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Les Chansons de la France

DigiTrad:
ALOUETTE
AUPRES DE MA BLONDE
CHEVALIERS DE LA TABLE RONDE
FRERE JACQUES
LE TEMPS DES CERISES


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GUEST,Doc Rock 20 Sep 01 - 03:01 PM
Mr Red 20 Sep 01 - 05:45 PM
Malcolm Douglas 20 Sep 01 - 07:34 PM
Amos 20 Sep 01 - 08:29 PM
John P 20 Sep 01 - 09:08 PM
GUEST,michael batory 21 Sep 01 - 04:16 AM
English Jon 21 Sep 01 - 06:18 AM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Sep 01 - 09:03 AM
GUEST,Michael Batory 21 Sep 01 - 09:31 AM
Mrrzy 21 Sep 01 - 11:07 AM
English Jon 21 Sep 01 - 11:32 AM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Sep 01 - 12:04 PM
Turtle 21 Sep 01 - 12:22 PM
Mrs.Duck 21 Sep 01 - 02:41 PM
weepiper 21 Sep 01 - 03:58 PM
GUEST,Jeanene 22 Sep 01 - 04:44 AM
GUEST,Doc Rock 23 Sep 01 - 05:10 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 01 Jul 04 - 06:46 AM
Dead Horse 01 Jul 04 - 10:34 AM
Les from Hull 01 Jul 04 - 02:11 PM
Nerd 02 Jul 04 - 01:21 AM
John MacKenzie 02 Jul 04 - 07:41 AM
Snuffy 02 Jul 04 - 09:34 AM
GUEST,Sheila 02 Jul 04 - 10:21 AM
Les from Hull 02 Jul 04 - 05:01 PM
McGrath of Harlow 02 Jul 04 - 07:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Jul 04 - 07:26 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 03 Jul 04 - 06:27 AM
semi-submersible 05 Jul 04 - 06:26 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Jul 04 - 08:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 Jul 04 - 12:05 AM
Laurent 31 Jul 04 - 02:12 AM
The Walrus 31 Jul 04 - 10:42 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 Jul 04 - 01:51 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 Jul 04 - 03:05 PM
The Walrus 31 Jul 04 - 04:16 PM
Monique 13 May 08 - 09:04 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Jun 08 - 04:13 PM
Mrrzy 02 Jun 08 - 10:30 AM
GUEST 02 Jun 08 - 02:30 PM
Monique 02 Jun 08 - 07:37 PM
Amos 02 Jun 08 - 07:49 PM
Barry Finn 02 Jun 08 - 08:00 PM
Monique 02 Jun 08 - 08:18 PM
Artful Codger 03 Jun 08 - 05:02 AM
Mrrzy 03 Jun 08 - 09:44 AM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 03 Jun 08 - 11:11 AM
Monique 03 Jun 08 - 11:50 AM
Monique 03 Jun 08 - 07:04 PM
Monique 07 Jun 08 - 06:22 AM
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Subject: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST,Doc Rock
Date: 20 Sep 01 - 03:01 PM

I would like to hear from people who are researching continental French folk music as well as those who are simply interested in it. I do research (and am a big fan of) on Cajun and Creole music as well as the French music of the Upper Mississippi Valley, in particular songs associated with Mardi Gras and Guignolee. I have conducted a moderate amount of comparative research on French Canadian folk songs (Mardi Gras, Mi-Careme, Guignolee and La Chandeleur), but far less so for France.

J'connais Francaise 'Cadien. Ca fait, si t'as besoin, tu peut ecrire en Francaise, mais j'su pas au courant.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Mr Red
Date: 20 Sep 01 - 05:45 PM

I once sang "A la Rochelle" to a french folklorist
she recognised the tune but couldn't make out the words
What is the nearest equivalent French accent to Black Country? (Not Birmingham to those unfamiliar with UK parochialisms)
Still, she thought the tune was really a dance tune from the Massif Central so for my impertinence I had to sing it for kiddies to dance to in the afternoon.
And she still couldn't make out the words, (owr kid).
Good job too, if the kiddies had followed the raunchy words to the shanty I would have been in trouble.
what is a pucelage by the way?


