Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn

DigiTrad:
BRYAN O'LYNN
JOHN BOLYN
TAM O THE LINN
TOM BOLYN
TOM BOLYNN (2)
TOM BOWLING


Related threads:
Lyr Add: Tom Bolynn (3) (45)
(origins) Origins: Brian O'Linn (6)
Lyr Add: brian o Lynn was a bold Brexiteer (3)
Lyr Req: Brian O'Lynne (from Dave Van Ronk) (7)
Lyr Req: Brian O'Linn / Bryan O'Lynn (2)
Lyr Req: Johnny Macree (5)
Lyr Add: Tommy Linn (8)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Tam o' the Linn (from the Silver Burdett third grade textbook, Music Now and Long Ago)


Lighter 19 Jan 19 - 07:11 PM
Lighter 19 Jan 19 - 07:35 PM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 08:56 AM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 09:23 AM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 09:34 AM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 09:45 AM
Lighter 20 Jan 19 - 10:49 AM
Lighter 20 Jan 19 - 10:51 AM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 01:39 PM
Lighter 20 Jan 19 - 02:19 PM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 05:07 PM
Steve Gardham 20 Jan 19 - 05:17 PM
Lighter 20 Jan 19 - 06:01 PM
Lighter 21 Jan 19 - 08:45 AM
Lighter 21 Jan 19 - 08:46 AM
Steve Gardham 21 Jan 19 - 09:29 AM
Steve Gardham 21 Jan 19 - 10:19 AM
Lighter 21 Jan 19 - 04:38 PM
Steve Gardham 21 Jan 19 - 06:54 PM
Lighter 21 Jan 19 - 08:56 PM
Steve Gardham 22 Jan 19 - 04:35 AM
Lighter 22 Jan 19 - 11:03 AM
Lighter 22 Jan 19 - 11:10 AM
Steve Gardham 22 Jan 19 - 03:53 PM
Lighter 22 Jan 19 - 07:27 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 24 Jan 19 - 10:14 AM
Steve Gardham 24 Jan 19 - 10:38 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 24 Jan 19 - 10:45 AM
Steve Gardham 24 Jan 19 - 10:46 AM
Steve Gardham 24 Jan 19 - 11:00 AM
Steve Gardham 24 Jan 19 - 11:12 AM
Lighter 25 Sep 19 - 10:20 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Jan 19 - 07:11 PM

From the ca1765 DSG:

Tommy Linn is a Scotchman born,
His Head is bald and his Beard is shorn,
He has a cap made of a Hare Skin,
An Elderman is Tommy Linn.

Tommy Linn has no Boots to put on,
But two Calves Skins and the Hair it was on,
They are open at the Side, and the Water goes in,
Unwolsome Boots, says Tommy Linn.                           [sic

Tommy Linn has a Mare of the Gray,
Lam’d of all Four, as I hear say;
It has the Farcy all over the Skin,
It’s a running Yade, says Tommy Linn.

Tommy Linn no Bridle had to put on,
But two Mouse’s Tails that he put on;
Tommy Linn had no Saddle to put on,
But two Urchin skins, and them he put on.

Tommy Linn went to yonder Hall,
Went hipping and skipping among them all;
They ask’d what made him come so boldly in,
I’m come a Wooing, says Tommy Linn.

Tommy Linn went to Church to wed,
The Bride follow’d after hanging down her Head,
She hung down her Cheeks, she hung down her Chin,
This is a glooming Quean, says Tommy Linn.

Tommy Linn’s Daughter sat on the Stairs,
Oh, dear Father, gin I be not fair;
The Stairs they broke, and she fell in,
You are fair enough now, says Tommy Linn.

Tommy Linn’s Daughter sat on the Bridge,
Oh, dear Father, gin I be not trig;
The Bridge it broke, and she fell in,
You are trig enough now, says Tommy Linn.

