Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Swiss Army Knives and musicians

Rick Fielding 22 Aug 01 - 11:10 PM
Jeremiah McCaw 23 Aug 01 - 12:00 AM
wysiwyg 23 Aug 01 - 02:04 AM
wysiwyg 23 Aug 01 - 02:11 AM
Liz the Squeak 23 Aug 01 - 02:15 AM
JohnInKansas 23 Aug 01 - 02:19 AM
Liz the Squeak 23 Aug 01 - 02:20 AM
Crazy Eddie 23 Aug 01 - 03:11 AM
Steve Parkes 23 Aug 01 - 03:24 AM
Sourdough 23 Aug 01 - 03:53 AM
mooman 23 Aug 01 - 04:01 AM
Ned Ludd 23 Aug 01 - 04:51 AM
CRANKY YANKEE 23 Aug 01 - 06:06 AM
McGrath of Harlow 23 Aug 01 - 06:10 AM
mooman 23 Aug 01 - 06:48 AM
Murray MacLeod 23 Aug 01 - 07:05 AM
Troll 23 Aug 01 - 07:48 AM
Paul Mitchell 23 Aug 01 - 07:52 AM
Fortunato 23 Aug 01 - 09:52 AM
Gervase 23 Aug 01 - 10:13 AM
sheila 23 Aug 01 - 10:47 AM
Peter T. 23 Aug 01 - 10:50 AM
sophocleese 23 Aug 01 - 02:59 PM
Clinton Hammond 23 Aug 01 - 03:29 PM
Jack The Lad 23 Aug 01 - 03:37 PM
Little Hawk 23 Aug 01 - 03:39 PM
Peter T. 23 Aug 01 - 04:09 PM
Eric the Viking 23 Aug 01 - 05:25 PM
Kim C 23 Aug 01 - 05:49 PM
Rick Fielding 23 Aug 01 - 11:09 PM
Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull 24 Aug 01 - 02:28 PM
Kim C 24 Aug 01 - 02:40 PM
JohnInKansas 24 Aug 01 - 03:58 PM
Peter T. 24 Aug 01 - 04:25 PM
Rollo 24 Aug 01 - 04:45 PM
John MacKenzie 24 Aug 01 - 05:32 PM
JohnInKansas 24 Aug 01 - 05:43 PM
Peter T. 24 Aug 01 - 07:13 PM
JohnInKansas 25 Aug 01 - 04:58 PM
Peter T. 25 Aug 01 - 05:48 PM
Little Hawk 25 Aug 01 - 07:57 PM
catspaw49 25 Aug 01 - 08:16 PM
JohnInKansas 25 Aug 01 - 09:12 PM
Rick Fielding 25 Aug 01 - 11:11 PM
catspaw49 25 Aug 01 - 11:41 PM
JohnInKansas 26 Aug 01 - 12:04 AM
Rick Fielding 26 Aug 01 - 03:21 AM
selby 26 Aug 01 - 03:52 AM
JohnInKansas 26 Aug 01 - 06:36 AM
mooman 26 Aug 01 - 10:03 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum Child
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 22 Aug 01 - 11:10 PM

One night while giving a concert I had a disaster happen. One of my Shaller guitar tuning pegs just came off. As you know there's a little screw in the tuner button which should be kept tight, and I guess it had just come loose and fallen out....the button came off in my hand.

My trusty Swiss Army knife was in the dressing room and so I just asked if anyone in the audience had one. At least half the folks raised their hands! I was amazed. We all ended up having quite a bit of fun (after I'd used one to screw the tuner back on) with the whole psychology of owning Swiss Army knives...and whether anyone had actually USED the ruler, the sewing thingy, and of course.....THE FISH SCALER!

To my amazement, at least one person admitted to having used each of them at least once.

I'm on my third one now (the other two were stolen) and for the first time I'm thinking of being disloyal to the Swiss Government and actually buying one of those "Leatherman" things.....'cause the plyers really work. I'd miss the toothpick, magnifying glass, crappy tweezers, tiny pen, and mostly the "mystique" though.

