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BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes

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Acme 31 Jan 02 - 01:06 PM
gnomad 31 Jan 02 - 02:53 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 02:55 PM
Acme 31 Jan 02 - 03:08 PM
Acme 31 Jan 02 - 03:09 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 03:28 PM
Sorcha 31 Jan 02 - 04:20 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 31 Jan 02 - 07:08 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 07:18 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 07:44 PM
DougR 31 Jan 02 - 07:56 PM
Rick Fielding 31 Jan 02 - 08:30 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 31 Jan 02 - 08:54 PM
DougR 31 Jan 02 - 10:47 PM
mack/misophist 31 Jan 02 - 11:16 PM
Haruo 31 Jan 02 - 11:25 PM
Acme 01 Feb 02 - 12:06 AM
Haruo 01 Feb 02 - 12:16 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Feb 02 - 12:23 AM
Acme 01 Feb 02 - 12:38 AM
Rick Fielding 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM
Acme 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM
Kaleea 01 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM
Acme 01 Feb 02 - 11:09 AM
MMario 01 Feb 02 - 11:56 AM
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catspaw49 01 Feb 02 - 04:37 PM
catspaw49 01 Feb 02 - 04:39 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Feb 02 - 08:24 PM
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Acme 01 Feb 02 - 09:50 PM
DougR 01 Feb 02 - 10:57 PM
alison 01 Feb 02 - 11:13 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 12:34 AM
alison 02 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM
John Gray 02 Feb 02 - 03:54 AM
GUEST,jaze 02 Feb 02 - 08:11 AM
DougR 02 Feb 02 - 01:04 PM
Acme 02 Feb 02 - 01:09 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 01:52 PM
Acme 02 Feb 02 - 03:48 PM
alison 02 Feb 02 - 07:10 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 07:54 PM
DougR 02 Feb 02 - 09:49 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 10:10 PM
alison 03 Feb 02 - 07:04 AM
gnu 03 Feb 02 - 07:29 AM
Peg 03 Feb 02 - 10:28 AM
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paddymac 03 Feb 02 - 09:41 PM
Acme 03 Feb 02 - 10:42 PM
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Acme 04 Feb 02 - 11:42 PM
Penny S. 05 Feb 02 - 05:10 PM
DougR 05 Feb 02 - 10:13 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 05 Feb 02 - 10:31 PM
E.T. 05 Feb 02 - 10:51 PM
Acme 06 Feb 02 - 12:53 AM
DougR 06 Feb 02 - 08:10 PM
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Subject: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 01:06 PM

The cornbread thread yielded some great recipes, but at the bottom of that one someone suggested stew--and it would be nice if those recipes turn up in a simple search so I'm moving the discussion over here.

My stew recipe is (pardon the pun) fluid. I like the liquid the meat and veggies stew in to be flavorful, but depending on what I have around the house, it can vary. Sometimes I stew beef in soup stock (beef or chicken) or sometimes just a couple of teaspoons of bouillion crystals. I often season it with mustard (yellow, out of the bottle in the fridge) and/or Worchestershire sauce. My recipe that I originally started with says use five vegetables, but I usually only manage carrots, potatoes, parsnip (a sweet white close cousin to the carrot) and broccoli added at the last minute or it turns to mush.

Lately I've discovered the joys of lamb stew. It's a much richer and more complex flavor than beef stew. I use the recipe (more or less) from The Joy of Cooking.

And I make a very good fish stew, using orange roughy or halibut.

Take it from here--anyone have a favorite stew recipe that they think would compliment all of the recipes for cornbread? Or I could post my baking powder biscuit recipe, which I frequently make to serve with stew or soup.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: gnomad
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 02:53 PM

Sounds good so far, but you've just got to include onions. Sweet peppers are a good idea too.

In lamb and pork stews I'm partial to paprika, and pork also seems a good match for oregano...gotta go, I'm drooling on the keys


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 02:55 PM

Just out of curiosity Maggie.........Did you check the other recipe threads which I linked toward the bottom of the other thread?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 03:08 PM

I was trying to put several links in when I started this thread, but the system froze up, and all I reached were error messages. I've only just gotten back to my computer. I looked at a couple of threads the other day--the goal here was to have one that would load more quickly. These discussions get so long that they're too ponderous. The thread this links to is here, to do with cornbread. But you're right, there probably are threads doing the same task as this. I'll have to stew about starting a superfluous thread (at least I used "BS" on it).

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 03:09 PM

Darn. That was backwards. I was going to link the other one over to this, not this one back there again. That's what happens when I try to do work at the office instead of just read email all day. :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 03:28 PM

How about a lighter and very easy version of Kentucky Burgoo? Since Burgoos are a two meat stew, I figured it would fit in here!

                  
                            Kentucky Burgoo

Serving Size : 10   Categories    : Soups And Stews

Amount Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
   1      pound         lean boneless chuck steak
   1 1/2 teaspoons    vegetable oil
   8      cups          no-salt-added beef broth
   1      pound         skinned boned chicken thighs
   1 1/2 pounds       cubed peeled baking potato -- (4 cups)
   2 1/2 cups          chopped carrot
   1      cup          chopped celery
   1      cup          chopped onion
   1 1/2 teaspoons    curry powder
   1      teaspoon      dried thyme
    1/2 teaspoon      salt
14 1/2 ounces       whole tomatoes -- (1 can)
                        undrained and coarsely chopped
   3      clove         garlic -- minced
   2      cups          frozen whole-kernel corn -- thawed
10      ounces       frozen lima beans -- (1 package) thawed

Trim fat from steak, and cut steak into 1-inch cubes. Heat vegetable oil in a large Dutch oven; add the steak cubes, and brown well on all sides. Add broth, and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 1 hour.

Trim any fat from chicken thighs, and cut the chicken into 1-inch cubes. Add chicken cubes and next 9 ingredients (chicken through garlic); simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

Add corn and lima beans to stew; cook an additional 45 minutes or until the beans are tender. But...at this point you can throw in a half cup of Maker's Mark or Wild Turkey and let the whole mess simmer for several hours and you'll be real happy with the result!!!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Sorcha
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 04:20 PM

I have just recently discovered a new trick......you know those envelopes of "gravy powder" that all you do is add water? They make pretty lousy gravy, but if you add a dry packet to stew........boy, does it ever help!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:08 PM

Being older, my wife and I like to make something that is good for two-three days, so stews are a favorite. Here is a simple one that we really overeat on.

SIMPLE BEEF STEW

3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped large
1 1/2 lb beef, cubed
3 medium potatoes (hard, white)
2 (about) cups beef or chicken broth
(we use low-salt canned)
2 carrots
4 celery stalks
1 sweet red pepper (if not too expensive this week)
1 cup red wine
1-2 bay leaves
1 tsp. basil
Garlic, chopped, to suit your taste
1/2 tsp. rosemary 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 tsp pepper

Heat oil in bottom of large thick-bottomed pot (one with a lid), sauté onion. Add meat, cook 5-7 minutes (add meat in 2-4 portions to facilitate browning). Cut and add potatoes (we use hard white because they don't go all soft and mushy). Add stock and wine. then add cut-up carrots, celery, red pepper, (or the vegetables you have on hand, reserving those that need less cooking to the last) and spices (I add a couple teaspoons full of New Mexico medium strength chili powder but this is strictly optional).
Cook 15-20 minutes at rather low heat in covered pot (or until you are satisfied with the doneness of the vegetables).
Good, tender, lean beef trimmings are usually available from our meat market at a reasonable price; we use it rather than the often fat or gristley "stewing beef."
Serve with corn bread (or any good bread).

