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Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet

DigiTrad:
SAE WILL WE YET


Anne 07 Jan 98 - 08:45 PM
John Nolan 08 Jan 98 - 06:13 PM
Anne 09 Jan 98 - 11:51 AM
Bruce O. 09 Jan 98 - 03:49 PM
judy 09 Jan 98 - 07:20 PM
John Nolan 09 Jan 98 - 10:07 PM
Anne 12 Jan 98 - 02:29 PM
judy 12 Jan 98 - 05:28 PM
rich r 16 Jan 98 - 12:23 AM
Murray 16 Jan 98 - 03:24 AM
Joe Offer 16 Jan 98 - 03:33 AM
Lorraine 16 Jan 98 - 06:06 PM
hanrahan 17 Jan 98 - 08:54 AM
Murray 19 Jan 98 - 04:58 AM
John Nolan 19 Jan 98 - 05:35 PM
BK 20 Jan 98 - 11:41 PM
Bruce O. 22 Jan 98 - 09:20 PM
Bruce O. 22 Jan 98 - 09:24 PM
lamparte@juno.com 16 Feb 99 - 05:35 PM
Joe Offer 04 Aug 03 - 05:34 PM
Joe Offer 04 Aug 03 - 05:56 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 11 Jun 04 - 04:50 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 11 Jun 04 - 05:07 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 11 Jun 04 - 07:17 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 22 Jan 12 - 12:10 PM
Ross Campbell 22 Jan 12 - 02:04 PM
GUEST,kenny 22 Jan 12 - 02:26 PM
Ross Campbell 22 Jan 12 - 09:05 PM
Jim Carroll 23 Jan 12 - 03:08 AM
Jim McLean 23 Jan 12 - 05:49 AM
Joe Offer 11 Mar 12 - 03:10 AM
Jim Dixon 14 Jul 17 - 01:54 AM
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Subject: sae will we yet
From: Anne
Date: 07 Jan 98 - 08:45 PM

Our troupe has started performing the beautiful Scottish drinking song "Sae Will We Yet." The person who introduced us to it thought it was an 18th century piece. But on this database, I see that its date is given as "ca. 1854." Can anybody tell me what the source for this is? Was it published in a collection that year? Is there any evidence that it might be older? Many thanks


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: John Nolan
Date: 08 Jan 98 - 06:13 PM

John Ord,in his collection of bothy ballads published in 1925, attributes the authorship of this song to Walter Watson, who was born at Chryston near Glasgow in 1780 and died at Kirkintilloch in 1854, when he fell and didnae get up again.


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Anne
Date: 09 Jan 98 - 11:51 AM

John, thank you so much for your help. We had no background information at all on the song. Do you by any chance know anything further about Walter Watson (like what other songs he may have written, what instrument(s) he played, did he have another profession)? Also, can you tell me the title of the John Ord collection you cited? Many, many thanks again, .Anne


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Bruce O.
Date: 09 Jan 98 - 03:49 PM

Perhaps someone's memory confused this with the 18th century "Sae merry as we twa ha' been"?


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: judy
Date: 09 Jan 98 - 07:20 PM

Here's an extra verse (second verse in my version)

Let the miser delight in the hoarding of pelf,
Since he has not the soul to enjoy it himself;
Since the bounty of Providence is new every day,
As we journey through life, let us live by the way.

a friend of mine lists this information at the bottom of the song

"The words (there is also another verse saluting Britain's King,) may be sung to "Wearin' o' the Green" but the tune used on the Gordon Bok/Ed Trickett/Ann Mayo Muir recording is SO much nicer.

And here are the definitions of some of the words:

crack = conversation
eident = diligence
flit = leave
lippened = depended on, trusted
nappy = strong, foamy
pelf = wealth
rinnin' = spinning


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: John Nolan
Date: 09 Jan 98 - 10:07 PM

Anne: Ord's Bothy Songs and Ballads of Aberdeen, Banff & Moray, Angus and the Mearns to give it full title. Published (most recently)by John Donald Publishers Ltd, Edinburgh in 1990. ISBN 0 85976 303 X No information on Watson, I'm afraid, beyond the book notes.


