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Lyr Add: Mowes a Vry + Pretty Maid

17 Mar 98 - 06:26 PM
Bruce O 17 Mar 98 - 08:28 PM
Joe Offer 16 Jun 21 - 11:05 PM
Reinhard 17 Jun 21 - 02:54 AM
RTim 17 Jun 21 - 05:25 PM
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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: MOWES A VRY/PRETTY MAID
From:
Date: 17 Mar 98 - 06:26 PM

PRETTY MAID

Where are you going to my pretty maid?
Where are you going to my pretty maid?

I'm going a milking Sir she said, Sir she said, Sir she said
I'm going a milking sir she said.

Shall I go with you my pretty maid?
Yes if you please Sir she said.

Then what is your father, my pretty maid?
My father's a farmer Sir she said.

Then what is your future my pretty maid?
My face is my future Sir she said.

Then I won't have you my pretty maid.
No-one asked you Sir she said.

MOWES A VRY

Also known as 'My pretty maid' and 'Dabbling in the Dew' (to be found on the database) this particular version was collected by Cecil Sharp from Jim Thomas (65) in Camborne 6th July 1914. It belongs to the same family as Delyow Syvy (tune published in Racca but no words) from British Museum MSS 28554 Edwin Chirgwin's song in Cornish noted by Thomas Tonkin and included in Pryce's Archaeologia Cornu-Britannica. Despite the universality of the theme, Thomas' tune and treatment of the words are apparently unique to Cornwall.

X: 1
T:MY PRETTY MAID
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:80
S:MERVE DAVEY, HENEGAN
K:G
"G"GGG BcB|"Am"AGA "G"G3|BAB ddd|"C"cBc "G"B2G|GFGB2B|
"Am"A2A "G"G3|B2cd3|"C"c2d"Em"e3|"G"dge dBG|B2AG3||

% Output from ABC2Win Version 2.1 f on 17/03/98

Pleth esos-sy ow mos mowes a vry
Pleth esos-sy ow mos mowes a vry
Yth af-vy dhe wodra yn-meth-hy, yn-meth-hy, yn-meth-hy
Yth af-vy dhe wodra yn-meth-hy.

A wraf-vy mos genes mowes a vry?
Gwra mar mynnyth-sy yn-meth-hy.

Pandra wra dha dasyk mowes a vry?
Ow thas yu tyak yn-meth-hy.

Pyth us dhe dhos ragos mowes a vry?
Ow fas yu ow gwaytyans yn-meth-hy.

Nyns osta ragof-vy mowes a vry.
Ny wovyn nagonen orthys yn-meth-hy.

Agas Dyw gans mos hwi
Baz


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add Mowes a Vry {Pretty Maid)
From: Bruce O
Date: 17 Mar 98 - 08:28 PM

Dabbling in the Dew/ Strawbery leaves make Maidens Fair
[Extract from unpublished MS. Predecessors, parodies, and sequels deleted here]

The Opies in 'The Oxford Book of Nursery Rhymes', #317, 1951, give the following version said to have been sung in 1698 at Cardew. This seems to connect the tune titles "Strawberry leaves made maidens fair," and "Where are you going my pretty fair maid." This seems to be the earliest good text known of the modern version. An earlier rotten expanded version follows

Whither are you going my pretty fair maid. said he
with your white face and your yellow hair?

I am going to the well, sweet sir, she said,
For Strawberry leaves make maidens fair.

Shall I go with thee pretty fair maid, he said, &c.
Do if you will, sweet sir, she said, &c.

What if I lay you down on the ground, &c.
I will rise up again, sweet Sir, she said, &c.
What if I do bring you with child, &c.
I will bear it, sweet Sir she said, &c.
Who will you have for father for your child, &c.
You shall be his father, sweet Sir, she said, &c.
What will you dor for whittles for your child, &c.
His father shall be a taylor, sweet Sir, she said, &c.

There was aparently a broadside ballad version, now lost of "Where are you going, my pretty maid", of about 1630. Fortunately the song was robust and the following dreadful version, of about 1689, didn't kill it. Indent 2nd and 4th lines of each verse.

A Merry new Dialogue Between a Courteous young Knight, and a gallant Milk-Maid

to Adams fall, or Jockey and Jenny, or where are you going my pritty Maid.

