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Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800

Charley Noble 01 Jul 01 - 04:07 PM
Charley Noble 02 Jul 01 - 04:17 PM
The Walrus 02 Jul 01 - 05:32 PM
Joe_F 02 Jul 01 - 05:52 PM
dick greenhaus 02 Jul 01 - 10:48 PM
The Walrus at work 03 Jul 01 - 01:37 PM
Charley Noble 04 Jul 01 - 01:07 PM
Charley Noble 04 Jul 01 - 01:14 PM
The Walrus 04 Jul 01 - 06:07 PM
Charley Noble 04 Jul 01 - 07:19 PM
wildlone 05 Jul 01 - 01:08 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Jul 01 - 01:12 PM
radriano 05 Jul 01 - 04:39 PM
Charley Noble 07 Jul 01 - 09:07 AM
Malcolm Douglas 07 Jul 01 - 09:48 AM
Charley Noble 07 Jul 01 - 09:54 PM
Charley Noble 08 Jul 01 - 10:07 PM
Abby Sale 13 Jun 04 - 10:21 PM
GUEST,Barrie Roberts 05 Mar 05 - 12:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Mar 05 - 01:39 PM
Lighter 05 Mar 05 - 08:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Mar 05 - 09:44 PM
Abby Sale 06 Mar 05 - 09:44 AM
GUEST,Georgina Boyes 06 Mar 05 - 11:25 AM
Charley Noble 06 Mar 05 - 03:03 PM
GUEST,Lighter at work 06 Mar 05 - 03:29 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Mar 05 - 09:35 PM
Charley Noble 13 Mar 05 - 06:01 PM
Lighter 13 Mar 05 - 06:15 PM
Stewie 13 Mar 05 - 07:39 PM
Charley Noble 13 Mar 05 - 08:07 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Mar 05 - 08:24 PM
GUEST,Harry_the_Horrible 15 Aug 19 - 04:16 PM
Charley Noble 18 Aug 19 - 01:01 PM
Lighter 18 Aug 19 - 03:45 PM
Lighter 18 Aug 19 - 04:36 PM
GUEST,Starship 18 Aug 19 - 04:59 PM
GUEST,Starship 18 Aug 19 - 05:13 PM
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Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: REVELRY OF THE DYING
From: Charley Noble
Date: 01 Jul 01 - 04:07 PM

This old soldier's drinking song is particularly haunting in its desparation and courage, would have been equally at home in Vietnam, on either side. It has some of the same qualities as "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda." I've done some folk-processing over the years, dropped one verse and standardized the chorus. I still have the original verses and music if anyone is curious.

REVELRY OF THE DYING
(Composed by a British officer in India in the 1800's when the plague was hourly sweeping off his companions. He did not long survive his wonderful production.
Adapted by Charlie Ipcar - 1993
Tune by Charlie Ipcar)
  G  C                 G          C
We meet 'neath the sound-ing raft-ers,
F
And the walls a-round are bare,
C
As they shout to our peals of laugh-ter,
D D7 G
You'd swear that the dead were there.
C G C
But stand to your glass-es, stead-y!
F
We'll drink to our com-rades' eyes,
C
Raise a cup to the dead al-ready,
G G7 C
And hur-rah! for the next that dies.

There's a mist on the glass congealing;
'Tis the furies' fiery breath;
And thus does the warmth of feeling
Turn ice in the grasp of death.
But stand to your glasses, steady!
For a moment the vapor flies,
Raise a cup to the dead already,
And hurrah! for the next that dies.

Who dreads to the dust returning?
Who shrinks from that sable shore?
Where the high and haughty yearning
Of the soul shall sting no more.
But stand to your glasses, steady!
This world is a world of lies,
Raise a cup to the dead already,
And hurrah! for the next that dies.

