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BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes

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Stilly River Sage 31 Jan 02 - 01:06 PM
gnomad 31 Jan 02 - 02:53 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 02:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Jan 02 - 03:08 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Jan 02 - 03:09 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 03:28 PM
Sorcha 31 Jan 02 - 04:20 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 31 Jan 02 - 07:08 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 07:18 PM
catspaw49 31 Jan 02 - 07:44 PM
DougR 31 Jan 02 - 07:56 PM
Rick Fielding 31 Jan 02 - 08:30 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 31 Jan 02 - 08:54 PM
DougR 31 Jan 02 - 10:47 PM
mack/misophist 31 Jan 02 - 11:16 PM
Haruo 31 Jan 02 - 11:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Feb 02 - 12:06 AM
Haruo 01 Feb 02 - 12:16 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Feb 02 - 12:23 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Feb 02 - 12:38 AM
Rick Fielding 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM
Kaleea 01 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Feb 02 - 11:09 AM
MMario 01 Feb 02 - 11:56 AM
DougR 01 Feb 02 - 04:21 PM
catspaw49 01 Feb 02 - 04:37 PM
catspaw49 01 Feb 02 - 04:39 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Feb 02 - 08:24 PM
GUEST,Jaze 01 Feb 02 - 09:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Feb 02 - 09:50 PM
DougR 01 Feb 02 - 10:57 PM
alison 01 Feb 02 - 11:13 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 12:34 AM
alison 02 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM
John Gray 02 Feb 02 - 03:54 AM
GUEST,jaze 02 Feb 02 - 08:11 AM
DougR 02 Feb 02 - 01:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Feb 02 - 01:09 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 01:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Feb 02 - 03:48 PM
alison 02 Feb 02 - 07:10 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 07:54 PM
DougR 02 Feb 02 - 09:49 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 02 Feb 02 - 10:10 PM
alison 03 Feb 02 - 07:04 AM
gnu 03 Feb 02 - 07:29 AM
Peg 03 Feb 02 - 10:28 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 03 Feb 02 - 10:40 AM
Peg 03 Feb 02 - 10:52 AM

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Subject: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 01:06 PM

The cornbread thread yielded some great recipes, but at the bottom of that one someone suggested stew--and it would be nice if those recipes turn up in a simple search so I'm moving the discussion over here.

My stew recipe is (pardon the pun) fluid. I like the liquid the meat and veggies stew in to be flavorful, but depending on what I have around the house, it can vary. Sometimes I stew beef in soup stock (beef or chicken) or sometimes just a couple of teaspoons of bouillion crystals. I often season it with mustard (yellow, out of the bottle in the fridge) and/or Worchestershire sauce. My recipe that I originally started with says use five vegetables, but I usually only manage carrots, potatoes, parsnip (a sweet white close cousin to the carrot) and broccoli added at the last minute or it turns to mush.

Lately I've discovered the joys of lamb stew. It's a much richer and more complex flavor than beef stew. I use the recipe (more or less) from The Joy of Cooking.

And I make a very good fish stew, using orange roughy or halibut.

Take it from here--anyone have a favorite stew recipe that they think would compliment all of the recipes for cornbread? Or I could post my baking powder biscuit recipe, which I frequently make to serve with stew or soup.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: gnomad
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 02:53 PM

Sounds good so far, but you've just got to include onions. Sweet peppers are a good idea too.

In lamb and pork stews I'm partial to paprika, and pork also seems a good match for oregano...gotta go, I'm drooling on the keys


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 02:55 PM

Just out of curiosity Maggie.........Did you check the other recipe threads which I linked toward the bottom of the other thread?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 03:08 PM

I was trying to put several links in when I started this thread, but the system froze up, and all I reached were error messages. I've only just gotten back to my computer. I looked at a couple of threads the other day--the goal here was to have one that would load more quickly. These discussions get so long that they're too ponderous. The thread this links to is here, to do with cornbread. But you're right, there probably are threads doing the same task as this. I'll have to stew about starting a superfluous thread (at least I used "BS" on it).

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 03:09 PM

Darn. That was backwards. I was going to link the other one over to this, not this one back there again. That's what happens when I try to do work at the office instead of just read email all day. :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 03:28 PM

How about a lighter and very easy version of Kentucky Burgoo? Since Burgoos are a two meat stew, I figured it would fit in here!

