Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


BS: MATH PROBLEM

Jeep man 24 Feb 02 - 05:45 PM
MudGuard 24 Feb 02 - 05:55 PM
Sorcha 24 Feb 02 - 05:56 PM
GUEST 24 Feb 02 - 05:59 PM
Sorcha 24 Feb 02 - 06:03 PM
Jeri 24 Feb 02 - 06:04 PM
GUEST 24 Feb 02 - 06:12 PM
Pene Azul 24 Feb 02 - 06:19 PM
Jeri 24 Feb 02 - 06:20 PM
John Routledge 24 Feb 02 - 06:24 PM
Jeri 24 Feb 02 - 06:25 PM
Sorcha 24 Feb 02 - 06:45 PM
John Routledge 24 Feb 02 - 06:47 PM
McGrath of Harlow 24 Feb 02 - 06:51 PM
M.Ted 24 Feb 02 - 06:59 PM
Jon Freeman 24 Feb 02 - 07:34 PM
GUEST 24 Feb 02 - 07:39 PM
SINSULL 24 Feb 02 - 07:50 PM
Jon Freeman 24 Feb 02 - 08:45 PM
Jon Freeman 24 Feb 02 - 08:47 PM
Jeep man 24 Feb 02 - 09:06 PM
8_Pints 24 Feb 02 - 09:17 PM
harpgirl 24 Feb 02 - 09:36 PM
IvanB 24 Feb 02 - 10:47 PM
Bobert 24 Feb 02 - 11:07 PM
AR282 24 Feb 02 - 11:21 PM
Gary T 25 Feb 02 - 12:09 AM
JohnInKansas 25 Feb 02 - 02:21 AM
Pene Azul 25 Feb 02 - 02:29 AM
JohnInKansas 25 Feb 02 - 03:17 AM
GUEST,bradfordian 25 Feb 02 - 06:42 AM
bradfordian 25 Feb 02 - 06:46 AM
GUEST,Nigel 25 Feb 02 - 08:32 AM
Jon Freeman 25 Feb 02 - 09:08 AM
M.Ted 25 Feb 02 - 09:48 AM
Mary in Kentucky 25 Feb 02 - 10:07 AM
Mary in Kentucky 25 Feb 02 - 10:15 AM
Dave the Gnome 25 Feb 02 - 10:22 AM
Mary in Kentucky 25 Feb 02 - 10:44 AM
IvanB 25 Feb 02 - 11:34 AM
GUEST,Lyle 25 Feb 02 - 02:53 PM
John Routledge 25 Feb 02 - 03:23 PM
Mrs.Duck 25 Feb 02 - 03:30 PM
Mr Red 25 Feb 02 - 04:31 PM
JohnInKansas 25 Feb 02 - 05:27 PM
harpgirl 25 Feb 02 - 09:38 PM
Louie Roy 26 Feb 02 - 12:58 AM
Trevor 26 Feb 02 - 08:04 AM
Mary in Kentucky 26 Feb 02 - 08:42 AM
Jon Freeman 26 Feb 02 - 09:45 AM

Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jeep man
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 05:45 PM

This has naught to do with music,but I think Mudcatters will not mind.

How to figure sales tax on a set amount which has the tax included? Example, Selling price, $100. Tax in NC is 6.5%. There is a simple formula for figuring the exact selling price and the tax.

Help anyone? Jeep

To explain, I just spent 3 days at a Bluegrass festival helping a friend at his booth. (Music Store). We sold everything "Tax Included". Get the picture? Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: MudGuard
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 05:55 PM

total = price + (price * 6.5)/100

or

total = price * 1.065

==>

price = total / 1.065

tax = price * 0.065

HTH MudGuard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Sorcha
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 05:56 PM

Aww shit.....math. It is easy, but my pore ole brain can't remember.......


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 05:59 PM

That is so simple, I can't even be bothered explaining it.

HINT: Switch on your brain and think for a few minutes.

I'm sure, unless you're dyspraxic, that you'll be able to work it out for yourself.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Sorcha
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:03 PM

Well, then, honeychile, Iz dyspraxic. Thanks for letting me in on the secret.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jeri
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:04 PM

It's beyond me, but with MudGuard's formula, aren't you subtracting 6.5% of 100, which isn't what 6.5% of a lesser amount (the sale price you added it to) would be?

I mean, you don't need to know what 6.5% of 100 is.

100 = X + (X * .065)
X = 100 - (X * .065)
...then my brain goes dead.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:12 PM

Jeez,

Multiply (that's the X button on your calculator)the selling price by .935 and you'll get the non-taxable portion.

