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Req/ADD: French folk songs

DigiTrad:
ALOUETTE
AUPRES DE MA BLONDE
CHEVALIERS DE LA TABLE RONDE
FRERE JACQUES
LE TEMPS DES CERISES


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Mrrzy 05 Jun 21 - 08:54 AM
Monique 21 Jul 20 - 01:34 AM
Mrrzy 20 Jul 20 - 05:02 PM
Mrrzy 20 Jul 20 - 05:01 PM
Monique 20 Jul 20 - 04:12 PM
Mrrzy 02 Jun 20 - 09:50 AM
Monique 01 Jun 20 - 09:36 PM
Monique 01 Jun 20 - 07:45 PM
Mrrzy 01 Jun 20 - 07:24 PM
Monique 01 Jun 20 - 06:32 PM
GUEST,diplocase 01 Jun 20 - 05:08 PM
Monique 12 Jun 14 - 02:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Jun 14 - 12:40 PM
Monique 12 Jun 14 - 11:26 AM
GUEST,charlie 12 Jun 14 - 08:17 AM
Artful Codger 23 May 13 - 06:54 AM
GUEST,Olga from Melbourne, Australia 21 May 13 - 06:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Apr 12 - 02:14 PM
Monique 09 Apr 12 - 02:14 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Apr 12 - 05:29 PM
Monique 08 Apr 12 - 02:48 AM
Artful Codger 07 Apr 12 - 06:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Apr 12 - 06:10 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Apr 12 - 05:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Apr 12 - 05:12 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Feb 12 - 09:41 PM
Paul Burke 19 Feb 12 - 05:48 AM
Monique 19 Feb 12 - 02:11 AM
Genie 18 Feb 12 - 11:11 PM
Paul Burke 18 Feb 12 - 06:17 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Feb 12 - 03:30 PM
Monique 17 Feb 12 - 05:48 PM
gnomad 17 Feb 12 - 05:11 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Feb 12 - 04:09 PM
Monique 17 Feb 12 - 03:19 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Feb 12 - 02:26 PM
Monique 04 Jan 12 - 04:14 PM
Artful Codger 04 Jan 12 - 03:21 PM
Crowhugger 04 Jan 12 - 03:19 PM
Monique 04 Jan 12 - 01:33 PM
Monique 04 Jan 12 - 01:27 PM
ollaimh 04 Jan 12 - 01:19 PM
GUEST,Tony 24 Jun 11 - 05:57 PM
maple_leaf_boy 21 Jun 10 - 07:10 PM
maple_leaf_boy 21 Jun 10 - 12:23 PM
Monique 28 Feb 10 - 07:05 PM
Mrrzy 28 Feb 10 - 06:16 PM
Monique 28 Feb 10 - 06:11 PM
GUEST,Lynn 28 Feb 10 - 03:02 PM
GUEST,Lynn 28 Feb 10 - 02:51 PM
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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 05 Jun 21 - 08:54 AM

Depuis quand or rather pourquoi is Quand les hommes vivront d'amour not a folk song? I know we know who wrote it, but I don't see how that makes it not a folk song.

And I will find a new link to that video.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 01:34 AM

Commentary on "Mon père y m'a marié": "Je kiff" (/je kiffe) = "j'aime" = I like (it). From the verb "kiffer", itself from "kif", a blend of pot and tobacco smoked in North Africa. From it > French colloquial verb "kiffer" meaning to smoke kif and the bliss felt when smoking. From this bliss > "kiffer" = to like.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 05:02 PM

Oops blicky


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 05:01 PM

Here is a link to the song this reminded me of...

https://youtu.be/tL-g9XnZM3w

I can't understand any of the commentary...


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 04:12 PM

A song from Brittany attributed to Pierre Certon (ca 1510/1515 - 1572)

DÉJA MAL MARIÉE

Mon père m'a mariée
À un tailleur de pierre,
Mon père m'a mariée
À un tailleur de pierre,
Le lendemain de mes noces
M'envoie-t-à la carrière, la.
Déjà mal mariée,
Déjà mal mariée, gué.

Refrain :
Déjà mal mariée déjà
Déjà mal mariée, gué
Déjà mal mariée, déjà
Déjà mal mariée, gué

Le lendemain de mes noces
M'envoie-t-à la carrière,
Le lendemain de mes noces
M'envoie-t-à la carrière,
Et j'ai trempé mon pain
Dans le jus de la pierre, la
Déjà mal mariée,
Déjà mal mariée, gué.

(Refrain)

Et j'ai trempé mon pain
Dans le jus de la pierre,
Et j'ai trempé mon pain
Dans le jus de la pierre,
Par là vint à passer
Le curé du village, la.
Déjà mal mariée,
Déjà mal mariée, gué.

(Refrain)

Par là vint à passer
Le curé du village,
Par là vint à passer
Le curé du village,
"Bonjour Monsieur le Curé
J'ai trois mots à vous dire, la.
Déjà mal mariée,
Déjà mal mariée, gué.

(Refrain)

Bonjour Monsieur le Curé,
J'ai trois mots à vous dire,
Bonjour Monsieur le Curé,
J'ai trois mots à vous dire :
Hier, vous m'avez fait femme,
Aujourd'hui faites-moi fille, la.
Déjà mal mariée,
Déjà mal mariée, gué.

