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Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore

In Mudcat MIDIs:
My Old Kentucky Home
Old Kentucky Home


GUEST,Clarks24@btinternet.com 08 Dec 01 - 02:33 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 08 Dec 01 - 02:45 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 08 Dec 01 - 02:46 PM
Sandy Paton 08 Dec 01 - 02:52 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 08 Dec 01 - 02:56 PM
GUEST,Clarks24@btinternet.com 09 Dec 01 - 06:03 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 09 Dec 01 - 08:31 AM
GUEST,Clarks24@btinternet.com 09 Dec 01 - 01:28 PM
Rolfyboy6 09 Dec 01 - 06:58 PM
Joe Offer 09 Dec 01 - 07:34 PM
Giac 09 Dec 01 - 08:01 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 09 Dec 01 - 08:13 PM
Rolfyboy6 09 Dec 01 - 08:16 PM
Rolfyboy6 09 Dec 01 - 09:05 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 09 Dec 01 - 09:25 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 09 Dec 01 - 09:36 PM
Rolfyboy6 09 Dec 01 - 09:59 PM
GUEST,tgv 18 May 05 - 07:14 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 May 05 - 02:16 PM
Peace 18 May 05 - 06:29 PM
GUEST,drbalog@yahoo.com 02 Jun 05 - 05:53 PM
dick greenhaus 02 Jun 05 - 10:02 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Jun 05 - 04:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Jun 05 - 04:40 PM
GUEST,Art Thieme 03 Jun 05 - 06:01 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Jun 05 - 06:26 PM
GUEST 22 Feb 06 - 11:31 AM
GUEST,Anne 16 Nov 11 - 02:42 PM
GUEST,Peter.. 01 Jan 13 - 04:02 PM
GUEST,Trevor on Bribie 27 Jan 13 - 02:39 AM
Jim Dixon 27 Jan 13 - 11:42 AM
GUEST 12 Oct 13 - 10:33 AM
GUEST,Amsam Dee 27 Jul 14 - 05:54 PM
GUEST,AmSam Dee 27 Jul 14 - 06:44 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 14 - 11:00 AM
GUEST,leeneia 28 Jul 14 - 04:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Jul 14 - 06:50 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Jul 14 - 10:04 PM
GUEST,leeneia 28 Jul 14 - 11:14 PM
GUEST,leeneia 29 Jul 14 - 12:46 AM
Jim Dixon 29 Jul 14 - 11:58 AM
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Subject: American ? folksong from a century ago
From: GUEST,Clarks24@btinternet.com
Date: 08 Dec 01 - 02:33 PM

I am trying to find the name and words of a song which my 80 year old mother was sung to her by her motherin London England: so it must be 1920s or 1930s. The only words she remembers are:

I feel so happy that I was set free
The master and the mistress were so kind to me
My heart is aching and breaking
Their faces to see once more
Piccanniny sitting by the fireside bright
Hanging up her stocjking on christmas night
Santa claus is coming in the morning
To the cabin on the mississippi shore

Could this be an American folksong? Help please


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Dec 01 - 02:45 PM

H. P. Danks, 1879. In American Memory. Type the title in google and you go directly to the titles, American sheet music, 1870-1885.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Dec 01 - 02:46 PM

Oops! "Cabin on the Mississippi Shore."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 08 Dec 01 - 02:52 PM

The title, as I guessed it might be, is "The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore." Google brought it up in a flash. What an amazing search aid!

Sandy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Dec 01 - 02:56 PM

If you have difficulty reading the sheet music, I will print it out for you.
The title to use is "De Cabin On De Mississippi Shore." There is an entirely different song under The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore, by Gussie L. Davis, 1884


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: GUEST,Clarks24@btinternet.com
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 06:03 AM

If you could print it for me that would be really great -and it would make my mother's Christmas!

Thanks

David clark Warwickshire UK


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Subject: Lyr Add: DE CABIN ON DE MISSISSIPPI SHORE
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 08:31 AM

DE CABIN ON DE MISSISSIPPI SHORE
(Ida Scott Taylor and H. P. Danks)

1. De years hab gone by, an' de darkies all am free,
But we'll neber see de happy times no more;
When we lib'd in Lou'sian', 'mong de blessed cotton fields,
In de cabin on de Mississippi shore.