If you can master addition and subtraction, you shouldn't have difficulty with the rest.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Pene Azul
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:19 PM

GUEST's solution is incorrect. Use Mudguard's method of dividing the total by 1.065 to find the price. Then you can subtract that from the total to find the tax, or as Mudguard said, you can multiply it by .065 to find the tax.

Jeff


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jeri
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:20 PM

Again, that's 100 - 6.5%

You come up with (duh) 93.5 This is 100 - 6.5% of 100

The 93.5% is supposed to be the selling price.
When you add 6.5%, you get 99.5775. Wrong answer.

GUEST, you're not doing better than anyone else.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: John Routledge
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:24 PM

If you multiply selling price by .935 you get the price on which 6.5% tax is paid to give the selling price inclusive of tax

The use of "non-taxable portion" by guest is potentially confusing as it is actually this amount that is subject to tax.

Cheers - Happy Calculating


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jeri
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:25 PM

GACK! MudGuard did get it. I only had to read it 3 or 4 times. I will go sit in a corner now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Sorcha
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:45 PM

Come join me, Jeri. I'm already there. What are you drinking tonight? I'll buy.........


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: John Routledge
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:47 PM

Thanks Jeri and MudGuard

I re-read MudGuard's post and he got it right first time. Cheers MudGuard - John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:51 PM

Our Value Added Tax is 17.5%. They'd never have dared to do that to us in the days of pounds shillings and pence, and no pocket calculators.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: M.Ted
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 06:59 PM

As a bit of advice, calculate your price *beforehand*--it looks like you were trying to save trouble, but it hasn' turned out that way---the problem is, how much did you sell things for? Was the price $100, or was $100 the sum of the price and 6.5% of the price? The amount of tax that you owe will be slightly different--

Your problems will not be over then, simply because it is often the case that, rather than being a straight percentage, the amount of tax was rounded off in a prescribed way by the state--to make this easy, the state provides a table of the tax surcharges that you are obliged to collect--and they expect you to collect them as per their formula--you better have your friend talk to his accountant about how to handle this all, because, take it from me, the State of North Carolina will not think much of the idea that you calculated what you owe them based on a formula that came from an internet discussion thread--


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 07:34 PM

The simplest way to think of this is that to add tax, you multiply by 1 + the % tax expressed as a decimal.

For example, to add 17.5% (wich is 1 + .175) VAT on £10 you get 10 * 1.175 = £11.75.

To reverse this processess, you simply divide, i.e. £11.75 / 1.175 = £10

Jon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 07:39 PM

Clear, simple and accurate, Jon

Thank you


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: SINSULL
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 07:50 PM

Is this lack of Mathematical ability another reason folkies can't make a dime?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 08:45 PM

Thanks guest, hope that "rule" of how you added may have helped others see Mudguard's solution. My own inclination would be follow Jeff's subtraction, e.g if Jeepman was constructing a spread sheet for his sales, it may make sense to have some cell containing the percentage tax, - I'll call it T1. On a spreadsheet that works like Excel, we could have:

Cell T1 - the actual % tax (useful as if tax ever changed, onlt the one cell would have to be changed):

Row1 - headings
A1: Item:
B1: Selling Price
C1: Qty Sold
D1: Total
E1: Cost
F1: Tax

row 2 and subsequent rows - actuals and formulae
A2: (Description of item)
B2: (Selling price)
C2: (Qty Sold)
D2: (=B2*C2)
E2: (=D2/(1+$T$1)) ... (those dollar signs are important)
F2: (=D2-E2)

Just copy formulae down a few rows and add a few totals...

Jon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 08:47 PM

opps, for all my references to row 1 in row 2 except the one with the $ sign, read 2!!!

Jon


I think I put 2s in appropriate places. --JoeClone


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jeep man
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 09:06 PM

Thanks, folks. If the combined knowledge of all Mudcatters was put to use, we could probably end all wars, eliminate hunger and desease, and everyone would pick and sing in tune. Mucho thanks, Jeep


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: 8_Pints
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 09:17 PM

Who said there are three kinds of mathematician: those can count and those who can't! *BG*

Bob vG


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: harpgirl
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 09:36 PM

What you do is find what 6.5% of 100 would be. You then minus that from a 100. You would get $93.50 without tax

or n times .065cents

That's how you would get the taxes for that state.