(Refrain)

Hier, vous m'avez fait femme,
Aujourd'hui faites-moi fille,
Hier, vous m'avez fait femme,
Aujourd'hui faites-moi fille.
De fille, je fais femme,
De femme je n' fais point fille, la."
Déjà mal mariée,
Déjà mal mariée, gué.

(Refrain)
ALREADY BADLY MARRIED


My father married me off
To a stonemason,
My father married me off
To a stonemason,
The day after my wedding,
He sent me to the quarry, la*.
Already badly married,
Already badly married, gay*.

Chorus:
Already badly married, already
Already badly married, gay
Already badly married, already
Already badly married, gay.

The day after my wedding,
He sent me to the quarry,
The day after my wedding,
He sent me to the quarry,
And I dipped my bread
In the stone juice, la.
Déjà mal mariée,
Already badly married,
Already badly married, gay.

(Chorus)

And I dipped my bread
In the stone juice,
And I dipped my bread
In the stone juice,
There happened to pass by
The village priest, la.
Already badly married,
Already badly married, gay.

(Chorus)

There happened to pass by
The village priest,
There happened to pass by
The village priest,
"Good morning, Father
I must tell you a few words, la.
Already badly married,
Already badly married, gay.

(Chorus)

Good morning, Father
I must tell you a few words,
Good morning, Father
I must tell you a few words:
Yesterday, you made a wife of me,
Today, make a girl of me, la.
Already badly married,
Already badly married, gay.

(Chorus)

Yesterday, you made a wife of me,
Today, make a girl of me,
Yesterday, you made a wife of me,
Today, make a girl of me.
Of a girl I make a wife,
Of a wife I make no girl, la."
Already badly married,
Already badly married, gay.

(Chorus)
*la either spelled "la" or "là" has no meaning here. "gué/gai" (or "ô gué") can be found in old songs to express joy. Here it's more about rhyming with "mariée".
I've seen "jus de la pierre" translated as "stone sap". Whether you word it as "juice" or "sap" as stone has neither of them it just shows how hard her life was.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 09:50 AM

Poetic license, granted, merci me chère!


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 09:36 PM

Oops! Sorry for the misspelling Mrrzy. There's also "La bave du crapaud n'atteint pas la blanche colombe!" when someone tells you something mean et bien sûr, "Blanche-Neige".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 07:45 PM

Mrzzy, you do find some "blanc/blanche-quelque-chose" in old stuff, poetry or songs as in Old French, you could say so (Ordre des adjectifs épithètes). Cf. La blanche hermine by Gilles Servat, La rue des Blancs-Manteaux by Juliette Gréco, Iseult aux blanches mains, sans oublier le blanc-manger que tu prépares de tes blanches mains!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 07:24 PM

Great thread! A coupla comments...

It would never be Blanche Biche. It would be Biche Blanche.

If we know who wrote it, that doesn't make it not a folk song. (Does it?)

It's Il était une bergère (once there was a sheperdess), not Elle était une bergère (she was a sheperdess). And *that* is a song not for American kids! The way I learned it she kills her cat and is sorry, end of song. But then I looked it up and it goes on to her going to the priest for absolution and the penance is he gets to kiss her! And he likes it so he does it again! Eewwww!

And to add a song: Il était un petit navire (in which the starving sailors draw straws/lots to see whom to eat, the chosen little boy prays and zillions of fish jump into the ship). Great song.

For the Canadian side I recommend the whole double album called J'ai vu le loup, le renard, le lion.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 06:32 PM

Conseils à la mariée by Marie-Noëlle Lemapihan. A slightly different version can be found here, page 57 (article in French from 1935 with some songs about engagement and wedding).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: GUEST,diplocase
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 05:08 PM

Here's a French folk song I translated into a singable English version. I stayed as close as possible to the original, making changes only to find a rhyme. As anyone knows who has tried to write poetry in French and English, it's much easier to find a rhyme in French!

The series of CDs "Anthologie de la chanson Française" is great and has three albums of songs from the oral tradition and great liner notes.

The lyrics I translated are very slightly different from the ones sung by Marie-Noëlle Lemapihan, but the tune is the same. I think it captures the meaning and the ironic tone.

"Anthologie de la chanson française”CD - singer Marie-Noëlle Lemapihan

ADVICE TO THE BRIDE

Conseils à la mariée
(w/m Trad French-speaking Brittany, translated from French by Casey)

1.      From all the glens around, we gather here together
to see these lovers joined in wedlock bands forever
In love and happiness, In joy and sweet content,
they come together now, and may they not repent.

Nous voici descendus, du haut de ces villages
Nous voici rassemblés pour faire un mariage
Ils sont doux et heureux, les voilà tous les deux
Ils ont le cœur content, en voilà pour longtemps


2. Remember what you said, before the priest and parish
to love him as your self, to love him and to cherish
Be true to your true love, as he must also be
Obey your wedded lord, and love him tenderly

Ne te rappelles-tu pas ce qu’il a dit, le prêtre?
A dit la vérité, comme elle devait être :
Fidèle à votre époux, de l’aimer comme vous.
Fidèle à votre amant, de l’aimer tendrement


3. Now he is your lord, and some would say your master
So soon their vows they make, they break them even faster
true to you alone, and true until they die
true to you alone, but every word a lie

Quand l’on dit son époux, on dit souvent "son maître"
les hommes ne sont point doux, comme ils l’ont promis d’être:
fidèles, ils ont promis, le reste de leurs vies
fidèles, ils ont promis, mais ils ont bien menti!


