your wet marshy lands is no bargain.

We all joined the Land League on last New Year's Day,
And I think in my heart we were not going astray,
While the clergy are with us, we'll carry the sway,
Now marshalling all in good order.

"Here's to Father O'Leary, the pride of our isle,
He's the boy that can title you ruffians in style.
Dillon and Davitt who rank in their file,
Take care you don't tramp on their corns."

Then I stepped out from the bush where I lay,
And as he passed by I heard him to say:
"I wish to my God I was ten miles away
From the wife of the bold tenant farmer."

I shouted hurrah and she shouted hurroo;
He showed us his back and like lightning he flew,
I said: "God save the Land League and old Ireland, too. "
Agus fágaimís suid mar atá sé.

Printed in "Ireland's Own" , date unknown.

NK


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Noreen
Date: 26 May 01 - 06:18 PM

And what does the last line mean, please, anyone?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 26 May 01 - 06:39 PM

It means, literally,"Let's leave that as it is!" The sense is roughly that of the English "'Nuff said!", I reckon. Before the splitters come in - yes it often appears as "fagfaimid" i.e. we WILL leave that as it is.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Noreen
Date: 26 May 01 - 06:42 PM

Thanks, Martin.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Big Tim
Date: 27 May 01 - 04:27 PM

The same Irish line, with the same meaning, also appears in "The Limerick Rake". I wrote to the National Library of Ireland for a translation and got a good, literal reply, but I reckon "'nuff said" is just about perfect.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 20 Jul 01 - 07:43 PM

That's the connection! The song was originally sung to the air of the Limerick Rake. I'll come back with details later.

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 Jul 01 - 05:27 PM

Manus O'Rioradan, trade union researcher, son of Michael O'Riordan (as in "Don't vote for the Red O'Riordan..) was kind enough to send me some details on this one. His family come from West Cork, where the song is based. IN fact his maternal grandparents were evicted by Bence-Jones, the lanlord referred to in the song.

Manus' version is very similar to Noreen/Ireland's Own version, but with one interesting variant! Here's his version and some of his comments:

Such was the national popularity of the song during the heydey of the Land War in the 1880's that it spread far and wide beyond its West Cork origins. It acquired more locally centred lines such as "You'll have the high road for Dungarvan" in County Waterford and "You'll have the high road for Dungannon" in County Tyrone. It also acquired a different air, and it is that new air which was used in the recordings of the song made by Joe Heaney of Connemara and the Clancy Brothers of Carrick-on-Suir. Clonakilty people, however, always sang the song to the same air as that used for The Limerick Rake. But because it was never recorded to that air you now have some Cork people singing it to the different air later used beyond the borders of Cork.


THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER

One evening of late as I happened to stray
Bound for Clonakilty from sweet Timoleague,
'Twas at Ballinascarthy some time I delayed;
I wetted my whistle with porter.
I kindled my pipe and I spit on my stick,
I kept the coach road, like a deer I did trip,
I cared for no bailiff, landlord or Old Nick;
I sang like a lark in the morning.

I scarcely had travelled a mile of the road
When I heard a dispute at a farmer's abode
'Twas the son of a landlord; an ill-looking toad,
And the wife of the bold tenant farmer.
He said: "What the devil's come over you all?
Not one penny of rent at each time that I call.
But by next October, I'll settle you all;
For you'll have the high road for your garden."

"You caffler," the bold tenant wife then replied
"You're as bad as your daddy at the other side.
But our National Land League will pull down your pride,
It's able to brave every storm."
"Its branches extend to country and town,
Protecting the tenants, their houses and ground.
I owe you twelve months and I'll give you one pound,
If you'll clear our receipts in the morning."

When she spoke of the Land League, his lips they grew pale,
Saying: "What good have they done, sure they're all stuck in jail?
And the rent that you owe, you must pay the next gale,
And believe me, we'll give you no quarter."
"Your husband I saw in the town just last night,
Drinking and shouting for poor tenants' rights.
But the month of October, we'll put you to flight,
To follow your friends o'er the water."

