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Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)

Deckman 09 Jan 02 - 02:59 PM
MMario 09 Jan 02 - 03:09 PM
MMario 09 Jan 02 - 03:13 PM
GUEST,BigDaddy 09 Jan 02 - 03:17 PM
annamill 09 Jan 02 - 03:28 PM
Lonesome EJ 09 Jan 02 - 03:50 PM
Deckman 09 Jan 02 - 03:51 PM
MMario 09 Jan 02 - 03:59 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 09 Jan 02 - 04:11 PM
GUEST,Les B 09 Jan 02 - 05:29 PM
Steve in Idaho 09 Jan 02 - 06:07 PM
Steve in Idaho 09 Jan 02 - 06:15 PM
GUEST,Boab 10 Jan 02 - 12:44 AM
Stephen L. Rich 17 Mar 03 - 10:22 AM
GUEST 17 Mar 03 - 10:01 PM
TawneyChaz 30 Nov 09 - 05:26 PM
Jim Dixon 01 Dec 09 - 11:08 PM
GUEST 15 Dec 09 - 11:58 AM
GUEST 15 Dec 09 - 12:01 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Dec 09 - 01:34 PM
GUEST 27 Dec 12 - 02:26 PM
sciencegeek 28 Dec 12 - 01:19 AM
GUEST 27 Jan 13 - 06:33 PM
GUEST 02 Dec 13 - 09:51 AM
McGrath of Harlow 02 Dec 13 - 05:26 PM
Greg F. 02 Dec 13 - 06:43 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: DIXIE'S SUNNY LAND
From: Deckman
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 02:59 PM

In 1956, I was headed for the Army in the Fall. That Summer I decided to travel America. I aimed for Wisconsin, missed and ended up in Columbus, Georgia. While there I viewed the Andersonville Prison memorial and cemetery. I knew that I had a Great Grandfather that was a union soldier, was captured and was imprisoned at Andersonville. I had just read McKinley Kantor's prize winning book on Andersonville. On my return to Seattle, I stopped in Springfield Illinois and researched my Grandfather ... G. W. Murray. I found, in the archives, a very small book he wrote after the war. It was titled "The Tales and Accounts of a Poor Union Soldier In Andersonville Prison." Then the cover page went on: "please buy this book as I'm destitute and can't support my family as I lost my leg fighting the glorious war for the North." The writing was quite crude and honest. But on the innerface, I found the following poem. As the writing was considerably different (better) than anything else in the book, I have always assumed that this poem was perhaps a ballad that was sung. If anyone out there knows anything of this tale, please let me know. I have always sung this to the melody of "Lilly of the West." (there were no notes indicating a melody).

DIXIE'S SUNNY LAND

Come friends and fellow soldiers, come listen to my song
About that rebel prison and how we endured so long.
Our wretched state and hardships great, no one can understand
But those who have endured this fate, in Dixie’s sunny land

When captured by their Chivalry (cavalry) and stripped unto the skin
They failed to give us back again, the value of a pin
Except some filthy rags of grease discarded by their band
And thus commenced our prison life, in Dixie’s sunny land

The hosts of guards surrounded us, each one with loaded gun,
We were stationed in a open field exposed to rain and sun
No tent or tree to shelter us we lay upon the sand
And side by side great numbers died in Dixie’s sunny land

What was our daily bill of fare, in that secesh saloon
No sugar, tea, nor coffee there, at morning, night or noon
But a pint of meal, ground cob and all, was served to every man
For want of fire we ate it raw, in Dixie’s sunny land

Our temper it was often tried by many a threat and bribe
To desert our glorious Union, and join the rebel tribe
But fain we were to leave the place, we let them understand
We'd sooner die than thus disgrace our flag in Dixie’s land

How sad those weary moments seemed, as weeks and months rolled by
And yet no tidings came to us, from loved ones far away
While here we lay to starve and die, upon that burning sand
Away from friends and homes so dear, in Dixie’s sunny land

When landed at Annapolis, a wretched looking band,
But glad to be alive and free, from Dixie’s sunny land
Having gained our wasted strength, all dressed in Union blue,
We'll pay them back our vengeance dear, or die their bitter foe

Another note. Andersonville prison was one of the worst shames of that war. The treatment of the prisoners was terrible. It's interesting to note, that at the end of the war, Col. Wirtz, who was the prison commander, was sentenced to death in the FIRST war crimes trial in America. So, again, if anyone knows anything of this ballad, please let me know. CHEERS, Bob Nelson, Everett, Washington USA


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:09 PM

Dixie's Sunny Land written by John Lauffer


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:13 PM

another site says the poem is sung to the air "Twenty Years Ago"


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: GUEST,BigDaddy
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:17 PM

I'm not familar with the song, Bob. My great-great grandfather Sylvester Turner died and was buried at Andersonville, however. He served with the 120th Illinois Infantry (Company A) until his capture at the Battle of Brice's Crossroads at Corinth, Mississippi. I hope to visit his grave for the first time this winter. I've been piecing together what I can of his short life since I was in my teens. I do have a dagerreotype of him in uniform. Didn't mean to ramble on...just wanted to say "thanks" for posting this interesting story and song.