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Anne
Date: 12 Jan 98 - 02:29 PM

Great!!. Thanks to you both, Judy and John. What a great resource you both are. I'll try to find the Ord collection. In the meantime, Judy, can you tell me the name of the Bok/Trickett/Mayo Muir album that the song is on? Many thanks again, Anne


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: judy
Date: 12 Jan 98 - 05:28 PM

Sorry, I don't find in the five or six records of theirs that I have. Remember, this was my friend's quote. I possibly have it on some record but I don't have time to look it up. Perhaps someone else will jump in.

judy


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: rich r
Date: 16 Jan 98 - 12:23 AM

Bok, Muir & Tricket "And So Will We Yet" (1990) Folk-Legacy CD-116.

rich r


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Murray
Date: 16 Jan 98 - 03:24 AM

Anne: I have a bit of information about Watson and his songs, and this one in particular, but it's probably too long to take up room here. Send me your e-mail address, or even your snailmail address, or fax number perhaps, and I can send you the stuff more conveniently. Cheers Murray@saltspring.com


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Jan 98 - 03:33 AM

Murray, you might be surprised at how many people might be interested.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Lorraine
Date: 16 Jan 98 - 06:06 PM

I'm interested Lorraine


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: hanrahan
Date: 17 Jan 98 - 08:54 AM

and i'm interested...

hanrahan


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Subject: Lyr Add: SAE WILL WE YET
From: Murray
Date: 19 Jan 98 - 04:58 AM

OK--this is a somewhat truncated version of the material I have. The version in the DT is the same as in Whitelaw, Book of Scottish Song (1844). With slight verbal differences in Ord, Bothy Songs & Ballads (1930), and The Songs of Scotland Chronologically Arranged (2nd ed., n.d.). A 7th verse in George Eyre-Todd, The Glasgow Poets (Paisley, 1906), 166:

Sae rax me your mull, and my nose I will prime,
Let mirth an' sweet innocence employ a' our time;
Nae quarrelling nor fighting we here will admit;
We've parted aye in unity, an' sae will we yet.
And sae will we yet, etc.

There is a text in Gwen Polwarth, Folk Songs of Northumberland (1966), from the Hepple MS., agreeing with Whitelaw & co., save that the burden does not change; the tune there is a *variant* of "The Wearing of the Green".

There is a cousin to this, "Laugh and Be Thankfu'" in the mid-19th century general collection of kailyardery, "Whistle-Binkie" (1890 reprint, I.124), consisting of 5 stanzas, but no tune indicated. Thus: 1: Come sit down 2: nappy guid ale 4: Queen. Others differ as follows.

3: May the taxes come off, that the drink may be cheap,
And the yill be as plentiful as 'gin it were a spate;
May the enemies o' liberty ere lang get a kick;
They've aye gotten't hitherto, and sae shall they yet.

5: Then push round the jorum, an' tak aff your dram,
An' laugh an' be thankfu' as lang as ye can.
For seed-time and harvest ye ever shall get,
When ye fell ye aye got up again, and sae will we yet.

John Greig (Scots Minstrelsie, c. 1895, VI.375) has Sit, farmer, king, glass; and his note (p. xxxiii) says it's a "refinement" of the Whistle-Binkie song, which may indeed be the case.

As for the author: Walter Watson (1780-1854) was one of the many muslin weavers in the village of Chryston, a few miles north of Glasgow. He is called "the Chryston poet", and wrote quite a few songs that became popular. He herded cattle, wound pirns, tried the loom, his father's trade; then a farm labourer, a sawyer in Glasgow, finally (aged 19) was recruited for the Scots Greys (3 years), being discharged at the Peace of Amiens in 1802. Came back to the loom, fell in love, married (1803), and turned to poetry (hampered by an total ignorance of grammar, as the village schoolmaster said). So he studied and became more proficient, and published a collection in 1808. This, like the other editions (1823, 1843) brought him fame but not much else. He spent his last years near Kirkintilloch, where he died of cholera in 1854.

That may be enough for you. I'd be interested to know what the *other* tune of the song is (not, that is, The Wearing of the Green).


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: John Nolan
Date: 19 Jan 98 - 05:35 PM

Murray - your post is greatly appeciated. The only way I know to get you the other (superior) tune is to sing it over the phone - there must be a better way.