Cut off from the land that bore us,
Betrayed by the land we find,
Where the brightest have gone before us,
And the dullest remain behind.
But stand to your glasses, steady!
'Tis all we've left to prize,
Raise a cup to the dead already,
And hurrah! for the next that dies.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 02 Jul 01 - 04:17 PM

This one needs to be stirred up rather than refreshed.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HERE'S TO THE LAST TO DIE
From: The Walrus
Date: 02 Jul 01 - 05:32 PM

I have a slightly different version of the song (from Winstock's "Songs and Music of the Redcoats"), attributed to one Captain Darling in India in about 1857 (Darling later, it is reported, died of cholera). The tune is given as "Traditional"

HERE'S TO THE LAST TO DIE

We meet 'neath the sounding rafters,
And the walls around are bare;
As they echo to out laughter
'Twould not seem that the dead were there.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

Who dreads to the dead returning,
Who shrinks from that sable shore
Where the high and haughty yearning
Of the souls shall be no more?
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

Cut off from the land that bore us,
Betrayed by the land we find,
When the brightest have gone before us,
And the dullest alone left behind.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

There's a mist on the glass congeling,
'Tis the hurricane's firey breath,
And 'tis thus that the warmth of feeling
Turns to ice in the grip of death.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

There is many a head that is aching,
There is many a cheet that is sunk,
There is many a heart that is breaking,
Must burn with the wine we have drunk.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

There is not time for repentance,
'Tis folly to yield to dispair,
When a shudder may finish a sentance,
Or death put an end to a prayer.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

Time was when we frowned on others,
We thought we were wiser then;
But now let us all be brothers,
For we never may meet again.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.

But a truce to this mournful story
For death is a distant friend;
So here's to a life of glory,
And a laurel to crown each end.
So stand to your glasses steady,
'Tis all we have left to prize,
Quaff a cup to the dead already,
And one to the next who dies.


Unfortunately, I don't know how to put a tune on this system (and I can't read the dots), but, IIRC a version of the tune is bellowed by Flynn and Niven in the film "Dawn Patrol", so if anyone has access to that...)

Good luck.

Walrus


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE REVEL (Bartholomew Dowling)
From: Joe_F
Date: 02 Jul 01 - 05:52 PM

Another version, FWIW: I neglected to note the title of the book I photocopied it from, but the introductory remarks, tho consequently anonymous, may be of interest.

THE REVEL

Words by Bartholomew Dowling

An absolutely fascinating and brilliant song that I learned twenty-odd years ago from Shana Ager Alexander,.... She learned it from her father...and mother.... All of them learned it from Dorothy Parker, who was not noted for her bell-like voice, and God only knows where she learned it. The words are by an Irish poet, Bartholomew Dowling (1823-1863), who lived in [the U.S.] for a while. It refers to the numerous plagues in India, either cholera or malaria, possibly around 1836.

Cut off by the land that bore us,
Betrayed by the land we find,
All the brightest have gone before us,
And the dullest are left behind.

So stand to your glasses steady,
And drink to your sweetheart's eyes,
Here's a sip to the dead already,
And a cup to the next that dies.

We meet 'neath the sounding rafter
And the walls all around are bare
And the dead echo back our laughter
For they know that we'll soon be there.

So stand to your glasses steady,
This world is a world of lies,
Here's a sip to the dead already
And a cup to the next that dies.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 02 Jul 01 - 10:48 PM

Several versions are in DigiTrad, if anyone bothers to look. (sigh)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: The Walrus at work
Date: 03 Jul 01 - 01:37 PM

Mea Culpa, I saw the "Lyr Add" and assumed that a search had been done.

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 04 Jul 01 - 01:07 PM

Sorry, Dick. I thought I checked the DT ages ago. Walrus, I've never seen as many verses as you've come up with. I definitely cropped one in what I sing. Lord knows who really wrote this one; it may not even have been a soldier but at least now we have some suspects. I wasn't particularly happy with the music that came with my old photocopy, and I haven't a clue where I came up with that. Now I'll check the DT and see what I can learn.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 04 Jul 01 - 01:14 PM

Well, it wasn't under "Revelry of the Dying" in the DT and I didn't mess with the title.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: The Walrus
Date: 04 Jul 01 - 06:07 PM

Charley,

It appears it's there under "Here's to the Last to Die".