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: annamill
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:28 PM

I love this place!


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:50 PM

On the battlefields of the Civil War, amputation was standard practice in the case of any arm or leg wound when the bullet struck bone. It is staggering to think of the number of men who survived the war as cripples, and sad to think that the gratitude of their country was so trifling that they were forced to plead for assistance. Very moving post, Deckman.


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: Deckman
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:51 PM

To: MMario ... WOW! I have wondered about this song's history for over 40 years. I post the words, and in TEN MINUTES the full history is there! Thank you so much. I never would have guessed that I could find out so much so fast. Thank you MAX for the wonderful MUDCAT. Bob


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 03:59 PM

ain't the internet a wonnerful place?

I wasn't able to find out any information on the air that the one site listed.

I searched on google for "dixie's sunny land"


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 04:11 PM

Funny. Dixie's Sunny Land came up for me on both Altavista and Google if I put in the apostrophe, but not if I left it out.
There are several good sites for songs of The Civil War-War Between the States-The War of the Rebellion. It is worth searching one of the engines for them and bookmarking.


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: GUEST,Les B
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 05:29 PM

You can find "Twenty Years ago", with words & notes, underthis heading at the Levy Sheet Music site:

Title: Just Twenty Years Ago. Song. Composer, Lyricist, Arranger: Composed by E.B. Sanford. Publication: New York: T.S. Berry & Co., 297 Broadway, 1852.


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: Steve in Idaho
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 06:07 PM

And as an aside - I'm currently researching my (unsure how many greats) Great Grandfather Abraham Tawny who fought with the Illinois Volunteers. I've a photo of him and several of his letters home. He also lost his leg to a minnie ball and was captured in Tennessee. He avoided Andersonville, I have not figured out what camp he went to, and was exchanged after several months in 1863. His wife, Amanda, ended up filing for a widows claim after his death. Her brother was destroyed (psychologically) in the same battle that my Grandfather lost his leg and lived with them until his death also. (I am using Grandfather cause I really haven't figured out how many Greats he is) And his letters are filled with how poorly they fared - even at the Union hands - after being repatriated.

So how many of us had a relative in the same unit? Three? Unfricking believable.

Steve


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: Steve in Idaho
Date: 09 Jan 02 - 06:15 PM

And this is the best site on the Illinois Volunteers on the net. They'd love to have a picture of your relative to put by his name on the roster. Very nice folks.

Steve


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 10 Jan 02 - 12:44 AM

Just back from North Britain---a Guid New Year tae yin and a'. Just a wee comment---"Andersonville", by McKinlay Cantor [sp?] recommended reading.


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Subject: RE: A Civil War Song: Dixie's Sunny Land
From: Stephen L. Rich
Date: 17 Mar 03 - 10:22 AM

Bob, here's the thread.

Stephen Lee


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Subject: RE: A Civil War STNEWALL JACKSONS WAY
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Mar 03 - 10:01 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: TawneyChaz
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 05:26 PM

Does anyone know how to contact Steve In Idaho? Abraham Tawney was my great-great-grandfather, by way of his son Elias. Thanks!


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Subject: Lyr Add: UNION PRISONERS, FROM DIXIE'S SUNNY LAND
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Dec 09 - 11:08 PM

From The Capture, the Prison Pen and the Escape: Giving a Complete History of Prison Life in the South ... by Willard W. Glazier (Hartford, Conn.: H. E. Goodwin, 1869), page 350:

The following poetical description of prison life in the South is from the genial pen of an Andersonville prisoner, whose name I have not been able to learn:

UNION PRISONERS, FROM DIXIE'S SUNNY LAND.
Air—"Twenty Years Ago."

I.
Dear friends and fellow-soldiers brave, come listen to our song,
About the Rebel prisons, and our sojourn there so long;
Yet our wretched state and hardships great no one can understand,
But those who have endured this fate in Dixie's sunny land.

II.
When captured by the chivalry, they strip't us to the skin,
But failed to give us back again the value of a pin—
Except some lousy rags of gray, discarded by their band—
And thus commenced our prison life in Dixie's sunny land.

III.
With a host of guards surrounding us, each with a loaded gun,
We were stationed in an open plain, exposed to rain and sun;
No tent or tree to shelter us, we lay upon the sand—
Thus, side by side, great numbers died in Dixie's sunny land.

IV.
This was the daily "bill of fare" in that Secesh saloon—
No sugar, tea or coffee there, at morning, night or noon;
But a pint of meal, ground cob and all, was served to every man,
And for want of fire we ate it raw in Dixie's sunny land.