                  
                            Kentucky Burgoo

Serving Size : 10   Categories    : Soups And Stews

Amount Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
   1      pound         lean boneless chuck steak
   1 1/2 teaspoons    vegetable oil
   8      cups          no-salt-added beef broth
   1      pound         skinned boned chicken thighs
   1 1/2 pounds       cubed peeled baking potato -- (4 cups)
   2 1/2 cups          chopped carrot
   1      cup          chopped celery
   1      cup          chopped onion
   1 1/2 teaspoons    curry powder
   1      teaspoon      dried thyme
    1/2 teaspoon      salt
14 1/2 ounces       whole tomatoes -- (1 can)
                        undrained and coarsely chopped
   3      clove         garlic -- minced
   2      cups          frozen whole-kernel corn -- thawed
10      ounces       frozen lima beans -- (1 package) thawed

Trim fat from steak, and cut steak into 1-inch cubes. Heat vegetable oil in a large Dutch oven; add the steak cubes, and brown well on all sides. Add broth, and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 1 hour.

Trim any fat from chicken thighs, and cut the chicken into 1-inch cubes. Add chicken cubes and next 9 ingredients (chicken through garlic); simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

Add corn and lima beans to stew; cook an additional 45 minutes or until the beans are tender. But...at this point you can throw in a half cup of Maker's Mark or Wild Turkey and let the whole mess simmer for several hours and you'll be real happy with the result!!!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Sorcha
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 04:20 PM

I have just recently discovered a new trick......you know those envelopes of "gravy powder" that all you do is add water? They make pretty lousy gravy, but if you add a dry packet to stew........boy, does it ever help!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:08 PM

Being older, my wife and I like to make something that is good for two-three days, so stews are a favorite. Here is a simple one that we really overeat on.

SIMPLE BEEF STEW

3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped large
1 1/2 lb beef, cubed
3 medium potatoes (hard, white)
2 (about) cups beef or chicken broth
(we use low-salt canned)
2 carrots
4 celery stalks
1 sweet red pepper (if not too expensive this week)
1 cup red wine
1-2 bay leaves
1 tsp. basil
Garlic, chopped, to suit your taste
1/2 tsp. rosemary 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 tsp pepper

Heat oil in bottom of large thick-bottomed pot (one with a lid), sauté onion. Add meat, cook 5-7 minutes (add meat in 2-4 portions to facilitate browning). Cut and add potatoes (we use hard white because they don't go all soft and mushy). Add stock and wine. then add cut-up carrots, celery, red pepper, (or the vegetables you have on hand, reserving those that need less cooking to the last) and spices (I add a couple teaspoons full of New Mexico medium strength chili powder but this is strictly optional).
Cook 15-20 minutes at rather low heat in covered pot (or until you are satisfied with the doneness of the vegetables).
Good, tender, lean beef trimmings are usually available from our meat market at a reasonable price; we use it rather than the often fat or gristley "stewing beef."
Serve with corn bread (or any good bread).

OLD-TIME BEEF STEW (from BHG)

1 1/2 lb. beef stew meat, 1-inch cubes
2-3 tablespoons olive oil
4 cups water (use broth for richer taste)
1 large onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons Worcester sauce
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 bay leaf
1/8 teaspoon groung allspice
6 medium carrots, sliced
1 pound small white onions, peeled and halved
4 medium potatoes, in 1-inch chunks
1/2 cup cold water
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Fresh parsley, snipped

1. In a large pot, cook all the meat at once in hot oil over medium high heat until brown (Note: keep spatula handy to scrape browned material on the bottom of the pot- a lot of the flavor comes from this). Browning and meat cooking take about 15-20 minutes. Drain off excess fat (we get lean trimmings from the butcher as our stew meat and don't have to do this). Add the 4 cups water, sliced onion, garlic, Worcester, lemon juice, sugar, salt, paprika, pepper, bay leaf and allspice. Bring just to boiling and reduce heat. Simmer covered, for two hours, stirring occasionally.
2. Stir in carrots, onions and potatoes. Return to boiling; reduce heat, simmer about 30 minutes.
3. Add flour to 1/2 cup cold water and use for thickening. Add parsley.