"If my husband was drinking, well what's that to you?
And sure if he spent it on mountainy dew
I'd sooner he'd spend it nor give it to you
For your wet, mossy land is no bargain."
"We all joined the Land League on last New Year's Day,
And I think in my heart, we were not going astray.
With the whole people with us, we'll carry the sway,
Now marshalling all in good order."

"Here's to Father O'Leary, the pride of our isle,
He's the boy that can title you ruffians in style.
John Dillon and Davitt, rank next in the file,
Take care you don't tread on their corns!"
Then I stepped from the bush where in ambush I lay,
And as he passed by me I heard him to say:
"I wish to my God I was ten miles away,
From the wife of the bold tenant farmer!"

I shouted "Hurrah" and she shouted "Hurroo"
He showed us his back and like lightning he flew.
So: "God save the Land League and Old Ireland too,"
Agus fágaimís siúd mar atá sé!


p.s hope the formatting works!

Regards

--- Line breaks
added ---
---Jeff (PA)---


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 Jul 01 - 05:29 PM

Damn! It didn't! Hopefully the elves will appear....

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 Jul 01 - 08:26 PM

Thanks Jeff.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Cruinneas
Date: 19 Aug 12 - 12:41 AM

I'm seeking (to sing) the most authentic text for The Wife of The Bold Tenant Farmer. Martin Ryan's notes accompanying the lyrics uploaded on July 22 2001 make a good case for this version, but the first three lines already give me cause to query its accuracy: A casual look at a map of West Cork shows that Ballinascarthy does not lie on the road from Timoleague to Clonakilty; in fact one would have to take a roundabout route on a minor road that would in part require traveling away from Clonakilty in the direction of Bandon. On the other hand, Ballinascarthy is situated on the main road from Bandon to Clonakilty, consistent with the standard version of the song:

One evening of late into Bandon I strayed,
And down to Clonakilty I was making my way.
At Ballinascarthy some time I delayed
etc.

Does Martin Ryan, or any other contributor, wish to comment on this?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Aug 12 - 03:56 AM

Hi GUESTcruinneas,

I'm afraid I can't really add to my quotation from Manus O'Riordan - other than the obvious one that placenames are often the most volatile bits of a song!

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: EVICTION OF TIM HURLEY, CASTLEVIEW
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Dec 12 - 02:58 PM

As a native of Clon (Clonakilty) and a distant relation to the farmer's wife, in question, I may be able to throw some light on the various queries sent to this site .....
Firstly, the incident happened just outside the villiage of Ballinascarthy, on the road between Bandon and Clon. However, the modern routes are not those necessarily used by road travellers in the 1800's. The Old road to Timoleague into Clon was quite frequently travelled by those coming from the east and Bandon - a handy diversion.    Also, the main road to Cork, was via Shannonvale Village near Ballinascarthy, and not on the modern line.
Secondly, a rather famous landlord's eviction to place about this time at Castleview Mills, the home of Tim Hurley (my Gr.Uncle).
This made the International News (Times / London Illust. News etc...) and many songs were written about it. I shall paste one of these taken from the UNITED IRELAND NEWSPAPER 1886 - unknown air.
Another was a ditty (to the air of the Limerick Rake), which was entitled "O'Leary, Lyons and the 4 O'Briens" ... again dealing with the Castleview Eviction of Miller Tim Hurley, his family and workers.
At about that time, the minor incident involving the farmer's wife became the subject of a local song - various versions exist, but NONE of the originals had the "diddly-ay-di diddly-ay-di chorus, made famous by the Clancy's.
Personally, I like it with diddly-ay ...., and often include it when we perform publicly.
The original version of the Bold Tenant Farmer's Wife, which many's the time I heard my forbears sing, was to the air of "The Limerick Rake".   It superceded the Castleview songs and heightened the importance of this minor comical incident.    Hope this helps.... If I locate the other versions of the Castleview Songs, I will certainly post them.


EVICTION OF TIM HURLEY, CASTLEVIEW
From 'United Ireland' 30/10/1886

Thrice at the mill that Hurley held    The Peelers' columns failed,
And crowbar-bearing blackguards   From the fierce encounter quailed.
For overhead was garrisoned   By gallant hearts and true,
Resolved to fight to death against    The base evicting crew.