CHORUS:
Den wipe away de tears from your shiny [Negro] face,
An' don't you go to mournin' any more;
But hand dat banjo down, an' I'll play a little tune,
'Bout de cabin on de Mississippi shore.

2. Dey bring'd us up Norf far away from all de folks,
An' de little picaninnies yell'd an' cried;
But dey's all grow'd up big an' has cabins ob deir own,
An' some ob de tender ones hab died.
CHORUS

3. My Dinah gal an' me am a-gettin' ole an' gray,
An' soon we won't be workin' any more;
When de Massa calls us home to de Canaan's happy land,
Whar de darkies am a-shoutin' on de shore.
CHORUS


Words by Ida Scott Taylor; music by H. P. Danks.
New York: H. P. Danks, 1879

H. P. Danks, 1879. Probably not the words you wanted, but these songs of that time were often changed and re-issued by other publishers. I have changed one word to make the lyrics slightly more acceptable in today's "corrected" climate; this song was popular and changes were made through time.


THE CABIN ON THE MISSISSIPPI SHORE
(Gussie L. Davis)

There's a little old log cabin on the Mississippi shore,
Where I whiled so many happy hours away,
Where the little picaninnies played around the cabin door
And the little birds piped out their tuneful lays;
It was many years ago when I left that dear old shore,
Where in childhood days I used to hoe the cain
But soon I will go back by the coon and possum track
To the old home and my dear old 'Liza Jane.

I have been away from the home I left so gay,
I know there's been a change around the place,
But I'm going back once more to that cabin on the shore,
My dear loving wife and children to embrace,
I was happy there and free from all sorrow, pain and care,
And it's years since I heard the old banjo,
The darks would sing all night, all so merry, gay and bright
In the cabin on the Mississippi shore.

I'm getting old, they say my limbs they won't obey,
My head it tells old age is coming on,
It tells of weary years of sorrow, grief and tears,
But I'll set out on my way with intention that some day
Will find me by old 'Liza's side once more,
Forever to remain and I'll never roam again
From the cabin on the Mississippi shore.

CHORUS:
I'm going back, I'm going back to my dear old southern home once more,
The place where I was born 'mong the sugar and the corn,
The cabin on the Mississippi shore.

Words and music by Gussie L. Davis
Cincinnati: J. C. Groene & Co., 1884.

Probably derived from the first song by Gussie L. Davis in 1884; perhaps closer to what you want.
I hope these help.


Click to play (joeweb)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: GUEST,Clarks24@btinternet.com
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 01:28 PM

Many thanks for the lyrics. That could be the end of a long search.

Happy Christmas


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Rolfyboy6
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 06:58 PM

I really have trouble with this song. I honor your desire to please your mother. But this song is an example of the worst sort of Victorian racism and is part and parcel of the cultural propaganda that accompanied the imposition of the vicious Jim Crow laws throughout the South. "Pickaninnies?" I realize that those without sufficient knowlege may be seduced by the "Gone with the Wind" image of "Darkies strumming their banjos and singing in the 'Quarters' and old Massa jest a-lubbing every one of them. The image doesn't contain the realities of the slave auctioneer, the counting house, and the whipping post.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Joe Offer
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 07:34 PM

True, Rolfyboy, but what do we do with songs like this? Do we erase them from all memory, and deny that such attitudes existed in our history?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD KENTUCKY HOME (Stephen Foster)
From: Giac
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 08:01 PM

I don't know the melody, but aren't these lyrics remarkably similar to Stephen Foster's My Old Kentucky Home? His, according to

American Music, Stephen Foster pages

was published in 1853, but these two in 1879 and 1884.

The following lyrics are from the DT and have been PC'd from the version I knew as a child.

OLD KENTUCKY HOME
(Stephen Foster)

The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home
'Tis summer, the folks there are gay
The corn top's ripe and the meadow's in bloom
While the birds make music all the day
The young folks roll on the little cabin floor
All merry, all happy and bright
By 'n by hard times come a-knocking at the door
Then my old Kentucky home good night

Weep no more, my lady
Oh, weep no more, today
We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home
For the old Kentucky home far away.