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: BK
Date: 20 Jan 98 - 11:41 PM

Murray: I'd suggest get the Tricket, Bok & Muir CD mentioned, hear the tune, and enjoy that tune and many other good things; I'm particularly fond of the rendition of "John Barleycorn" on that CD. They impart a kind of stark drama to the song; it somehow feels very right to me... and, for what it is - or isn't - worth, rather non-commercial. None the less, when I've seen them in person it was consistantly in standing-room-only/sold out situations.

Cheers, BK


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Bruce O.
Date: 22 Jan 98 - 09:20 PM

Anyone here have the text of the John Barleycorn song in Thomas Robbins' chapbook 'The Arraingement and Inditing of Sir John Barleycorn, Knight', c 1678 and later reissues?


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: Bruce O.
Date: 22 Jan 98 - 09:24 PM

As Murray, above, well knows, "The Wearing of the Green" was by another Scotsman, James Oswald, and was called "The Tulip" in the 'Spring' part of his 'Airs for the Seasons, copyrighted in 1747. I have a copy of that tune if anyone wants it.


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Subject: RE: sae will we yet
From: lamparte@juno.com
Date: 16 Feb 99 - 05:35 PM

RE: Oswald's "Airs for the Seasons"

Sorry if this is the wrong group to post this. I got this page via a search engine.

I'd like to obtain "The Lilac" from the Spring section of James Oswald's "Airs for the Seasons"

Does anyone know who publishes this? Thanks R. Lamparter


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Subject: ADD Version : Sae Will We Yet
From: Joe Offer
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 05:34 PM

Here's the whole shebang from Ord's Bothy Songs and Ballads. I'm trying to imagine this sung to "Wearin of the Green." What's the tune used by Bok-Muir-Trickett?
-Joe Offer-

SAE WILL WE YET

Sit ye down here, my cronies, and gie us your crack;
Let the win' tak' the care o' this life on its back.
Our hearts to despondency we never will submit,
For we've aye been provided for, and sae will we yet.
And sae will we yet, and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for, and sae will we yet.

Let the miser delight in the hoarding of pelf,
Since he has not the soul to enjoy it himself;
Since the bounty of Providence is new every day,
As we journey through life, let us live by the way.
Let us live by the way, let us live by the way,
As we journey through life, let us live by the way.

Then bring us a tankard o' nappy gude ale,
For to comfort our hearts and enliven the tale;
We'll aye be the happier the langer we sit,
For we've drank together mony a time, and sae will we yet.
And sae will we yet, and sae will we yet,
We've drank together mony a time, and sae will we yet.

Success to the farmer, and prosper his plough,
Reward his eident toiling a' the year through!
Our seed-time and harvest we ever will get,
And we've lippen'd aye to Providence, and sae will we yet
And sae will we yet, and sae will we yet,
We've lippen'd aye to Providence, and sae will we yet.

Long live the King, and happy may he be,
And success to his forces by land and by sea!
His enemies to triumph we never will permit,
Britain's aye been victorious, and sae will we yet.
And sae will we yet, and sae will we yet,
Britain's aye been victorious, and sae will we yet.

Let the glass keep its course and go merrily roun';
For the sun has to rise, though the moon it goes down:
Till the house be rinnin' roun' about its time enough toflit;
When we fell we aye got up again, and sae will we yet.
And sae will we yet, and sae will we yet,
When we fell we aye got up again, and sae will we yet.

Written by Walter Watson, who was born at Chryston, near Glasgow, in 1780, and died at Kirkintilloch in 1854.


Air: "The Wearing o' the Green"


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Subject: ADD: So Will We Yet (Bok)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 05:56 PM

This is the version from the Folk-Legacy CD called And So Will we Yet.

SO WILL WE YET
(traditional, with new words by Gordon Bok)


Come sit down beside us and give us your chat;
Let the wind take the cares of this life off your back.
For our hearts to despondency we never will submit;
We've always been provided for and so will we yet.
   And so will we yet, and so will we yet.
   We've always been provided for and so will we yet.

Come lift up your voices so hearty or frail;
'Twill lighten your hearts and enliven the tale.
We will always be the merrier, the longer that we sit,
We've sung together many a time and so will we yet.

Here's a song for the farmer who prospers the plow,
Rewarding his ardent toils all the year around.
And seedtime and harvest he always will get,
For he's left it all to Providence and so will we yet.