In vain through door or window frame   They scrambled or they burst
Once in, the competition was Who should be out the first.
Like rats on whom the trap has closed,   Possession they had got.
Within a welcome greeted them,   Uncomfortably hot.

Though the Royal Irish Constables   Are not afraid of rain
And bailiffs bear a washing In the hope of drink or gain,
Though they are not unaccustomed To dirty weather, still
They did not like the shower That came tumbling down the mill.
For the atmosphere betokens Scalded shins and broken bones
When it rains down boiling water   And it rains down paving stones.

'They might bear with equanimity A rain of "cats and dogs"
But not of broken bottles And not of heavy logs.
The bobby and the bailiff both Do much respect their skin,
Though they came out much quicker Than they had entered in.
But to prove to all spectators That they were not afraid,
In the yard they executed   A military parade.

And there they marched and countermarched   In measured martial tread,
Though the grand effect was injured By the laughter overhead.
But when they threatened vengeance, And stamped and swore and cursed,
Came the short and stern defiance, "You may go and do your worst"
Till, like that mighty monarch who   Marched up and down the hill,
The bailiffs and the bobbies both, Evacuate the mill.

And long they'll tell the story   Of the milling that they got,
And the dreaded Hurley burley   They encountered on the spot.
By many a peasant fireside   The story will be told,
To make the weak-kneed resolute To make the cowards bold;
Of Saunders' fort and Hurley's mill, Their names will live in rhyme,
Who taught the noble lesson That submission is a crime.
Who held their humble homesteads, With gallant hearts and true,
And set a brave example of    What Irishmen should do.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 26 Dec 12 - 03:28 PM

I have a ballad sheet that doesn't name a printer but names Charles Jackson as the author. My research indicates that he was one of a group of balladmakers centred in Limerick from 1830 to 1880 or thereabouts. (See my article in Limerick History and Society, Dublin, 2009). The text seems very similar to that provided by Manus O' Riordain. I''ll check it closely if requested.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: MartinRyan
Date: 27 Dec 12 - 04:08 AM

Hi John.
Yes - some of us would be interested in seeing that version, alright...

Best wishes


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 27 Dec 12 - 10:16 AM

What's the name of the air used for this song ? it's also used for The Limerick Rake and The Galbally Farmer [ Darby O'Leary ]

Dave H


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: Charley Noble
Date: 28 Dec 12 - 10:11 AM

Thanks for the additional information and comments.

Charley Noble


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 08:51 AM

Below is the ballad sheet text of which I wrote and which Martin Ryan was interested in seeing. There are several places where it seems not as plausibly worded as other versions but it seems certain that it's the oldest text known.

THE WIFE OF THE BOLD TENANT FARMER
Written and sung by Chas Jackson

One evening of late as from Bandon I strayed,
Bound for Clonakilty the best haste I made,
At Ballinascorty for some time I delayed,
    And wetted my whistle with porter.

I kindled my pipe and I spat on my stick
I kept the coach road, like a deer I did trip,
I cared not for bailiff, landlord or old Nick
    But I sang like a lark and a sporter.

I scarcely had travelled a mile on that road,
When I heard a dispute at a farmer's abode,
'Twas the son of a landlord; an ill-looking toad
    And the wife of the bold tennant farmer,

He says When the Devil came over you all,
Not one penny rent at each time we call,
But I think next October we'll settle you all,
    And you'll have the high-road for your garden.

You caffler, this bold tennant's wife she replied
Our national Land League will pull down your pride
You're as bad as your old daddy lived at the other side,
    They're able to brave every storm.

They've branches extending to every town,
Protecting the tennant, their houses and grounds,
We owe you 12 months so we'll give you a pound
    If you clear our receipt in the morning.

When she spoke of the Land League, his lips turned pale
What good have they done? they're stuck into jail
All the rent that is due you must pay the next gale
    For indeed, we will give you no quarter

Your husband I've seen in the town the other night
Drinking and shouting "we must have tenant right.
But the month of October I'll put you to flight,
    To follow your friends o'er the water.

If my husband was drinking, what has it to do?
I'd sooner he'd drink it than give it to you
So make up your mind for you'll get not a screw
    For your poor, marshy land, is no bargain.