OLD-TIME BEEF STEW (from BHG)

1 1/2 lb. beef stew meat, 1-inch cubes
2-3 tablespoons olive oil
4 cups water (use broth for richer taste)
1 large onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons Worcester sauce
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 bay leaf
1/8 teaspoon groung allspice
6 medium carrots, sliced
1 pound small white onions, peeled and halved
4 medium potatoes, in 1-inch chunks
1/2 cup cold water
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Fresh parsley, snipped

1. In a large pot, cook all the meat at once in hot oil over medium high heat until brown (Note: keep spatula handy to scrape browned material on the bottom of the pot- a lot of the flavor comes from this). Browning and meat cooking take about 15-20 minutes. Drain off excess fat (we get lean trimmings from the butcher as our stew meat and don't have to do this). Add the 4 cups water, sliced onion, garlic, Worcester, lemon juice, sugar, salt, paprika, pepper, bay leaf and allspice. Bring just to boiling and reduce heat. Simmer covered, for two hours, stirring occasionally.
2. Stir in carrots, onions and potatoes. Return to boiling; reduce heat, simmer about 30 minutes.
3. Add flour to 1/2 cup cold water and use for thickening. Add parsley.

PORK AND SWEET POTATO STEW

1 pound boneless pork shoulder roast, cut in 1-inch cubes (we use lean pork roast- little difference in cost here. Shoulder does have more flavor)
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped (1 cup)
1/3 cup dried apples, coarely chopped
1 tablespoon quick-cooking tapioca
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon dry sage, crushed
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamon
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 cups chicken broth
1 cup apple juice or apple cidar

In a large skillet, brown meat, half at a time, in hot oil. Drain off fat (with lean pork so available, this is no longer a problem). In a 33 1/3 to 4-quart cooker, place sweet potatoes, onion and dried apples. Add browned meat. Sprinkle with tapioca, garlic, dried sage, cardamon and pepper. Pour broth and juice or cidar over all.
Cover, cook on low heat for 6 hours or on high heat for 3 hours.
Note: Europeans often add a little allspice to stews and other meat dishes. Be careful; it enriches the taste, but too much covers up the meat and vegetable flavors.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:18 PM

Hey Dicho.....I cook a Pork and Sweet Potato Stew too, pretty similar including the apple juice. Using pretty lean pork, it's a real good, nourishing, low-fat and low cholesterol stew with a real "Fall" flavor.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:44 PM

Here's a lamb one we really like.....and we LOVE lamb around here!!!!            

                Lamb Ragout

Serves 8   

Amount Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
   6      tablespoons   olive oil
   3      pounds       lamb stew meat -- cut in 2-inch cubes
   4      medium       yellow onions -- diced
   3      stalks       celery -- sliced
   3      cloves       garlic -- sliced
   2      tablespoons   tomato paste
    1/4 cup          minced parsley
   2      teaspoons    salt
   1      teaspoon      freshly ground pepper
   1 1/2 teaspoons    dried thyme
   1      teaspoon      rosemary
   2                      bay leaves
   1      pound         small red potatoes-- peeled and quartered
   1      pound         carrots -- peeled and cut in 1" sections

1. In a large Dutch oven over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons olive oil and toss half the lamb cubes in oil; brown lamb on all sides (5 to 7 minutes). Remove to a bowl or platter and reserve.

2. Add 2 more tablespoons oil and remaining lamb cubes, browning while stirring constantly (5 to 7 minutes). Push meat to one side and add remaining oil, yellow onions, celery, and garlic. Return reserved lamb cubes to pan and cook until onions are translucent (4 to 5 minutes).

3. Add tomato paste, parsley, salt, pepper, thyme, bay leaves, potatoes, and water to cover. Reduce heat to simmer, cover, and cook 1 hour.

4. After 1 hour add carrots and pearl onions (if you wish--12 ounces) to ragout. Cook 1 hour and 10 minutes more. Serve hot.


Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:56 PM

I'm getting hungry again.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 08:30 PM

Just bringing this over from my original cornbread thread, 'cause it's getting too long.

Thanks good people, I've been on a "cornbread tear" and have tried:

"Catspaw's first recipe

Emily's "Norwegian"

Dicho's

Silly River sage's

They're all a tad different....and so far so good. I'm workin' my way down the list.

However....when it comes to STEW.....Ummm Boy! Best little addition trick I know is half a can of consomme soup. Another thing I've been FORCED to do is learn to use a NET. That is, I put the onions in a plastic net (never minded the taste...it's just the pieces that make me gag) and after dishin' out my own portion, empty the onions back into the pot. Been tempted to do the same thing with turnips, but I don't want people to think I'm THAT finicky...so I just ignore them.

Rick


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 08:54 PM

Hey, Catspaw, that's quite a lamb stew! Will have to try it.
This is one we do often.

POSOLE (New Mexican pork stew)

2 pounds pork tenderloin, cubed
2 onions, chopped
1-2 bay leaves
1 tablesoon drippings or other fat
1/2 teaspoon orégano
1 cup red chile pulp OR 2 tablespoons pure Chimayo
medium hot chile powder
2 cans Ortega green chile, chopped
3 cans white hominy (about 1 qt.)
1 teaspoon salt
Hot water

Fry onions in fat. Add pork and blend. Brown slightly (should still be faintly pink on the inside of cubes). Add hominy, chile and seasoning.
NOTES: If chile powder is used, mix with one tablespoon flour and stir into fat. Use only enough hot water to get the posole to a nice, stew-consistency.
Cook only long enough for pork to become tender (Try after about 1 hour). Pork tenderloin is easily overcooked.
If not familiar with pure chile powder, start with two tablespoons and adjust to taste. Flavorful Chimayo, San Juan or other New Mexico chile powder is available in specialty stores in most larger centers. Commercial chile powder sold alongside other spices in the supermarket is mostly flour, etc.; the "real thing" can be a shock! Old timers made posole with pigs feet and other poor meats.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 10:47 PM

But you haven't tried my recipe yet Rick, and you originally asked for a "simple" recipe. None could be much more simple than mine, and I think it's only fair that I tell you I'm a bit hurt.

**SOB!**

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: mack/misophist
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 11:16 PM

Dicho was right on the mark with the recipe above, with one exception. ONE CUP of red wind????????? How about half a bottle? Any cheap red table wine will do. Start adding it early on, a bit at a time. The alcohol goes away fast. My experience has been that simple recipes with the best ingredients you can find work best. And don't trim off all the fat. Fat carries flavour, like it or not.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Haruo
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 11:25 PM

I made a scrumptious dish a few days ago of canned (well, jarred) venison (the label called it "deer") with holiday-shape pasta, crushed pineapple, Thai-style coconut milk, bacon bits, and garlic.

For lamb stew, as a cut I prefer lamb cheeks, which can be purchased (only place I know of) at the Pike Place Market in Seattle, at Don and Joe's meats I think it's called, anyway the butcher shop across the aisle from the place where they throw the fish.

Liland


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:06 AM

Oh, what a wonderful treat, to find so many great recipes this evening! A funny story--a friend of mine (who when I was a youngster I thought of as elderly at 65 or 70, but at 85 she is young as ever and still a great cook) was making stew one afternoon. She had a bottle of red wine, and sedately poured in a little, and as I watched, she said "what the heck!" and poured in a huge dollop (probably a couple of cups). It was wonderful! And yes, the alcohol goes fast with the heat.

I've been looking through the book to find the lamb stew recipe I used, and think I actually used a recipe for "braised lamb shanks and trotters" but (as is typical of my cooking) didn't quite follow the recipe. I used big stew-sized chunks of meat instead of shanks. And went from there. No trotters in my version. It cooked in the big stock pot.