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 20 Sep 01 - 07:34 PM

Staying within the idiom, pucelage = maidenhead.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Amos
Date: 20 Sep 01 - 08:29 PM

The few French folksogs I know are pretty standard:

Chevaliers de la Table Ronde
Perrine Etais Servante
Aupres de ma Blonde
A La Claire Fontaine
Les Bouchees A La Reine (really dirty)

plus a few more modern numbers like Georges Brassens and a couple of Francois Hardy's tune which don't qualify as folk, I guess:



Le Petit Cheval Blanc
Monsieur le President
Ton Meilleur Ami
Je Veux Qu'el'qu'un Qui M'Aime

Maybe one or two others tucked in the dustier back corners of memory.

Amos


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: John P
Date: 20 Sep 01 - 09:08 PM

We do a lot of French folk songs, and I have listened to tons of them over the years, but not being concerned about musical scholarship I've never made a study of them. I'm going to a big hurdy-gurdy festival tomorrow, so I'll probably be playing French dance tunes all weekend.

Some recorded sources:
Malicorne, the first five albums or so.
Lo Jai
La Bamboche
Maluzerne
Melusine
Serge Laine and Isla Ross
Gabriel and Marie Yacoub
Telynor (my band)

Some books:
Chansons de la Mer by Gerard Carreau (Les Editions Ouvrieres)
Chansons de France by Marcel Vigneras (D. C. Heath & Company)
The Gambit Book of French Folk Songs by Elizabeth Poston and Paul Arma (Gambit Incorporated)
Songs of France by Jerry Silverman (Mel Bay)
Sixty Folksongs of France by Julien Tiersot (Oliver Ditson Company)
La France Qui Chant by Bernard Fuller (Heinemann Educational Books, Ltd)
Anthologie des Chants Populaires Francais by Joseph Canteloube (Durand & Cie)

John Peekstok


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST,michael batory
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 04:16 AM

I've been looking for the lyrics of an old song from the Drome region entitled " Le Mai de Clerieux ". Can anyone help? michael.batory@bcuc.ac.uk


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: English Jon
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 06:18 AM

1. Lyr req: "Bergeres si tu m'aime" anyone? Please?

2. Frank Dobbins's Oxford book of French Chanson is a pretty good resource. Loads of stuff from Attaignant, Sermissy, Gombert, Mouton etc...

EJ


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 09:03 AM

Michael: your question was answered last time you asked!  See:  Le Mai de Clerieux


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST,Michael Batory
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 09:31 AM

Malcolm,

Re: Le Mai de Clerieux

Thankyou so much, I'm really grateful to you. I obviously missed your answer first time around.

All the best,

Michael.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Mrrzy
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 11:07 AM

Quelle joie, d'autres francophones! Et qui ecoutent Malicorne, I didn't know anyone else had ever heard of them... Are they on CD en France?


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: English Jon
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 11:32 AM

I've got one of their albums somewhere...

EJ


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 12:04 PM

The early stuff in particular was great.  I haven't seen the person who has all my vinyl copies for about ten years, but fortunately kept tape backups!  I believe that most, if not all, of the œuvre is now out on CD.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Turtle
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 12:22 PM

Moi aussi, j'ecoute Malicorne! Et Tri Yann aussi...Mrrzy, connais-tu cette groupe Bretonne?

Now, I'm looking for the lyrics and music to a round/catch my French mother used to sing, called "In vino veritas". The first two lines are:

In vino veritas, mes freres,
c'est un vieux proverbe latin

and it ends with a line about "trouver la verite dans le vin." Est-ce quelqu'un le connait?

hey, this is fun! It's been a long time since I used my (fading) French.