Tommy Linn, and his Wife and his Wife’s Mother
They all fell into the Fire together;
They that lay undermost got a hot skin,
We are not enough, says Tommy Linn.                  [sic

By way of contrast, ca1775 has no common-noun capitalization. Also,

2.2 calf's skins 2.3 The arey 2.4 Unwholesome 5.4 I am   6.4 queen

OED has "gin" from 1590, marking it Scots, English regional (esp. northern), and Northern Hiberno-English.

But all its exx. before 1842 appear to be Scots.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Jan 19 - 07:35 PM

Tomalyn is listed as place in County Clare by John Speed, Abraham Goss, Dirck Gryp, "A prospect of the most famous parts of the vvorld" (London: William Humble, 1646. p. 144.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 08:56 AM

Jon,
As I wrote earlier 'Tomlinson' is a very common surname so Tomlin and similar spellings must have been at one time a very common Christian name. (Mary Poppins--David Tomlinson was the father.

The capitalisation and lack thereof is a common indicator of age in street lit. Up to about 1780 it was very common to capitalise most nouns, but not consistently so, even in the 17th century, so the later non-capitalisation is another indication of their differences in age. Obviously this is not a hard and fast rule and some capitalisation carried on into the 19th century in outlying places.
I would still like to see a copy of the c1765 garland again. It's possible I have it on an ECCO disc somewhere but finding it would take me ages. Do you have the actual references to the 2 copies? So that I can compare with my references.

Yes, once we get into the late 18th century northern England/Scotland is where it turns up and then back to England in the 19thc printings.
All we can say regarding likely origins is that the song was known in London and Scotland in the 16th century.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 09:23 AM

The first ms copy from the late 18thc is as given above the St Clair 3st ms. Am I right in saying this is the first appearance of the 'shit' stanza? St2 'daughter on the stairs' is in DSG and St3 the everpresent 'broken bridge'. Quite expectedly Sharpe when he published the St Clair version in his 'Ballad Book' in 1823 omitted the 'shit' stanza. Whole sets of 'new' stanzas start to appear in the 1820s in Scottish collections. Robt Chambers gives 2 quite different versions.

Popular Rhymes of Scotland 1826 (MY copy is 1844 but I'm assuming the song was in the first edition.) 4sts
1. puddings on plate
2. no breeches
3. fell in the fire
4. horse in the moss.

The Scottish Songs Vol 2. 1829 3 sts split into 6
1. sold sow, bought gryce
2. puddings on plate
3. fell in the fire (long fa la la chorus.

In a new edition of Sharpe's Ballad Book ed by David Laing in 1880 there is another version which fits in well here. 4sts with a 'fa-linkum feedledum' chorus.

1. mixture of usual first line with cap which is 'right side out wrong side in.
2. daughter on the stair
3. broken bridge (daughter)
4. horse in the moss.

Also in here needs to go the Kinloch version from 1827-9. 6 sts
1. usual 1st v.
2. bridle and saddle
3. horse in the moss
4. fell in the fire
5. puddings on plate
6. shit

BTW the 'shit' stanza could well be 17thc. I have similar pieces much longer which were printed then which go into much scatalogical detail one being an early version of 'The Slattern Wife'/'Robin-a-Thrash' Roud 2792, also found in these early Scottish collections.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 09:34 AM

Before moving on to the mid 19thc broadsides it's worth a look at the Nathaniel Coverley, Boston broadside reissued by Deeming of Boston. It takes us back to Tom Bolin again. There are 15sts (Thomas Coll. Vol 1, 21.) If I remember aright Coverley was c1820. The first 3 sts follow the late 18thc North British copies already referred to, and indeed most of the sts are found there (9) in some form or other but there are others from the general stock and some new ones as well.
4. no boots
7. mounted mare, sword and buckler, courting

new
12. after wedding dinner
14. after broken bridge wife gets out of water and goes off to search for TB
15. TB hides in a hollow tree.