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 04 Jul 01 - 07:19 PM

Thanks, Walrus. I did finally find it myself but it's not an easy job. My guess is that the longest version might be from a broadside but maybe one of the "authors" wrote it. I'd love to see some of the more recent historical revisions.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TOAST OF MORGAN'S MEN
From: wildlone
Date: 05 Jul 01 - 01:08 PM

While surfing the net I found this
The Toast of Morgan's Men
General John Hunt Morgan, C.S.A.
THE TOAST OF MORGAN'S MEN
By Captain Thorpe, Kentucky

Unclaimed by the land that bore us,
Lost in the land, we find
The brave have gone before us;
Cowards are left behind.
Then stand to your glasses, steady;
Here's a health to those we prize.
Here's a toast to the dead already,
And here's to the next who dies.

The song was adapted from the Bartholomew Dowling poem
dave


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Jul 01 - 01:12 PM

Probably the most current is Called "We Loop in the Purple Sunset". DON'T look for names, look for words and phrases.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: radriano
Date: 05 Jul 01 - 04:39 PM

Charley, I'm very interested in getting the music to this song. I don't want to post personal information but please PM or e-mail me (I'm listed in Mudcat Resources) and let me know if there's anything I can do from my end. I'm sure there are others who'd like the melody too so if you can post it in some way that would be preferable.

Richard


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 07 Jul 01 - 09:07 AM

Richard, I'll be happy to send attachments of the original music I have, as well as the tune I worked up. Bear with me; I'm tied up until after 7/14 but after that I will comply with reasonable requests.

Does everyone agree that "the song was adapted from the Bartholomew Dowling poem"?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 07 Jul 01 - 09:48 AM

In order to avoid confusion, it might be a good idea to join up the references.  In the DT:

HERE'S TO THE LAST TO DIE  Text from the Scottish Students' Song Book, c. 1892: attributed to Captain Darling.

WE LOOP IN THE PURPLE TWILIGHT  With tune.

in the Forum:

THE REVEL  Text attributed to Bartholomew Dowling (with a note that it has also been credited to Alfred Dommett; Dommett himself, in a letter to Rossiter Johnson in 1879, specifically denied having written it); the same text posted by Walrus in this thread, though with some changes presumably made by an intermediate source.

Lyr Req: Here's To The Last One to Die  Inconclusive discussion.

It would seem reasonable to suppose that Bartholomew Dowling (1823-1863; at the time of his death he was editor of the San Francisco Monitor) and "Captain Darling" were the same person.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 07 Jul 01 - 09:54 PM

Malcolm – Thanks for your usual good clarification. I finally found my "original photocopy" of "Revelry of the Dying" to the air "Away with Melancholy" with a note: "Composed by a British offier in india, at a time when the plague was hourly sweeping off his companions. He did not long survive his wonderful production." I haven't a clue where this came from other than it's on page 77 proceeded by "Landlord, Fill Your Flowing Bowl." The second verse that I dropped runs:

Not a sigh for the lot that darkles;
Not a tear for the friends that sink;
We'll fall 'midst the wine-cup's sparkles,
As mute as the wine we drink;
So stand to your glasses, steady!
'Tis this that respite buys;
One cup to the deal already;
Hurrah! for the next that dies.


In my opinion, not worth much reconsideration as a verse.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 08 Jul 01 - 10:07 PM

Here's an example of my folk-processing:

There's a mist on the glass congealing;
'Tis the furies' fiery breath;

Instead of the original:

There's a mist on the glass congeling,
'Tis the hurricane's firey breath,

I prefer the illiteration and I never could figure out what a "hurricane" was doing in India.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Abby Sale
Date: 13 Jun 04 - 10:21 PM

Since a local ex-Vietnam US fighter pilot (the Vietnamese also had fighter pilots) sang this last Memorial Day, I've become much taken with the song.

I've researched as far as I can with my present resources but I wonder more about the song and about Dowling. I haven't found any really hard information about him. It seems clear that Dowling was the poet and there does not seem much question of this after 1919. Seems he was a Captain in the India service and wrote at least several other, more often cited, poems.

The poem seemed essential to military in high death-expectancy situations and was used, as above, in the Boer War HERE'S TO THE LAST TO DIE. It seems to then pass to pilots in WW I
WE LOOP IN THE PURPLE TWILIGHT

I came across one "comic" version song popularized by Chicago reporters circa 1890, apparently referring to lack of safety in the streets.