I noticed that night that the guys seemed to need the real "big jobbies" (I've always bought the super deluxe one that weighs a ton) and the women seemed to prefer the ones with only twenty or so functions. Probably Freudian, 'cause after the concert at least five guys (and moi) were "comparing" our knives!!

Any "Swiss Army" tales?

Cheers

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Jeremiah McCaw
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 12:00 AM

No tale; just some trivia. Originally, there were 2 models: the standard and the officer's model. The difference? - the officer's model had the corkscrew.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: wysiwyg
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 02:04 AM

Hardi's pockets: Swiss in one pocket, Leatherman in the other.

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: wysiwyg
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 02:11 AM

And Rick, you must already know what Richard Nixon said about using the Leatherman pliers to tune the autoharp when the wrench is not in the case.

~Susan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 02:15 AM

There's an authentic Swiss Army Knife shop just down the road from where I work. On my occasional evenings out with skinny biker friend, we have spent more than a few minutes drooling over the myriad varieties in the window, and wondering if the big 4 foot one in the back was ever for sale....

Now I'm back to being greasy biker chick after 20 years, I guess I'd better get myself one.... bliss!! Do they do them with pliers AND a corkscrew??

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 02:19 AM


Sorry Rick, I'm not a fan of the SAK. I've never seen one yet that had a good KNIFE blade.

I carry a small set of jeweler's screwdrivers, needle-nose pliers, diagonal (wire cutter) pliers, and a couple of hemostats (for fishing things out of holes) in my instrument case.

I carry a small stockman pocket knife on my person at all times. I've WORN OUT a good dozen pocket knives over the years, because it's for usin' not just for braggin'.

That's sufficient - no need for gimmicks.

Of course I have 350 pound toolbox bolted to floor of my van - for the emergencies.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 02:20 AM

Oh and they're great for tuning bodhrains and melodeons!!!

Especially that spike thing for getting boy scouts out of horses' hooves.....

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Crazy Eddie
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 03:11 AM

Actually, Victorinox now have a swiss-army tool. It resembles the leatherman, but looks a bit sturdier IMHO. (I was quite miffed, cos I first saw one about a week after I'd bought a Leatherman Wave. My cousin swears by the Gerber. another similar device.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 03:24 AM

The screw came loose in the scissors on mine, as the thread wore away. Eventually it got lost altogether. The scissors was (were?) the most useful tool on the knife for me. The can opener is very handy for putting the bike chain back when it comes off (push-bike, that is; I don't know if it would be any good for you, Liz!). I wouldn't be without it.Steve

P.S. If it only had a thing for snipping the ends off new strings it would be perfect.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Sourdough
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 03:53 AM

There are two "official" Swiss Army knife manufacturers. I had one of the others, not the VIctorinox but one from the other company whose name I can't recall now. They are a smaller contractor so most of the knives, perhaps all the ones imported into the US are Victorinox.

I had been given this particular knife by my sister who bought it when she was in school in Switzerland. I had carried it with me for years including on a year-long motorcycle trip from Spain to Asia Minor and return, eight other trips aross North America on motorcycles and a dugout canoe trip that took ten days to reach the village that was our destination. I had foiund uses for every single attachment on tha tknife. The knife was beginning to show its age though. The scissor spring had broken and the toothpick and tweezers were long gone.

I wrote to the Swiss company and told them how much the knife meant to me and that I really did not want to replace it, I wanted it repaired.

At this time, I was living in the US and the Swiss company said in their return reply that they always enjoy hearing from longtime users of their knives who have relied on them in interesting situations. They told me that if I would ship them the knife, they would repair it at no charge and reurn it to me! I had already had the knife for twenty years!!

Several years ago, there was an article in Smithsonian Magazine that was an enertaining history of the Swiss Army Knife and the companies who make it.