Turtle


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 02:41 PM

At Windy Bottom Festival this year we had a few French songs in the singaround when Maggie produced an old book of same. Il etait un petit navire and Aupres de ma blonde are the only ones I can recall off the top of my head but it was great fun.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: weepiper
Date: 21 Sep 01 - 03:58 PM

Malicorne are available on cd through Amazon for those interested, and for those who haven't heard them they're well worth a try. A good French-Canadian group that I haven't been able to find in Scotland are Mes Souliers Sont Rouges (I think that's how it's spelt), also La Volee De Casteurs, quite similar to La Bottine...my boyfriend met a French band called Tradicelte when he was gigging near Toulouse who were good too, they had a hurdy-gurdy, two cornemuses, a guitar and songs, they do have at least one cd but I'm not sure how easy it would be to get outside France.


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Subject: ADD: J'fais pipi sur le gazon
From: GUEST,Jeanene
Date: 22 Sep 01 - 04:44 AM

How about this French schoolboys' song:

J'fais pipi sur le gazon

J'fais pipi sur le gazon
Pour ambiter les coccinelles;
J'fais pipi sur le gazon,
Pour ambiter les papillons.

Pipi, gazon, papillons, coccinelles,
Pipi, gazon, coccinelles, papillons, 'pillons.

My singable translation:
I go pee pee on the lawn
To annoy the ladybird bugs,
I go pee pee on the lawn
To annoy the butterflies.

Pee pee on the lawn,
The ladybugs, they get pissed off;
Pee pee, on the lawn,
Likewise, the butterflies, 'terflies.

I don't know how old the song is or where it originated. Does someone else know?
Jeanene

From Monique:
    Hi Joe

    Thanks! Here is the midi Guest Jeanene's post. It's the same tune to "Y'a une pie dans le poirier/pommier"/"Y'a un rat" that I posted at the end of the thread.
    More to come...later!

    Monique

    Click to play


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST,Doc Rock
Date: 23 Sep 01 - 05:10 PM

Thanks for the information on published sources of French folk music. I was interested to hear about the group Mes Souliers Sont Rouge, because that is (more or less) the name of a traditional Cajun children's song that has been covered by Beausoleil and Zachary Richard.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 06:46 AM

Refresh

My school will be hosting a jeunne femme francaise this coming school year, and I'm looking for sources of chansons francais that are appropriate for les enfants. Looks like there are some good ones right here on this thread!

Allison


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Dead Horse
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 10:34 AM

I assume you are already familiar with :-
http://membres.lycos.fr/breric/cajun.htm


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Les from Hull
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 02:11 PM

The book that Mrs Duck mentioned is called 'Diguedondaine' by Ejnar Kampp published in Copenhagen (Wilhelm Hansen, Musik-Forlag) with 100 songs suitable for children (words, music, chords).

It might be hard to find, though, being a 1970s Danish book about French folksongs. I could maybe copy a page or two and send them by email.

Did you know that the Danish for bookseller is boghandel?

Les


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Nerd
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 01:21 AM

All of malicorne's albums are or have been on CD; I've got 'em all. There are also two compilation CDs.

The best overall source for French trad songs is a set that is a 920 page harcdcover book and a 15 CD box set by some of the greatest French revival artists: Yacoub, Catherine Perrier, Evelyne Girardon, Jean Francois Dutertre, Jan-Loup Baly, etc, etc. Basically, members of all the groups John P recommended above. Book has melodies, chords and words (Chords have their solfege names, like "re" or "lam").

Title: Anthologie de la Chanson Francaise: La Tradition
Edited by Marc Robine

editions Albin Michel & EPM Musique.

It cost me almost three hundred bucks, but it was worth it!


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 07:41 AM

I was taught a song at school about Une Bergere [Shepherdess]

Il etait une bergere et ron ron ron petit pat a pon
Il etait une bergere qui gardez sez moutons ron ron,qui gardez sez moutons.

and that's all I remember of that one. There's one I remember even less of, which has a line.