Rub: 4 lamb shanks (3/5 to 4 pounds) with garlic
Roll in seasoned flour
heat 2 tablespoons of oil and partially sear the lamb, and add
2 tablespoons onion, diced
and cook meat until browned on all sides. It says to pour off the fat, but I believe I kept it, because the lamb was so lean. Place in a pan with a rack (I used no rack) and add
1.5 cups boiling stock
1/3 teaspoon pepper
1.5 teaspoons salt
1/2 bay leaf

Note: I always add at least two bay leaves to whatever I'm cooking, it's such a great flavor. And this says you can add 1/2 cup lemon juice, but I didn't).

Cover. Simmer meat or bake covered in a 325 degree oven about 1.5 hours or until tender. You may add for the last .5 hour of cooking:

3 cups diced vegetables
.5 cup boiling stock or water

The veggies may be onions, carrots, celery, green peppers, turnips, tomatoes and potatoes, a matter of choice and expediency. Strain, degrease and reduce stock. Serve as is or make pan gravy.

I've narrowed it down to this recipe because I know I didn't add peas, or peppers, or beans, and there was no cream of any kind in it (I can't eat it). I wish I'd paid more attention, but I've made this a couple of times and am pretty sure this was the recipe.

I have my Dad's old Joy of Cooking book, and if anyone thinks that a thread to do with food has nothing to do with cooking, they were never at one of the Seattle Song Circle meetings on Sunday nights. I always knew not to try to call Dad on Sunday evenings because he wouldn't be home, he'd be out singing. And if I called earlier in the day, he'd describe what he was cooking for the meeting at his house (usually a barbecue rib recipe he liked) or to take along to someone else's house. Food and Folk music go together.

Maggie


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Haruo
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:16 AM

Why would anybody think a thread to do with food had nothing to do with cooking (unless, of course, it specified "raw" in the heading)?

Liland
(who thinks maybe you meant Folk music instead of "cooking"?)


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:23 AM

Misophist, I ask my liquor vendor for 2-3 bottles of cheap wine for cooking, and he bags it for me. I seldom look at the label. Usually the result is fine (I don't really use measuring cups by the way) but one bottle had a very strong flavor and it spoiled the taste of the stew. I have been careful ever since. It was French. I should have checked because the french cheap wines are the worst of any sold here.
I have a recipe for a French stew that uses a lot of wine. I will dig it out for you. I liked it, but my wife didn't- taste too concentrated, if that's the word, so I only used it once.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:38 AM

Oops. I spent too much time looking at the book and not at the screen. Yes, of course, comparing cooking and singing was the goal. Sigh. It has been a long day. House purchase is just about in the tank, but, on the up side, our karma is improving because my daughter managed to connect a cat she saw on the block with a cat described on a "lost cat" poster. We called and told the poster poster (!) where to look for their cat. My neighbor suggested that the cat's name might be "Lucky," since he is described as having a broken leg and a notched collar. No kidding!

I agree with Dicho--inexpensive wine is good to use in cooking. I make a faux chicken marsala with chablis or chardonay that I buy in a box at the grocery store. My kids love it (it's cheaper than going to the Olive Garden and we can eat sooner!). I cut about three large split chicken breasts into a few pieces each, saute them in olive oil and garlic, then add mushrooms (canned or fresh work equally well). Stir it around a bit more, add a half cup of wine, and about a cup of chicken boullion, and once it simmers, thicken it with some cornstarch (in water). Serve over some kind of chunky pasta (rigatoni is good) or linguini.

Time to turn off the computer and get some sleep.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM

Doug, I'm being democratic. Trying to go in some kind of order. Yours DOES look pretty simple, but I'm flushed with power right now. Four batches, no duds. On the other hand, my students are all starting to wonder why they're getting cornbread with their banjo and guitar lessons!

Cheers

Rick


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM

No telling what the collar notches come from. . . this is my evening for leaving thoughts incompleted. My kids and I discussed what a cat might notch his collar about (kittens? tires dodged? lives lived already?).


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Kaleea
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM

People often ask for my recipe for Beef Soup, but when I give it to them and they are unable to duplicate my soup. It is because they do not know the SECRET INGREDIENT is glazing the onion! For an extremely savory soup, one should first dice a large white onion, and in a large pot or skillet, saute the onion it a bit of oil (about a tablespoon)until the onions are glazed & very brown. This will make a flavor which is unsurpassed by any other ingredients! Place the onions into a slow cooker or crockpot. In the same pot, add a little more oil, and add the beef (about 1 Lb. lean beef), diced & lightly floured, and stir onions in the Crockpot. Add whatever ingredients you like after that to the crockpot, and simmer for several hours until done. I like to keep it simple by using diced potatoes, carrots, fresh parsley. Salt and Pepper to taste. Sometimes I add peas or corn. Celery, if you like it, should be diced and glazed with the onions. I often add one small can of tomato paste or a small can of tomato sauce. Experiment with different ingredients & proportions, but the secret is in the glazed onions! Bon Appetite`!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:09 AM

The lamb in that recipe of mine was supposed to be 3.5 to 4 pounds, not 3/5 as my dyslexic fingers typed. And I think my evening glass of wine might have contributed to the drowsy lack of proof-reading.

Clearly some of the Mudcatters split their days very well between kitchen and computer. I'm going to head over to Sam's Warehouse this weekend and buy one of their deboned legs of lamb and get cooking! Sam's is also the only place I know in this general area (north Texas) where I can buy pork that hasn't been adulterated with saline solution. I think the various grocery store wrappers say it has been "enhanced," I say it's too salty to eat and the consistency is strange.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: MMario
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:56 AM

A friend of mine does a guiness stew that is incredible.

Here's his recipe as he gave it to me:

a couple pounds of onions; slice thinly; cook in a little oil until just begin to brown; add cubed beef ( he said about three pounds) 2 bay leaves,1 teaspoon of paprika, 2 teaspoons cracked black pepper.

Add Guiness about 2/3 of the way up the meat. cover and cook on a slow simmer at least 4 hours. Salt to taste.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 04:21 PM

My wife use to bake a stew in the oven rather than the usual way either in a crockpot or in a dutch oven on a stove burner. Anybody have a baked stew recipe? I've looked everywhere for her recipe, and cannot find it.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 04:37 PM

Here's one Doug......I pulled it off the net, but Karen has one that is real close to it she got from her Grandmother. I ought to let her cook sometime....She really is a good cook it's just that I love to do it!

Oven-Baked Stew

2 pounds boneless beef chuck or round steak, cut into 1" cubes
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cups sliced carrots
14 oz. can whole peeled tomatoes, undrained, chopped
1 envelope dry onion soup mix
1/2 cup dry red wine or water
1 cup fresh or canned sliced mushrooms
8 oz. medium or broad egg noodles, cooked and drained

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In 2-quart casserole, toss beef with flour, then bake uncovered 20 minutes. Add carrots, tomatoes, then beefy onion soup mix blended with wine. Bake covered 1 1/2 hours or until beef is tender. Stir in mushrooms and bake covered and additional 10 minutes. Serve over hot cooked noodles.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 04:39 PM

BTW, Karen adds potatoes in equal quantity to carrots and skips the noodles.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 08:24 PM

PROVENCE BEEF STEW

3 lb. bottom round, excess fat trimmed,
(1 1/2 in. cubes; better meat cuts stewing time
and prevents overcooking of vegetables)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1-2 onions, peeled and quartered
1 lb white mushrooms, caps and stems separated
2 celery stalks, 1 1/2 inch lengths
2 large carrots, cut in 1 1/2 inch lengths
3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup port
2 cups red wine
2 sprigs thyme
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1-2 bay leaves
Orange peel (3" x 1/2")
18 pearl onions
24 green pitted olives
4 plum tomatoes, 1" dice
1/4 cup chopped parsley

1. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper
2. In a large, heavy bottomed pot, heat the oil to very hot. Place the meat in the pot in a single layer and brown thoroughly on all sides. Do in batches if necessary. Remove meat and set aside.
3. Place quartered onion in pot along with mushroom stems (not caps), celery and carrots. Cook briefly (about 1 minute), stirring. Return meat to the pot and sprinkle all ingredients with the flour, stirring until the flour seems to have disappeared.
4. Add the port quickly and stir to deglaze the pot. Add the wine and use a wooden spoon to scrape any deposits away from the bottom of the pan.
5. Add bay leaf, thyme, saffron, garlic and orange peel. Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover the pot. Simmer for one hour, occasionally scraping the bottom. From time to time check to see that the liquid is still covering the ingredients. If it isn't, add water or stock and return to a simmer.
6. After the stew has been simmering for one hour, add the pearl onions and the mushroom caps. Simmer 20 minutes longer or until the meat is tender.
7. Just before serving, add the diced tomatoes and olives (rinsed). Stir them in to heat them, but do not cook them.
8. Serve in soup plates. use a slotted spoon to arrange the solid ingredients artfully in each plate. Discard thyme sprigs, orange rind and bay leaves. Ladle the liquid into the bowl. Be sure the olives, tomato and onions are clearly visible in each serving. Sprinkle with parsley.
I have given the text of the NY Times Professional Chef recipe. We made a few changes. We had no port, so used Madeira (left over from the previous Christmas). We left out the saffron but added garlic. We cut the vegetables normally. We did not have plum tomatoes, so used Roma tomatoes and cooked them lightly. We didn't worry about the fancy presentation.
My wife didn't care for the olives and thought the stew was a little heavy (not much liquid). She thought maybe adding a little stock would help. I liked it straight up and would do it again.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,Jaze
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 09:15 PM

Here's a recipe my family likes(even the kids!)

DAD'S CROCKPOT BEEF 1 lb stew beef 1packet of Lipton Onion Soup Mix 2 cans Cream of Mushroom soup (I add sauteed Crimini Mushrooms)

cook 6 hours in Crockpot and serve over noodles. Enjoy!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 09:50 PM

Jaze, if near the end of cooking you add a glassful of red wine and a big dollop of sour cream to that you'd have something remarkably like an easy beef stroganoff.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 10:57 PM

Spaw: that sounds very close to Velma's recipe I believe. I know she used fresh mushrooms in it, and she used veggies instead of pasta. Thanks.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:13 PM

OK enough of this cook for 6 hours nonsense!!

15 minute stew (assuming you have a pressure cooker)

brown a few well chopped onions
add some mince (approx 500g... not good with figures.. just bung in enough)
brown mince
add a few chopped carrots
add about 6 peeled and chopped spuds
add water/ beef stock / guinness / red wine... whatever(enough to 3/4 cover the meat and spuds in the pot)
add herbs to taste
dash of worcester sauce
stock cubes / gravy powder (depending on what liquid you used)

bung the lid on and cook for whatever length of time it needs to cook spuds (approx 7 mins with mine)

take off lid and attack with a Cheatle (wooden musher thing) or potato masher.. and mush until it looks like stew.... I like mine with recognisable potato lumps....

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 12:34 AM

Alison, very like our cheater Hamburger (= mince) Soup my wife makes (she lacks patience too, and seldom thinks about dinner until it is too late to do it up right). She adds onions, stalk celery and a couple cloves of garlic. The only real difference is that we use low-salt canned stock (Campbells) rather than water and the usual cubes. Your 500 g is just over a pound; we generally use extra lean grade hamburger (we avoid the fat beef, being virtuous here so that we can grate some old cheddar or parmesan into it just before we eat). No pressure cooker, so takes about an hour.
I am the recipe fiend in the family, and I start getting stuff out and cutting about 2 pm (retired=redundant) for stew at six.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM

much as I'd like to be that organised... it's "what can I get and bung in a pot tha'll be ready in 30 mins?"... I should have married one of you men that loves to cook!!!


slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: John Gray
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 03:54 AM

'Spaw, the folks in Kentucky certainly have a different interpretation of 'burgoo'than here in Oz. To us burgoo is porridge.

JG/FME


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,jaze
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 08:11 AM

The really cool thing about the crockpot method is that yoou can prepare it in the am, go out and have fun all day(or work) and it's ready when you come home.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:04 PM

Alison: I've been tempted to get a pressure cooker, but just haven't done it. I guess the main reason I haven't is I have lots of time so cooking speed isn't that important to me. You really lost me with that "Mince" stuff though. I thought maybe it was kangaroo or something. Thanks Dicho for the explanation.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:09 PM

Jaze, Yes, the art of slow cooking has been put to use at our house. If I put a chicken to roast or stew in the crock pot, and have a loaf of bread in the bread machine on the timer (as described, with recipe, here) it means walking into a house at the end of the day that smells wonderful, and you can sit right down to eat.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:52 PM

Crockpots are useful to those with no time on their hands; they do a good job. There are many recipes especially for use in them.
Pressure cookers, on the other hand, scare me because of the possibility of explosion. I remember people getting hurt. This was years ago, and perhaps they have improved the escape valve, but I don't know anyone who has one now.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 03:48 PM

I have one, given to me by my Mom (and she swore by them) but, as with so many of my kitchen things, the pressure cooker is packed right now. I've had some good results with it, though time does improve on things where pressure just cooks them fast. There are some things that you simply should not cook in pressure cookers. I think beans are one of those things, because they turn to mush and clog that "escape valve" as you call it, and can cause an explosion. Mom used to have one with a pressure guage, but I haven't seen any of those in years.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 07:10 PM

Hamburger mince is different... I use minced steak, (same as I'd use to make bolognaise)

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 07:54 PM

English vs American-Canadian terminology is different and can be confusing. (Some differences also between American and Canadian). When I buy ground beef at the store (Canadian), I find 3 grades- extra lean, lean and regular. The difference depends on the allowable fat amount in the meat and is defined by regulations. The limits are fairly broad, so we pick a store that consistently sells a leaner product (of course paying more). The extra lean is so lean that sometimes extra fat must be added. I presume that this is what you mean by minced steak.
The term mince is seldom used here, except for a "mince meat" sold in containers for use in pies, etc., that is mostly cooked spiced fruit with added fat. I had assumed that English mince was equivalent to the stuff used in MacDonalds' hamburger patties (do you still have Wimpy's in Europe or have they killed off all their patrons?) - No, I'm being facetious, I don't know how the term mince is used in the British Isles or Ireland or how hamburger is defined over there. When we first came to Canada, we had trouble with the Canadian meat cuts, but now I am familiar with them so they cause no trouble. I know nothing of English meat cuts, but some I saw in a butcher's over there seemed different to me.
Don't mention Holland! I watched a man unloading beef carcasses from a truck at a meat market- he unhooked the carcasses and tossed them out- Thunk! on the cobbles. There was one hotel with a large dining hall that served American-style steaks in Amsterdam and that was it- everything else was chopped up and cooked to death. All this is thread creep and another story or three.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 09:49 PM

Alison: bolognaise?

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 10:10 PM

Do you mean Bolognese meat sauce for use with Tagliatelle, etc.? Ragù ? Done properly, this takes several hours.
Do they have Salisbury steak in Europe or is this a North American invention? Ground-up lean meat made into a large patty and served like a steak.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 07:04 AM

yep bolognaise as in italian meat sauce for pasta.... and it doesn't take hours... 7 mins in my pressure cooker!! lol.....
never heard of Salisbury steak
and for whoever asked earlier.. Wimpy disappeared from Belfast a long time ago.. only to be replaced by Burger King.......

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: gnu
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 07:29 AM

Excellent stuff here !!! The thread title reminded me of the first time I tried any baking. One of my chores when I was a lad was supper as Mum and Dad both worked. I was twelve when this honour was bestowed upon me, so suppers were simply meat and potatoe type dishes. One winter's day, however, I wanted to surprise my parents with a step up. I made Johnny Cake and sausages, one of my Dad's favourites. Goodness gracious, it smelled perfect and I couldn't wait for their arrival.