It does not stop there, but rather remains in Air Force tradition until the present and is known to US Air Force in Korea today.

It appears that of the services, pretty much only the Air Force has retained a significant singing tradition of aurally-learned and passed-on songs.

A story, as I recall it, from the above-mentioned ex-pilot: During WW I, the song was regularly sung in the officer's mess before missions. There came a time, however, that the death rate was so high that no one could sing a full set. They had to call in the mechanics to teach them the words.

It was certainly sung in WW II, Korea and then Vietnam (now usually called "Stand to Your Glasses)." No big surprise that by now there are multi versions, some long, some only two verses, some bawdy, some very bawdy, some travesties, some parodies.   
immortalia.com has a number of full commercial clips from ex-servicemen including a good one by the above pilot near the bottom of the page at "SOBA 2000: Society of Old Bold Aviators. Ft. Myer Officers' Club" or direct to the clip at http://www.immortalia.com/sounds/records-and-cds/CDs/various-artists/border-city-records/SOBA-2000/26%20-%20Stand%20To%20Your%20Glasses%20-%20Chip%20Dockery.mp3

Oop! Sadly, Immortalia seems to have had to cut the clips from full to sample in the last few days. Still, it gives the tune.

So here's my questions:

1. Where and when did Dowling write/publish "The Revel?"

2. What and when was the plague referred to?

3. Who set it to the fairly consistant tune?

4. Did it get retained among UK military? The comment at THE REVEL implies it but it doesn't go very far.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: GUEST,Barrie Roberts
Date: 05 Mar 05 - 12:54 PM

Re: Abby Sale's question about the song lingering in the British military, my military historian brother Phil has given me the following version from the SAS in WWII:

Stand by your glasses steady,
This world is a world full of strife;
Here's a toast to the dead already,
And here's to the next man to die.
Let your voices ring out in laughter,
As they did in the days gone by,
Here's a toast to the dead already,
And here's to the next man to die,


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Mar 05 - 01:39 PM

Known in the Canadian Services as "Stand to Your Glasses Steady." The chorus is similar to that of several versions:

So stand to your glasses, steady.
The world is a world full of lies.
Here's a toast to the dead already,
And hurrah for the next man who dies.

One verse is in the DT, appended to one of the versions.
Anthony Hopkins, 1979, Songs From The Front & Rear, p. 120, Hurtig pub.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Lighter
Date: 05 Mar 05 - 08:54 PM

The only tune I have ever heard to Dowling's text is "The Eton Boating Song," first performed, they tell me, in 1863. Words were by William Johnson, melody by Capt. Algernon Drummond.

The same melody is used for "The Sexual Life of The Camel."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Mar 05 - 09:44 PM

Music to verses and chorus of "The Eton Boating Song" is found in "The Academy Song Book for Use in Schools and Colleges," Ch. H. Levermore, 1895, No. 50, pp. 188-189, without attribution.
Slightly different from that in the adaptation by Macy in the sheet music at Levy (link in thread 7609). Eton Boating Song


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Abby Sale
Date: 06 Mar 05 - 09:44 AM

Thanks for additional info, guys. I only barely get the tune as being Eton but no relation at all to Camel...at least the one in DT or the one at immortalia.com. Since Dowling died in 1863 it's unlikely he, himself, used the Eton tune, though. Only example I find is chorale


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: GUEST,Georgina Boyes
Date: 06 Mar 05 - 11:25 AM

As Dowling was a poet, rather than a songwriter, it's likely that the tune was added later.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 06 Mar 05 - 03:03 PM

Hmmm. I better record my tune (initial post) for this song and make it available as a MP3 sample of my website. Should be able to pull that off next weekend.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: GUEST,Lighter at work
Date: 06 Mar 05 - 03:29 PM

Another tune for "Camel" is "Botany Bay." But not for "The Last Carouse." The WWI stanzas mentioned above also go to the "Camel" tune - and a Sopwith Camel airplane appears in the lyrics. Evidence perhaps that the composer knew the "Sexual Life of the Camel." Or perhaps not.

RAF / USAF "Stand to Your Glasses"/ "Poor Aviator Lay Dying" usu. goes to "Tarpaulin Jacket." I don't recognize the tune Brand uses for it on "Out of the Blue."