V.
We were by these poor rations soon reduced to skin and bone,
A lingering starvation—worse than death! you can but own,
There hundreds lay, both night and day, by far too weak to stand,
Till death relieved their sufferings in Dixie's sunny land.

VI.
We poor survivors oft were tried by many a threat and bribe,
To desert our glorious Union cause, and join the Rebel tribe,
Though fain were we to leave the place, we let them understand,
We had rather die than thus disgrace our flag! in Dixie's land.

VII.
Thus dreary days and nights roll'd by—yes, weeks and months untold,
Until that happy time arrived when we were all paroled.
We landed at Annapolis, a wretched looking band,
But glad to be alive and free from Dixie's sunny land.

VIII.
How like a dream those days now seem in retrospective view,
As we regain our wasted strength, all dressed in "Union Blue."
The debt we owe our bitter foe shall not have long to stand;
We shall pay it with a vengeance soon in Dixie's sunny land.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 09 - 11:58 AM

I have a paper with a song you have posted here and it was not called Dixies Sunny Land it was titled The Soldiers Lamentation and another poem called The Horrors of Andersonville - printed about 1868-1870 Not sure of the date - The name on this was G.W. Murray.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 09 - 12:01 PM

Soory - I am Adrienne and I am reseraching this to see if GW Murray was the author and the soldier in a picture I have....any direction would nice??


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Dec 09 - 01:34 PM

"Dixie's Sunny Land" seems to have had several printings made during Civil War times.

The New York State Military Museum mentions a copy-
"The song was sold for 10 cents- "which any person can obtain by calling on, or addressing, N. O. Bowhall, Co. B, 92d NY Volunteers, Fort Anderson, Newbern, NC" (Brown Univ. has a copy). Song in 8- 12(?)-line stanzas.
Also mentioned at NY Military Museum site, "A prison song, lines supposed to be written by Dr. Sutherland, a "live Yankee" of the 92nd. N. Y. Regiment ....confined in "Dixie's Sunny Land,"...1862..."
Herman, 1862, broadside, 48x30 (this may be in Sutherland's "history" and Herman the publisher of his book).

www.civilwarpoetry attributes the song to John Lauffler, 1846-1921.

Oberlin Univ. has a copy pub. by A. W. Auner, Philadelphia, "Dixie's Sunny Land, or the "Cruelty to Our Union Prisoners."

A copy was found with the papers of a private with the 16th Connecticut Infantry, "The Song of Union Prisoners, from Dixie's Sunny Land."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Dec 12 - 02:26 PM

We have a copy in the hand of David Jones, Co. D,82nd O.V.I. He spent
18 months in prison camps, most of it in Andersonville except for the
3 moths he escaped but never got out of Georgia.
Sounds like copies were made by a number of soldiers perhaps while
they were at Annopolis awaiting discharge.
The last paragraph would indicate it was written while the war was stilll going on.

RBF


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: sciencegeek
Date: 28 Dec 12 - 01:19 AM

The treatment of sailors and soldiers has historically been shameful. Which is part of what made the US GI Bill so groundbreaking... providing educational benefits along with other benefits for American servicemen & women.

GI stands for Government Issue... a term used by servicemen to refer to themselves, after they emerged from boot camp clad in their government issued uniforms, etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Jan 13 - 06:33 PM

HI,   I ALSO HAVE FOUND IN MY GREAT GRAET GRANDFATHERS ATTIC THIS SONG CALLED----IN DIXIES SUNNY LAND.

IT'S TYPED ON OLD YELLOWED PAPER IS RIPPED UP SOME ,BUT CAN BE READ REALLY GOOD.

CAN'T SAY WHEN IT WAS TYPE. BUT TYPE IS FROM AN OLD TYPERWRITTER,YOU CAN SEE THAT.

IT ISD SIGNED ----THIS SONG WAS COMOPOSED BY ONE OF THE BOYS WHILE IN ANDERSONVILLE PRISON, DUIRING THE WAR OF THE REBELLION.

ANYONE INTERESTED IN IT ..IT WILL BE ON EBAY IN THE NEXT 2 DAYS--[FOR A WEEK]

LOOK UP AQUARS   SMALL CASE    JIM       ""WILL BE PICTURES""


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Dec 13 - 09:51 AM

A 1902 diary written by the brother of an Andersonville soldier shares several verses, saying it was written by his brother, Delos Lyons, and his bunkmate. Delos was paroled from Andersonville, spent a few weeks recovering, and then was called back to his regiment, the 108th Ohio, never to be seen again by his family.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 02 Dec 13 - 05:26 PM

I wondered whether "the Chivalry" might not have been just a mistake for cavalry but also, or rather, a reference to Southern claims about having a more aristocratic and feudal society than the North, and the scorn directed at that in the North. See this cartoon for example.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dixie's Sunny Land (a Civil War song)
From: Greg F.
Date: 02 Dec 13 - 06:43 PM

Got it in one, McGrath.


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