PORK AND SWEET POTATO STEW

1 pound boneless pork shoulder roast, cut in 1-inch cubes (we use lean pork roast- little difference in cost here. Shoulder does have more flavor)
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped (1 cup)
1/3 cup dried apples, coarely chopped
1 tablespoon quick-cooking tapioca
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon dry sage, crushed
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamon
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 cups chicken broth
1 cup apple juice or apple cidar

In a large skillet, brown meat, half at a time, in hot oil. Drain off fat (with lean pork so available, this is no longer a problem). In a 33 1/3 to 4-quart cooker, place sweet potatoes, onion and dried apples. Add browned meat. Sprinkle with tapioca, garlic, dried sage, cardamon and pepper. Pour broth and juice or cidar over all.
Cover, cook on low heat for 6 hours or on high heat for 3 hours.
Note: Europeans often add a little allspice to stews and other meat dishes. Be careful; it enriches the taste, but too much covers up the meat and vegetable flavors.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:18 PM

Hey Dicho.....I cook a Pork and Sweet Potato Stew too, pretty similar including the apple juice. Using pretty lean pork, it's a real good, nourishing, low-fat and low cholesterol stew with a real "Fall" flavor.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:44 PM

Here's a lamb one we really like.....and we LOVE lamb around here!!!!            

                Lamb Ragout

Serves 8   

Amount Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
   6      tablespoons   olive oil
   3      pounds       lamb stew meat -- cut in 2-inch cubes
   4      medium       yellow onions -- diced
   3      stalks       celery -- sliced
   3      cloves       garlic -- sliced
   2      tablespoons   tomato paste
    1/4 cup          minced parsley
   2      teaspoons    salt
   1      teaspoon      freshly ground pepper
   1 1/2 teaspoons    dried thyme
   1      teaspoon      rosemary
   2                      bay leaves
   1      pound         small red potatoes-- peeled and quartered
   1      pound         carrots -- peeled and cut in 1" sections

1. In a large Dutch oven over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons olive oil and toss half the lamb cubes in oil; brown lamb on all sides (5 to 7 minutes). Remove to a bowl or platter and reserve.

2. Add 2 more tablespoons oil and remaining lamb cubes, browning while stirring constantly (5 to 7 minutes). Push meat to one side and add remaining oil, yellow onions, celery, and garlic. Return reserved lamb cubes to pan and cook until onions are translucent (4 to 5 minutes).

3. Add tomato paste, parsley, salt, pepper, thyme, bay leaves, potatoes, and water to cover. Reduce heat to simmer, cover, and cook 1 hour.

4. After 1 hour add carrots and pearl onions (if you wish--12 ounces) to ragout. Cook 1 hour and 10 minutes more. Serve hot.


Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 07:56 PM

I'm getting hungry again.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 08:30 PM

Just bringing this over from my original cornbread thread, 'cause it's getting too long.

Thanks good people, I've been on a "cornbread tear" and have tried:

"Catspaw's first recipe

Emily's "Norwegian"

Dicho's

Silly River sage's

They're all a tad different....and so far so good. I'm workin' my way down the list.

However....when it comes to STEW.....Ummm Boy! Best little addition trick I know is half a can of consomme soup. Another thing I've been FORCED to do is learn to use a NET. That is, I put the onions in a plastic net (never minded the taste...it's just the pieces that make me gag) and after dishin' out my own portion, empty the onions back into the pot. Been tempted to do the same thing with turnips, but I don't want people to think I'm THAT finicky...so I just ignore them.

Rick


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 08:54 PM

Hey, Catspaw, that's quite a lamb stew! Will have to try it.
This is one we do often.