Si le fils de Roi m'aime avec mes sabots dondaine
Oh oh oh, avec mes sabots.

Giok


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Snuffy
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 09:34 AM

John,

I have vague memories of the first one. I think it's about a drummer boy and the ron ron ron petit pat a pon is supposed to be drumbeats.

I remember the first verse of the other one from a vacation course in Menton in 1968:

En passant par la Lorraine
Avec mes sabots
En passant par la Lorraine
Avec mes sabots
En passant par la Lorraine
Avec mes sabots, dondaine
Oh, oh, oh
Avec mes sabots


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST,Sheila
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 10:21 AM

There's a charming song, "En roulant ma boule rollant"(?) with apologies for my French.
Sheila


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Les from Hull
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 05:01 PM

According to my book the Danish for bergère (shepherdess) is 'hyrdepige'. I'm not sure it's suitable for les petits, though. It seems to be a song about kittenicide.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 07:04 PM

Here's a site with a great collection of songs by 20th century chansonniers. Unlike their Anglophone equivalent, they aren't referred to as "folk songs", which avoids all kinds of futile arguments - but it's an incredibly rich tradition.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 07:26 PM

A good one, McGrath. Another is "ABC de la Chanson Francophone" which has 20,000 lyrics. It also has 'folk' songs scattered through the collection. Paroles
Of course the lyrics are those that are sung now.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 03 Jul 04 - 06:27 AM

Has anyone heard the "Rough Guide to the Music of France" cd?


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: semi-submersible
Date: 05 Jul 04 - 06:26 PM

For the song beginning "Il etait une bergere," and related rhymes, search at Google for "elle fit un fromage". (This line has no accents to confuse the search.) Half of my first 20 results were versions of this song.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Jul 04 - 08:04 PM

Il etait une bergère- There was a shepherdess.
Il etait une bergère- There was an easy chair.

Not pertinent, but I always wondered why the word was the same.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jul 04 - 12:05 AM

Over 650 traditional French songs here. See site map. Well-organized website. Usual lyrics, etc., but ABC for all airs. Subcategories for lyrics to sailors' songs. About 200 of the songs are Breton. Ogg Vorbis audio.
French traditional


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Laurent
Date: 31 Jul 04 - 02:12 AM

Bonjour Doc Rock.

Nice to find someone interrested in French Folksongs.

For songs from Center France :
Try www.CMTRA.ORG and look for Millien's "Chansons populaires du Nivernais et du Morvan" (7 books, the first 4 are worth the money to me) and Barbillat-Tourraine's "Chansons populaires du Bas-Berry". Some of Malicorne's song come from this book. All these books contain lyric and scores.
This site sells true French Folk music CDs.

For sea shanties and sea songs : Le chasse-maree

Hope this helps

Laurent


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: The Walrus
Date: 31 Jul 04 - 10:42 AM

As we're on French songs, does anyone have the words to 'Chanson de Crayonne" - the French soldiers' song from the First World War:
"Adieu la vie
"Adieu l'amour
"Adieu a tout les femmes"

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jul 04 - 01:51 PM

Walrus, you can get them at Craonne
"La Chanson de Craonne," author unknown.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jul 04 - 03:05 PM

An MP3 of refrain (1) and a midi of La Chanson de Craonne here: Craonne
Good text here: Craonne

Couldn't find a translation.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: The Walrus
Date: 31 Jul 04 - 04:16 PM

Q,

Many thanks.

Walrus


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Subject: ADD: Il était une bergère
From: Monique
Date: 13 May 08 - 09:04 AM

Il était une bergère

Il était une bergère
et ron et ron petit patapon
Il était une bergère
Qui gardait ses moutons ron ron
Qui gardait ses moutons.

Elle fit un fromage, et ron...
Du lait de ses moutons

Le chat qui la regarde
D'un petit air fripon.