It will be interesting to see if these new sts crop up in later American oral versions.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 09:45 AM

Coverley
Just had a quick Google and there was father and son and the dates I've seen are 1776-1814. In light of that the broadside is more likely c1810 going on style.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 10:49 AM

Am working on chronology. Daunting!

63 instances of "Tom Boleyn [etc.]" alone! And "Bryan" is more common.

Both DSG's are from the BL. ECCO gives the English Short Title Catalogue number of the ca1765 as T034706, and the ca1775 as T034707.   No shelf numbers or the like.

Sir Walter sang a good version, though undoubtedly improved by him.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 10:51 AM

Thanks for note on ca1810 second ed.

Is "ca1765" still acceptable?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 01:39 PM

If they were both printed in Newcastle, as seems likely, and one White and the other Saint then those dates would be fair, but again I'd rather have another look to be certain. When I'm in the BL feverishly copying things out by hand with a pencil and paper, I don't have time to take note of the finer points of printing. As far as I can tell, if they are the same copies that I have seen they are
c1765. 11621 c 2 13, song 3.
c1776 11621 c 5 50, song 3.

The later one contains the following:
the Distracted Sailor's complaint for his sweet-heart marrying with another in his absence, they being betrothed together.
Nancy's to the Greenwood gone.
Tommy Linn.

Because of the title I presume the earlier one has the same 3 songs.

The problem with ECCO is the entries as you say don't contain the original shelfmarks, nor do most of them make it obvious which library they have come from, and you have to rely on library stamps where evident.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 02:19 PM

The earlier ed. contains the same songs, but oddly the long title is:

"The distracted sailor's garland. Beautified with two delightful New Songs. I. The distracted Sailor's Complaint for his Sweetheart marrying with another in his Absence, they being betrothed together. II. A new Scots Song, called, Nancy's to the Green Wood gane. III. Tommy Linn. Licensed and entered according to Order."

Despite the short title, there are three new songs, not two.

Unless "Tommy Linn" was not new.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 05:07 PM

I think White is claiming Nancy and Tommy are the 2 new songs. What is interesting is 'A new Scots Song'. If the garland had been printed in Scotland would they have used that description? Makes it more likely to be White.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 05:17 PM

We can't really glean that much from looking at the oral versions. They are as you would expect very diverse. Most American versions are influenced by the Coverley/Deeming broadside. Surprisingly few versions, but very widespread. About the same number of American and British versions.

I've done a quick survey of stanza frequency. The most frequent is 'sheepskin breeches' with 33, closely followed by 'broken bridge' with 32. The usual first st comes in at 22 and then we have 'horns for pistols' at 19, latecomer 'turnip watch' at 18, and 'grey mare' at 17 and then there's a drop to 13 'in the bed'. There are about 30 sts that occur more than once.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 20 Jan 19 - 06:01 PM

Steve, my impression of the frequency of the breeches and the bridge stanza match yours. That of the others sounds right too.

BTW, the surname O'Linn may have nothing to do with a geographical place.

The genealogy sites call it an anglicization of Irish "O Floinn," i.e. "Flynn" and "O'Flynn."

Texts with "Barney O'Flynn," etc., exist, prob. as a rationalization of he less familiar "O'Linn."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 08:45 AM

References to "Tom a Lynn" to 1700:

ca1475 Blind Harry the Minstrel, Acts and Deeds of Wallace, mentions “John of Lyn” (a pirate) and “Thomlyn of Wayre.” James Moir (1889) speculates that “Thomlyn” is an error for “John Lyn.”

1549 Complaynt of Scotland mentions tale of “Yong Tamlene” and “dance” of “Thom of Lynn.”

1558 Lost “Ballet of Thomalyn” licensed.

1569 Wager, “The Longer Thou Livest”: one stanza of the song (about the bridge).

ca1593 “Tomalin” is the frustrated narrator of Thomas Nashe’s comic-erotic poem, “Choice of Valentines.”