As for my knife, I took it with me on another transcontinental trip, this time driving a truck with my soon to be wife. One afternoon, while cleaning out the bags of trash from the food we ate while driving, she inadvertently threw out my knife.

Now I have a Victorinox but it just isn't the same.

Sourdough


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: mooman
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 04:01 AM

I was a committed Swiss Army knife user and it saved the day during many a gig and session. But my daughter took a shine to it and it was never then where I expected it to be so I let her keep it. On a subsequent trip to Boston I saw the Leatherman and treated myself to it and I must say that I'm now a complete convert to it from the SAK, I think the design and engineering are far better. I also keep a Leatherman Micra in my pocket which is used many times every day. Being a fanatic for such gadgets, I also keep a Topeak McGuyver 33-function Tool in my work bag (especially as I usually cycle to work and it has many useful bicycle tools on it).

I like the Gerber multitools as well but Lady McMoo will kill me if she finds any more of these things (or cameras or musical instuments for that matter) in the house!

If I'm not mistaken, there was a factory for tools of this type in Pictou, Nova Scotia, which I visited one time. Was that Gerber or another manufacturer as I can't remember the make now.

Best regards

mooman the toolman


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Ned Ludd
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 04:51 AM

In a session at Hastings Jack in the green three melodeons broke! Two were fixed with a s.a.k. Is this a good thing? (joke.) Liz, I won't come near you with my bodhran again. (even a s.a.k. cant tune a bottle 'o' wasps.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: CRANKY YANKEE
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 06:06 AM

I carry a Buck rigging knife (with spike) (not a marling sp[ike which is used to splice wire rope, but the itsy bitsy shackle pin and turnbuckle turner) and an old Air Force Tl 29 knife and common screwdriver combination. There's just too many useless gadgets (useless for me) on the "two ton" Swiss Army knife. I have enough trouble keeping my pants from falling down without adding all that superfluous weight. I don't have any hips to speak of, and lately I've developed a serious cse of Dunlop's disease. (My belly done lopped over my belt buckle) which aggrivates the "pants holding up" problem. (O.K. I don't know how to spell, either)

I also carry a socket wrench (1/4" drive "Snap on" ratchet) and four sockets that fit the standard banjo brackets and tail piece. plus an eyeless awl in one of my banjo cases. I carry two banjos, a long necked one of a kind made in 1920\./ Fred Bacon , himself, made the pot and Todd Farnham, the famous luthier of North Tiverton Rhode Island made the neck. Tuned to Uncle Dave Macon's open "C" tuning and a Gibson Mastertone (copy) tuned to standard "G" with D-tuner pegs added. So I need the Common Screwdriver for the "Bacon"'s Dowel type neck fitting, and the awl to adjust the Gibson (copy)

Todd's in his 90's, losing his eyesight. His wife died a couple of months ago and he's moving down to Florida to live with one of his neices, so he doesn't have to be alone or in a nursing home. Just before he left, He went down into the basement and cqame up with this GREAT BANJO, AND HE GAVE IT TO ME. He said that he wanted me to have this. It was the first thing he ever made. (the neck) when he was still an amateur. "Play it a lot" he said, as he put6 it in the case, while my jaw dropped down to my knees. I told him (and it's so) that this is the nicest gift anyone has ever given me. He also made the case, which is leather covered BRAZILLIAN ROSEWOOD. I could sell the case to any number of Luthiers (for the Brazilian Rosewood) for a couple of grand. But it is not and never will be for sale.

Donna, my wife, has started calling me King Nebuchudnezzer again (because I do Babble on) so I'll end this thing after I tell you that he also gave my daughter, Joyce Katzberg, a resonator guitar (dobro-like) that he made in 1929.