Si tu y mets la patte,
Tu auras du bâton,

Il n'y mit pas la patte,
Il y mit le menton.

La bergère en colère,
Tua son p'tit chaton.

Elle s'en fut à confesse,
Pour demander pardon.

Mon père je m'accuse,
D'avoir tué chaton.

Ma fill' pour pénitence,
Nous nous embrasserons.

La pénitence est douce,
Nous recommencerons.


About bergère meaning also easy chair: it was given to these armchairs because of the shepherds scenes showing on the fabric covering these seats.
"Bergère: s'est spécialisé comme terme d'ameublement (1746) et de mode (1752) lié à la mode des bergers au XVIIIème s.: son emploi pour désigner un fauteuil, favorisé par celui de duchesse, est dû aux scènes de bergers représentées sur les tapisseries garnissant ces sièges." (Le Robert.Dictionnaire historique de la langue française -1992)

Il était une bergère (Click to play)


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Jun 08 - 04:13 PM

You can hear a recording of "Il était une bergère" (and lots of other French-language songs) at The Virtual Gramophone, a web site of the Library and Archives of Canada.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 10:30 AM

Wow! I never knew the ending to La Bergere, where it turns from kittencide to child abuse by priests! What a riot!


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 02:30 PM

This may not be quite what you were seeking, but the thread reminded me of something from long ago.

When I was a boy, I remember hearing a recording by Les Compagnons de la Chanson, a French group that dated from the early 1940's. Among the selections was "The Three Bells" of Swiss composer Jean Villard, a song which was an international success for them. The group had a wonderful, rich harmony that I found haunting, even then, a sound especially well suited to this song.

"The Three Bells" was revived as an American country music-based rendition by The Browns, in 1959 or so.


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Subject: LYRICS ADD: LES FILLES DES FORGES
From: Monique
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 07:37 PM

Maybe it wasn't "child" abuse but it certainly was "abuse by taking advantage of a position of authority" (aggravating circumstance according to present French law)
Here is another one in which the priest wants to take advantage of his position:

LES FILLES DES FORGES
(Traditional)

1 Digue, ding don, don, ce sont les filles des forges (bis)
Des forges de Paimpont, digue ding dondaine
Des forges de Paimpont, dingue ding dondon

2 Digue, ding don, don, elles s'en vont à confesse (bis)
Au curé du canton, digue ding dondaine
Au curé du canton, dingue ding dondon

3 Digue, ding don, don, qu'avions-vous fait les filles (bis)
Pour demander pardon, digue ding dondaine
Pour demander pardon, dingue ding dondon

4 Digue, ding don, don, j'avions couru les bals (bis)
Et les jolis garçons, digue ding dondaine
Et les jolis garçons, dingue ding dondon

5 Digue, ding don, don, ma fille pour pénitence (bis)
Nous nous embrasserons, digue ding dondaine
Nous nous embrasserons, dingue ding dondon

6 Digue, ding don, don, je n'embrasse point les prêtres (bis)
Mais les jolis garçons, digue ding dondaine
Qu'ont du poil au menton, dingue ding dondon

7 Digue, ding don, don, mais l'on peut bien être prêtre (bis)
Et être joli garçon, digue ding dondaine
Et être joli garçon, dingue ding dondon

8 Digue, ding don, don, allez-vous en les filles (bis)
Sans avoir de pardon, digue ding dondaine
Sans avoir de pardon, dingue ding dondon

9 Digue, ding don, don, il faut aller à Rome (bis)
Chercher l'absolution, digue ding dondaine
Chercher l'absolution, dingue ding dondon

10 Digue, ding don, don, si je l'avions à Rome (bis)
J' l'aurions bien à Paimpont, digue ding dondaine
J' l'aurions bien à Paimpont, dingue ding dondon

11 Digue, ding don, don, elles s'en vont à l'auberge (bis)
L'auberge de Paimpont, digue ding dondaine
L'auberge de Paimpont, dingue ding dondon