And a song for the carpenter, may patience guide your hand,
For the dearer your work to you, the longer it will stand.
And when the wind is at our door we never will forget,
We've sung your praises many a time and so will we yet.

*And a song for the women with your voices so dear;
Field and road in sun and snow, you bring it all in here.
Your wisdom is as welcome here as is your laughter bright;
We've sung your praises many's the day, and so into the night.

And a song for all you singers who keep your voices clear;
Good health to you and happiness to all that you hold dear.
For the world, as you would have it be, you sing with all your wit,
And ease the work of Providence, and so will we yet.

So lift up your noble hearts with laughter and song,
And may your days be brighter and your nights be not so long.
For your joys were just as welcome here as woes you would forget
And when you wept, we wept with you, and so will we yet.

*Not sung on this recording.


©1990, Timberhead Music

I'd still like to know the source of Bok's tune. Is it traditional?
-Joe Offer-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h48Db_cvdDE<>/a>


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Subject: Lyr Add: And Sae Will We Yet
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 11 Jun 04 - 04:50 PM

And Sae Will We Yet

Sit ye down here my cronies and gie me your crack,
Let the win' tak the care o' this life on its back,
Our hearts to despondency we ne'er will submit,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet,
And sae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Let the miser delight in the hoarding of peelf,
Since he has not the soul to enjoy it himself;
Since the bounty of Providence is new every day,
As we journey through life, let us live by the way,
Let us live by the way and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Then bring us a tankard of nappy good ale,
For to comfort our hearts and enliven the tale,
We'll aye be provided for the longer we sit,
For we've drank togither mony a time, and sae will we yet,
And saae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Success to the farmer, and prosper his plow,
Rewarding his eident toils a' the year through;
Our seed time and harvest we ever will get,
For we've listen'd aye to providence, and sae will we yet,
And sae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Long live the King, and happy may he be,
And success to his forces by land and by sea,
His enemies to triumph we en'er will submit,
Britains aye hae been victorious and sae will they yet,
And sae will they yet and sae will they yet,
For they've been provided for and sae will they yet.

Let the glass keep its course, and go merrily roun',
For the sun has to rise, though the moon has gane down,
Till the house be rinnin' round about, 'tis time enough to flit,
When we fell we aye get up again and sae will we yet,
And sae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

crack=gossip
Nappy= frothy
Eident= industrious

X: 1
T:And Sae Will We Yet
M:4/4
L:1/4
S:Polwarth
K:F
|AG|(FA) A c|(BA) G F| (FA) cc|
c2 c c | (de) f c| c2 B A| (AG) GA|
G2 (AG))| (FA) A c| B A G F | (FA) cc|
c2 A c| (de) f d| c B A G| (GF) FG|
F2|| (fe) | (dc) c d| c2 (FG)| (AG) GA|
G2 A B|(cB) A c| d B A G|
(GF) FG| F2||


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Subject: ADD Version: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 11 Jun 04 - 05:07 PM

The Polwarth version mentioned earlier is here:

AND SAE WILL WE YET

Sit ye down here my cronies and gie me your crack,
Let the win' tak the care o' this life on its back,
Our hearts to despondency we ne'er will submit,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet,
And sae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Let the miser delight in the hoarding of peelf,
Since he has not the soul to enjoy it himself;
Since the bounty of Providence is new every day,
As we journey through life, let us live by the way,
Let us live by the way and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Then bring us a tankard of nappy good ale,
For to comfort our hearts and enliven the tale,
We'll aye be provided for the longer we sit,
For we've drank togither mony a time, and sae will we yet,
And saae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Success to the farmer, and prosper his plow,
Rewarding his eident toils a' the year through;
Our seed time and harvest we ever will get,
For we've listen'd aye to providence, and sae will we yet,
And sae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

Long live the King, and happy may he be,
And success to his forces by land and by sea,
His enemies to triumph we en'er will submit,
Britains aye hae been victorious and sae will they yet,
And sae will they yet and sae will they yet,
For they've been provided for and sae will they yet.

