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Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)

Wolfgang Hell 07 Jan 98 - 06:17 AM
Brendan Kyne 11 Oct 98 - 02:42 PM
Wolfgang 12 Oct 98 - 02:51 AM
Maelgwyn 13 Oct 98 - 12:52 PM
Wolfgang 15 Oct 98 - 03:28 PM
GUEST,Jonathan McCloy 09 Sep 08 - 12:56 PM
GUEST,Jonathan McCloy 09 Sep 08 - 12:59 PM
GUEST 17 Nov 10 - 02:34 PM
David Ingerson 17 Nov 10 - 02:47 PM
GUEST,^&* 17 Nov 10 - 02:54 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Nov 10 - 03:04 PM
GUEST,steve90 15 Apr 15 - 03:57 PM
GUEST,Eugene 30 Sep 18 - 12:52 PM
leeneia 01 Oct 18 - 06:08 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: BRAES OF MONEYMORE (from Patrick Street)
From: Wolfgang Hell
Date: 07 Jan 98 - 06:17 AM

Below you find my transcription of "Braes of Moneymore" as found on "Patrick Street 2". It is a traditional Irish emigration song. I'm not contented with my transcription, so whoever knows this song, please correct my version or post another version.

Wolfgang

Braes of Moneymore

Farewell to you, old Ireland, since I must go away,
I now shake hands and bid goodbye and can no longer stay.
Our big ship lies in deep Lough Foyle bound for the New York shore
and I must go from all I know and lovely Moneymore.

That little town encircled round with many's the (groving?) hill,
where lads and lassies they do meet, for pleasure there's the rule.
Through (Springhill?) braes and flowery fields, (where oft I've wandered low?),
and by my side was the girl I loved, the flower of Moneymore.

How lonely is the (pailshen's??) coo and sad the blackbird's play
and loud and high the thrushes cry on a long right summer's day.
And as I sat down to cry my fill the tears come trickling down,
for in the morning I must leave you, my own dear native town.

Kind friends I'll bid you all goodbye, I can no longer stay.
Our big ship sails tomorrow and it's time I was away.
So fill your glasses to the brim and toast with one loud (law?)
of your singing praise of Springhill braes and lovely Moneymore.


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Subject: RE: Req.: Braes of Moneymore
From: Brendan Kyne
Date: 11 Oct 98 - 02:42 PM

Used to live in Moneymore--will enquire --may have been a song


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Subject: RE: Req.: Braes of Moneymore
From: Wolfgang
Date: 12 Oct 98 - 02:51 AM

I nearly had forgotten my request for correction. Just want to let you know, Brendan, that I'm still interested.


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Subject: RE: Req.: Braes of Moneymore
From: Maelgwyn
Date: 13 Oct 98 - 12:52 PM

Could 'pailshen's' be 'pigeon's'?


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Subject: RE: Req.: Braes of Moneymore
From: Wolfgang
Date: 15 Oct 98 - 03:28 PM

pigeon's? Fair guess and consistent with relistening. Thanks, Maelgwyn.

Wolfgang


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Subject: Lyr Add: BRAES OF MONEYMORE
From: GUEST,Jonathan McCloy
Date: 09 Sep 08 - 12:56 PM

Farewell to you, old Ireland, since I must go away,
I now shake hands and bid goodbye and can no longer stay.
Our big ship lies in deep Lough Foyle bound for the New York shore
And I must come from all I know and lovely Moneymore.

That little town encircled round with many's the groving hill,
Where lads and lassies they do meet, for pleasure there's the rule.
Through Springhill braes and flowery fields, where oft I've wandered lone,
And by my side was the girl I loved, the rose of Moneymore.

How lonely is the pigeons' coo and sad the blackbird's play
And loud and high the thrushes cry on a long right summer's day.
And as I sat down to cry my fill, sure the tears come trickling down,
For in the morning I must leave you, my own dear native town.

Kind friends, I'll bid you all adieu, I can no longer stay.
Our big ship sails tomorrow and it's time I was away.
So fill your glasses to the brim and toast with one loud roar
Of your singing praise of Springhill braes and lovely Moneymore.