4. Unto the bonny bride, we bring a-many’s a flower
That you may not forget, they’re withered in an hour
So you may understand, while in your blushes gay,
The roses in your cheeks they soon will fade away

Recevez ces bouquets, Madame la mariée
Recevez ces bouquets, prenez et regardez
C’est pour vous faire connaitre, aussi vous faire savoir
Que toutes vos belles couleurs flétriront comme ces fleurs

[alternate for the foregoing verse:
Recevez ce bouquet
Que nous venons vous tendre :
Il est fait de genêts
Pour vous faire connaitre, aussi vous faire savoir
Que tous les vains honneurs
Passent comme des fleurs.]

5. Unto the bonny bride, we bring the fine white bread-o
We bring you cakes and ale, a table fine to spread-o
That you may not forget your bread is won with pain
So you may understand you first must win the grain.
Recevez ces gâteaux, Madame la mariée
Recevez ces gâteaux, prenez et en mangez
C’est pour vous faire connaitre, aussi vous faire savoir
Que pour les bien manger, il faudra les gagner!

[Variante de ce dernier couplet:
Recevez ce gâteau
Que ma main vous présente.
Il est fait de façon à vous faire comprendre
Qu’il faut pour se nourrir travailler et souffrir.]
[Si vous avez, Bretons,
Des bœufs dans vos herbages
Des brebis, des moutons, des oisillons sauvages
Il faut leur conseiller, de mieux se rappeler.
Songez, soir et matin qu’à leur tour ils ont faim.]

6. My money and my land, unto my lord are rendered
Farewell my liberty, no more to be remembered
Farewell, my native place, farewell my parents kind
Let no one speak to me of what I leave behind

Adieu Chateaubriande, le château de mon père
Où j’ai été élevée, en faisant bonne chère
Adieu plaisirs et joies d’une enfant comme moi
Adieu ma liberté, il n’en faut plus parler

7. It’s no more to the May, and no more to the fair-o
No more ribbons gay, to flyte the young men there-o
We all will go and dance, while you will meekly bide
It’s you will keep the house, my bonny little bride!

Vous n’irez plus au bal, Madame la mariée
Vous n’irez plus aux bals, aux bals et assemblées
Vous resterez à regarder, tandis que moi j’irai,
À garder la maison, mon joli cœur mignon!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 12 Jun 14 - 02:32 PM

I also thought of "Chevaliers de la table ronde" because "Le roi du vin" might be "Le roi des buveurs" but without any other clue, it's impossible to tell.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Jun 14 - 12:40 PM

Charlie, do you recall any other lines?

Reminds me of "Chevaliers de la table ronde," although the line you give is not in the song (which has variants, however). See DT.

Could it be a lyric from Gounod's "Faust"?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 12 Jun 14 - 11:26 AM

Charlie, would you have anything else as a clue apart from this title? This title reminded me of "Le roi d'Yvetot" (lyrics and tune here) who indeed "had four meals a day" but I can't think of any song called "Le roi du vin".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: GUEST,charlie
Date: 12 Jun 14 - 08:17 AM

I am working with some elderly people at the moment and we were singing songs about food. One of the men starting singing this wonderfulk song called "Le roi du vin" does anyone know this song and where I could locate it. The man's voice was frail and it was hard to follow. It would be much appreciated as we would like to include this in our show.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Artful Codger
Date: 23 May 13 - 06:54 AM

Could it be "Bateau d'amour" by Charles Trenet, the chorus of which begins "L'amour est un petit bateau / Qui s´en va, tout joyeux, sur l´onde"?

YouTube: Reda Caire (1937): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsqXzMQtNPI

Lyrics can be found on several sites.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: GUEST,Olga from Melbourne, Australia
Date: 21 May 13 - 06:27 PM

I would love to find the words and music for 'Amourette, petit bateau' which my Mum used to sing and play on piano.

Hopefully,

Olga


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Apr 12 - 02:14 PM

Monique, don't misunderstand, the Berthier volumes are an excellent resource for French songs, folk or other, but the indexes are difficult to use for one who is used to a different usage of terms.
I am considering copying the indexes, cut and paste, to see if I can make an alphabetical listing. (if I get the time!)

Treatment of articles doesn't seem to be consistent.

To continue this digression, which really doesn't belong here:
Seeing Stephen Foster's "Old Black Joe" listed as a folk song grates; Foster was one of the great U.S. song composers, and the song was spread by reams of sheet music and latterly many recordings.

"Moby Dick" seems to be by a modern French composer; your explanation that titles in caps are not in the volume explains why it couldn't be found. Certainly not a folk song in English usage.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 09 Apr 12 - 02:14 AM

Q, it's explained at the top of page 247 but it's in French.
To find what is actually in the book in alphabetical order (you need to check after you've removed le, la, l' or les if the title begins by any of these articles) you must go to p. 275.
In the table of themes, in each section, the first titles which are in lower case and italics ARE in the book, then there are titles mentioned in bold capitals with the name of their authors: those are NOT in the book, they're mentioned to let people know they exist.
In Berthier's 1000 chants, you'll find all the foreign songs listed in the table of themes in "Pays, terroirs" in which you first find the names of different countries or groups of countries then the names of different regions of France.