Let the glass keep its course, and go merrily roun',
For the sun has to rise, though the moon has gane down,
Till the house be rinnin' round about, 'tis time enough to flit,
When we fell we aye get up again and sae will we yet,
And sae will we yet and sae will we yet,
For we've aye been provided for and sae will we yet.

crack=gossip
Nappy= frothy
Eident= industrious

X: 1
T:And Sae Will We Yet
M:4/4
L:1/4
S:Polwarth
K:F
|AG|(FA) A c|(BA) G F| (FA) cc|
c2 c c | (de) f c| c2 B A| (AG) GA|
G2 (AG))| (FA) A c| B A G F | (FA) cc|
c2 A c| (de) f d| c B A G| (GF) FG|
F2|| (fe) | (dc) c d| c2 (FG)| (AG) GA|
G2 A B|(cB) A c| d B A G|
(GF) FG| F2||


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: And Sae Will We Yet
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 11 Jun 04 - 07:17 PM

Yup!
Sometimes it takes me a while as I am transcribing away and away and away....
These songs will soon appear in my collection of Newcastle songs=

http://www.geocities.com/matalzi/geordiesang.html

with corrections as well.....I put the first drafts here.....for safekeeping. I will also have notation images and midi sound files to go with these.

actually not all that many corrections this time....

Conrad


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Subject: ADD: The Newcastle Worthies
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 12:10 PM

this makes me feel old and confused.....which....actually....it seems I am.....oh well.....here is the song I am working on
The Newcastle Worthies, 1827, WM. Armstrong, Air- We're aye Been Provided For

THE NEWCASTLE WORTHIES
(Wm. Armstrong, 1827)

The praises o' Newcassel aw've lang wish'd to tell,
But now then aw'm determin'd to hae a right good spell,
An' shew what noted kiddies frae Newcassel town hes flit,
For it's a' wis been a canny place, an' sae will it yet.

A chep, they call'd him Scott, he liev'd on the banks o' Tyne,
Had a son, that i' the Government he wanted to shine:
By degrees the youth he rose up, now Lord Chancellor does sit,
And he's fill'd his place reet brawly, aye an' sae will he yet.

Of a' the fine Engravers that grace fair Lunnen toon,
Wor Tom Ransom and Bill Harvey bang a' that's up or doon:
The praises frae the 'Cademy they constantly do get;
Tor their pieces they've got medals, aye an' sae will they yet.

For boxing tee, the Lunnen cheps we'll thresh them i' their turns;
Ony see what science he has lairnt--that noted chep, Jem Burns:
Jem Wallace tee, wor champion, how Tommy Dunn he hit,
But they both good ones ever were, an' sae will they yet.

A vast mair cliver cheps we ha'e some aw'll let ye knaw;
For a strong man, whe could beat both Airchy wi' his wonderous claw;
When six men tuik him in a boat, her bottom suen he split,
And the hiding that he ga'e them, they've not forgot it yet.

For fiddling tee, now whe is there wor Blind Willie can beat?
Or for dancing whe before Jack Cockson e'er could set their feet?
Cull Billy only try him now, he'll cap ye wi' his wit;
He's truly wond'rous, ever was, and sae will he yet.

Bob Cruddance, ah, poor soul! he's deed--he had a cliver knack
O' keeping beer, aye three yards off, when he parish'd the pack!
And whin Bob 'bout the militia constantly does swet;
But by cunningness escap'd them, aye sae will he yet.

Jack Nicholson, the noble soul, a deal o' breeding shows,
Got a patent frae the King to split sheep heads with his nose;
The butchers fearing o' disgrace, a job he ne'er cud get--
But the hounour aye been wi' him, aye, an' sae will it yet.

Of Fishwives tee, that's i' wor toon, up to the present day,
Euphy Scott she is prime minister to Queen Madgie Gray:
The understerappers and descendants maintain that it was fit,
She should rule the market as she lik'd, and' sae will she yet.

Captain Starkey, Pussey Willie, and poor Cuddy Reed,
Lousy Donald and au'd judy, poor souls! they've a' gyen deed:
But, marrows, keep ye up your hearts, this is not the time to fret,
For their memories hae e-eer been up, aye an' say will they yet.


The Newcastle Worthies, 1827, WM. Armstrong, Air- We're aye Been Provided For

-Wm Armstrong, -In: Thompson, T., J. Shield, W. Midford, H. Robson, and others, A Collection of Songs,Comic and Satirical, Chiefly in the Newcastle Dialect, 1827 , p. 196., and in: The Newcastle Song Book or Tyne-Side Songster., W&T Fordyce, Newcastle Upon Tyne, 1842.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE NEWCASTLE WORTHIES
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 02:04 PM

Apart from the black-print-on-dark-blue-background layout, the verses are better set out here:-

Conrad Bladey's Beuk O' Newcassel Sangs The Tradition of Northumbria

Nice work, Conrad.