The look on Dad's face when he entered and smelled that Johnny Cake was truly satisfying. Mum was equally surprised and beaming. I swelled up a foot with pride. The look on Dad's face when he took that first bite was something I will never forget. Obvious puzzlement went to sheer disgust and he spat it to the plate, looked at me and asked, in his kind and gentle manner, "What the fuck did you put in that ?"

Seems a twelve year old does need to be taught the difference between baking powder and baking soda. The next one was perfect... of course, Mum hovered over me like a guardian angel for every new dish after that. In his kind and gentle manner, Dad bestowed that chore upon her.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Peg
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:28 AM

Heres a recipe forthe Brits or tose who can find good gourmet sausages at the all-natural supermarket. I discovered/developed this recipe when I fell in love with the all-natural herb sausages I bought at the Oxford butcher shop when I was house-sitting one lonely January in Dorchester-on-Thames...I needed to find a way to cook them that went beyond just frying them in a pan.

Peg's Banger Stew

Slice sausages (GOOD freshly made ones; the more savory and herby the better) into half-inch chunks. Brown them in olive oil or butter in a large saucepan or pot. Add some more oil or butter and add sliced onions, carrots and potatoes to the sausages, and saute, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent. Salt and pepper lightly. Add some red wine and let simmer for a few minutes. Than add water or stock to cover. Let simmer on LOW heat for 20-30 minutes, or until potatoes are tender.

Enjoy with crusty bread and red wine.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:40 AM

Here we have several good Italian and German independent sausage makers, so no trouble with your "bangers" recipe. We don't have the word, but we have the goods. Just reading your "Peg's Banger Stew," I can almost smell the sausages sizzling. Not for calorie counters.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Peg
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:52 AM

Calories? Who counts calories?

:)

To round out the meal a nice salad of bitter greens would be lovely...helps counter the effects of so much fat and animal protein, too. But having a cold salad with a stew often seems odd to some. So you can make these meals on a day when you have a spare lunch of salad or steamed vegetables...


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: MMario
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 02:14 PM

Bolagnaise sauce should take DAYS to make, not minutes. It's just not right otherwise. My Grandmother's recipe that took only 6 or seven hours she considered a short-cut recipe and for emergency use only. She didn't like serving it to family - and refused to serve it to company.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 03:13 PM

Mario, I'm with you on the sauce. The good Italian restaurants here start the sauce the day before- using probably something like your mother's shortcut method. Each of their sauces is a little different. I'm confused by the use of the French(?) word bolognaise- is it something different from the Italian alla bolognese? (with ragù) I have a recipe for a 6-hour ragù but so far haven't tried it because of my limited skills- and no patience. We go out to the Italian restaurants for a treat when we can.
Alison, stewed or baked tomatoes with herbs are good with sausage. I generally leave lettuce to the rabbits but if faced with green stuff, grated Parmesan or a blue cheese makes it edible (good English Stilton is readily available here, as well as a number of other English cheeses).


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 04:14 PM

Alison: I have a new name for you. "Speedy."

Peg, that sausage stew sounds great! We do have one or two shops that specialize in sausages, but I don't know if they include herbs in their making. I'm gonna check it out though and when I feel I can afford the calories and fat, I'm gonna try it. Like maybe this week!

Today is Superbowl day, and though I am not a great fan of either team I usually try to cook something in keeping with the event. Today it is smoked St. Louis style spare ribs, potato salad and cowboy beans with a green salad.

DougR

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: E.T.
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 09:33 PM

If you're gonna get fancy with your beef stew - why not make your own stock? In a big pan, put your bones (split), your whole onions, quartered, carrots, and whatever (NO cabbagey/broccoli things - they go in last up on top)and roast at 400 for 2 hours. They should be nice and carmelized.

Put in big pot with water to cover and simmer for 4 hours. Then cool and skim, discard vegies and bones. Freeze in smaller quantities or use it then and there. This stuff is really good. Lasts about ayear in the freezer too.(well, if it ever lasted that long). Can do a stock with chicken or fish or just veggies too. This is where you can use up everything - old carrots, tired celery etc. You're taking out the good bits only. Leave the onion skins on, they color the broth. Learned this from the Frugal Gourmet.

Reason you don't use broccoli or cabbage is because they stink and ruin the stock - they don't reheat well. You can throw in fresh when you make your final dish. Don't salt/pepper the stock, do it when you use it in the dish. Put a half-cup or so in a small bag in the freezer and you can have instant gravy.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: paddymac
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 09:41 PM

Damn. I'm sorry I even opened this thread. I'm just coming off the worst bout with the flu that I can remember in several years. After a week of the runs and zero apetite, I discovered that the only positive attribute of the crud was that I had lost several pounds, and my stomach had seemingly shrunk a bit. I decided to try to keep control of the apetite thing, and have actually been doing reasonably well, till I opened this thread without thinking of the "drool factor." I can just smell most of these simmering away on the back burner. Hmm. Downright lustful. My favorite stews usually start out in life as a pot-roast, with a big hunk of chuck, simmered till tender, then covered up in spuds, onions, carrots and celery. Usually by the second day, I start adding whatever else happens to be handy and let it evolve from there. As the word gets out that I've got a pot stewing, friends start dropping in for a bowl, and usually bring something to "go with." By the end of the week, it's usually run its course, and it's time to clean the pot and wait for the next urge to strike. Seems like folks who have some sort of "extended family" background seem to enjoy it more. I've always enjoyed the informality of it, especially when I used to have something resembling a "country kitchen." Good, food, good friends, good cheer, good music - it just doesn't get any better.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:42 PM

E.T.

That stock recipe sounds wonderful. I know that he's persona non grata now, but the Frugal Gourmet (aka Jeff Smith) did a lot of great cooking on his program. I remember also his tip about using the onion skins to color the broth, and I find it a very nice way to make the soup look more interesting. (Remove the skins before serving the soup!).

He also did a deep-dish Chicago-style pizza to die for.

Maggie


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 04 Feb 02 - 10:21 PM

Maggie: do you have a recipe for his pizza? I'd forgotten all about him, and I use to watch his show a lot. Not stew, I know but ...

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 04 Feb 02 - 11:42 PM

I don't have the exact recipe, but I adopted several of his techniques in my own pizza. I can tell you that he put a handful (in his cupped palm) of corn meal into this dough, and he pours in the olive oil without measuring it. I think the sugar was fairly low (only a teaspoon or two). Don't forget the salt. I always give a big sprinkle (BIG sprinkle!) of garlic powder, and about a tablespoon (it fills my cupped palm) of dried oregano is ground between my hands and dropped into the dough.

But this may be nothing like his dough. He baked it in a deep pan, and I prefer to make a thick crust, with a high rim, that I bake on a pizza stone. He did his in a pan, and put all of his ingredients (diced tomatoes, cheese, meat) on the dough before baking it. I preheat my pizza stone at about 500 degrees.

Trouble with getting recipes like this, you have trouble telling where yours ends and theirs begins.