Now a word about "folk song": it doesn't have the same meaning in French (!). A "folk song" (English words) for us is any American traditional song with or without author(s). You might not consider all of them either folk songs or trad songs in your culture. They're usually the type you can listen in westerns or a song by Woody Guthrie and the like. We use "chanson folk" to mean French traditional songs that people such as Malicorne revived in the 70's. Traditional songs from whatever other country is a "chanson traditionnelle".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Apr 12 - 05:29 PM

Monique, I looked in the "Table Alphabetique" and it is not listed there.
It is listed under "anciennes" p. 249, but unless one knew it was medieval, how would one find it?
"Table of Themes," which lists "Anciennes" is on p. 274.

Or does one have to have a gallic mind to use these most peculiar indices?

My eye happened to see "Moby Dick" listed as a folksong (which it isn't) but I couldn't find a page number for it.
(It is an instrumental, also used with a lyric, by Led Zeppelin, but I don't think that is the number referred to).

"Ya se van los pastores", a favorite folksong of mine (esp. as sung by Germaine Montero) is in the "Table Alphabetique" as "Ya se van" but not under the section folksong.

"'Tis a puzzlement."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 08 Apr 12 - 02:48 AM

Q, it is on Berthier's Mille chants, Book 1 page 23, or are your edition and mine different?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Artful Codger
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 06:57 PM

I suspect you meant to give the 1st verse 1st line correction as:
L'amour de moy s'y est enclose

The line you gave was the 1st line of the 2nd verse, which you'd given correctly.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 06:10 PM

Sheet music can be found online, American University Library, Historical Sheet Music Collection.

Not included in Berthier, Mille Chants


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 05:54 PM

Correction 1st verse, line 1-
Ce jardin est bel et plaisant,

L'AMOUR DE MOI
Free translation

Refrain-
My love is enclosed there
In a pretty garden
Where grow the rose and lily of the valley
Also there is the sparrow.

The garden is beautiful and pleasant
It is filled with many flowers
We take its pleasure
At much at night as in the day

*Alas! There is nothing more sweet
Than this gentle nightingale
Who sings in the evening and early morning
And rests when he is weary

I saw her the other day, collecting
Violets in the green meadow
The most beautiful sight
And most pleasant to me

I regard her appearance;
She is white as milk,
and as sweet as a baby lamb
And as bright as the rose.

* Helas usually means Alas!, but here it literally means 'struck dumb'.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: L'Amour de Moi
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 05:12 PM

Lyr. Add: L'AMOUR DE MOI (MOY)
Medieval, c. 15 C.

Refrain
L'amour de moy s'y enclose
Dedans un joli jardinet
Où croît la rose et le muguet
Et aussifait la passerose

Refrain

Ce jardin est bel et plaisant
Il est garni de toutes flours
On y prend son ébattement
Autant la nuit comme le jour

Refrain

Hélas! Il n'est si douce chose
Que de ce doux rossignolet
Qui chante au soir, au matinet
Quand il est las, il se repose

Refrain

Je la vis l'autre jour, cueillir
La violette et un vert pré
La plus belle qu'oncques je vis
Et la plus plaisante à mon gré

Refrain

Je la regardai una pose
Elle était blanche comme lait
Et douce comme un agnelet
Et vermeillette comme rose

Refrain

A note in Wikipedia says the song was sung by Pierre de la Rue (c.1452-1518). Composer unknown.
Sung by many (see youtube) including Streich and Mouskouri.

Rough translation to follow.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 09:41 PM

Lyr. Add: Bonhomme, bonhomme

Il estoit un bonne homme (bis)
Jouant de la temboure (bis)
Di be di be di be don
Et de la trompette,
Fran, fran, fran
Et de la my fluste,
Turelututu relututu
Et de la mi fa sol la,
Farelarirette, farelarirette
Et de la mi fs sol la,
Farelarirette liron fa.

Il estoit un bon homme (bis)
Jouant de la cymbale (bis)
Drin relin din din relin din
Et de la vielle,
Yon, yon, yon
Et de la rebeque,
Tire li ty ty reli ty ty
Et de la mi fa sol la,
Farelarirette liron fa
....
Jouant de la violle
Torelo totio rela totio
Et de la raquette,
clac clic clac
Et de la musette,
Toure loure loure lou, .....

.....
Jouant de la mandore
Tire lire lire la
Et de la navette,
Vrest vrest brest
Et de la cliquette,
Taque tique taque tac, .....

....
Jouant de la braguette
Zipe zipe zipe zipeson
Et de son de rire re,
Zesteroc pouf
Et de la bouteille,
Glou glou glou glou glou
Glou glou glou glou ....

A French "Bonhomme, bonhomme."
Association@lyon: Chansons populaires, song collection.

http://www.alyon.org/litterature/chansons/


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Paul Burke
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 05:48 AM

Mere si beau cul, Monique!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 02:11 AM

La vielle d'argent

À PARIS Y A-T-UNE DAME

À Paris y a-t-une dame
Belle comme le jour,
À Paris y a-t-une dame
Belle comme le jour,
Bell' comme le jour,
Maluraine !
Bell' comme le jour.