Ross

The Newcastle Worthies

Air- We're aye been provided for

The praises o' Newcassel aw've lang wish'd to tell,
But now then aw'm determin'd to hae a right good spell,
An' shew what noted kiddies frae Newcassel town hes flit,
For it's a' wis been a canny place, an' sae will it yet.

A chep, they call'd him Scott, he liev'd on the banks o' Tyne,
Had a son, that i' the Government he wanted to shine:
By degrees the youth he rose up, now Lord Chancellor does sit,
And he's fill'd his place reet brawly, aye an' sae will he yet.

Of a' the fine Engravers that grace fair Lunnen toon,
Wor Tom Ransom and Bill Harvey bang a' that's up or doon:
The praises frae the 'Cademy they constantly do get;
Tor their pieces they've got medals, aye an' sae will they yet.

For boxing tee, the Lunnen cheps we'll thresh them i' their turns;
Ony see what science he has lairnt--that noted chep, Jem Burns:
Jem Wallace tee, wor champion, how Tommy Dunn he hit,
But they both good ones ever were, an' sae will they yet.

A vast mair cliver cheps we ha'e some aw'll let ye knaw;
For a strong man, whe could beat both Airchy wi' his wonderous claw;
When six men tuik him in a boat, her bottom suen he split,
And the hiding that he ga'e them, they've not forgot it yet.

For fiddling tee, now whe is there wor Blind Willie can beat?
Or for dancing whe before Jack Cockson e'er could set their feet?
Cull Billy only try him now, he'll cap ye wi' his wit;
He's truly wond'rous, ever was, and sae will he yet.

Bob Cruddance, ah, poor soul! he's deed--he had a cliver knack
O' keeping beer, aye three yards off, when he parish'd the pack!
And whin Bob 'bout the militia constantly does swet;
But by cunningness escap'd them, aye sae will he yet.

Jack Nicholson, the noble soul, a deal o' breeding shows,
Got a patent frae the King to split sheep heads with his nose;
The butchers fearing o' disgrace, a job he ne'er cud get--
But the hounour aye been wi' him, aye, an' sae will it yet.

Of Fishwives tee, that's i' wor toon, up to the present day,
Euphy Scott she is prime minister to Queen Madgie Gray:
The understerappers and descendants maintain that it was fit,
She should rule the market as she lik'd, and' sae will she yet.

Captain Starkey, Pussey Willie, and poor Cuddy Reed,
Lousy Donald and au'd judy, poor souls! they've a' gyen deed:
But, marrows, keep ye up your hearts, this is not the time to fret,
For their memories hae e-eer been up, aye an' say will they yet.

-Wm Armstrong, -In: The Newcastle Song Book or Tyne-Side Songster., W&T Fordyce
Newcastle Upon Tyne.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 02:26 PM

I'm surprised that the name of Tony Cuffe [ RIP ] hasn't surfaced yet in this discussion. I have a recording of Tony singing this - the first time I ever heard the song - at Aberdeen Folk Club I think in 1972/73, when he dropped in past and did a "floor-spot" [ and was immediately booked as a future guest ]. The tune Tony used was his own, and is the only tune I've ever heard it sung to, although I had heard that the "Corries" recorded it to the tune of "The Wearing Of The Green". Tony sang it on the very first "Jock Tamson's Bairn's" LP, released in 1980, and also on "Sae Will We Yet", the "memorial" album to Tony, released in 2003.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 09:05 PM

The Gordon Bok version (So Will We Yet), behind some random footage on YouTube

Sounds as though the tune follows Tony Cuffe's version at a distance.