Maggie

P.S. Made pot roast tonight, and set up the bread machine this a.m. also. The kids had been grumbling about "pot roast again" on the drive home, but when the walked in and smelled it, changed their minds. The bread wins out in fragrance over the roast, and both were great. It doesn't hurt that it's cold and rainy here today. Great comfort foods, both of them.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Penny S.
Date: 05 Feb 02 - 05:10 PM

My grandmother's rabbit stew. (On the ancient Cat Hunting thread you may find out how she sometimes got the rabbit.) Skin and paunch the rabbit if it's not already been done. Get rid of any extra fat (if it's a tame bunny), but keep the heart, liver and kidneys to add to the stew. Joint the rabbit, and put in the saucepan, with a bacon knuckle, or a few rashers of streaky bacon, and a sliced onion (and the offal). Add enough water to barely cover the meat, and simmer for a couple of hours. About half an hour before serving, add a generous handful of curly parsley, chopped. Then put a rounded tablespoon of flour in a cup, and mix to a thin paste with milk. Add this to the saucepan, and raise the temperature to thicken the liquid before serving. It goes well with a good buttery mash, peas or carrots.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 05 Feb 02 - 10:13 PM

Penny: heart, liver, kidneys? Yeah. Offal? Yeah. Uh, I think there is somebody at the door ...

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Feb 02 - 10:31 PM

I got hungry for a good steak and kidney pie after seeing the last two posts. My wife hasn't made it for a while. Not traditional, but it goes well with cornbread. How about a good "down home" British Isles recipe?


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: E.T.
Date: 05 Feb 02 - 10:51 PM

DougR & Maggie: Here's a site for the pizza recipe thanks to Google: http://www.blue-crab.org/pizza/deepdish.htm I'm gonna try it tomorrow to give my opinion (a little late to get the dough rising tonight!) I like the oregano in the dough.

Yes, the traditional "Chicago" style is done in high sided pans - like a cake layer pan, the blacker the better - like a good wok.

I lived in Chicago for the better part of 25 years and have eaten at Pizzeria uno after an hour wait. I still think Edwardo's makes the BEST pizza - their stuffed sausage pizza is a double layered wonder. There was a small gourmet pizza place - I tried it - making duck sausage and goat cheese pizza. (too greasy - but happy to try once!) Anybody ever try a beef stew pizza? (okay, had to get it back to topic somehow). Elaine.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 06 Feb 02 - 12:53 AM

Elaine,

That's it! And here it is with a link. I'm glad to see I remembered it as closely as I did. A lot of oil in that crust (I didn't remember the vegetable oil, just the olive oil). And the squish of the tomatoes was an interesting feature I don't think I got around to mentioning.

We made calzone tonight. (Kind of like pizza closed in on itself, for anyone not familiar with it). I forgot just how big they grow in the oven--they came out huge. For a batch of dough made with three cups of flour, the dough should be divided into at least four pieces. To answer the beef stew pizza question, I suppose you could make a stew filling and put in calzone. My kids wanted chicken, mushrooms, and tomato sauce. I made mine with onion, mushroom, kielbasa, tomato sauce, and soy cheese (parmesian and mozarella). They were excellent. I'd suggest not making the stew too runny before enclosing it in the dough. The secret to good pizza or calzone is to bake it fast, in a 500 degree (F) oven for about 8 minutes.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 06 Feb 02 - 08:10 PM

SRS: we sure may not agree on much politically, but on food and cooking, we are in the same corner. No doubt about it. Thanks for posting that website.

I haven't gotten brave enough to get into baking so if I make the pizza, it will probably be with a store bought crust (I know I hear the screams already).

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Feb 02 - 02:43 PM

Cooking like music takes practice, DougR; what's the worst you're going to do with that crust but toss out about a buck's worth of paste if it doesn't work? Surprise yourself and whip up a great pizza tonight!

Here's the full recipe I use:

1 tablespoon yeast
3 cups flour (you can mix in a little whole wheat if you want, but not much)
a small handful of cornmeal, in your palm, don't cup your fingers
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
pour in some olive oil (I'd guess somewhere around 3-4 tablespoons)
a big sprinkle of garlic powder and a tablespoon or so of dried oregano
1 cup warm water, add a little more if needed

This is put in the bread machine on the manual setting. If you're making it by hand, mix your yeast thoroughly into half of your flour, add the rest of the dry ingredients, add the oil, then the water. Beat it with a blender for a couple of mintues, then work in the rest of the flour by hand. Of course if it ends up too wet, add a little flour back in to make the consistency right. Knead it for several minutes, let it rise double, punch it down, and make your dough with it. It'll rise when it bakes, don't worry about a second rising.

I use a pizza stone, heat the oven to 500(F). The stone is preheated, and after I've rolled out my pizza dough I get the stone out of the oven, lay the dough on it, pierce it with a fork in many places so it doesn't turn into a huge loaf of pita, and proceed to quickly put on sauce, toppings, and my soy cheeses. Bake for about 6-8 minutes. If you use meat toppings that need to be cooked cook them ahead of time then put them on the pizza.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 07 Feb 02 - 03:35 PM

This thread has convinced me to make two investments: a pressure cooker, and a bread maker.

Thanks for the recipe SRS. You're right, what have I got to lose but some sticky dough.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 10:55 PM

Here's a request for a recipe with a great musical connection. I was speaking to my next door neighbor this afternoon, and it seems he's looking for a specific recipe for Parker House rolls. It was on the back of the box of Burrus Mills flour back when he was a boy. (He's retired now). Here's a little history of the ties between Burrus Mills and music:


    From http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/treasures/characters/pappy.html
    W. Lee O'Daniel served as Texas governor and United States senator. Born in 1890 in Ohio, O'Daniel came to Texas at age 29 as a sales manager for Burrus Mills, a flour-milling company in Fort Worth. In 1928, O'Daniel took over the company's radio advertising and started a country music program to promote the flour. O'Daniel hosted the show and organized a band called the Light Crust Doughboys. Many of the musicians who made Western Swing famous, including Bob Wills, got their start in O'Daniel's band. In 1935 he organized his own flour company to make "Hillbilly Flour" and began to call his band the Hillbilly Boys. The slogan, "Pass the biscuits, Pappy," made O'Daniel a household name throughout Texas.


    From http://www.main.org/tfr/cg_western_swing.html
    The radio also provided a venue to develop and popularize western swing. Bob Wills, a fiddle player, and Milton Brown, a vocalist, began to perform together on the radio in Dallas in 1930. Accompanied by guitar, banjo, and a second fiddle, they formed a band called The Light Crust Doughboys, named after their sponsor Burrus Mills Flour. They performed on the radio daily, doing a mixture of traditional fiddle tunes and popular jazz tunes. By 1932, the Doughboys could be heard all over the state of Texas as well as in Oklahoma, but were subject to the rigid control of Burrus Mills' manager and future Texas governor, W. "Pappy" Lee O'Daniel, Milton Brown and his brother, Derwood, left Burrus Mills in 1932 and formed what is known as the first western swing band, Milton Brown and His Musical Brownies. With the standard string band (guitar, fiddle, banjo, and bass) at its core, Brown hired jazz pianist Fred "Papa" Calhoun, a second fiddle, and finally electric steel guitar. Milton Brown and his Musical Brownies were essentially a string band, but they played hot jazz and popular songs, incorporating improvisation into the solos and singing in a popular crooning, rather than country, style. The Brownies were the first swing band to incorporate the tradition of twin fiddling into their music; that is, one fiddle playing lead and the other playing a tight harmony. Milton Brown tragically died in a car accident in 1936. Until that day, Milton Brown and the Musical Brownies were the most popular swing band in Texas. It was after Milton's death that Bob Wills became the all time king of western swing.

    Bob Wills left Burrus Mills and The Light Crust Doughboys soon after Milton Brown. He formed a band much like the Brownies known as the Texas Playboys.


Burrus Mills had a distinctive box (but I don't have an image available), with this recipe on the back. But Cecil hasn't been able to get his hands on one of the old boxes to get the recipe. Even tried Ebay, he said. Closest he came was when someone used the front of an old box in some sort of shadow-box framed art.

Anyone out there maybe have the box, or have torn off and kept or copied the recipe?