12 Digue, ding don, don, apportez quinze bouteilles (bis)
du cidre et du vin bon, digue ding dondaine
du cidre et du vin bon, dingue ding dondon

13 Digue, ding don, don, elles ont bu quinze bouteilles (bis)
Sans savoir s'il est bon, digue ding dondaine
Sans savoir s'il est bon, dingue ding dondon

14 Digue, ding don, don, apportez la seizième (bis)
Et nous la goûterons , digue ding dondaine
Et nous la goûterons , dingue ding dondon

15 Digue, ding don, don, donnez la dix-septième (bis)
Redoublez la ration, digue ding dondaine
Redoublez la ration, dingue ding dondon


Music and lyrics: Breton tradition - previous to the 19th century. The modern version as sung by Tri Yann goes as far as verse # 6.
The verses from 7 to 12 come from Diapason Turquoise, volume 2, Les Presses de l'Ile de France, Paris.
I found the ones from 13 to 15 on line on Bcld.net, Brocéliande en Bretagne, (http://www.broceliande-pays.com/?Les-filles-des-Forges-de-Paimpont) where they also give another version of the song.

Recording by Tri Yann here
M.P.

Click to play


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Amos
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 07:49 PM

Here's one I learned from some Breton schoolboys about 50 years ago.

Par les champs et par les plaines
S'en allant deux compagnons, compagnons
Qui chantaient ‡ perdre haleine,
Que la vie avait su bon, du bon!
Wui chataient ‡ perdre haleine,
Que la vie avait du bon!!


There was a good deal more to the story but my tattention span was short back then and I never learned it! :D

Trans:

Over fields and over meadows
Two companions go along, go along,
Singing loud enough to lose their voices
How good life is, how good life is.
(bis)

A


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Barry Finn
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 08:00 PM

Not a French song so much as about an Austraian Priest who goes to Franc. It's pump shanty found in Harlow's Chanting Aboard American ships. Thought it might be of some interest here.

Priests & Nuns

A priest in Austria thought one day
1st Ch. Ho, Ho, Ho
He'd go to France without delay
2nd Ch. Hal-ler-al-le-re. hal-ler-al-le-ra
He'd go to France without delay
3rd Ch. Hal-ler-al-le-re, Ho, Ho

So when the father came to France
Ho, Ho, Ho
T'was seven sick nuns he found by chance
Hal-ler-al-le-re, hal-ler-al-le-ra
Seven sick nuns he found by chance
Hal-ler-al-le-re, Ho, Ho

He saw these nuns in the convent yard
All laying down on benches hard

He gave these nuns his calling card                        
And asked may I come in your yard

To one he asked what he could
I'm priest as well as doctor too

A sick nun then made quick reply
Said treat me father ere I die
                                                         
With cane in hand a walking stick
And he touched that nun so very quick

The others quickly ran to see
And asked the priest what could it be

A medicine stick in my hand I hold
To cure all sick nuns in my fold

Another nun that lay close by
Cried father none so sick as I

He treated all the nuns alike
And said he'd call another night

Their money gone they looked in vain
For the priest that carried the medicine cane

Barry


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Monique
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 08:18 PM

Oh oh! reminds me of a French bawdy song!


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Artful Codger
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 05:02 AM

Like "Il était une fillete"? (A ribald but sweet madrigal by Clément Jannequin)

I was taught "Il était une bergère" in French class, but it wasn't until many years later that I ran across the final verses. Odd the teachers hold back on this one, considering they like to teach children "Alouette", a song espousing gleeful, sadistic mutilation.

Just goes to show: many songs sound much better when you don't know what they mean.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 09:44 AM

OK, I have been corrected, la bergere was an adult, so it's just priests soliciting sex as a penance for confessed sins. Much more palatable!