POSOLE (New Mexican pork stew)

2 pounds pork tenderloin, cubed
2 onions, chopped
1-2 bay leaves
1 tablesoon drippings or other fat
1/2 teaspoon orégano
1 cup red chile pulp OR 2 tablespoons pure Chimayo
medium hot chile powder
2 cans Ortega green chile, chopped
3 cans white hominy (about 1 qt.)
1 teaspoon salt
Hot water

Fry onions in fat. Add pork and blend. Brown slightly (should still be faintly pink on the inside of cubes). Add hominy, chile and seasoning.
NOTES: If chile powder is used, mix with one tablespoon flour and stir into fat. Use only enough hot water to get the posole to a nice, stew-consistency.
Cook only long enough for pork to become tender (Try after about 1 hour). Pork tenderloin is easily overcooked.
If not familiar with pure chile powder, start with two tablespoons and adjust to taste. Flavorful Chimayo, San Juan or other New Mexico chile powder is available in specialty stores in most larger centers. Commercial chile powder sold alongside other spices in the supermarket is mostly flour, etc.; the "real thing" can be a shock! Old timers made posole with pigs feet and other poor meats.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 10:47 PM

But you haven't tried my recipe yet Rick, and you originally asked for a "simple" recipe. None could be much more simple than mine, and I think it's only fair that I tell you I'm a bit hurt.

**SOB!**

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: mack/misophist
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 11:16 PM

Dicho was right on the mark with the recipe above, with one exception. ONE CUP of red wind????????? How about half a bottle? Any cheap red table wine will do. Start adding it early on, a bit at a time. The alcohol goes away fast. My experience has been that simple recipes with the best ingredients you can find work best. And don't trim off all the fat. Fat carries flavour, like it or not.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Haruo
Date: 31 Jan 02 - 11:25 PM

I made a scrumptious dish a few days ago of canned (well, jarred) venison (the label called it "deer") with holiday-shape pasta, crushed pineapple, Thai-style coconut milk, bacon bits, and garlic.

For lamb stew, as a cut I prefer lamb cheeks, which can be purchased (only place I know of) at the Pike Place Market in Seattle, at Don and Joe's meats I think it's called, anyway the butcher shop across the aisle from the place where they throw the fish.

Liland


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:06 AM

Oh, what a wonderful treat, to find so many great recipes this evening! A funny story--a friend of mine (who when I was a youngster I thought of as elderly at 65 or 70, but at 85 she is young as ever and still a great cook) was making stew one afternoon. She had a bottle of red wine, and sedately poured in a little, and as I watched, she said "what the heck!" and poured in a huge dollop (probably a couple of cups). It was wonderful! And yes, the alcohol goes fast with the heat.

I've been looking through the book to find the lamb stew recipe I used, and think I actually used a recipe for "braised lamb shanks and trotters" but (as is typical of my cooking) didn't quite follow the recipe. I used big stew-sized chunks of meat instead of shanks. And went from there. No trotters in my version. It cooked in the big stock pot.

Rub: 4 lamb shanks (3/5 to 4 pounds) with garlic
Roll in seasoned flour
heat 2 tablespoons of oil and partially sear the lamb, and add
2 tablespoons onion, diced
and cook meat until browned on all sides. It says to pour off the fat, but I believe I kept it, because the lamb was so lean. Place in a pan with a rack (I used no rack) and add
1.5 cups boiling stock
1/3 teaspoon pepper
1.5 teaspoons salt
1/2 bay leaf

Note: I always add at least two bay leaves to whatever I'm cooking, it's such a great flavor. And this says you can add 1/2 cup lemon juice, but I didn't).

Cover. Simmer meat or bake covered in a 325 degree oven about 1.5 hours or until tender. You may add for the last .5 hour of cooking:

3 cups diced vegetables
.5 cup boiling stock or water

The veggies may be onions, carrots, celery, green peppers, turnips, tomatoes and potatoes, a matter of choice and expediency. Strain, degrease and reduce stock. Serve as is or make pan gravy.

I've narrowed it down to this recipe because I know I didn't add peas, or peppers, or beans, and there was no cream of any kind in it (I can't eat it). I wish I'd paid more attention, but I've made this a couple of times and am pretty sure this was the recipe.

I have my Dad's old Joy of Cooking book, and if anyone thinks that a thread to do with food has nothing to do with cooking, they were never at one of the Seattle Song Circle meetings on Sunday nights. I always knew not to try to call Dad on Sunday evenings because he wouldn't be home, he'd be out singing. And if I called earlier in the day, he'd describe what he was cooking for the meeting at his house (usually a barbecue rib recipe he liked) or to take along to someone else's house. Food and Folk music go together.