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Subject: RE: Req.: Braes of Moneymore
From: GUEST,Jonathan McCloy
Date: 09 Sep 08 - 12:59 PM

I came across this whilst lookin for slieve gallion braes. found Breas of Moneymore on youtube and changed the words above to what they guy sings there...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhtB-jmhB80


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Nov 10 - 02:34 PM

The definitive lyrics


Farewell to you old Ireland since I must go away.
I'll now shake hands and bid goodbye I can no longer stay.
Our big ship lies in deep Lough Foyle bound for the New York shore.
And I must go from all I know and lovely Moneymore.

That little town encircled round with manys the grove and hill.
Where lads and lassies there do meet for pleasure fair's the rule.
Through Springhill braes and flowery fields where oft I've wandered o'er.
And by my side was the girl I loved the Rose of Moneymore.

How lonely is the pigeons coo and sad the blackbird's lay.
And loud and high the thrush's cry on a long bright summer's day.
And as I sat down to cry me fill sure the tears came trickling down.
For in the morn I must leave you my own dear native town.

Kind friends I'll bid you all goodbye I can no longer stay.
Our big ship sails tomorrow and it's time I was away.
So fill your glasses to the brim and toast with one loud gra.
And we'll sing in praise of Springhill braes and lovely Moneymore.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)
From: David Ingerson
Date: 17 Nov 10 - 02:47 PM

Thank you, Guest, for those corrections. They sure make more sense. "Gra" of course is the Irish word for Love.

I would love to know what your source is. Where did you get this definitive version?

Cheers,

David


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)
From: GUEST,^&*
Date: 17 Nov 10 - 02:54 PM

Mmmmm... - but "toast with one loud roar" makes more sense - and scans consistently with the other verses?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Nov 10 - 03:04 PM

Calling anything "definitive" will often get you ridiculed at Mudcat—so it's just as well that this particular guest was anonymous. Maybe that's why this guest was anonymous.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BRAES OF MONEYMORE (from Patrick Street)
From: GUEST,steve90
Date: 15 Apr 15 - 03:57 PM

Farewell to you, old Ireland, since I must go away.
I now shake hands and bid goodbye and can no longer stay.
Our big ship lies in deep Lough Foyle bound for the New York shore,
And I must go from all I know and lovely Moneymore.

That little town encircled round with many's the grove and hill,
Where lads and lassies they do meet, for pleasure there's the rule,
Through Springhill braes and flowery fields, where oft I've wandered o'er,
And by my side was the girl I loved, the rose of Moneymore.

How lonely is the pigeon's coo, and sad the blackbird's lay,
And loud and high the thrushes cry, on a long bright summer's day,
And as I sat down to cry my fill, sure the tears come trickling down,
For in the morning I must leave you, my own dear native town.

Kind friends, I'll bid you all adieu; I can no longer stay.
Our big ship sails tomorrow and it's time I was away,
So fill your glasses to the brim and toast with one loud roar,
And we'll sing in praise of Springhill braes, and lovely Moneymore.


(Springhill House and Demesne outside Moneymore, plus Moneymore is surrounded by hills and wooded groves and small rolling hills).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)
From: GUEST,Eugene
Date: 30 Sep 18 - 12:52 PM

Has anyone put the chords to this great tune?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes of Moneymore (from Patrick Street)
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 18 - 06:08 PM

I wrote down the tune from Kevin Burke's performance on YouTube. Most measures have three beats and the first two go with a chord while the third does not.   Therefore, your accompaniment needs to die away or otherwise accommodate that third beat. Here are the chords for the key of C.

See where there are two C's at the end of each line? The melody notes are tied so that they are five counts long.

pick up note/G/G/G/G/G/Am/C/C for two beats
pick up note/G/G/G/G/G/Am/C/C for two beats
pick up note G/G/Am/G/G/Am/C/C for two beats
pick up note G/G/G/G/G/Am/C/C for two beats


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