There are at least three or four different songs related in this complex, with more at one more remove, e.g. "Dying Stockman," "Dying British Soldier," "Dying Lancer," "Dying Harlot," etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Mar 05 - 09:35 PM

The poem "The Revel," posted in thread 17137 by Wildlone (linked above by Malcolm), is correct, the words as written by Bartholomew Dowling. All of the versions in this current thread are either condensed or re-written.
See E. C. Stedman, ed., 1895 (and later reprints), "A Victorian Anthology, 1837-1895." Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 744 pp.

Thread 17137: The Revel

Capt. Bartholomew Dowling wrote the poem in India about 1845. Music was first set to his poem by Alfred Domett, using a dirge by Beethoven.
See "Air Force," Journal of the Air Force Assn., July 2004, Vol. 87, no. 7. See online magazine, Air Force
The article also gives words and information on "We Loop in the Purple Twilight," from WW1. A version venting frustration over a Pentagon project called "Rapid Roger," is also given.

Dowling is listed as a contributor to the founding of "The Nation," an important Irish paper, in 1842.

Writing in 1902, in his book "The Blood of the Nation," David Starr Jordan, then President of Leland Stanford University, praised the lines composed by Dowling, and stated that he died during the plague in India.

A Bartholomew Dowling who was editor of "The Monitor" in San Francisco, came to Canada from Ireland and later farmed and edited that paper in California. He died in San Francisco in 1863. Was this the same Dowling, and Jordan wrong?
Bartholomew Dowling also wrote "The Brigade of Fontenoy," (not seen).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 06:01 PM

As promised, here's a link to a MP3 file of how I sing this song: Charley Noble Website

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Lighter
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 06:15 PM

Well done, Charley. Very folklike. Do you know anything about the "dirge by Beethoven" that's mentioned ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Stewie
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 07:39 PM

This was also recorded by Martyn Wyndham-Read on 'Songs and Music of the Redcoats (1642-1902)' Argo LP ZDA 147 under the title 'Here's to the Last to Die'. The sleeve note by Lewis Winstock is: 'A typical example of Victorian sentimentality. It is said to have been written during a cholera epidemic in India, and to have been sung during the mutiny'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 08:07 PM

Lighter-

Thanks. This song, as I envision it, really calls for a strong chorus and a 12-string guitar.

It's been over 20 years that I tried the original arrangement which I assume is the "Beethoven dirge" and I have no memory of it. I do still have the sheet music but I'd need help decoding it again. Maybe someone else can provide a MP3 or Mini.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 08:24 PM

Does the sheet music have a heading to show what piece by Beethoven is involved? I haven't been able to find any sheet music for the original poem, "The Revel."

I am curious also for the reason that Alfred Domett published a few volumes of poetry, but I can't find any mention of him setting music to anything. He is mentioned in the old encyclopaedias mostly because he was an administrator in New Zealand for a while.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: GUEST,Harry_the_Horrible
Date: 15 Aug 19 - 04:16 PM

In Fokkers, Spads and Camels,
On wings made of wood and steel,
We gamble for stakes that mortal,
With cards that are stacked for the deal!

Stand to your glasses steady!
...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Charley Noble
Date: 18 Aug 19 - 01:01 PM

Thanks, Harry!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Aug 19 - 03:45 PM

More than anyone could ever want to know about the original song (written not by Bartholomew Dowling but by W. F. Thompson in India in 1835) is available here:

https://www.horntip.com/html/books_&_MSS/2010s/2010-03-10_stand_to_your_glasses_steady__lighter_&_patrick__wiki-folklore-ms_(HTML)/index.htm
Link fixed.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Aug 19 - 04:36 PM

I hope the link was worth the trouble!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: GUEST,Starship
Date: 18 Aug 19 - 04:59 PM

Sure was, although the pictures/photographs wouldn't show.
I fixed the link. Part of the address and the title had fallen off. -Mod


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Revelry of the Dying, circa 1800
From: GUEST,Starship
Date: 18 Aug 19 - 05:13 PM

Mod, may as well delete my posts :-)
I think I got 'em. Holler at me if I messed something up. :-)


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