Trois garçons de la Rochelle
Vont lui faire la cour,
Trois garçons de la Rochelle
Vont lui faire la cour,
Lui faire la cour,
Maluraine !
Lui faire la cour.

Le plus jeune dit aux autres :
" Comment donc ferons-nous?
Le plus jeune dit aux autres :
" Comment donc ferons-nous?
Comment ferons-nous ?
Maluraine !
Comment ferons-nous ? "

" Nous ferons faire une vielle
Qui sera-t-en argent,
" Nous ferons faire une vielle
Qui sera-t-en argent,
Mais tout en argent,
Maluraine !
Mais tout en argent.

Nous nous irons à sa porte,
Comme trois mendiants,
Nous nous irons à sa porte,
Comme trois mendiants,
Comm' trois mendiants,
Maluraine !
Comm' trois mendiants."

Quand ils sont devant la porte,
Vir' la vielle d'argent,
Quand ils sont devant la porte,
Vir' la vielle d'argent,
La vielle d'argent,
Maluraine !
La vielle chargent.

" Qu'est ça, qu'est ça? " dit la mère.
" Sont là trois mendiants.
" Qu'est ça, qu'est ça? " dit la mère.
" Sont là trois mendiants.
Sont trois mendiants,
Maluraine !
Sont trois mendiants."

" Vite allez-vous-en, ma fille.
Chasser ces mendiants,
" Vite allez-vous-en, ma fille.
Chasser ces mendiants,
Chasser ces mendiants,
Maluraine !
Chasser ces mendiants.

Quand vous serez à la barrière,
Vit' retournez-vous-en.
Quand vous serez à la barrière,
Vit' retournez-vous-en.
Retournez-vous-en ,
Maluraine !
Retournez-vous-en."

En entendant jouer la vielle,
Jouer la vielle d'argent.
En entendant jouer la vielle,
Jouer la vielle d'argent.
La vielle d'argent,
Maluraine !
La vielle d'argent.

A bien passé la barrière
Encore plus avant,
A bien passé la barrière
Encore plus avant,
Encor' plus avant,
Maluraine !
Encor' plus avant.

Le plus jeun' la prend, la monte,
Monte sur son cheval blanc,
Le plus jeun' la prend, la monte,
Monte sur son cheval blanc,
Sur son cheval blanc,
Maluraine !
Sur son cheval blanc.

"Adieu, père, et adieu, mère
Et tous mes grands-parents,
"Adieu, père, et adieu, mère
Et tous mes grands-parents,
Et tous mes parents,
Maluraine !
Et tous mes parents.

Je m'en vas à la Rochelle,
Avecque mon galant,
Avec mon galant,
Maluraine !
Avec mon galant."

C. Mendès, Les plus jolies chansons du pays de France p. 33 (Saintonge).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Genie
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 11:11 PM

That's an important point, LeTenebreux.   The French do tend to 'elongate' many words in song by pronouncing the normally silent final "e" sounds, as we English speakers tend to do the same by holding a vowel sound over 2 or more beats (as in "I-i-i-i-i will always love you-u-u-u ...")



Nia [[Does anyone have the french lyrics / english translation to a little french children's song starting
"un deux trois cache-toi
quatre cinq six "]]

DK if I've heard that one. There was a French song called "Un, Deux Trois" that was on an old LP I had from the Norman Luboff Choir back about 1960.

But I also heard a sad story about three little French kittens named Un, Deux and Trois.
They all went down to the seashore to play, and, unfortunately,
Un, Deux, Trois cats sank.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Paul Burke
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 06:17 PM

Anyone got the rest of this one, tenth-remembered from twenty-odd tears (stet) ago (the lines progress by a lot of repetition, with intercalated "maluraines"):

A Paris y'at une dame belle comme le jour (bis)
Belle comme le jour maluraine
Belle comme le jour

Trois garcons de La Rochelle vont lui faire la court..

Le plus jeune a dit aux autres "Comment faisons nous"..

Il a dit "Faisons une vielle, mais en tout argent"..

Anyway it finishes up with la belle, despite sa maman, riding off with le plus jeune...

J'en vais(?) a La Rochelle avec mon amant..


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 03:30 PM

Alouette! is an old French song, but its greatest popularity is in French Canada.

Marius Barbeau- "Cette rengaine, née en France, est devenue la plus populaire de toutes les chansons canadiennes."

Marius Barbeau, En roulant ma boule, 1982, Deuxième partie du Répertoire de la chanson folklorique française au Canada, pp. 571-574. (And earlier publications)

Fowke & Johnston- ""Alouette!" is undoubtedly the most popular and the most widely sung of all our songs. Many people think it originated in Canada, but it was actually imported from France several centuries ago."

E. F. Fowke and Richard Johnston, 1954. Folk Songs of Canada, Waterloo Music Company Ltd., Canada.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 05:48 PM

@Q: This is no French, it's Arpitan. I'll ask my s-i-l if she can.

@ Gnomad: maybe that.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: gnomad
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 05:11 PM

Monique, your link of Jan4 now shows (me) a 404error,any chance you can offer an alternative?

Can Crowhugger expand on the assertion that Allouette is Quebecois, I have long understood it to be French, but have no evidence? (No knowledge, just curious)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 04:09 PM

Monique, could you give a rough translation?