Maggie


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Haruo
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:16 AM

Why would anybody think a thread to do with food had nothing to do with cooking (unless, of course, it specified "raw" in the heading)?

Liland
(who thinks maybe you meant Folk music instead of "cooking"?)


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:23 AM

Misophist, I ask my liquor vendor for 2-3 bottles of cheap wine for cooking, and he bags it for me. I seldom look at the label. Usually the result is fine (I don't really use measuring cups by the way) but one bottle had a very strong flavor and it spoiled the taste of the stew. I have been careful ever since. It was French. I should have checked because the french cheap wines are the worst of any sold here.
I have a recipe for a French stew that uses a lot of wine. I will dig it out for you. I liked it, but my wife didn't- taste too concentrated, if that's the word, so I only used it once.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:38 AM

Oops. I spent too much time looking at the book and not at the screen. Yes, of course, comparing cooking and singing was the goal. Sigh. It has been a long day. House purchase is just about in the tank, but, on the up side, our karma is improving because my daughter managed to connect a cat she saw on the block with a cat described on a "lost cat" poster. We called and told the poster poster (!) where to look for their cat. My neighbor suggested that the cat's name might be "Lucky," since he is described as having a broken leg and a notched collar. No kidding!

I agree with Dicho--inexpensive wine is good to use in cooking. I make a faux chicken marsala with chablis or chardonay that I buy in a box at the grocery store. My kids love it (it's cheaper than going to the Olive Garden and we can eat sooner!). I cut about three large split chicken breasts into a few pieces each, saute them in olive oil and garlic, then add mushrooms (canned or fresh work equally well). Stir it around a bit more, add a half cup of wine, and about a cup of chicken boullion, and once it simmers, thicken it with some cornstarch (in water). Serve over some kind of chunky pasta (rigatoni is good) or linguini.

Time to turn off the computer and get some sleep.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM

Doug, I'm being democratic. Trying to go in some kind of order. Yours DOES look pretty simple, but I'm flushed with power right now. Four batches, no duds. On the other hand, my students are all starting to wonder why they're getting cornbread with their banjo and guitar lessons!

Cheers

Rick


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:42 AM

No telling what the collar notches come from. . . this is my evening for leaving thoughts incompleted. My kids and I discussed what a cat might notch his collar about (kittens? tires dodged? lives lived already?).


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Kaleea
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM

People often ask for my recipe for Beef Soup, but when I give it to them and they are unable to duplicate my soup. It is because they do not know the SECRET INGREDIENT is glazing the onion! For an extremely savory soup, one should first dice a large white onion, and in a large pot or skillet, saute the onion it a bit of oil (about a tablespoon)until the onions are glazed & very brown. This will make a flavor which is unsurpassed by any other ingredients! Place the onions into a slow cooker or crockpot. In the same pot, add a little more oil, and add the beef (about 1 Lb. lean beef), diced & lightly floured, and stir onions in the Crockpot. Add whatever ingredients you like after that to the crockpot, and simmer for several hours until done. I like to keep it simple by using diced potatoes, carrots, fresh parsley. Salt and Pepper to taste. Sometimes I add peas or corn. Celery, if you like it, should be diced and glazed with the onions. I often add one small can of tomato paste or a small can of tomato sauce. Experiment with different ingredients & proportions, but the secret is in the glazed onions! Bon Appetite`!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:09 AM

The lamb in that recipe of mine was supposed to be 3.5 to 4 pounds, not 3/5 as my dyslexic fingers typed. And I think my evening glass of wine might have contributed to the drowsy lack of proof-reading.

Clearly some of the Mudcatters split their days very well between kitchen and computer. I'm going to head over to Sam's Warehouse this weekend and buy one of their deboned legs of lamb and get cooking! Sam's is also the only place I know in this general area (north Texas) where I can buy pork that hasn't been adulterated with saline solution. I think the various grocery store wrappers say it has been "enhanced," I say it's too salty to eat and the consistency is strange.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: MMario
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:56 AM

A friend of mine does a guiness stew that is incredible.