Jody Gibson


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 06:10 AM

Maybe they shouild come up with a musicians' version. Could incorporate a tuner and a mouth organ.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: mooman
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 06:48 AM

CY...I have a rigging knife too (circa 1942 Sea Scouts) which used to belong to my Dad. Super rugged with a great long blade and a humungous spike (which I used to believe was "for taking stones out of horses' hooves) till I knew better. It also has a useful little screwdriver blade at one else. This is another prized possession which Lady McMoo frowns at in a most distrustful fashion whenever she sees it. I once took it to a session to tighten the friction pegs on an old Abbott tenor bajo I used to have, but it frightened everybody so much when I pulled it out (the knife that is!) that I never took it again!

I loved your story about Todd Farnham and the banjo. I once had a wonderful meeting with the luthier (now sadly long deceased) who once made Paragon banjos in the 20s and 30s and another with an old collector of very unusual instruments who sold a number of them to me for a very reasonable price as he had retired. It is these sort of encounters that are really special.

McGrath...we must get 'Spaw onto this! Perhaps it could also incorporate the famous Aussie-Amish double-pronged moustache tuner that he invented a year or two back.

Best regards,

mooman


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 07:05 AM

A banjo case made of Brazilian rosewood ? Disbelief, horror and disgust all vie for first reaction.

Sell it and let a competent luthier use the wood for its proper purpose.

Murray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Troll
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 07:48 AM

While in Mongolia this summer, we had gone riding only to find on our return that we had locked the keys to our ger (yurt or felt tent) inside. Also inside was my ersatz swiss army knife so no help there.
The hasp had been installed wrong and the screws were acessible but I had no screw-driver. As I prepared to sacrifice (maybe) a blade on my pocket knife, the young Mongolian wrangler ,Bata, stopped me, whiped out his leathermen. and had the hasp off in short order.
This was out on the steppes and quite a good distance fron any town. SAK,s and combo tools are everywhere.

troll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Paul Mitchell
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 07:52 AM

My s.a.k. serves a range of functions. I've had it for about 10 years now, having had it repaired once. In my form of witchcraft we have a "black handled knife" for doing ritual stuff with, and a "white handled knife" for doing work with. My s.a.k. has a white handle.. so I use that. If you need a working knife you might as well get one that's up to the job! I have, however, been asked to leave some pompus rituals when producing it.

I wouldn't be without mine, or my Victorinox Swiss Tool thing.

Paul


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Fortunato
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 09:52 AM

Rick, I carry a micro leatherman in my pocket and a set of nippers (pliers not children) in my guitar case. Recently I screwed up the tweezers on the micro trying to use them as needle nose pliers, so the micro has frailties and shortcomings, but it fits nicely in the pants pocket.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Gervase
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 10:13 AM

The biggest SAK has a reasonable set of pliers with a built-in wire clipper which will do strings (but not cello strings or fat b*****s like that). I prefer it to the Leatherman because the blades are less fiddly to get out.
The fish scaler works a treat - dealt dandily with some sardines at Sidmouth.
That said, the blades on the Leatherman are sharper and safer as they lock into position. Being a sucker for toys, I've got both. Sad sod that I am!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: sheila
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 10:47 AM

Liz -

Leatherman has a very nice model, with corkscrew, pliers/wire-cutter, scissors, knife (with serrated section), screwdrivers, bottle opener, can opener, fork, and spreading knife. I carry it when travelling, and I always have a micro attached to my keyring.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Peter T.
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 10:50 AM

All us wimpy guys who use knives for cutting French cheese at picnics with elegant blondes sporting elegant baskets in which there is at least one light St. Emilion (1997 is turning out to be a good year), swear by Opinel. I have never needed to sharpen mine in 15 years (used for all kinds of duller things alas as well).

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: sophocleese
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 02:59 PM

Geez Peter T. does this mean I'm a wimpy guy. I swear by Opinel too. That along with a pocket corkscrew was my usual party gear for years. Somebody else always had a lighter if necessary.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Clinton Hammond
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 03:29 PM

I never leave home without my s.a.k.!