1617 Nicholas Breton, “Machiavel’s Dog,” mentions “Tom a Lin” as an avatar of the spellbinding tale-teller.

1621 Richard Johnson, History of Tom Thumbe: “Nor shal my story be made of the mad merry pranckes of … Tom a Lin, the Divels supposed Bastard.” Also mentions “the lusty Pindar of Wakefield.”

1627 “Tomalin” is a fairy in Michael Drayton’s Nimphidia, the Court of Faery (1627).

1632 The Pinder of Wakefield: earliest full text of “Tom a Lin,” a “Welch man borne.”

1646 “Tomalyn” mentioned as a place in Co. Clare.

1658 “Tomalin” is the name of the demonic familiar of Mother Sawyer, the protagonist of “The Witch of Edmonton: a known true story composed into a tragi-comedy, by divers well-esteemed poets, William Rowley, Thomas Dekker, John Ford, &c.”


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 08:46 AM

I doubt that Blind Harry's "Thomlyn" is relevant here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 09:29 AM

I think they're all relevant in establishing that Tomlin (and derivatives) is simply a well-established Christian name, but that's just my opinion.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 10:19 AM

A few observations on some of the sts that don't occur in early versions. Considering the earliest date I have for 'bed/blankets' is c1840 a count of 13 is quite good going, but the 'turnip/watch' doesn't turn up until 1858 and that scores 18 hits. Of course we have no way of knowing how old these stanzas are.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 04:38 PM

"Tom o' Lynn," 1700-1830:

Ca 1765 Distracted Sailor’s Garland, “Tommy Linn”

ca1775 Distracted Sailor’s Garland ed. 2

1781-85 St. Clair ms., 3 stzs. Scots “Tom o’ Lin.”

1802 Ritson, North Country Chorister (text from Distracted Sailor?)

1810 The Farmer’s Magazine (Edinburgh), 2 lines of “Tam o’ the Lyn.”

1810-14 Coverly broadside, “Tom Bolin,” 15 stzs.

1810-14 Mass. broadside “Tom Bolin, and the Maid of Boston.”

1816 Scott, “Old Mortality”: “Ye ken what the auld sang says,
                   Take turn about, mither, quo Tam o' the Linn.”

1822 Earl of Somerset, “Blighted Ambition,” bridge stz., “Tom o’ Lyn.”

1823 C. K. Sharpe, “A Ballad Book,” 2 stzs “Tam o' the Lin.”

1824 Scott gives 6 stzs. in a note to Sharpe, “Tam o’ the Linn,”
learned before 1812 from James Drummond of Strageath.”

1825 Morning Chronicle (London) reports boxing match involving Jemmy Wilson, who called himself “Tommy O’Lynn.”

1826 Chambers “Tam o’ the Lin,” 1 stz. (fell in the fire), from recitation in Lanarkshire.

1828 New England Galaxy mentions “Tom Bolin, a personage of great notoriety in the world of song.”

1827-29 Kinloch ms., 6 stzs. “Thomas o’ Linn,” 2 resembling Sharpe’s.

1829 Chambers, "Scottish Songs," 3 stz. ‘Tam o’ the Linn, same stanza form as Scott’s, mostly different words.

1830 Scott sings three stanzas of “Tom o’ the Linn” or “Thomas O’Linn” to John Leycester Adolphus of London, who also had of it “boyish recollections.” Adolphus was struck by the excellence of Scott’s “set.”

1830 Columbian Register (New Haven, Conn.): 1 stz. with chorus: “I’ll sleep in the middle”

1830 Daily National Journal (Washington, D.C.): 1 stz. “Tommy Linn…hot skin.”

1830 Boston Saturday Morning Transcript: “The good old ballad that we knew when we were knee-high to a mosquito.” Full text, like Coverly


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 06:54 PM

You've missed out the Gardner 1794 set which contains 2 genuine sts.
and The Siege of Gibraltar set of 5 sts from about 1785. Do you want me to post them?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 21 Jan 19 - 08:56 PM

I do have the Siege of Gibraltar but don't' think I 'm familiar with Gardner.