Here's his recipe as he gave it to me:

a couple pounds of onions; slice thinly; cook in a little oil until just begin to brown; add cubed beef ( he said about three pounds) 2 bay leaves,1 teaspoon of paprika, 2 teaspoons cracked black pepper.

Add Guiness about 2/3 of the way up the meat. cover and cook on a slow simmer at least 4 hours. Salt to taste.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 04:21 PM

My wife use to bake a stew in the oven rather than the usual way either in a crockpot or in a dutch oven on a stove burner. Anybody have a baked stew recipe? I've looked everywhere for her recipe, and cannot find it.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 04:37 PM

Here's one Doug......I pulled it off the net, but Karen has one that is real close to it she got from her Grandmother. I ought to let her cook sometime....She really is a good cook it's just that I love to do it!

Oven-Baked Stew

2 pounds boneless beef chuck or round steak, cut into 1" cubes
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cups sliced carrots
14 oz. can whole peeled tomatoes, undrained, chopped
1 envelope dry onion soup mix
1/2 cup dry red wine or water
1 cup fresh or canned sliced mushrooms
8 oz. medium or broad egg noodles, cooked and drained

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In 2-quart casserole, toss beef with flour, then bake uncovered 20 minutes. Add carrots, tomatoes, then beefy onion soup mix blended with wine. Bake covered 1 1/2 hours or until beef is tender. Stir in mushrooms and bake covered and additional 10 minutes. Serve over hot cooked noodles.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: catspaw49
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 04:39 PM

BTW, Karen adds potatoes in equal quantity to carrots and skips the noodles.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 08:24 PM

PROVENCE BEEF STEW

3 lb. bottom round, excess fat trimmed,
(1 1/2 in. cubes; better meat cuts stewing time
and prevents overcooking of vegetables)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1-2 onions, peeled and quartered
1 lb white mushrooms, caps and stems separated
2 celery stalks, 1 1/2 inch lengths
2 large carrots, cut in 1 1/2 inch lengths
3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup port
2 cups red wine
2 sprigs thyme
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1-2 bay leaves
Orange peel (3" x 1/2")
18 pearl onions
24 green pitted olives
4 plum tomatoes, 1" dice
1/4 cup chopped parsley

1. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper
2. In a large, heavy bottomed pot, heat the oil to very hot. Place the meat in the pot in a single layer and brown thoroughly on all sides. Do in batches if necessary. Remove meat and set aside.
3. Place quartered onion in pot along with mushroom stems (not caps), celery and carrots. Cook briefly (about 1 minute), stirring. Return meat to the pot and sprinkle all ingredients with the flour, stirring until the flour seems to have disappeared.
4. Add the port quickly and stir to deglaze the pot. Add the wine and use a wooden spoon to scrape any deposits away from the bottom of the pan.
5. Add bay leaf, thyme, saffron, garlic and orange peel. Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover the pot. Simmer for one hour, occasionally scraping the bottom. From time to time check to see that the liquid is still covering the ingredients. If it isn't, add water or stock and return to a simmer.
6. After the stew has been simmering for one hour, add the pearl onions and the mushroom caps. Simmer 20 minutes longer or until the meat is tender.
7. Just before serving, add the diced tomatoes and olives (rinsed). Stir them in to heat them, but do not cook them.
8. Serve in soup plates. use a slotted spoon to arrange the solid ingredients artfully in each plate. Discard thyme sprigs, orange rind and bay leaves. Ladle the liquid into the bowl. Be sure the olives, tomato and onions are clearly visible in each serving. Sprinkle with parsley.
I have given the text of the NY Times Professional Chef recipe. We made a few changes. We had no port, so used Madeira (left over from the previous Christmas). We left out the saffron but added garlic. We cut the vegetables normally. We did not have plum tomatoes, so used Roma tomatoes and cooked them lightly. We didn't worry about the fancy presentation.
My wife didn't care for the olives and thought the stew was a little heavy (not much liquid). She thought maybe adding a little stock would help. I liked it straight up and would do it again.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,Jaze
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 09:15 PM

Here's a recipe my family likes(even the kids!)

DAD'S CROCKPOT BEEF 1 lb stew beef 1packet of Lipton Onion Soup Mix 2 cans Cream of Mushroom soup (I add sauteed Crimini Mushrooms)

cook 6 hours in Crockpot and serve over noodles. Enjoy!


