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Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights

DigiTrad:
FIVE NIGHTS DRUNK (OUR GOODMAN)
SHICKERED AS HE COULD BE
THE TRAVELER(Our Goodman)


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: 7 Drunken Night 1864 (2)
'Cabbage Head' - wanted (App Bluegrass) (15)
seven drunken nights (61)
You blind fool you drunken fool/4 Nights Drunk (50)
Chord Req: Seven Drunken Nights (31)
Lyr Add: Yet another OUR GOODMAN (#274) (8)
Lyr Req: Seven Drunken Nights (by The Dubliners) (24)
Lyr Req: Pretty Far Out (The Limeliters) (4)
Lyr Req: Four Nights Drunk (Steeleye Span) (10)
Lyr Req: Oor Gudeman (Alastair McDonald) (3)
Lyr Req: Seven Drunken Nights (23)
seven drunken nights+whiskey in the jar (12) (closed)
Lyr Req: Seven Drunken Nights - Irish (10)
Lyr Req: Seven Drunken Nights (12)
help w/ Irish or Scottish song (7 nights drunk) (28)


GUEST,Petter@killieburne.no 15 Jan 02 - 04:49 AM
GUEST,MCP 15 Jan 02 - 05:11 AM
masato sakurai 15 Jan 02 - 05:11 AM
Aidan Crossey 15 Jan 02 - 05:12 AM
GUEST,Paddy Plastique (sans Cookie) 15 Jan 02 - 05:43 AM
Malcolm Douglas 15 Jan 02 - 07:21 AM
Aidan Crossey 15 Jan 02 - 08:18 AM
Dave Bryant 15 Jan 02 - 10:57 AM
michaelr 15 Jan 02 - 01:12 PM
Charcloth 15 Jan 02 - 04:42 PM
Brían 15 Jan 02 - 08:52 PM
Joe Offer 17 Dec 02 - 01:33 AM
masato sakurai 17 Dec 02 - 04:20 AM
masato sakurai 25 Dec 02 - 11:56 AM
Cluin 26 Dec 02 - 08:47 PM
masato sakurai 26 Dec 02 - 10:04 PM
Jon Bartlett 26 Dec 02 - 10:33 PM
Declan 30 Dec 02 - 06:16 AM
Susanne (skw) 30 Dec 02 - 07:45 PM
masato sakurai 30 Dec 02 - 09:39 PM
HuwG 02 Jan 03 - 07:01 AM
GUEST 01 Jun 07 - 11:29 AM
EBarnacle 01 Jun 07 - 09:27 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: SEVEN DRUNKEN NIGHTS
From: GUEST,Petter@killieburne.no
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 04:49 AM

Seriously, an authoritative site like Mudcat should have this one, so here it is. In case of typos or other shortcomings, I'd much welcome a note.

SEVEN DRUNKEN NIGHTS

As I went home on a Monday night as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a horse outside the door where me old horse should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that horse outside the door where me old horse should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk, you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
That's a lovely sow that me mother sent to me."
Well, it's many a day I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But a saddle on a sow, sure, I never saw before.

As I went home on a Tuesday night as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a coat behind the door where me old coat should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that coat behind the door where me old coat should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
That's a woolen blanket that me mother sent to me."
Well, it's many a day I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But buttons on a blanket, sure, I never saw before.

As I went home on a Wednesday night as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a pipe upon the chair where me old pipe should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that pipe upon the chair where me old pipe should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
That's a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to me."
Well, it's many a day I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But tobacco in a tin whistle, sure, I never saw before.

As I came home on a Thursday night as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw two boots beneath the bed where me old boots should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns them boots beneath the bed where me old boots should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
They're two geranium flowerpots me mother sent to me."
Well, it's many a day I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But laces on a flower pot I never saw before.

As I came home on a Friday night as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a head upon the bed where me old head should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that head upon the bed where me old head should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
That's a baby boy that me mother sent to me."
Well, it's many a day I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But a baby boy with his whiskers on, sure, I never saw before.

As I came home on a Saturday night as drunk as drunk could be,
I spied two hands upon her breasts where me old hands should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Whose hands are these upon your breasts where me old hands should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
'Tis nothing but a Living Bra Jane Russell gave to me."
Well, it's many a day I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But fingernails on a Living Bra, I never saw before.

Now when I came home on a Sunday night a little after three,
I saw a man running out the door with his pants about his knee.
I called me wife and I said to her, "Will you kindly tell to me,
Who was that man running out the door with his pants about his knee?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
'Twas nothing but the tax collector the Queen sent to me."
Well, it's many a night I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But an Englishman that could last 'til three I never saw before.