If you don't mind posting the latter, it would be helpful and interesting.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 22 Jan 19 - 04:35 AM

17th 6.43. You posted it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Jan 19 - 11:03 AM

Uh-oh. Didn't recognize Gardner's name in the "Tom..." context. And forgot that the "Siege" had a "Brian." Too much information to keep track of while working on other things.

So far all references are to "Tom" forms. Especially interesting is the 1621 remark that Tom a Lin is "the supposed devil's bastard." (Like Merlin.) There must have been some folklore tradition behind this, possibly related (by confusion?) with the "Tam Lin" ballad.

(Might as well remind everyone that the Irish reel "Tam Lin" was composed ca1974 by Davey Arthur and has nothing to do with the present discussion.)

I have so many "Brian O'Linns" that I'll have to list them separately - if I can find time.

They begin in the late 18th C. and are mentioned (no text) in America in 1793. I believe that the "Siege" version of the previous decade is the earliest.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Jan 19 - 11:10 AM

"Tom Boleyn," etc., 1830-1900.

1830 Columbian Register (New Haven, Conn.): 1 stz. with chorus: “I’ll sleep in the middle”

1830 Daily National Journal (Washington, D.C.): 1 stz. “Tommy Linn…hot skin.”

1830 Boston Saturday Morning Transcript: “The good old ballad that we knew when we were knee-high to a mosquito.” Full text, like Coverly.

1832 The Day (Glasgow) 1 stz. (“gryce”), perh. with new humorous final line, also allusion to “dochter” and bridge.

1833 Salem (Mass.) Gazette, breeches stz.

1834 Arkansas Times and Advocate: full Coverley text with two added stzs.

1839 Wreck of schooner “Tom Bolin” off coast of Massachusetts.

1842 Kellogg Crosswell diary. (Pa.), printed in E. Garner, Folklore of the Schories Hills (1937), 15 stzs. like Coverly, with tune.

1846 Mass. Poetaster Albert White, Poems, has bullfrogs croaking “Tombolin, Tombolin, Tombolin.”

1849 Republican Farmer and Democratic Journal: identical but for one phrase with 1834 Ark. Times.

1851 Joanna Baillie’s humorous “Tam o’ the Lin,” 9 stzs., a complete rewrite (written perh. as early as ca1780).

1853 Literary World (London), two humorous paragraphs about “Tom Bolin” and the bridge.

1854 "Marsh’s Selection; or Singing for the Million": full text like Coverley, with tune.

1858 The Child’s Friend and Family Magazine mentions “Tom Bolin,” poss. as a broadside.

1869 Saturday Evening Post, bridge stz. but with kittens: “May the rats go with you, said Tom Bolin.”

1872 Sarah Emory, Three Generations, gives 3 ½ stzs. of “Tom Bolyn,” whole song called “vulgar.”

1876 Christie reprints Chambers’s text with a tune sung in Buchan “from time immemorial,” app. Collected before ca1850.

1890 G. W. Russell, “Up Neck” in 1825: 1 stz (bridge) “from an elderly lady.”

1892 Elizabeth Ward, Old Times in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts: 4 trad. stzs “The Song of Tombolin”; claims song was written about “an eccentric individual who lived here [about 1740] by the name of Tombolin.”

1893 Daily News (London): “There is an English hero called Tom o’ the Linn”; prints initial stz.

1895 Baring-Gould, A Book of Nursery Songs and Rhymes: 2 texts of ”Tommy-a-Lynn” (“a Dutchman born”), coll. in Devonshire.

None of these lists should be considered complete.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 22 Jan 19 - 03:53 PM

Jon,
Have you anything that positively recognises 'Tam Lin' before 1769? If not it's highly unlikely to have any connection to our song here. The tentative supernatural connection you make here could, I suppose, have influenced the writer of 'Tam Lin' in the middle of the 18th century. Just an opinion.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Jan 19 - 07:27 PM

"Tom Boleyn," etc., 1896-2019:

1903 Sharp coll. “Brian O Lynn or Tom Boleyn” in Somerset. Text recollected from Brian O’Linn broadside.

1906-07 Sharp coll. 1 stz (“Thomas A Lynn…I’ll marry them both”) in Somerset.