As I walked forth one Summers day
By a green Meadow I took my way,
I met with a bonny lass fresh and gay
with a fa la la la la le ro.
This bonny Lass was a handsome girl
I asked her questions above two or three
Word for word she answered me.
With a fa &.

Where art thou going my pritty Maid
A milking good sir she said.
Shall I go with thee my pritty maid?
with a fa
What will you do to with me sir she said
Talk of old stories my pritty Maid
You're kindly welcome sir she said.
with a fa &.

But what if I kiss thee my pritty Maid?
I hope you'll not hurt me sir she said.
I of a man yet ne're was afraid
with a fa &
Now if I get the with child my pritty maid
I'll give you the bearing on't sir she said
Thou art to be commended my pritty maid.
with a fa &.

But what if I unto the wars do go?
My pritty Maiden then what wilt thou do?
I'll put on Arms, and travel with you
with a fa &.
Alas pritty Maiden that must be not be
The bloody wars is not fitting for thee
Yet I commend the for thy constancy
with a fa &.

Hast thou any Parents my pritty maid?
Yes I have some good sir she said
My fathers a Black-smith by his trade
with a fa
Has he any means or Lands by the year?
O what portion can he give thee my dear
My portion good sir is my forehead I bear
with a fa &.

But what if I marry thee my pritty maid
What you will good sir she said
Thy wit and thy beauty my heart hath betrayed
with a fa &.
I'll make thee a Lady of high degree
If thou my Love and my wife will be
Lo yonder fine Bower is mine thou dost see
with a fa &.

Then let us walk to it my dearest quoth he
Nay pray you stay sir that must not be
My father and Mother first let us go see
with a fa &.
But when they came there this courteous young Knight
The old couple in him did take such delight
They made him so welcome he tarried all night
with a fa &

And in their discourse the Knight was so kind
Unto this old couple he told his mind
Where he much love and respect did find
with a fa
The old man replyed sir Knight quoth he
My daughters not fitting your bride to be
Yet the wait of her in Gold I'll give to thee
with a fa &.

Then wed her and bed her and take her away
And if you can love her by night and by day
Three thousand more i'le be bound you to pay
with a fa &,
The courteous knight then strait he replyed
Your pritty Milk-Maid shall be my bride
She'll ne're carry pale more what e're betide
with a fa &.

The Black-smith his daughter he cloated in Gold
The Knight was most rich and brave to behold
They seemed like two satuts cut out of one mould
with a fa &,
Then unto the church they strait took their way
And join'd both their loves in one night and day
with a fa &.

So farewell to Mary, to Peg and to Sue
And all pritty Maidens that dabbles i'th dew
See that in your Loves you ever prove true
with a fa &.
As credit you'll get if constant you be
For this pritty Milk-Maid did humble you see
Which made this young Knight & her to agree.
With a fa &.

Printed for W. Thackeray at the Golden Sugar-loaf in Duck-lane.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mowes a Vry + Pretty Maid
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Jun 21 - 11:05 PM

Any more versions?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mowes a Vry + Pretty Maid
From: Reinhard
Date: 17 Jun 21 - 02:54 AM

Dabbling in the Dew / Rolling in the Dew / The Milkmaid's Song (Roud 298, Greig/Duncan 4:812, Ballad Index R079)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mowes a Vry + Pretty Maid
From: RTim
Date: 17 Jun 21 - 05:25 PM

Come Roll the Cotton Down (A Chantey...)
Local Number - H879 - Collected from James G. Bounds - at Portsmouth Workhouse, Hampshire by Dr. George Gardiner in August 1907.

As I was a walking out one morn (day)
        Come Roll the Cotton Down
A fine (fair) young girl I chanced for to meet
        Come Roll the Cotton Down

Good morning to you, my pretty maid
Oh where are you going to, my pretty maid?

I’m going a-milking, Sir she said
Can I come with you, my pretty maid?

You can come if you like, kind Sir she said
So he took her in tow and away did go

Now what is your father, my pretty maid?
My father’s a farmer, Sir she said

And what is your Mother, my pretty maid?
The same as my Father, Sir she said

And what is your fortune, my pretty maid?
My face is my fortune, sir she said

Then I can’t marry you, my pretty maid
Nobody asked you, Sir she said

As I was a walking out one morn (day)
        Come Roll the Cotton Down
A fine (fair) young girl I chanced for to meet
        Come Roll the Cotton Down

A copy of my recording - https://soundcloud.com/tim-radford/roll-the-cotton-down

Tim Radford


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