They hunt no more for the 'possum and the coon,
On meadow, the hill and the shore,
They sing no more by the glimmer of the moon,
On the bench by that old cabin door.

The day goes by like a shadow o'er the heart,
With sorrow where all was delight.
The time has come when the darkies have to part,
Then my old Kentucky home, good night.

The head must bow and the back will have to bend,
Wherever the poor folks may go
A few more days and the trouble will end,
In the field where sugar-canes may grow.

A few more days for to tote the weary load,
No matter, 'twill never be light
A few more days till we totter on the road,
Then my old Kentucky home, good night.

@nostalgia @South
filename[ KENTYHOM

Sorry if this has been mentioned previously. I searched, but found nothing comparing these songs.

Mary


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 08:13 PM

People who object to these songs and stories have no conception of history and how the past shapes the present and our response to it.
Piccaninny is not Victorian; it saw print at least as early as 1657, when it was used in the Barbados, by Negros, for a very small child. The word comes from the completely acceptable (I hope) Spanish pequeniño, or wee child (OED). Spanish remained common in the Caribbean islands and region for years after the British takeover. The word came to the Louisiana area with Spanish planters and with slaves transferred from Caribbean plantations to the mainland. Introduced to Australia, South Africa and other areas, it was "commonly used by the natives themselves." Certainly it was the usual term among southern Negroes, slave or free, for their wee ones.
The word is also related to the American picayune, or very small, from the Sp. half-reale, a coin still in circulation in the States until the mid-19C. (Harriet Beecher Stowe, in Uncle Tom's Cabin).
Limiting consideration of these terms to southern cultural propaganda also betrays ignorance; slavery was not legally proscribed by the British until 1833, but continued covertly in the Caribbean, and particularly in the Australasian area, until after the time of the Emancipation Proclamation.
I also suggest, for the general Anglo-Saxon British views, the Encyclopaedia Britanica 11th Edition, post-Victorian, be consulted.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Rolfyboy6
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 08:16 PM

Joe, I'm well aware of that arguement and subscribe to it myself. I am, however, also aware of the tendency to retreat behind that arguement and pat oneself one the back for 'broadmindedness', and thus, failing to shortcircuit the subconcious viciousness of the song's cultural baggage. Actually, the best thing that could happen to this song is what Randy Newman did to "Old Folks At Home"--full irony.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Rolfyboy6
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 09:05 PM

Dicho--so what? How is this germane to the central issue? Your posting contains an assumption that I am labelling a word victorian. Academic obfuscation. Further, I am well aware of how such songs shaped the world view and more importantly the view of the south and the lace curtain mentality. Beware blanket statements.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 09:25 PM

Rolfeyboy, you were the one who used the term "Victorian Racism" and "cultural propaganda" which are not germaine to rational argument. I should have realized that response should not be made to people who use such terms.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 09:36 PM

Giac, you may well be correct. I found myself humming "My Old Kentucky Home" as I copied these songs from American Memory, Library of Congress. It was a very common practice for publishers to profit from popular songs by others; they would get some musician to make up new words and a slightly different tune and sell the result as original. Collections of old broadsides and sheet music show that this happened over and over.
In the case of "Cabin on the Mississippi Shore," this copy? became popular in its own right.
You probably realize that the version of "My Old Kentucky Home" as you have posted it is not the original version by Stephen Foster.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: American ? folksong from a century a
From: Rolfyboy6
Date: 09 Dec 01 - 09:59 PM

Dicho, blow the dust off yourself, son.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,tgv
Date: 18 May 05 - 07:14 AM

I've been looking for the same song. I saw a copy of it in a collection of Christmas songs about 12 years ago in a library book and I have lost my copy of it... Life was ever thus. There was DEFINITELY a reference to Santa in it...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 May 05 - 02:16 PM

We never did find this one.
Here are two possibilities.
Hank Snow- "On the Mississippi Shore."
Delmore Bros.- "Happy on the Mississippi Shore."