1907 4 stzs. of “Wiley Bolin” coll. in E. Tennessee by E. C. Perrow.

1912 The Hardware Reporter (St. Louis): “I’ll sleep in the middle.”

1917 Sharp coll. 2 texts to different tunes in Hyden, Ky.

1930 George Brown coll. 4 stzs (and 1 new one), with tune and refrain (“Old Tombolin”) from lady whose father, born 1800, had sung the song. Pub. In H.H. Flanders & Brown, “Vermont Folk Songs and Ballads” (1931).

1940 Courier-Journal (Louisville, Ky.) 1 stz. : “Tom Bo-lin…no watch to wear.”

1940 Downes & Siegmeister, “Treasury of American Song,” “Tombolin” adaptation of Brown-Flanders.

1945 Helen Flanders coll. 14 stzs., with tune, in Middlebury, Vt.

1957 Oscar Brand, LP “Bawdy Songs and Backroom Ballads,” Vol. IV. Bawdified rewrite, at least partly inspired by Flanders-Brown.

ca1958 Brand’s polite version on LP “Laughing America.”

1962 folkie group The Swagmen record adaptation of Brand, LP “Meet the Swagmen.”

1966 Helen Vita, German-language adaptation of Brand on LP “Freche Chansons aus dem alten Frankreich” [!]

1979 Brand records his own new song, in old form, about “Tam O’Lynn…a leprechaun king.”

1980s “Annie Boleyn had no panties to wear”: 2 stzs. reported by “Leslie” to Mudcat in 2005. “Jim” replies that his mother had learned it ca1950.

1989 G. Legman receives "Xeroxlore" copy of "Tumble O'Lynn's Farewell," a new song about AIDS partly inspired by "Tom Boleyn."

2011 “Nicole” reports same 2 stzs of “Annie Boleyn,” app. Adapted from Brand. Another online report (1 stz.) from Martin Wainwright.

2014 Oakland group Starboard Watch performs Brand, with 1 stz. added from “Bryan O’Linn.”


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 24 Jan 19 - 10:14 AM

Your list omits this short version from Belden Ballads and Songs Collected by the Missouri Follk-lore Society, 1940. It's short so I'll give it all here. Belden's notes include the following: The first of the following stanzas from Missouri is found in most versions; the other I have not seen elsewhere


TOM BO-LIN

Not title. Secured by Miss Hamilton in 1912 from Mary Morrison of the Kirksville Teachers College, who traced it back to her great-grandmother, born near Richmond, Virginia, in 1801.

Tom-bo-lin had no breeches to wear;
He bought a sheepskin to make him a pair.
With the skin side out and the woolly side in,
Make a fine summer suit for Tom-bo-lin.
  Larry-ho-ho, ho-larry-ho.

When you go to old Ireland, you know,
This is the way to milk an old ewe:
One at the head and one at the hams,
Two little boys to knock off the lambs.
  Larry-ho-ho, ho-larry-ho.



Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 24 Jan 19 - 10:38 AM

Hi Jon,
Looking at your lists, I'll try to send you copies of any you haven't got if that's useful to you. I'll start with the earliest stuff. I can't see the 2 really long versions c1790, the one without imprint which is probably the earlie and the Aberdeen print which is almost identical but lacks one verse.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 24 Jan 19 - 10:45 AM

I've just noticed a 1786 entry in Ford: Broadsides, ballads, &c. printed in Massachusetts 1639-1800 (1922, many copies at archive):

2457. [Cuts.] Tom Bolin: | Together with | Collin and Phebe.
I A Couple of excellent New Songs; with good Tunes. [Printed
and] Sold at the Office Street, next Liberty Pole. 1786.
— Cash for Linen Rags. aas


There are also 2 entries for 1800:

3370. [Cut.] Tom Bolin.
Tom Bolin was a Scotchman born,
His shoes worn out, his stockings were torn,
+ AAS. EI

3371. [Cut.] Tom Bolin, | And the Maid of Boston.
Where Charles's tide encircling leaves
The sweets of Boston's fertile shore,
HC


AAS= American Antiquarian Society, Worcester
EI = Essex Institute, Salem
HC = Harvard College

3371 looks like it could be the same as your 1810-14 entry above, but with earlier date.