Ross


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 03:08 AM

According to a handwritten note in our set of 'Vagabond Songs and Ballads' (1899), once owned by William Walker (of Peter Buchan controversy fame) 'Sae Will We Yet' was written by the same author as 'A Wee Drappie O't' (wrongly attributed to Tannahill)
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: Jim McLean
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 05:49 AM

This is from John Greig's Scots Minstrelsie 1895, Vol Vl, notes xxxiii:

Sae Will We Yet, (p. 375). In a concert programme "Sae Will We Yet" is a song to conjure with. It was one of the battle-horses of that great Scottish vocalist the late Mr David Kennedy; it is sure of "bringing down the house" when Mr James Lumsden "buckles to it"; while Mr Robert Kennedy, the successor to his father, has again brought it to the front. The air is a variation of the characteristic Irish melody "The Wearin' o' the Green," and is confined to the notes of the pentatonic scale. "Laugh and be Thankful," of which "Say Will We Yet" is a refined version, was published in "Whistle Binkie" (1832-1853). To the same may be also sung that favourite convivial effusion entitled "A Wee Drappie o't," which we have appended:- .....................

There are no credits but we've gone into this before and Jim Carroll has confirmed who wrote it (see above).


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Mar 12 - 03:10 AM

Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

    And Sae Will We Yet

    DESCRIPTION: "Come sit down, me cronies, And gie us your crack, Let the win lift the cares o' this life from aff your back... For we've always been provided for, and sae will we yet." The singer and the nation have endured through troubles, "and sae will we yet."
    AUTHOR: Walter Watson ? (died 1854)
    EARLIEST DATE: 1812 (Ulverston New Poetical Miscellany, Ulverston: G. Ashburner, 1812)
    KEYWORDS: drink work party
    FOUND IN: Britain(Scotland)
    REFERENCES (7 citations):
    Ford-Vagabond, pp. 256-258, "Sae Will We Yet" (1 text)
    Greig #129, p. 1, "We've Aye Been Provided For and Sae Will We Yet" (1 text)
    GreigDuncan3 552, "Sae Will We Yet" (3 texts, 2 tunes)
    Ord, p. 371-372, "Sae Will We Yet" (1 text)
    Whitelaw-Song, p. 267, "Sae Will We Yet" (1 text)
    DT, SAEWILL
    ADDITIONAL: The Ulverston New Poetical Miscellany: Containing a Selection of the Most Fashionable Songs, with Many Originals, Not Inserted in Ashburner's Vocal and Poetic Repository, G. Ashburner, Ulverston, 1812 (available on Google Books), p. 184, "And Sae Will We Yet" (1 text)

    Roud #5611
    BROADSIDES:
    Bodleian, Harding B 28(42), "And sae will we yet," W. Armstrong (Liverpool), 1820-1824 (barely legible); Firth b.26(389), "We've aye been Provided For" ("Sit ye down here my cronies, and gie us your crack"), J. Scott (Pittenweem), 19C; Harding B 11(61)=Firth c 13(296), "And so will we yet," Hoggett (?), n.d.; Harding B 25(55), "And so will we yet"; Firth n.26(389); Firth b.26(289), "We've Aye Been Provided For"
    NLScotland, RB.m.143(154), "We've Aye been Provided For" ("Sit ye down here, my cronies, and gie us your crack"), Poet's Box (Glasgow), 1869

    CROSS-REFERENCES:
    cf. "Never lippen to chance" (tune, per broadside Bodleian Firth b.26(389))
    NOTES: Greig quotes a version sent to him by Ord as Watson's original version. It does not include three verses included by Whitelaw. "This inclines one to think that the addenda may have been written by the author [Watson] himself; but, inasmuch as in the final edition of Watson's works the song appears without the addenda, they must have either been withdrawn by the author or discarded as spurious." Greig's version also includes a verse not in Whitelaw. - BS
    Ord lists this as being sung to "The Wearing of the Green." I can't for the life of me make it fit; I suspect he derived that from a broadsheet which indicated an incorrect tune.
    The broadsides list various tunes: Bodleian Firth b.26(289) lists "Never lippen to chance"; another Bodleian text claims an original tune. The Ulverston Poetical Miscellany (which was pointed out to me by Jim Dixon) does not list a tune. - RBW
    Last updated in version 3.5
    File: FVS256

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Song List

    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2015 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sae Will We Yet / So Will We Yet
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Jul 17 - 01:54 AM

Here's the text of AND SAE WILL WE YET in The Ulverston New Poetical Miscellany, (Ulverston: G. Ashburner, 1812), page 184, which is the earliest publication date I can find, and agrees with the information in the Traditional Ballad Index. The text is very nearly the same as that posted by Joe Offer above from Ord's Bothy Songs and Ballads, ignoring some differences in spelling.


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