An alternative, rather naughty, Sunday verse:

As I came home on a Sunday night a little after three
I saw a ... inside me wife where me old ... should be.
I called me wife and I said to her, "(Hey wife) Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that ... outside the ... where me old ... should be?"
"Oh, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, and still you cannot see,
That's just the lovely Englishman me ma she sent to me."
Well, it's many a night I've travelled, a hundred miles or more,
But an Englishman who could stay up past three, sure, I never saw before.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: GUEST,MCP
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 05:11 AM

If you type Drunken Nights into the Digitrad and Forum search box, you'll find numerous references to vesions of this song. Or you might look at this thread(click) for some references without the search.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: masato sakurai
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 05:11 AM

It's a version of "Our Goodman" (Child #274). FIVE NIGHTS DRUNK (OUR GOODMAN), THE TRAVELER(Our Goodman), and SHICKERED AS HE COULD BE are in the DT.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Aidan Crossey
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 05:12 AM

There are probably any number of alternatives to the "Sunday" verse ...

e.g. (one I heard me da sing when in impolite company)
That's a lovely banana that my mother gave to me
Sure it's many's the day ...etc
But a banana with two brussels sprouts sure I never saw before


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: GUEST,Paddy Plastique (sans Cookie)
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 05:43 AM

Masato,

The Dubliners claim they got it from Joe Heaney who claims it to be related to a very long song in Irish that he sings a few verses of on the Ossian LP 'Songs in English and Irish' (I think). As I remember the title is 'Peigín agus Peadar' and is about a farmer going away to work 21 years for a richer farmer and coming home to find a bearded fella in bed with his wife - ostensibly his grown-up son. Same premise as 7 drunken nights minus the drink and with a bit more ambiguity thrown in. I'm sure it's a fairly generic theme anyway.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 07:21 AM

Beside the thread MCP indicated, where I gave links to the DT files and other discussions here, see also  Peigín 's Peadar.

Beside numerous British and Irish forms (and their descendants in America and Canada), there seem to be few European countries which do not have equivalent songs.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Aidan Crossey
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 08:18 AM

I came across a blues song years ago which was almost identical in form. I'm buggered if I can remember the title or the artist. I THINK "cabbage" was in there somewhere ...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 10:57 AM

I was once told by Bert Lloyd that this song is based on an Arabic song/story and that after the bit where his wife and her lover think they are duping him, the cuckolded husband retaliates by torturing and eventually killing them. During the second half as he hacks bits off them, he tells them that his strokes are only caresses etc.

Perhaps last verse of the version I sing reflects this a bit.

My Saturday verse is:

...
I found a t'ing in my wife's t'ing...
It's nothing but a rolling pin...
But a rolling pin with B****cks on (or two walnuts in polite company)

My Sunday verse is (the tune is altered somewhat) is

As I came home on a Sunday night just a little before me time.
I went into the cowshed me old twelve-bore gun to find.
Now what is this, now what is that, the frightened couple asked.
I said, "It is a twelve-bore gun to shoot right up your ... bottom".
Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more,
But I never saw two f***ers run so bloody fast before.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: michaelr
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 01:12 PM

Dave - funny, I was just thinking along those lines (your saturday verse) the other day. My verse would end thus:
"...but bollocks on a vibrator sure I've never seen before."
~Michael


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Charcloth
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 04:42 PM

"Cabbage head" is the old mountain version. My Grandfather used to sing that to my grandmother as a courting song. Hey they were married almost 65 years before he died a few years back. My Grandmother talks like the Carter family recorded it. I wish I could verify that though.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Brían
Date: 15 Jan 02 - 08:52 PM

My friend Chez used to say "Two o' them on a walkin' stick I never saw before".

"Peigín augus Peadar" and the story of "The Three Advices" is quite tame compared to this version.

Brían


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 01:33 AM

If I recall correctly, Lee Hays did a great job on this song on a recording with the Weavers. I went looking for it this evening, but couldn't find it.
What title did the Weavers use for it?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU OLD FOOL (The Weavers)
From: masato sakurai
Date: 17 Dec 02 - 04:20 AM

The Weavers' version is titled "You Old Fool". It's on The Weavers: Wasn't That a Time! (disc 2, track 19).

YOU OLD FOOL

I came home the other night as drunk as I could be
I saw a horse in the stable where my horse ought to be
I said to my wife, my pretty little wife
Explain this thing to me
What's this horse doing here in the stable
Where my horse ought to be?