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 24 Jan 19 - 10:46 AM

Also I can't see the 4st version in Chambers' Popular Rhymes of Scotland 1829.

There is in Scottish Tradition, by David Buchan a 4st version said to have come from Sharpe and reprinted by David Laing in 1880.

You don't mention Deeming's Boston reprint of Coverley which might have helped to spread that version in America.

You haven't yet included the many broadside printings c1840-70.

It will be easier for me to put up my own lists as it would take me longer to compare.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 24 Jan 19 - 11:00 AM

British. 1890-1972. All Brians unless otherwise marked.
Alfred Williams. Oxon 7sts 1910s
Irish Street Ballads, Dublin 10sts c1841
My own recordings, E Yorks, 3 sts 1972
ditto             E. Yorks, 1 st 1972
Folk Song Journal, 33, p137, Edmondson, 7sts, Lancashire, 1910
English Folk Singer/New Penguin Book of FS, Todd of Derby, 6sts, 1960s
Songs of the West, Dart, 7sts, (Tommy) Devon 1890s
Kennedy, p644, 5sts, Co. Leitrim, 1954

Sam henry/Huntington Songs of the People, p52, 10sts, N Ireland.
Songs and sayings of an Ulster Childhood, Kane & Fowke, p32, 3sts, 1930s
Cecil Sharp Mss, Warren, Somerset, 1905, 1 st
My own recordings, E Yorks 2sts, 1920s
Voice of the People CDs Vol22 track 13, 5sts, Fuller, 1952, Sussex.


Australia
single st 'sheepskin' Folk Songs of Australia, Meredith Anderson, p14.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 24 Jan 19 - 11:12 AM

N. America.
Belden as Mick says Tom B
Our Singing Country, Lomax/Seeger, p117, 10sts based on Coverley, Ky 1937
Pankake, p35, 4sts, 'O'Brien O'lin. c1960, Minnesota
Texas FS Owens p110, 2sts, 1952
Leach, LLC, p272, 3sts, Labrador, 1960
Hubbard, p322, Utah, 1947, 2sts
Wells, The Ballad Tree, p167, 6sts, Ky 1938 (Tom)
Sharp, Vol 2, p202 11 sts, Ky, Pace 1917, + 1 st from Morgan
Vermont FSB, p178, 5sts, Coolidge, 1930 (Old Tom B)
Brown, Vol II p459, 5sts, battle, 1910, NC
In The Pines, p306, 3sts, Nelson, 1959, Ky


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Brian O'Lynn & Tam o' the Linn
From: Lighter
Date: 25 Sep 19 - 10:20 AM

Charles Hoy Fort, "Ructions" (short story ca.1906) [takes place in N.Y.C.]:

" 'Bryan O'Lynn, his wife and wife's mother, all went over the bridge together.' Mary Ann Thornton capering on a table, screeching, 'Bryan fell out and his wife fell in! `She's gone to the divil!' said Bryan O'Lynn!'

        "Cousin Mary Ellen, lively as anybody, sour jeering side of her mouth tucked away and smiling side dominating, taking up the next stanza:

'Oh, Bryan O'Lynn had no breeches to wear!
Bought a sheep's skin and made him a pair;
Fleshy side out and woolly side in--
"They itch like the divil!" said Bryan O'Lynn.' "

[Fort is better known as an indefatigable collector of weird events; see "The Book of The Damned" and its sequels.]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 4 April 2:02 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.