The song Jeanette and Jeannot by the English composers Glover and Jeffreys was very popular in the period 1850-1870. The title is unusual for an English song and I wondered if it had been revised from a French song.

Jeannette and Jeannot


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 03:19 PM

You can hear it sung there


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 02:26 PM

Lyr. Add: JEANNETTE ET JEANNOT
"Vieille Chanson"

1
J'â mo bin ma Jeannette
Et son nâ rizolet:
Tot cein qu'on l'ai conmande
Lo fa à bètzevet.

Refrain
Jeannette, Jeannette, Jeannette, Jeannot.
Faut brama trei coup Jeannette,
Et rein qu'un coup Jeannot!
Chorus
Jeannette, Jeannot.
Hé Jeannette,
Hé Jeannot
2
Lo bet' cin tsamp lè vatse
Dévant de lè z'a ryâ,
Lè caïon dein l'étrabllye
Chautant lau dédjon nâ.
3
Jeannot, t'î onna bîte
Lè bin tè que t'î fou:
T'a rolhî noutrè modze,
Epouaitî lo berau!
4
T'î pas fotya deféré
Ne bûro, ne sèré,
Et te letse la cranma!
Quin repé de sorcié!
5
Jeannot! oh! tsaravoûta!
T'ein a mé bu soulon,
Que n'ein a pè La Coûta
Dein lè meillâo z'aôn.
6
Quais'-tè, vîlhie baôgresse
Fifare de café!
T'ein faut dâi zécouèlette
Quasu plleinn' onna mé.
7
Et Por quie ein tant dere
Et tant no remauffâ?
Fazein vit' onna danse,
Dévant que de goutâ!

http://www.scribd.com/patoisvaudois/d/34715091-Jeannette-Et-Jeannot-Vielle-Chanson
folklore jurassien, Adaptée en patois vaudois
par Jules Cordey, dit Marc à Louis.

Found while obtaining lyrics to the English song, Jeannette and Jeannot.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 04:14 PM

About larks and songs about larks, a pdf doc. It's in French (os, sorry for the English-only speakers) but very interesting. It says, among other things, that Marius Barbeau suspected the song to have originated in France.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Artful Codger
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 03:21 PM

There's a spirited rendition of "C'est l'aviron"/"M'en revenant de la jolie Rochelle" in the middle of (French) podcast 50 of "Bordel de Mer":
http://bordeldemer.com/blog/bordel-de-mer-episode-50/
It's a live version, performed by Mille Sabords (who happen to be the podcaster and his friend). Also notable in the same podcast is the song "Panta Rhei" by the Polish group Banana Boat--sort of sea song meets boy band. I've really enjoyed listening to all the Bordel de Mer podcasts--lots of interesting sea songs.


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Subject: What is an "alouette"?
From: Crowhugger
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 03:19 PM

To explain some more about what kind of bird is "alouette":
In Québécois & other versions of Canadian French the default meaning of 'alouette' is any of several meadowlarks of the genus Sturnella. In French of France its default meaning is skylark, Alauda arvensis. Because the song "Alouette" is from Québec, I figure it's talking about a meadowlark.

Of course that explanation gets sorely tested, downright fowled up, when the French discuss North American ornithology, or the Québécois discuss European ornithology.

I like to imagine this song could have been a woman's work song, to be sung whilst plucking domestic birds, both to make the work pass more easily and to express a certain longing for the chickens or ducks to be closer in size to the meadowlark, plucking being a thoroughly tedious task, which longing would disappear once plucking was done and the lone bird must feed many mouths.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 01:33 PM

Oops! sorry ,the -ow ending confused me; a sparrow is un moineau, une hirondelle is a swallow.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 01:27 PM

No Ollaimh, une alouette is a skylark. A sparrow is une hirondelle.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: ollaimh
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 01:19 PM

je n'ecrit pas en francais tres beaucoup ,mais je pense que'n allouette est un sparrow en anglais. n'est pas?


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Subject: Lyr Add: C'EST AVIRON
From: GUEST,Tony
Date: 24 Jun 11 - 05:57 PM

C'est l'aviron

C'est l'aviron   qui nous mène, mène, mène.   C'est l'aviron   qui nous mène en haut!

1. M'en revenant   de la jolie Rochelle,   j'ai rencontré   trois jolies demoiselles.
1. On my return   from lovely Rochelle,   I chanced upon   three lovely young ladies.

2. J'ai point choisi,    mais j'ai pris la plus belle.   J'l'y fis monter   derrièr' moi, sur ma selle.
2. I had no choice;   I took the loveliest.   I pulled her up   behind me on my saddle.

3. J'y fis cent lieues   sans parler avec elle.   Au bout d'cent lieues,   ell' me d'mandit à boire.
3. I rode a hundred leagues   without a word to her.   After a hundred leagues,   she said that she was thirsty.

4. Je l'ai menée   auprès d'une fontaine.   Quand ell' fut là,   ell' ne voulut point boire.
4. I set her down   beside a little fountain.   When she was there,   she did not want to drink it.         

5. Je l'ai menée   au logis de son père.   Quand ell' fut là,   ell' buvait à pleins verres.
5. I took her to   the home of her father.   When she was there,   she drank full many glasses.