;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Jack The Lad
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 03:37 PM

I am a schoolteacher I always carry a SAK , I use it for unlocking doors to let teachers out when the kids have pinched the doorhandles. The screwdriver fits neatly into the little square hole where the handle fits , I get the door open in 2 seconds flat. I used to lose my knives until I tied a long bit of cord to one end, and somehow this prevents them from dropping out of my pocket. It is also useful for garrotting the kids who lock teachers in classrooms.

Jack The Lad


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Little Hawk
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 03:39 PM

I take mine everywhere. I've had it since the late 60's, and it works for everything from trimming fingernails to fixing an RC sailboat. The Swiss Army Knife is one of the greatest inventions of all time. I favour a small one with six blades/tools on it (not counting the toothpick and the tweezer). That's entirely enough, and it doesn't take up too much pocket space.

- LH


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Peter T.
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 04:09 PM

I never liked the red plastic on SAK's. Do they make the standard one with a metal coverboard? yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 05:25 PM

SAW,s Ive got about 4 all different, but the best I ever had, which was stolen about 4 months ago was a Spanish army knife. Artor- was the the make, as good if not better than a Swiss, and with pliers that really gripped. I've just got another Artor knife, ex German army when i was in holland, takes an edge like nothing else. I think the leatherman is over priced. If you don't like the red SaK you can get the marine/sailing version with blue-looks smart and there is also a black handle. I've used them for so many different-legal uses, I always carry at least one. my wife and son also have one each.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Kim C
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 05:49 PM

I love my SAK! And it's a Victorinox, bought for me by Mister at the Smoky Mountain Knifeworks on I-40, east of Nashville. Mine's black and it doesn't have the corkscrew (damn! I will have to get a second one - winkwinknudgenudge) but I can tell you that Phillips head has got me out of a jam more than once.

See, the office where I work is mostly women, and we never had a decent set of basic tools. (I bought a multi=tool once, but it got lost when we moved, or someone absconded with it). I'm sure you all have noticed that when you need a Phillips head, there's never one to be found... unless you carry a SAK or equivalent.

I have used the crappy tweezers on more than once occasion.

The knife blades may not be great, but they sure are handy for openin' boxes.

Mine's also got a wirestripper on it, but I've never had occasion to use that.

And of course, Mister has one too. :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 11:09 PM

The WIRE STRIPPER! I'd forgotten about that. I've never stripped a wire with my SAK. 'Course I've never used the fish hook dis-gorger either.

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 02:28 PM

I've got the top of the range victorinox one, the gun shop in Hull (Duncans) stocks the full range. I found the tin opener bit was one of the few that can cope with Fray Bentos meat pie tins.I also own a Maglite, it is just about unbreakable! Brittish tools used to be good quality, now all the best stuff is foreign.I wonder what happened.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Kim C
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 02:40 PM

I want one of them little purse-size Maglites. Those things are awesome.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 03:58 PM


While I can't buy into the s.a.k. concept (planning ahead and having proper tools at hand is better), I will give a strong and emphatic second to the awesome Maglite.

I started using one when I was crawling around airplanes and peering and poking into dark corners. Even though I quit doing that kind of stuff quite a while back, I still never leave home without my little 2xAA maglite in its holster.

When you get to the point where sometimes it's hard to focus on the really fine print, a good, bright light on the subject is a real help. Not only does a bright light raise the contrast, but the pupil contraction you get when you look at something well lit gives you a significant improvement in depth of focus.

Given the choice between the Maglite and a good 3x or 5x pocket loupe (that quite a few oldsters carry, if you knock them down and search carefully) I'll take the Maglite FIRST. The loupe AND Maglite come out together only when my SO asks for help reading those glazed over pot marks on the s.... she collects, but they're invisible to the naked eye of ordinary mortals to begin with. (TIK?)

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Peter T.
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 04:25 PM

I often wondered why improving the light improves your ability to read fine print, apart from the improvement in contrast. Does the depth of focus improvement mean that for people who have difficulty reading close up, the plane of sharper focus close up moves in as well as out? This doesn't make sense in cameras, if I remember correctly.