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 11:11 AM

In about 1979, I was travelling in the Beaujolais region of France with my wine marketing company. At a early morning stop at Chateau de la Chaize, in Brouilly, we were entertained by a small boy, the son of the maitre de chais, who stood atop an upturned barrel holding a candle while singing a traditional song of the region. I cannot recall the song, but I remember how clear and pure his sound was and that he delivered it with great feeling. Does anyone know this or other such local or regional celebratory songs of France?


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 11:50 AM

It seems that we have one more priest than those. Here he is: Le curé de Pomponne.


LYRICS ADD: LE CURÉ DE POMPONNE
(Traditional)

À confesse m'en suis allée au curé de Pomponne. (bis)
Le curé de Pomponne m'a dit : "Qu'avez-vous fait mignonne ?

(Refrain)
Ah, il m'en souviendra, larira, du curé de Pomponne ! (bis)

Le curé de Pomponne m'a dit : "Qu'avez-vous fait mignonne ?
- Le plus grand péché que j'ai fait, c'est d'embrasser un homme.
(Refrain)

- Le plus grand péché que j'aie fait, c'est d'embrasser un homme.
- Ma fille, pour ce péché-là, il faut aller à Rome !
(Refrain)

- Ma fille, pour ce péché-là, il faut aller à Rome !
- Dites-moi, Monsieur le Curé, faut-y qu' j'emmèn' mon homme ?
(Refrain)

- Dites-moi, Monsieur le Curé, faut-y qu' j'emmèn' mon homme ?
- Ah ! Vous prenez goût au péché, je vous entends, friponne !
(Refrain)

- Ah ! Vous prenez goût au péché, je vous entends, friponne !
- Embrassez-moi cinq ou six fois, et je vous le pardonne.
(Refrain)/Ah vraiment, je m'en souviendrai ! La pénitence est bonne!

"Clé du Caveau" #945
Also p. 69, "1000 chants" by Jean-Edel Berthier, volume 1, Les Presses d'Ile de France, Paris - . The three volumes are out of print. Volumes 2 and 3 can only be found on Ebay as far as I know.
MP

I'll make a midi as soon as can be but in the meanwhile, you can listen to it here it's # 106.

We also have an Occitan song about a priest wanting to confess a young woman but weird things happen in the church so they decide to go away from each other.
Our best-known Occitan bawdy song is also about a priest "confessing" the hero's wife and a baby being born 36 weeks later.

Anyone interested in any of those tells me.

Click to play LE_CURE__DE__POMPONNE


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 07:04 PM

Amos, you have it here lyrics and tune.


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Subject: RE: Les Chansons de la France
From: Monique
Date: 07 Jun 08 - 06:22 AM

Guest Jeanene's post on 09/22/01-

This song is sung to the tune to "Y'a une pie dans l' poirier/pommier/un nid" or "Y'a un rat dans l' grenier"

LYRICS ADD: Y'A UNE PIE DANS L' POIRIER
(Children's traditional)

Y'a une pie dans l' poirier
J'entends la mère qui chante
Y'a une pie dans l' poirier
J'entends la mère chanter
J'entends, j'entends
J'entends la mère qui chante,
J'entends, j'entends
J'entends la mère chanter.

"Les plus belles chansons", Ed. Hachette Livres, says it originates in Poitou.

"Le troisième livre des chansons de France" by Claudine and Roland Sabatier, Découverte Cadet Gallimard, 1987, mentions it to be a variant from early 19th century.
M.P.


LYRICS ADD: Y'A UN RAT DANS L' GRENIER
(Children's traditional)

Y'a un rat dans l' grenier
J'entends le chat qui miaule
Y'a un rat dans l' grenier
J'entends le chat miauler
J'entends, j'entends
J'entends le chat qui miaule,
J'entends, j'entends
J'entends le chat miauler.

M.P.

Click to play FAIRE__PIPI__SUR__LE__GAZON

It's the same tune to "Y'a une pie dans le poirier/pommier"/"Y'a un rat" that I posted at the end of the thread.


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