6. À la Santé   de son père et sa mère.   À la Santé   de celui que son coeur aime.
6. Drank to the health,   of her father and her mother.   Drank to the health,   of her heart's beloved.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: maple_leaf_boy
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 07:10 PM

I should probably post a link to a recording of this song, on youtube.
It summarizes the turning point of the Hundred Years War in France.
It's a good song and a good video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7jK2PVvXI8&NR=1


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: maple_leaf_boy
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 12:23 PM

La fiancée du timbalier:
It's a long song. It's based on a poem.

FRANCAIS:

"Monseigneur le duc de Bretagne
A, pour les combats meurtriers,
Convoqué de Nantes à Mortagne,
Dans la plaine et sur la montagne,
L'arrière-ban de ses guerriers.

Ce sont des barons dont les armes
Ornent des forts ceints d'un fossé ;
Des preux vieillis dans les alarmes,
Des écuyers, des hommes d'armes ;
L'un d'entre eux est mon fiancé.

Il est parti pour l'Aquitaine
Comme timbalier, et pourtant
On le prend pour un capitaine,
Rien qu'à voir sa mine hautaine,
Et son pourpoint, d'or éclatant !

Depuis ce jour, l'effroi m'agite.
J'ai dit, joignant son sort au mien :
- Ma patronne, sainte Brigitte,
Pour que jamais il ne le quitte,
Surveillez son ange gardien ! -

J'ai dit à notre abbé : - Messire,
Priez bien pour tous nos soldats ! -
Et, comme on sait qu'il le désire,
J'ai brûlé trois cierges de cire
Sur la châsse de saint Gildas.

À Notre-Dame de Lorette
J'ai promis, dans mon noir chagrin,
D'attacher sur ma gorgerette,
Fermée à la vue indiscrète,
Les coquilles du pèlerin.

Il n'a pu, par d'amoureux gages,
Absent, consoler mes foyers ;
Pour porter les tendres messages,
La vassale n'a point de pages,
Le vassal n'a pas d'écuyers.

Il doit aujourd'hui de la guerre
Revenir avec monseigneur ;
Ce n'est plus un amant vulgaire ;
Je lève un front baissé naguère,
Et mon orgueil est du bonheur !

Le duc triomphant nous rapporte
Son drapeau dans les camps froissé ;
Venez tous sous la vieille porte
Voir passer la brillante escorte,
Et le prince, et mon fiancé !

Venez voir pour ce jour de fête
Son cheval caparaçonné,
Qui sous son poids hennit, s'arrête,
Et marche en secouant la tête,
De plumes rouges couronné !

Mes soeurs, à vous parer si lentes,
Venez voir près de mon vainqueur
Ces timbales étincelantes
Qui sous sa main toujours tremblantes,
Sonnent, et font bondir le coeur !

Venez surtout le voir lui-même
Sous le manteau que j'ai brodé.
Qu'il sera beau ! c'est lui que j'aime !
Il porte comme un diadème
Son casque, de crins inondé !

L'Égyptienne sacrilège,
M'attirant derrière un pilier,
M'a dit hier (Dieu nous protège !)
Qu'à la fanfare du cortège
Il manquerait un timbalier.

Mais j'ai tant prié, que j'espère !
Quoique, me montrant de la main
Un sépulcre, son noir repaire,
La vieille aux regards de vipère
M'ait dit : - Je t'attends là demain !

Volons ! plus de noires pensées !
Ce sont les tambours que j'entends.
Voici les dames entassées,
Les tentes de pourpre dressées,
Les fleurs, et les drapeaux flottants.

Sur deux rangs le cortège ondoie :
D'abord, les piquiers aux pas lourds ;
Puis, sous l'étendard qu'on déploie,
Les barons, en robe de soie,
Avec leurs toques de velours.

Voici les chasubles des prêtres ;
Les hérauts sur un blanc coursier.
Tous, en souvenir des ancêtres,
Portent l'écusson de leurs maîtres,
Peint sur leur corselet d'acier.

Admirez l'armure persane
Des templiers, craints de l'enfer ;
Et, sous la longue pertuisane,
Les archers venus de Lausanne,
Vêtus de buffle, armés de fer.

Le duc n'est pas loin : ses bannières
Flottent parmi les chevaliers ;
Quelques enseignes prisonnières,
Honteuses, passent les dernières...
Mes soeurs ! voici les timbaliers !... "

Elle dit, et sa vue errante
Plonge, hélas ! dans les rangs pressés ;
Puis, dans la foule indifférente,
Elle tomba, froide et mourante...
Les timbaliers étaient passés".




ANGLAIS:
"The Duke of Brittany
A, for the bloody fighting,
Convened Nantes to Mortagne
In the plains and the mountains
The backbenchers of his warriors.

They are the barons whose weapons
Adorn forts girded by a moat;
The gallant old in alarms,
Squires, men of arms;
One of them is my fiance.

He went to Aquitaine
As a drummer, and yet
You take it to a captain
Just seeing his haughty mien,
And his doublet, bright gold!

Since then, the terror agitated.
I said, clasping her fate with mine:
- My boss, St Bridget,
For he never leaves,
Watch her guardian angel! -

I said to our Father: - Sir,
Pray also for all our soldiers! -
And, as we know he likes,
I burned three candles wax
On the shrine of St. Gildas.

At Our Lady of Loreto
I promised in my black sorrow,
To attach my gorget,
Closed for the indiscreet
The shells of pilgrims.