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Rollo
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 04:45 PM

In the past I was proud Victorinox-customer, but having tried out a Waenger model (the other oficial manufactor, someone mentioned it but couldn`t remember the name, I recall), I converted. The big heavy ones with each and every tool make no sense, but the medium ones are just the thing to have. I could live without the pincer and the tootpicker, but having can opener, corkscrew and bottle cap opener at hand along with a small blade is really helpful. The saw is all right. A small scissor might be useful.

and lifelong guarantee means something, talking of bagknifes...

No Leatherman for me. It is much too big to have it around every day. My knife disappears somewhere in my trouser bag, secured against dropping it with a small chain. Black leather sheaths on the belt are something for posers. Besides, an original red swiss army knife enables you to construct nuclear bombs with some pieces of rubbish and an old yoghurt. Imagine McGyver with a leatherman... never!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 05:32 PM

I just ordered myself a Leatherman Wave and had it sent to my friend in Owego so that I can pick it up when we come over the pond next month. This model costs about £90.00 Sterling here in the UK,[approximately $130.00] and only about $60.00 in the US, so less than 1/2 price. I'm afraid that as an unreconstructed gadget freak, I also have two SAKs as well.

Jock


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 05:43 PM


Peter T

Think pin-hole camera. When you look through a small enough hole, depth of field is essentially infinite.

Since the iris of the eye contracts in bright light, there is a definite increase in depth of field, since the pin-hole effect of the iris aids the focusing normally done mostly by the lens.

In a camera, you generally use a small aperture to get lots of depth, and a very large aperture (and corresponding very fast shutter) if you want to "blur out" a nasty background or foreground.

Focal length changes will also have an effect, but they don't matter much to the eyeball (unless you have one of those you can screw out and replace.)

A trick used by lots of old-timers I've known - who definitely didn't know much optical theory - is to make a fist, and then raise the fingers enough to open a small hole between the palm/first finger and the thumb. Peek through the hole, and distant objects will be somewhat sharper (but of course a little dimmer). Used to see which one of the neighbors kids was on the tractor next door (up to say a half-mile off?).

Technical references, compare Fraunhoff vs Fresnel focusing theories in most any "optics" text.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Peter T.
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 07:13 PM

Thanks, John, as usual I didn't ask the question properly, let me try again. There is a chunk of space that is in focus when a camera is at a specified aperture. What I couldn't remember was (what you are essentially saying is true) that when the aperture gets smaller, the chunk of space in focus not only increases outwards into the distance, but also closer to the aperture, thus making it easier to read a text without your reading glasses.

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 04:58 PM


Peter T.

I think you've got it.

Some change in primary focus (focal length) that affects us as we age can be corrected by adding a single lens.

The troublesome thing is that the ability to focus over a range of distances, by "stretching" the lens of the eye, decreases. The distance between the "farthest" and "nearest" things we can "focus" is referred to as the "accommodation range."

When focused at any particular distance, there is a small range of things nearer and farther that are sufficiently "near focuse" that they can be seen with fairly good clarity. The difference in distance between the nearest and farthest things that are "visually clear," when your eye is fixed at a particular distance is your "depth of field."

A smaller aperture gives greater depth of field.

When near vision is such that the nearest distance at which you can focus is at about arms length, people will generally admit to becoming somewhat "far sighted."

In an ordinary room light, you might be able to focus at a nearest distance of - for a crude example - 2 feet. Objects may be fairly clear at 20 inches and out to, say 30 inches or so. (Depth of field usually extends further "beyond" the focal distance than "inside" focal distance.)

A very bright light might contract your pupil to half the diameter it has in ordinary room light. This will not change the fact that your "nearest focal distance" is still at 24 inches, but the pinhole focusing produced by the smaller "aperture" might now allow you to see things as near as 16 inches and out to perhaps 40 - due to the increased "depth of field."