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: gnu
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 07:37 AM

Here's a quick soup recipe. Fry a pan of burger and add it to one can Primo (I use Primo brcause it's the cheapest) Beef and Barley, one can Campbell's Vegetable, one can tomatoes, two cups or so frozen veggie mix, water to cover. Boil six minutes. Chow down.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Beccy
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 09:15 AM

You know, you can always whip up a cornmeal crust for a taco pizza. It's one of my family's favorites. The crust recipe is Julia Child's:

1/4 cup tepid water
1/4 cup milk (more later, if necessary)
2 TB olive oil
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup cornmeal (NOT self-rising, plus more for dusting
1/8 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp instant yeast (or 1 pkg dry yeast if you lack instant.)

If you have a bread machine, add the above ingredients in the pan in the manufacturer's recommended order and process on dough cycle. When dough cycle is complete, turn dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and allow to double again. If you don't have a bread machine, I can pm you other directions.

Preheat oven to 425F. Brown a pound of ground beef, drain, and spice with your desired taco spices. (I like cumin, minced onion and green pepper, garlic, a pinch of cayenne and a little bottled taco sauce or salsa.) Set aside.

Next, lightly grease a large cookie sheet or pizza pan and lightly dust with cornmeal. Using your hands, spread the dough out fairly thin. This is a resilient dough, so it will spread easily. Using a fork, dock the dough at 1 inch intervals, leaving a 1 inch bumper around the edges. Lightly brush with olive oil, sprinkle with minced garlic, and bake for 8 minutes. Remove from oven, spread ground beef evenly around crust (leaving the bumper around the edge again), sprinkle with copious amounts of shredded cheddar, jack, etc... and pop back in the oven until cheese is melted and bubbly and crust is lightly browned around the edges. Remove from oven, let cool for 8 minutes, and cut into wedges (or squares if you used a cookie sheet) and serve pieces with desired taco condiments. We do shredded romaine, diced onion, chopped black olive, and hot sauce.

When we're feeling particularly decadent we also serve sour cream and guacamole or avocado slices. Mmmmmmmmmm...

Beccy


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Subject: How about Tortillas?
From: Acme
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 08:22 PM

I don't want to start a new thread for this request, so I'll piggyback a great older thread.

I want to make some flour tortillas. I'm pretty sure that all I need to do is take a couple of cups of flour, a teaspoon of salt and enough water to make it the right consistency, but does anyone have an actual recipe for flour tortillas? I have several for corn tortillas, it's the wheat flour type I'm wanting to make.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 12:18 AM

refresh--

anyone? MMario? Have any tortilla recipies handy?


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: freda underhill
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 12:43 AM

INGREDIENTS:
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 cups whole wheat bread flour
1/2 cup shortening
2 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 cups boiling water
all-purpose flour for rolling

DIRECTIONS:
In a large bowl, stir together 1 cup all-purpose flour, the whole wheat flour, and salt. Rub in the shortening by hand until the mixture is the texture of oatmeal. Make a well in the center, and pour in the boiling water. Mix with a fork until all of the water is evenly incorporated. Sprinkle with a bit of additional flour, and knead until the dough does not stick to your fingers. The dough should be smooth.
Make balls the size of golf balls, about 2 ounces each. Place them on a tray, and cover with a cloth. Let stand for at least 1 hour, or up to 8 hours.
Heat a griddle or large frying pan over high heat. On a lightly floured surface, roll out a tortilla to your preferred thinness. Fry one at a time. Place on the griddle for 10 seconds, as soon as you see a bubble on the top, flip the tortilla over. Let it cook for about 30 seconds, then flip and cook the other side for another 30 seconds. Roll out the next tortilla while you wait for that one to cook. Repeat until all of the balls have been cooked. Tortillas can be refrigerated or frozen. Makes around 18 tortillas.

Note:

For white Mexican Flour Tortillas, use the same amounts of flour, but using white flour only. Another variation is to use 3/4, 1 cup, or 1 1/4 of vegetable shortening or lard. The best tasting recipe is reputed to be the one with all white flour, and 1 1/4 cup lard.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 03:22 AM

More Fat.
More Taste.
More Waist.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 01:27 PM

Thanks! I do use a lot of whole wheat flour, so this is the best of the white and whole wheat tortilla worlds, depending on what we feel like making.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Amos
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 01:52 PM

Good Mexican restaurants always give you a choice, corn or flour tortillas, as you know, being in Texas.

I have seen these being pumped out by the dozen, and it is a simple process once learned, like flipping pancakes!


A


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 03:48 PM

Amos,

We make pancakes here all of the time. I make them thin, like Swedish pancakes. When I was a kid we used to use the cold leftover pancakes by smearing them with jam before rolling them up to eat. (I'm sure that is some kind of poor-man's crepe!)

Yesterday I was trying to think of a way to make an average taco dinner more interesting for the kids, and hit on the idea of having them make their own tortillas. There are other foods that typically come ready made that we've made, such as our own raviolis. Though they're labor intensive they taste so good it's worth the time it takes.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Rapparee
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 04:04 PM

My favorite stew recipe, which I invented.

Paha Sapa Stew

1 large can of Dinty Moore beef stew.
Whatever vegetables you have laying around, like onion, carrots, zucchini, celery, and so on, washed, peeled and chopped up.
Wine or beer.
Tiger Sauce
Salt, pepper
Smoked, Andouille, or other such sausage, chunked up (optional)
Rice or rice-like pasta

Open the can of stew. Dump it in a large pot or pan.
Cook the stew until it bubbles gently. Toss in the hard veggies, like carrots or potatoes, if you have any. Cook until these are soft.
Now toss in the chunks of sausage, if you have any and you want to.
Cook for about fifteen minutes.
Dump in the wine* or beer -- about 12 oz.
Toss in the "soft" veggies (like zucchini).
Cook for a while.
Put in the rice or rice-like pasta. Cook until this is cooked. (Warning: understand that 1 cup of uncooked raw rice yields 3 cups of cooked rice. If you can't cook rice, use minute rice or pasta.)
Add the salt, pepper and Tiger Sauce to taste.
Serve. Eat, with beer.


*"To make a fancy French ragout, add wine to plain old stew." --My Mother.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 25 Sep 04 - 01:06 PM

Cooking season is about here. It's not like I haven't been cooking all summer, but we're coming to the time of year when letting a pot of something simmer on the stove doesn't make the air conditioner work overtime. The local big-box grocery store had a good sale this week, so I've stocked up and filled canisters with various types of pasta, and with white and brown rice. My freezer is filled with lots of frozen homegrown tomatoes and diced bell peppers. The cool storage bin has homegrown onions. I have packages of several varieties of beans, and am ready to go.

Since I have a couple of eggplants growing in the yard that are about ready, I'll pick up a pork tenderloin for a casserole that involves cooking the pork (in chunks), tomatoes, onions, and at the end of the time, the eggplant. Serve with mashed potatoes or rice. It's good any time of year, but particularly nice in cool weather.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Chris Green
Date: 25 Sep 04 - 01:18 PM

CHICKEN STOO (works well with turkey, too!)

Dice 500g (1lb) of chicken breast and brown it in a deep pan (actually I use a wok)

Chop up a couple of leeks, some new spuds, and carrots and throw them in. Throw some peas and black-eye beans in, too.

Add a liberal jigger of Worcester sauce, a little jigger of soy sauce, two crushed garlic cloves and about a teaspoon of fresh chopped tarragon.Pour in enough chicken stock to just about cover everything. Bring to the boil.

Reduce heat, cover and simmer for about forty minutes or until veg is tender (but not mushy!) Thicken to taste with chicken gravy granules and gerrit down yer!

Yum!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Sorcha
Date: 25 Sep 04 - 01:38 PM

The really hard part about making flour tortillas is getting them round. Mexicans learn this at mama's knee. Make the dough (lard does work best), then pinch off little balls about the size of a golf ball. Kinda work them in your hands sort of like the way you start a pinch pot, with a little dent in the bottom. Don't know why, but you're supposed to. I was taught to make all the little balls first. Cover them with a moist cloth.