Does anyone know the lyrics to these?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Peace
Date: 18 May 05 - 06:29 PM

http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:g8dcpQ9EfjAJ:arc.cs.odu.edu:8080/dp9/getrecord/oai_dc/oai.dlib.indiana.edu/oai:oai.dlib.ind

Happy on the Mississippi Shore available here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,drbalog@yahoo.com
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 05:53 PM

I have an old ukulele primer in which the second line reads:

"'Tis summer the darkies are gay"

Just thought I'd make everyone even more touchy. Sorry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:02 PM

For them as don't know it, Gussie L. Davis was the first black songwriter to make it on whatever passed for the pop charts back then.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 04:32 PM

Guest drbalog- 'darkies are gay' is the original in Foster sheet music, but often changed now.
My Old Kentucky Home
All Foster songs at this website, original lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 04:40 PM

Does anyone have the lyrics to Hank Snow, "Mississippi Shore"? The song is in cd1 of the 5-cd set, "The Yodeling Ranger."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,Art Thieme
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 06:01 PM

Good folks,

I loved the song De Massa Ob De Sheepfol' ever since I first heard it sung by Dr. Jerry Epstein at Pinewoods Camp in Massachusetts. Sing Out! magazine had printed it some time earlier---just the lyric--in a column---but still with the heavy dialect included. I thought it interesting, and a good document of another time and place---and, as such, ought to be saved in an archive like the Archive Of Folk Song at the Library Of Congress.

Later, when I learned the song, I did it based on Jerry Epstein's sung version the first time I'd heard it. It would've sounded totally outrageous, I felt, for me to even begin to sing the song like I was some vaudeville black-faced Eddie Cantor.

Master Of The Sheepfold is what I called it. I thought I was correct in doing what I did. I did what I had to in order to live with myself---and to do my part in bringing a fine song forward to more of the folk revival in the USA. Some say it is religious, but I see it as a song about INCLUSION -- the opposite of exclusion. Therefore it cannot be about organized religion as that is exemplified on this planet.

Years later, old friend Cindy Mangsen found the original poem called De Massa Ob De Sheepfol' by the poet Sarah Pratt McLean Greene---born in Connecticut in the 1800s--died in Massachusetts in 1932. This original lyric, without any tune yet, was in the heavy caricature dialect that whites thought blacks, at best, actually were enunciating. At worst this dialect was yet another way to poke fun at, and/or heap derision and hate on the entire Negro race.

This week I found the song at a website dedicated to the wonders that are SHEEP in just about any shape or form. (I can see the old western cattlemen spinning in their graves! ;-) There is a wonderful full color painting of a flock of sheep basking in the warm light lowering rays of the sun along with the words.

(I get mentioned as their source, although they say I attributed the song to "someone in Maine"---which I did not. I said that some earlier carriers of the song learned it from BILL BONYUN in Maine. Unfortuneately, this misquote is from our own Mudcat DIGITAL TRADITION.--Hint, hint, Dick Greenhaus.

Possibly intentionally, the sheep on the highest point of land is the darkest in color.

Check it out at:

http://www.ramshornstudio.com.sheepfold_m.htm

Enjoy! It's a nice song with a moral---about some sheep!!   ;-)

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 06:26 PM

The song with music by John Kimball Reynolds, pub. in 1895, is in American Memory. As mentioned in thread 10649, it was used as a hymn in Negro churches in Canada. Col. W. Mallory, ex-slave who escaped to Canada, printed the version he knew in his booklet, "Old Plantation Days," pub. in 1902.
What music was set to the poem in Canada I don't know; it could have been different from that written by Reynolds.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Feb 06 - 11:31 AM

Those who complain about the past's prejudices are wasting their time. Also, to protest songs of the past which contain racism is to limit one's understanding of the past. If you don't let people see what black people suffered, then they won't have any understanding for them.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,Anne
Date: 16 Nov 11 - 02:42 PM

My mother sang this to us when we were kids, her grandad sang it to her, I sang it to mine and now I am singing it to my grandaughter though with todays society it wouldn't be politically correct!!!!!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,Peter..
Date: 01 Jan 13 - 04:02 PM

Well it's 2013, and I'm still looking for it. I live in New Zealand and a Dear old Aunt used to sing it. As she sang it...

Oh I do feel so happy that I was set free
The master and the misses were so good to me
My heart is aching and breaking
Their faces I long to see.
The Piccanninies standing 'round the fireside bright
Hanging up their stockings on Christmas night
For Santa Claus is coming in the morning
To the cabin on the Mississippi shore.