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 09:50 PM

Jaze, if near the end of cooking you add a glassful of red wine and a big dollop of sour cream to that you'd have something remarkably like an easy beef stroganoff.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 10:57 PM

Spaw: that sounds very close to Velma's recipe I believe. I know she used fresh mushrooms in it, and she used veggies instead of pasta. Thanks.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 01 Feb 02 - 11:13 PM

OK enough of this cook for 6 hours nonsense!!

15 minute stew (assuming you have a pressure cooker)

brown a few well chopped onions
add some mince (approx 500g... not good with figures.. just bung in enough)
brown mince
add a few chopped carrots
add about 6 peeled and chopped spuds
add water/ beef stock / guinness / red wine... whatever(enough to 3/4 cover the meat and spuds in the pot)
add herbs to taste
dash of worcester sauce
stock cubes / gravy powder (depending on what liquid you used)

bung the lid on and cook for whatever length of time it needs to cook spuds (approx 7 mins with mine)

take off lid and attack with a Cheatle (wooden musher thing) or potato masher.. and mush until it looks like stew.... I like mine with recognisable potato lumps....

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 12:34 AM

Alison, very like our cheater Hamburger (= mince) Soup my wife makes (she lacks patience too, and seldom thinks about dinner until it is too late to do it up right). She adds onions, stalk celery and a couple cloves of garlic. The only real difference is that we use low-salt canned stock (Campbells) rather than water and the usual cubes. Your 500 g is just over a pound; we generally use extra lean grade hamburger (we avoid the fat beef, being virtuous here so that we can grate some old cheddar or parmesan into it just before we eat). No pressure cooker, so takes about an hour.
I am the recipe fiend in the family, and I start getting stuff out and cutting about 2 pm (retired=redundant) for stew at six.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 12:47 AM

much as I'd like to be that organised... it's "what can I get and bung in a pot tha'll be ready in 30 mins?"... I should have married one of you men that loves to cook!!!


slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: John Gray
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 03:54 AM

'Spaw, the folks in Kentucky certainly have a different interpretation of 'burgoo'than here in Oz. To us burgoo is porridge.

JG/FME


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: GUEST,jaze
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 08:11 AM

The really cool thing about the crockpot method is that yoou can prepare it in the am, go out and have fun all day(or work) and it's ready when you come home.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:04 PM

Alison: I've been tempted to get a pressure cooker, but just haven't done it. I guess the main reason I haven't is I have lots of time so cooking speed isn't that important to me. You really lost me with that "Mince" stuff though. I thought maybe it was kangaroo or something. Thanks Dicho for the explanation.

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:09 PM

Jaze, Yes, the art of slow cooking has been put to use at our house. If I put a chicken to roast or stew in the crock pot, and have a loaf of bread in the bread machine on the timer (as described, with recipe, here) it means walking into a house at the end of the day that smells wonderful, and you can sit right down to eat.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 01:52 PM

Crockpots are useful to those with no time on their hands; they do a good job. There are many recipes especially for use in them.
Pressure cookers, on the other hand, scare me because of the possibility of explosion. I remember people getting hurt. This was years ago, and perhaps they have improved the escape valve, but I don't know anyone who has one now.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 03:48 PM

I have one, given to me by my Mom (and she swore by them) but, as with so many of my kitchen things, the pressure cooker is packed right now. I've had some good results with it, though time does improve on things where pressure just cooks them fast. There are some things that you simply should not cook in pressure cookers. I think beans are one of those things, because they turn to mush and clog that "escape valve" as you call it, and can cause an explosion. Mom used to have one with a pressure guage, but I haven't seen any of those in years.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 07:10 PM

Hamburger mince is different... I use minced steak, (same as I'd use to make bolognaise)