Well, you old fool, you blind fool
Can't you plainly see
It's nothing but a milk cow
That my mother sent to me

I've traveled this wide world over
10,000 miles or more
But a saddle and a bridle on a milk cow
I never did see before
A saddle and a bridle on a milk cow
I never did see before

I came home the next night so drunk I could not see
There was a hat on the hat rack where my hat ought to be
I said to my wife, my pretty little wife
Explain this thing to me
What's this hat doing here on the hat rack
Where my hat ought to be?

Oh, you old fool, you blind fool
Can't you plainly see
It's nothing but a chamber pot
My mother sent to me

I've traveled this wide world over
10,000 miles or more
But a J.B. Stetson chamber pot
I never did see before
A J.B. Stetson chamber pot
I never did see before

I came home the next night as drunk as I could be
I spied some pants upon the chair where my pants ought to be
Well, I said to my wife, my pretty little wife
Explain this thing to me
What are these pants doing here on the chair
Where my pants ought to be?

Oh, you old fool, you blind fool
Can't you plainly see
It's nothing but an old dish rag
My mother sent to me

I've traveled this wide world over
10,000 miles or more
But cuffs and a zipper on a dish rag
I never did see before
But cuffs and a zipper on a dish rag
I never did see before

I came home the next night as drunk as I could be
And there was a head on the pillow where my head ought to be
I said to my wife, my pretty little wife
Explain this thing to me
What's this head doing here on the pillowcase
Where my head ought to be?

Oh, you old fool, you blind fool
Can't you plainly see
It's nothing but a melon
That my mother sent to me

I've traveled this wide world over
10,000 miles or more
But a mustache on a muskmelon
I never did see before
A mustache on a muskmelon
I never did see before

It's a good thing I'm not of a suspicious nature

For info on other recordings, see notes to "DRUNKARD'S SPECIAL" by Coley Jones.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: masato sakurai
Date: 25 Dec 02 - 11:56 AM

'Three Nights Drunk' - Gid Tanner and His Skillet Lickers [RealAudio], from The Record Lady's All-Time Country Favorites.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Cluin
Date: 26 Dec 02 - 08:47 PM

Bill O'Donnell from our band, "Blarney" sings:

"I saw a dink upon the bed where my own dink should be!"

...which the wife claims is a "sausage that me mother sent to me"

...and to which the drunk replies, "But a sausage that is circumcised, I never saw before."

Just to add one more strand to the thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: masato sakurai
Date: 26 Dec 02 - 10:04 PM

Helen Hartness Flanders (Ancient Ballads Traditionally Sung in New England, vo. 4, 1965, p. 63) wrote of this ballad that "Many informants refuse to sing this ballad on moral grounds, though the lines that have caused them to feel this way are not to be found in print." Now "unprintable" versions have been printed (see Vance Randolph, Roll Me in Your Arms, University of Arkansas Press, 1992, pp. 53-57).
~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Jon Bartlett
Date: 26 Dec 02 - 10:33 PM

The ballad "La Adultera" in Spanish Traditional Ballads from Aragon" includes the following lines:

En donde dejo mi caballo? - En la cuadra lo dejo
Donde dejo mi escopeta? - En ra rincon la dejo.
Donde dejo mi sombrero? - Y en la pueta lo colgo...

And the abstract gives: "A women's husband has left her to go to the mountains (or islands) of Leon. She sets a curse on him so that he will never return. The husband returns and knocks at the door. Her lover, already in the house, has placed his horse, gun, and hat in the places where the husband had kept his. When the husband comes in , he sees the belongings of the other man and inquires to whom they belong. She tells him they all all his, the gifts of her parents (cf. "...just a rolling pin me mother gave to me"). She cannot keep up the lie any longer and tells him to kill her: she has betrayed him.... He kills her."

I wonder if our "Five Nights Drunk" had an earlier life as this type of revenge killing? As Marx says, the first time tragedy, the next time farce.

Jon Bartlett


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Declan
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 06:16 AM

Johnny Moynihan wrote a great parody of this song called The Other Night Drunk. I don't have the exact words, but its something like this :

As I came home the other night, I was drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a fair maid on the bed where my ould wife should be,
Well I took off my overcoat and I rubbed my hand with glee,
She jumped out of bed, and screamed and said "You live at number 3"

Ah you're drunk you're drunk you're Micky Monk,
Your nose is turning blue,
for I'm your neighbours daughter,
and I'm not for the likes of you

I came back again the very next night,
I was sober as a judge,
I climbed into bed beside her and I gave to her a nudge,
I said   (move over there me love ??), your skin is like a peach,
When a well known head looked from the bed and this to me did screech :

You've been living here this thirty years,
And you still don't know the score.
Or are you dreaming of the neighbours girl,
Who lives at number four.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 07:45 PM