Ring out the bells for Christmas
Ring out the bells for Christmas
Ring out the bells
Ring out the bells.
Foe it's been a happy day.....

I would love to find the complete lyrics....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,Trevor on Bribie
Date: 27 Jan 13 - 02:39 AM

I too have looked for "Santa Claus is Coming in the Morning..." etc, after seeing it in a Christmas song compendium, published possibly in the UK in the 80s. Might even have been edited by someone important such as David Willcocks. Glossy colour printing. In a local Brisbane library. Gone now.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE CABIN NEAR THE MISSISSIPPI SHORE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 13 - 11:42 AM

I found this additional song with a similar title at the Maine Music Box. Unfortunately, only the first 2 pages are viewable; after that, pages from a different song have been mismatched with it. (I have emailed the librarians about the error.)


THE CABIN NEAR THE MISSISSIPPI SHORE
Words by Henry Wise, music by Sidney Perrin.
New York: Howley, Hawland & Co., 1898.

1. Way down in Louisiana, near the Mississippi's flow,
There stands an old log cabin on the hill,
Behind the cabin in the fields the corn and 'taters grow,
In the trees the birds send forth their sweetest trill,
Within the old log cabin lives a darkey and his wife,
And....

2. Thro' the windows of the cabin beams the silvery moon,
While night-birds they are cooing soft and low,
And mammy says that daddy will be coming mighty soon,
As she slowly rocks the cradle to and fro,
The ringing of a banjo coming to them down the lane,
Tells....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Pickaninnys sitting by the fire side
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 10:33 AM

Like our Newzealand Friends we too
have been looking for this Black Lullaby

Alex. from Liverpool


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,Amsam Dee
Date: 27 Jul 14 - 05:54 PM

I have the lyrics remembered and written down by my mother, when she was very, very old, so no guarentees but I am fascinated how it seems to match and belong on this page.

About slave being SORRY he was set free
"Masser and de Missus were so good to me"

It includes the line about the Christmas stockins, the piccaninnis and the mississippi shore.
2 full verses and a chorus.

Happy to share but not sure how to do it. Maybe i just post it here?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shor ADD
From: GUEST,AmSam Dee
Date: 27 Jul 14 - 06:44 PM

I don't care so much about de sunshine
I don't bother much about de rain
I can't help brooding over bygone days
And a home i may never see again
Trying mighty hard to keep from weeping
An longin for de Mississippi shore
Where de steamboats used to come a sweepin
By my cabin door

Chorus
Oh I do feel sorry that i was set free
Masser an de Missus was so good to me
Ma hearts just achin and abreakin
Dere faces to see once more
Pickaninis sitting round a fire so bright
Hangin up dere stockins on a Christmas night
Cos Santa claus is comin in the mornin
To de cabin on de mississppi shore

Sometimes I feel I'd like to wander
Back to de cotton fields again
I can't help broodin over bygone days
And my tears dey start to fall just like de rain
Piccaninies run to meet dere mammies
Dere merry voices ringin thro de air
Pretty soon de moon begins a shinin
And Dina meet me dere"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 14 - 11:00 AM

The lyrics that GUEST,AmSam Dee has just posted are apparently from

SANTY CLAUS IS COMIN' 'FORE DE MORNIN'
Words by C.L. Mays; music by M.P. Hunter; "sung by Miss Bessie Wentworth"
London : Francis, Day & Hunter, ©1898.

First line: I don't care much about de sunshine.
First line of chorus: I do feel sorry dat I was set free.

WorldCat.org says that the Oxford University has the sheet music.

Yale University also has it--they classify it as "British Art."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 28 Jul 14 - 04:36 PM

When I was a kid, growing up in Chicagoland, I was taught that black people 'escaped' the South and were so lucky to come up north.

This song shows us the emotional wrench of that migration - how a black person misses his homeland, his southern environment, with its heat, its plants, its water. He also misses his extended family and his friends, snd when he retires, he's going back.   

(I am reminded of Helen Keller in her autobiography, speaking of "the many flowers of my southern home."