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 07:54 PM

English vs American-Canadian terminology is different and can be confusing. (Some differences also between American and Canadian). When I buy ground beef at the store (Canadian), I find 3 grades- extra lean, lean and regular. The difference depends on the allowable fat amount in the meat and is defined by regulations. The limits are fairly broad, so we pick a store that consistently sells a leaner product (of course paying more). The extra lean is so lean that sometimes extra fat must be added. I presume that this is what you mean by minced steak.
The term mince is seldom used here, except for a "mince meat" sold in containers for use in pies, etc., that is mostly cooked spiced fruit with added fat. I had assumed that English mince was equivalent to the stuff used in MacDonalds' hamburger patties (do you still have Wimpy's in Europe or have they killed off all their patrons?) - No, I'm being facetious, I don't know how the term mince is used in the British Isles or Ireland or how hamburger is defined over there. When we first came to Canada, we had trouble with the Canadian meat cuts, but now I am familiar with them so they cause no trouble. I know nothing of English meat cuts, but some I saw in a butcher's over there seemed different to me.
Don't mention Holland! I watched a man unloading beef carcasses from a truck at a meat market- he unhooked the carcasses and tossed them out- Thunk! on the cobbles. There was one hotel with a large dining hall that served American-style steaks in Amsterdam and that was it- everything else was chopped up and cooked to death. All this is thread creep and another story or three.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: DougR
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 09:49 PM

Alison: bolognaise?

DougR


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Feb 02 - 10:10 PM

Do you mean Bolognese meat sauce for use with Tagliatelle, etc.? Ragù ? Done properly, this takes several hours.
Do they have Salisbury steak in Europe or is this a North American invention? Ground-up lean meat made into a large patty and served like a steak.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: alison
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 07:04 AM

yep bolognaise as in italian meat sauce for pasta.... and it doesn't take hours... 7 mins in my pressure cooker!! lol.....
never heard of Salisbury steak
and for whoever asked earlier.. Wimpy disappeared from Belfast a long time ago.. only to be replaced by Burger King.......

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: gnu
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 07:29 AM

Excellent stuff here !!! The thread title reminded me of the first time I tried any baking. One of my chores when I was a lad was supper as Mum and Dad both worked. I was twelve when this honour was bestowed upon me, so suppers were simply meat and potatoe type dishes. One winter's day, however, I wanted to surprise my parents with a step up. I made Johnny Cake and sausages, one of my Dad's favourites. Goodness gracious, it smelled perfect and I couldn't wait for their arrival.

The look on Dad's face when he entered and smelled that Johnny Cake was truly satisfying. Mum was equally surprised and beaming. I swelled up a foot with pride. The look on Dad's face when he took that first bite was something I will never forget. Obvious puzzlement went to sheer disgust and he spat it to the plate, looked at me and asked, in his kind and gentle manner, "What the fuck did you put in that ?"

Seems a twelve year old does need to be taught the difference between baking powder and baking soda. The next one was perfect... of course, Mum hovered over me like a guardian angel for every new dish after that. In his kind and gentle manner, Dad bestowed that chore upon her.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Peg
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:28 AM

Heres a recipe forthe Brits or tose who can find good gourmet sausages at the all-natural supermarket. I discovered/developed this recipe when I fell in love with the all-natural herb sausages I bought at the Oxford butcher shop when I was house-sitting one lonely January in Dorchester-on-Thames...I needed to find a way to cook them that went beyond just frying them in a pan.

Peg's Banger Stew

Slice sausages (GOOD freshly made ones; the more savory and herby the better) into half-inch chunks. Brown them in olive oil or butter in a large saucepan or pot. Add some more oil or butter and add sliced onions, carrots and potatoes to the sausages, and saute, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent. Salt and pepper lightly. Add some red wine and let simmer for a few minutes. Than add water or stock to cover. Let simmer on LOW heat for 20-30 minutes, or until potatoes are tender.

Enjoy with crusty bread and red wine.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:40 AM

Here we have several good Italian and German independent sausage makers, so no trouble with your "bangers" recipe. We don't have the word, but we have the goods. Just reading your "Peg's Banger Stew," I can almost smell the sausages sizzling. Not for calorie counters.


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Subject: RE: BS: From Cornbread to Stew recipes
From: Peg
Date: 03 Feb 02 - 10:52 AM

Calories? Who counts calories?

:)

To round out the meal a nice salad of bitter greens would be lovely...helps counter the effects of so much fat and animal protein, too. But having a cold salad with a stew often seems odd to some. So you can make these meals on a day when you have a spare lunch of salad or steamed vegetables...


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