Then, start stretching and pulling them in your hands (trick to this!) until they are about 3-4" across. Then put on a lightly greased surface and roll out like pie crust. Mine always look like aemobeas.

Heat a cast iron griddle (or just an open gas flame) pretty hot. Grease lightly. Place a tortilla on the hot griddle or over the flame and cook about 1 min. each side. Flip onto a tea towel and keep covered until all are cooked.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 25 Sep 04 - 02:15 PM

Recipe? Recipe? for Stew?

"We don't need no steenkin' recipe!"

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Sep 04 - 07:56 PM

Italian Stew

1 can Beef broth
2 cans Diced Tomatoes
1 large onion-chopped
1 lb mushrooms-sauteed
2 celery stalks-chopped
1 package Italian Sausage(mild or hot)-cut in small pieces and browned
1 package small Cheese Tortolini
1/2 cup good red wine
Garlic, oregano and basil to flavor
1 can tomato paste to thicken

simmer for 2 hours or use crockpot

Serve with garlic bread


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 25 Sep 04 - 11:50 PM

That sounds good!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 26 Sep 04 - 09:33 AM

I made a pot of beans last night--they came out wonderful, and some will go into the freezer for future meals. This isn't any of the chili recipes posted in the past, though there is a little chili powder in it. This is a variation of the Puerto Rican recipe I got from my ex-mother-in-law (to which I forgot to add the corriander this time).

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,Jaze
Date: 26 Sep 04 - 12:02 PM

The Italian Stew recipe above was mine. I forgot to add a Caesar salad on the side is great with this stew.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 26 Sep 04 - 12:25 PM

The meaning of my last post, about "We don't need no steenkin' recipe!" is that a stew, as I see it and do it, is a very flexible thing. Depends very much on what I have on hand, and also how I happen to feel. I don't believe I've ever made (over 55 years of cooking) stew twice the same way. Same thing with a pot of beans.

Actually, since a stew in my hands utilizes what is to hand, even if the result gets an enthusiastic reaction from the family, I wouldn't be able to repeat it if I wanted to.

On a different (but related) line of thought, I like to tell people that anyone can cook if (s)he has one of two sets of qualifications:
1. (S)he can read and follow directions; or
2. (S)he likes to eat and has some imagination.

And if you have both (1) and (2) you can be a good cook!

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Mar 05 - 06:03 PM

HOECAKE Recipe

1 cup water-ground white corn meal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon melted lard
Boiling water

Combine cornmeal and salt, then add lard and enough boiling water to make a dough heavy enough to hold a shape. Form into 2 thin oblong cakes and place in a heavy, hot, well-greased pan. Bake in a preheated 375 F oven about 25 minutes. Serve hot!
Thoreau made hoecakes at Walden.

Or- Place cakes on an oven hoe and place them in the outdoor oven, horno or fireplace. The oven should have been properly prepared- a wood fire, the coals then removed or put to the side, and the oven shovel used to place the cakes on the hot floor of the oven. NOTE! Too hot and the cakes burn on the outside, too cool and the centers don't cook properly. It is a fine art. The hoe is then used to remove the cooked cakes.
If cooking at a campfire, use a flat shovel and cook on its surface.

There is a California Pizza chain that makes their pizzas in a wood-fired oven shaped like a horno on the inside. They use an oven shovel (hoe) to place the pizzas, and to pull them out when done.

See thread 43283 for good corn meal recipes. Corn Breads
Unfortunately, this fine thread has been closed.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 07 Mar 05 - 11:11 PM

Q, what a nice reminder of some good recipes. And I learned something new--I had to look up "horno". There are many types of clay ovens. This is one I've used over the last few years. Chicken with veggies is to die for from one of these.

Do you make hoe cakes yourself?

I made a batch of stew last week when it got cold out. I was home all afternoon so I did it the old fashioned way, cooked it on the stovetop. It was marvelous, the beef was falling apart but the veggies were cooked just enough to be flavorful and soft without being mush. And I put about a 1/2 cup of red wine in, which took it to the next stew dimension.

I think we don't have as many of these cooking threads going since Rick Fielding is gone. He was one to ask interesting culinary questions. Not only was he a great musician, he was an adventurous cook (who described some amusing kitchen disasters). It's nice to see the old threads return.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 08 Mar 05 - 06:17 PM

Last Sunday we had our annual "Critter Dinner" and since the squirrels are rarely eaten by anyone except Wayne and myself, I thought perhaps a stew would be interesting. I thought long and hard about the natural flavor of squirrel and then tried to do some things that might make it more appealing to others. This plan was so successful that I couldn't believe it. Even my son Michael had TWO bowls!!!!

Three squirrels were crockpotted overnite in garlic seasoned water and they cmae off the bones so beautifully!!!! Plus we had about a third more meat doing this than you could normally gnaw off after roasting or frying. I used Alaska Gold potatoes for the special flavor they have. I also used an equal number of parsnips to carrots to add in some natural sweetness. One medium onion and three stalks of celery along with one can of corn completed the stew except for the dumplings added towards the end. The entire mixture cooked down together for several hours and I added a few seasonings during that time. A bit of rosemary, a wee bit of sage and a few shots of soy sauce and Tabasco gave me about the right flavor. After cooking down I added dumplings and the ste was a HIT!!! All of the non-squirrel eaters ate the living daylights out of it and I wish I had made more.

A word about dumplings.........Everyone has a favorite recipe and I have a few myself, but for the past ten years or so I have used the one I got from Justin Wilson on his Cajun Cookin' TV show. They are heavy, but everyone loves them and they are dead simple. Two ingredients........Flour and Sour Cream.....Mix to a dough consistency. That's it! Add a bit of salt or pepper or parsley or wahtever you like, but they're fine with just the sour cream and flour!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 08 Mar 05 - 11:55 PM

Spaw, is it a safe guess that one would serve a red wine with squirrel stew? Is an Italian Chianti too robust?

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,Gringo
Date: 09 Mar 05 - 12:00 AM

Most any stew is much improved by adding 1 jar of Hienz Mushroom Gravy. Add it late in the cycle and enjoy. gringo


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 09 Mar 05 - 12:41 AM

The Scandihoovian approach is to add a can of Cream of Mushroom soup. . . I can't imagine that with a chianti. . . (maybe a mild merlot)


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 09 Mar 05 - 04:00 AM

Squirrel goes best with red. Red Rocket is the preferred brand and it doesn't even have to be decantered......

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 09 Mar 05 - 06:13 AM

The Aussie approach is 1 teaspoon Vegemite....


in the soup, not the wine!!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 09 Mar 05 - 08:00 PM

SRS: I wholly agree with you (surprise!) it's great to see this old thread renewed! A reminder, though, that the Mudcat lost an original when Rick left us.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 09 Mar 05 - 11:08 PM

DougR, We agreed on something else once, and I should remember what it was because that is so unusual, but I don't. So, do you drink red or white with your squirrel stew?

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 10 Mar 05 - 08:01 PM

I drink Red with everything!

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Acme
Date: 10 Sep 05 - 10:21 PM

I don't have much produce to show for my garden this year, but the one thing that produced well was squash. I cut up a lot and froze it.

Any suggestions on how to cook it? This is the green zucchini type that grows huge if you don't get to it soon enough. My recipes are limited: I put it in soup sometimes, I make zucchini bread, and I sautee it with garlic and tomato sauce, topped with parmesian cheese.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Leadfingers
Date: 10 Sep 05 - 11:34 PM

Tortillas to Zucchini ? I suppose that's Cornbread to Stew!!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Leadfingers
Date: 10 Sep 05 - 11:35 PM

Oh Yes -- And 100 !!


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