Since we joined the League at last New Year's Day,
I think in my heart, we're not going astray
While our Clergy are with us we'll carry the sway
    Singing 'Faughe mea saugh mor a hauasha.

Blessed Father O'Leary, the pride of our isle,
That's the man that can title the landlords in stile.
Next Father Mulcahy ranks on the file,
    Take care he don't tread on your corns!

*** To sweet Timoleague he brought a Free Fair.
*** And the buyers of Munster came from far and near
*** Believe me his foes will have nothing to spare,
***    That's true as the day you were born

Then I slipt from the spot where in ambush I lay
And as he passed out I heard him to say
He wished in his heart he was ten miles away,
   From the wife of the bold tennant farmer!

I shouted Hurrah! and she shouted Hurroo!
He showed us his back and like lightning he flew.
God save the Land -League and Old Ireland too,
    Singing Faugha-mo-saugh-mor-a thashea.


The spelling and punctuation follow the original, as far as my fallibility allows. Note the asterisked verse, which I have not seen elsewhere. It is also notable that the format is four line verses, following the pattern of the 'Limerick Rake' tune, and that the names of the national leaders of the Land League have been substituted by those of local clergy. It is not certain, but is likely, that this text is closer to the original than later oral sets. The curious rendition of the Irish tag, given accurately above by Martin Ryan, is typical of the phonetic imitation of Irish used by ballad printers, and especially by Joseph Haly of Cork. Charles Jackson's work, (he flourished around 1860-90) together with that of another six or seven Limerick based 'poets and singers' was mainly printed by Haly's daughter Catherine, who succeeded him in about 1846, continuing until about 1870. This song is thus too late to have been printed by her and was probably the work of the Dublin printer, John F Nugent, by the time of the Land League the only really prolific printer of Ballads left in Dublin. The copy I have transcribed is unique in my experience. Its survival is very strange indeed for it appears, with a range of secular and freethinking tracts, cuttings, poems, oddities and another 140 ballads whose subjects cover both sides of the Irish political spectrum and none, in a scrapbook compiled, between 1875 and 1895, in Loughgall, Co Armagh, one of the bastions of Unionist power and an epicentre of the tenant population that sustained its masters and landlords. A copy is in ITMA.

I have written about this scrapbook, about the Halys and about the Limerick writers in a range of places. Anyone who would like details should contact me at jmoul81075ATaol.com, where AT = @.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: MartinRyan
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 09:01 AM

Thanks, GUESTJohnMoulden

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Cruinneas
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 09:52 AM

Thanks indeed to John Moulden (02 Jan 13 - 08:51 AM ) for this oldest-known text. It may be that the metre is occasionally strained, but the words make more sense in places, notably the very first line:

"One evening of late as from Bandon I strayed, "

is more satisfactory than the common:

"One evening of late into Bandon I strayed,"

given that Bandon is the starting point of the reported journey.

Thanks also for the post from the "distant relation to the farmer's wife" dated
26 Dec 12 - 02:58 PM. I take your point about route changes since the 19th century.

With regard to the air, well even with the knowledge that the song was originally and widely sung to the air of "The Limerick Rake", I would still be inclined to sing it to the melody as rendered by the great Joe Heaney (see www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=1102), and not the Clancy Brothers, with the justification that both textual and melodic changes are both valid aspect of the folk process.

The caption accompanying the "Bold Tenant Farmer's Cottage" at
http://www.geograph.ie/photo/537941
states that "The inspiration for the lyrics of the song The Bold Tenant Farmer, this cottage in Ballinascarty was the home of Dan Walsh [1841 - 1906], and his wife Mary [1855 - 1932] They were among the first who offered passive resistance to the unjust demands of the Landlords' agents, by organising the first "Boycott"."

Can the "distant relation to the farmer's wife" or other contributors vouch for the accuracy of this fascinating information?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: MartinRyan
Date: 13 Oct 14 - 05:06 AM

There's now a recording of Manus O'Riordan singing the version ascribed to him above, at The Goilin Song Project -

Click here

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Bold Tenant Farmer
From: GUEST,Mrr
Date: 13 Oct 14 - 09:35 PM

When we were in Ireland we left Bandon and went to Ballinascathy thru Clonakilty and the pub in Ballinascathy was called the Whistle something, get it?


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