I'm going to make a MIDI of the song from American MEmory and ask Joe to post it (maybe today, maybe not) so people can sing it. Check back.
=========
I too can quibble about an isolated word. No American would say 'Mississippi shore.' Rivers don't have shores, they have banks. Lakes and oceans have shores, but not rivers.

Starting at the river and moving inland, we have

River
River bank
Levee (if any)
Bottomland or floodplain
Bluff
Upland

But 'shore' rhymes with 'door,' so what can ya do?


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Subject: ADD: Down on the Mississippi Shore
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Jul 14 - 06:50 PM

Here's a song with "Mississippi shore" printed in New York. I know of one other (both in American Memory). Joseph P. Skelly also wrote "The Old Rustic Bridge by the Mill," sheet music printed in Australia. I have no idea where he hailed from.
The text seems to be based on a better song. Possibly from an Australian minstrel troupe.

DOWN ON THE MISSISSIPPI SHORE
(Joseph P. Skelly)

I was a festive little nigger,
In the days what used to be,
Down on de Mississippi river,
O, dem was de times for me.
I can't fergit dem good ole days
Just fore de cruel war,
When de coons were happy in de fields of corn,
Down on de Mississippi shore.

CHORUS
Halelujah! shout and sing,
Don't you be sad no more.
We will sing togedder of de dear ole home
Down on de Mississippi shore.

We played on de fiddle and banjo
And sang all de livelong day,
Ole Uncle Rufus used to watch us
Dancing around so gay.

At night when all de work was done
We sat at de cabin door,
And the gals went crazy wid de music sweet,
Down on de Mississippi shore.

Dere I would ramble in de twilight
Wid my true love so dear,
And stray in de shadow of de branches
Where de birds sang sweet and clear.

Dat happy time is passed away,
'Twill never come no more;
I'm always t'inking of de dear ole home,
Down on de Mississippi shore.

Copyright E. E. Harding, 1879. Printed by E. H. Harding, New York, 1880.

American Memory.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Jul 14 - 10:04 PM

The other song is "Mississippi Shore," lyrics by Charley Lawton Lovell, music by Edgar G. Spinning.

Sheet music at American Memory. A sad song, about Nellie who now "lies sleeping."
Published by Oliver Ditson, Boston, 1857.
No information on Ch. L. Lovell (possible;, English, ancestry.com, record for 1860).
Edgar G. Spinning wrote "The Blind Soldier's Lament," 1863; an American Civil War song (not seen).

1st. verse:

Where the Mississippi's waters lave a flow'ry southern shore,
A little cot was standing in the happy days of yore;
There oft-times I have wandered, with Nellie by my side,
And watched the wavy motion of the river's rolling tide.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 28 Jul 14 - 11:14 PM

Thanks for enriching the compendium, Q.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cabin on the Mississippi Shore
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 29 Jul 14 - 12:46 AM

I've made a MIDI of the song by Gussie L. Davis and submitted it for posting here. This is the song in the American Memory collection in the Library of Congress. It is a nice little 19-C. tune, and I've changed it from A flat to A.

The lyrics for this tune were posted by Dicho (above) on Dec 9, 2001.

Click to play (joeweb)


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Subject: Lyr Add: SANTY CLAUS IS COMIN' 'FORE DE MORNIN'
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Jul 14 - 11:58 AM

Sorry I didn't find this earlier. The sheet music can be viewed online at the University of Tennessee website. Only one verse is given. There is a 4-part harmony arrangement of the chorus.


SANTY CLAUS IS COMIN' 'FORE DE MORNIN'
Words by C. L. Mays, music by M. P. Hunter, "sung by Miss Bessie Wentworth"
London: Francis, Day & Hunter, ©1898.

1. I don't care much about de sunshine,
And don't bother much about de rain,
I'm always thinkin' ob de southern clime
And a home I may never see again.
Tryin' mighty hard to keep from weepin',
Longin' for de Mississippi shore,
Where de steamboats used to go a-sweepin'
By my cabin door.

CHORUS: I do feel sorry dat I was set free,
Massa and missus were so good to me,
My heart's just aching and a-breakin'
Their faces just to see once more.
Piccaninnies singin' roun' de fires so bright;
Hangin' up their stockings on Christmas night,
'Cause Santy Claus is comin' 'fore de mornin'
To de cabin on de Mississippi shore.


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