Jon, you're echoing Bert Lloyd's suspicions there, even though he set them out slightly more dramatically in'Folk Song in England':

[1967:] What ancient saga of trickery and revenge lurks behind the favourite joking song of Our goodman, Five nights drunk, The old farmer and his young wife? Known all over Europe, it tells of a man returning home to find another man's horse, sword, cloak, etc., where his own should be. Like an epic hero he asks in formula fashion: Whose horse is this? Whose sword? Whose cloak? Each time the adulterous wife insists that his eyes deceive him, and that the objects are really a cow, a spit, a bed-sheet, etc. In the ballad, the husband's rival appears only at the very end of the song and then merely as a head on the pillow. No struggle takes place, there is no retribution; the ribaldry of the situation has seemed sufficient for modern singers.

Yet somehow, in the form as well as the atmosphere of the song, there is the sense of something far more than a rough joke, something larger than life, something to suggest that important things have happened before the song begins, and that weighty and perhaps terrible events will occur after the song ends. In his studies of the medieval folk ballad, Lajos Vargyas makes a fleeting reference to Our goodman in connection with what seems on the surface to be a separate and distinct song, namely the ballad, known in Hungary as Barcasi, with parallels in the Balkans, France and Spain, of the couple surprised in adultery by the returning husband, who kills his rival, daubs his wife with pitch or gunpowder and burns her. In 1879, the Russian explorer Potanin found an epic version of this theme in north-western Mongolia, in The tale of Tonchi Mergan. But more research is needed before we may surely link our drunken cuckold to the mighty Mongol hero, or identify the strange head on the pillow as belonging to a foreign warrior, or declare that the cheating wife is the lineal descendant of that bygone adultress who was trampled to death by eighty mares on the steppes of Tannu Tuva. (Lloyd, England 147f)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: masato sakurai
Date: 30 Dec 02 - 09:39 PM

The [Iberian] story itself agrees with ours [i.e., Hungarian versions] in no more than the outlines, though it is closer than the Balkan ones in that it is the ballad of a case of adultery. The husband is away hunting, or at the wars, and returns home unexpectedly. There is trouble as soon as the door has to be opened: he has to break it down [...], or she has lost the key to the passage [...]--like the key to the chest with us--but the husband nevertheless finds the hidden lover. But this story goes off into details of the "Deceived Husband" [i.e., "Our Goodman"], a humorous ballad (Child 274): the qestions as to whose is the horse in the stable, the clothing, the sword, etc., probably blended secondarily with the preceding details. This rouses the suspicion that this, too, is a transfer, like so many other Iberian ballads, in all probability from the French. In one Portuguese text, indeed, this later additions is missing, and here, too, there is a reference to burning: "A woman who talks like that ought to be burned alive. Thirty wagonloads of straw, and the same of branches!"
    It was probably a French ballad of this type which gave rise to the Barcsai formulation in Hungary, blending together elements from the earlier heroic poems with effective details found in the new ballad.
    --From Lajos Vargyas, Researches into the Medieval History of Folk Ballad (Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1967, pp. 162-163)

Texts [Englsih translations] and analyses of "Barcsai" are in Nimon Leader, Hungarian Classical Ballads and Folklore (Cambridge UP, 1967, pp. 230-239), where she says:

    Apart from a Rumanian ballad of questionable authenticity 'Barcsai' has no close international parallels. This is to say only that its motifs and incidents are not found elsewhere in the same conjunction, and not that its theme is particulary original.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: HuwG
Date: 02 Jan 03 - 07:01 AM

The usual method, when performing live for radio or TV, or when the audience is likely to be offended, is to replace the last verse (involving the rolling pin, sausage, helmeted thermometer or whatever) with:

As I came home on a Sunday night,
As drunk as drunk could be,
I saw my wife inside the bed,
And this she said to me ...


And then play out with the Greek song, "Never on a Sunday". I have heard the Dubliners, and my friend Sean Wood and his now-defunct group, "Banshee", adopt this method. It is awkward if playing a guitar in concert tuning (this song is normally accompanied on a bouzouki), and I have yet to crack it properly, but you can manufacture something with F, Gm and D7.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Jun 07 - 11:29 AM

does anyone of you if I can download an instrumental version of seven drunken nights??and where?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seven Drunken Nights
From: EBarnacle
Date: 01 Jun 07 - 09:27 PM

The cabbage verse is similar to the melon version--"A cabbage with a moustache I never saw before!

In the early 70's I originated a new final verse which has since been cited with some regularity as Anon:

... As you can plainly see,
'Tis nothing but a bathtub me mother gave to me.

... Such plumbing on a bathtub I never saw before!.


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