A bright light does let you read things closer than you can read in a dim light.

It should be noted that even though you can see the fine print well enough to read it in a bright light, you may be reading "inside" the distance at which your eye is focusing. Done for extended periods, this can cause eye strain.

The ideal is to have reading glasses adjusted to the distance at which you would normally read, AND use a fairly bright light. Here, the increase in depth of field from the bright light lets you scan across a page (over a fair range of distances) without "working" your eyeball to keep sharp focus.

(The ability to scan without refocusing is helpful, even for persons who don't need vision aids, hence the recommendation that reading be done in good light by everyone.)

A bright reading light will let you read things closer - and over a wider range of distances - than you can comfortably see in a less bright situation.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Peter T.
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 05:48 PM

Thanks, John, for the clear, thoughtful presentation of all this information.

yours, Peter


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Little Hawk
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 07:57 PM

Pinhole glasses are based on that same principle (the small aperture) and can greatly improve poor vision, although they are not so good in dim light, because not enough light reaches the eye then through the little holes.

- LH


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: catspaw49
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 08:16 PM

Geeziz, this place never ceases to amaze me........a lesson in optics in a simpleass knife thread. Well done Gents!!!

I don't have SAK, don't want one, think they're friggin' ridiculous............Why not as John states have the right tool? I have never seen a SAK that has any kind of real quality about it......Certainly not a "Hen and Rooster" now is it? Of course all those indispensible crappy ass tools are well worth it! I think I may buy two of them........One to crap on and the other to cover it up.

Anybody got one of them new Liberian Navy Knives?

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 09:12 PM


The SAK, like much of what you find on the market these days, is designed to SELL. Whether it's useful or not doesn't matter much to the people who put them out.

Judging by most of this column, we would have to call the SAK a very successful item.

Sorta like the ZIP-Lock baggie. Even though they don't really work for sh..., you can't get a plain old freezer bag (that does work) in most retail stores in the US.

Marketing rules.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 11:11 PM

Tonight I marinated a big roast in a ZIP-LOC Baggie (extra large size) for the first time. It's fantastic! you can dump all the wine and soy sauce and peppercorns and garlic and ginger etc. in it, close it up and rub like crazy. Gets the stuff really adhering to the roast.

ZIP LOCK BAGGIES....not as hip as a SAK but definitely useful.

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: catspaw49
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 11:41 PM

Get the freezer ones Rick.....Then you freeze the roast. We've got a freezer full of marinated beef and chicken......Adds a lot when you thaw it a month later. Be sure to do the "Air out of the bag" trick.

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 12:04 AM


Yeah, but Rick, you like gadjets.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 03:21 AM

Ahhhh LUVVVVVS gadgets John. I've probably invented a couple of hundred gadget type things, and maybe fifty of them actually DID what they were supposed to. My problem is that once an invention comes to fruition, I lose interest in actually DOING anything with it money-wise, and move onto something else.

For example, tonight I just finished modifying a perfectly good Dobro into a seven string one. Dreamed up a Gmaj7th tuning, that works great in my head......Tomorrow I'll try it out....can't do it when Heather's asleep.

Hmmmmmm, maybe I can change that "Fish-scaler" into something more useful....

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: selby
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 03:52 AM

my 13 year old has just recieved his first swiss army knife ( he's a scout )and on the first opening of the knife managed to cut himself.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 06:36 AM


Rick Fielding:

But that's not a new invention??

My SO didn't have much luck with her post HERE

Have you discovered something new, or are you reinventing the flat tire?

Let us know how that 7 string works.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Swiss Army Knives and musicians
From: mooman
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 10:03 AM

And for the real gadget nerds you can get the mini-Maglite and Leatherman Micra packaged tohether in a handy lttle box!

Needless to say I have both of these in my "arsenal"!

mooman


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 24 September 10:46 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 2022 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.