He did not by love of wages,
Absent, console my home;
To bear the tender messages
The vassal has no pages
The vassal had no squires.

It should now of war
Back with my Lord;
It is not a vulgar lover;
I raise a brow fell once,
And my pride is the happiness!

The Duke triumphantly recounts
His flag crumpled in the camps;
Come all under the old door
See the brilliant pass escort
And the prince, and my boyfriend!

Come see for this holiday
His horse caparisoned
Who under his weight neighing, stops,
And walking, shaking his head,
Red feathers crowned!

My sisters, you deal so slow,
Come see by my winnings
These cymbals sparkling
Who in his hand still trembling
Sound, and make the heart leap!

Come see above himself
Under the cloak that I embroidered.
That will be beautiful! I love him!
He wears a tiara
His helmet-hair flooded!

The Egyptian sacrilege
Drawing me behind a pillar,
Told me yesterday (God forbid!)
That the fanfare of the parade
It lacks a timpanist.

But I prayed, I hope!
While showing me the hand
A grave, his dark lair
The old look of the viper
Told me: - I expect you here tomorrow!

Let's fly! more dark thoughts!
These are the drums that I hear.
Here are the ladies huddled
Purple tents erected,
Flowers, flags and floats.

On the train sways two rows:
First, the pikemen not heavy;
Then, under the banner that displays,
The barons, in a silk dress,
With their velvet caps.

Here are the jumpers of priests;
The heralds on a white steed.
All in memory of ancestors,
Wear the badge of their masters,
Painted on their thorax steel.

Admire the Persian weave
Templars, feared of hell
And, in the long partisan,
Archers from Lausanne
Dressed in Buffalo, armed with iron.

The Duke is not far: his banners
Float among the knights;
Some signs prisoners,
Ashamed, spend the last ...
My sisters drummers here! ... "

She said, and his eyes wandering
Dive, alas! in serried ranks;
Then, in the indifferent crowd,
She fell, cold and dying ...
The drummers were gone.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 28 Feb 10 - 07:05 PM

Marie-Madeleine a l'âge de 15 ans... Full version (with copyright)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 28 Feb 10 - 06:16 PM

Hmm - i know a totally different one:

Marie-Madelaine a l'âge de 15 ans
On n'a jamais vu une si belle enfant
Son père et sa mère lui ont demandé
Marie-Madelaine, veux-tu te marier

Non, non, non, je n' me marie pas
Ni avec un prince ni avec un roi
(repeat her answer)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: Monique
Date: 28 Feb 10 - 06:11 PM

You can hear it played here


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Subject: RE: Un Pied Mariton
From: GUEST,Lynn
Date: 28 Feb 10 - 03:02 PM

Never mind - I finally found it - It's called "Un Pied Mariton"

http://home.ca.inter.net/~yvondian/pidmarit.htm

Marie-Madelaine a une jambe de bois
Une jambe de bois
Un pied mariton


REFRAIN:
Un pied mariton Madelaine
Un pied mariton Madelon


Marie-Madelaine a une cuisse de v'lours
Une cuisse de v'lours
Une jambe de bois
Un pied mariton
Refrain


Marie-Madelaine a un ventre d'acier
Un ventre d'acier
Un cou en tuyau
Une gueule de bois
Une dent d'ciment
Un nez d'plastic
Un œil de vitre
Des oreilles en rubber
Des ch'veux d'papier
Une cuisse de v'lours
Une jambe de bois
Un pied mariton
Refrain


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French folk songs
From: GUEST,Lynn
Date: 28 Feb 10 - 02:51 PM

I vaguely remember a funny song about a girl named Marie-Madeleine. It's not the Marie-Madeleine song mentioned above by Artful Dodger (Marie-Madeleine verse 1. Mon père n'avait fille que moi/Encore sur la mer il m'envoie).

This song was an add-on song, and each verse described a different feature of Marie Madeleine's rather unattractive appearance. Example "Marie Madeleine a une dent cement" or "Marie Madeleine a une oreille en bois".

I think the verses goes sort of like this:
The leader sings the first line "Marie Madeleine a une dent cement."
The rest of the group calls out in a surprised way "une dent cement???"
The leader sings "Une dent cement!!"

There may be something else before the refrain.

When you start a new verse, I think you add on all the other descriptions. So the song gets longer and longer as you add more verses.

I remember the tune and the rhythm for those of you who know solfege. It's in 3/8 or 6/8 meter. The first 8th note is a pick-up to the next bar.

(low)sol doh-doh-doh doh-doh-doh   re(qtr note) re(8th) low sol (qtr)
       Ma - rie-Mad-e- leine a   une       dent             ce-ment___


and the refrain is this:


mi-re-mi   high sol(dotted qtr)    re(qtr)    mi(8th)    doh (dotted qtr)
mi-re-mi   high sol(dotted qtr)    re(qtr)    mi(8th)    doh (dotted qtr)

The refrain words could possibly be (though it doesn't make sense)
Pied mirinton Madeleine
Peid mirinton Madeleine

Does anyone remember this song? I remember learning it either on a French exchange trip to Trois-Riviere (in the 1990's), or else when I worked in Ottawa playing in the Band of the Ceremonial Guard (in the 1990's). (Both things were a LONG time ago, so the words may be way off, but I'm quite sure of the tune and rhythm.)


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