This is from Nathan, harpgirl's son... and if you need help with any other math problem contact me at nated2000@yahoo.com and I will get back to you as soon as possible.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: IvanB
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 10:47 PM

No, Mudguard's solution is the correct one. If you sell something for $100, sales tax included, the actual selling price is 93.90 (100/106.5). The tax at 6.5% would be $6.10. I've done sales tax reports in Michigan and I know here that, no matter how much you collect by using the state's tax tables, you send in 6% of your sales at the end of the month.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Bobert
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 11:07 PM

If a hen and a half can lay an egg and a half in a day and a half... then how long would it take a monkey with a wooden leg to kick the seeds out of a dill pickle???... You all wore this ol' hillbilly out tonight with all this mathmatics... Had to give the Wes Ginny slide rule a couple of asprins, too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: AR282
Date: 24 Feb 02 - 11:21 PM

Multiply the selling price by .065 and then add that amount to the selling price.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Gary T
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 12:09 AM

MudGuard's explanation is correct. IvanB's figures are correct.

GUEST at 24-Feb-02 - 06:12 PM, John Routledge, and Nathan (harpgirl's post) were wrong. Problem stated that selling price INCLUDING tax was 100, thus "item price + 6.5% of item price = 100". Whatever item price is, it is NOT 100, and thus 6.5% of item price is NOT 6.5.

AR282's reply is wrong if he uses MudGaurd's definition of "selling price" (item price plus tax). It could be considered technically correct if he means the pre-tax price of the item, but is then useless in solving the problem--we already know how to figure the tax given the item price, the question is how to figure the item price.

To sum it up in algebra:

P = item price, what we're trying to calculate

S = amount of sale (MudGaurd's "selling price"), which includes item price plus tax, which is 6.5% of item price

S is known to be 100. What is P?

S = P + 6.5%P = 100

S = 1.065P = 100

1.065P = 100

P = 100/1.065 = 93.90 (rounded to second decimal place)

Double check (all figures rounded to second decimal place):

93.90 + 6.5%(93.90) = 93.90 + 6.10 = 100

Figures add up, all is well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 02:21 AM

An amazing amount of discussion, for an apparently trivial question.

About the only thing "proved" is that the first GUEST was wrong - for a bunch of musicians, it ain't that simple.

MudGuard's answer is correct. The only simplification I can see is to "reduce" the 1/(1+.065) to 0.93897. Multiply the amount "collected" by 0.93897 to get the "sale price." Then when the "sale price" is multiplied by 0.065, you get the tax. Add Price + Tax and you should come up with the amount collected ($100 for purposes of the original question.

The remaining difficulty is that various tax jurisdictions don't always come up with the "mathematically correct" number as the amount you must pay.

Many tax jurisdictions will permit you to pay a "lump sum" percentage of the total "amount of sales." Others insist that each item sold must be taxed separately, and you must pay the "total of the taxes collected on individual sales."

Some of these later bandits jurisdictions require "rounding up" on each individual sale. This can significantly increase the amount collected.

For information on North Carolina, you might want to check out:

Tax Forms and Instructions: North Carolina

From there, you can click to:

Sales and Use Taxes: North Carolina

The "real world answers" should be there(?).

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Pene Azul
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 02:29 AM

According to the tax table on their site (http://www.dor.state.nc.us/downloads/E502G_1-02.pdf), the tax on an individual sale is conventionally rounded off to the penny.

Jeff


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 03:17 AM

Jeff

I didn't go into the NC tax tables - just thought it a good idea for the ones with the problem to go to the source.

I have run into places where "rounded off to the penny" actually meant "rounded up to the penny." If the "calculated" tax was 5.01 cents, you paid 6 cents. Places with this kind of "math" seem often to demand that each individual sale be reported separately, since - on average - it gets them an extra half-cent per sale(?)

Usually, math works; but when dealing with politicians, it's best to check the "official" sources.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: GUEST,bradfordian
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 06:42 AM

If sales tax is 6.5%, then you can use the following fractions:- For tax 13/213, for cost of item less tax 200/213. In UK (17,5%) tax = 7/47 & price less tax = 40/47 Hopefully!!! Check these out for $10.65 & £11.75 respectively.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: bradfordian
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 06:46 AM

oops. cookie now reset


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: GUEST,Nigel
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 08:32 AM

Bradfordian's solution is correct. My wife is a VAT auditor (makes sign of cross and checks garlic necklace) and she has been given these same fractions to use.

McGrath, 17½% is a doddle to use, (purchase price plus 10% plus half as much again plus half as much again). Musically speaking (back to subject) think of it as 10% with a double dot. Before decimalisation, 7/48 would have been a simpler fraction, (7pennies in 4 shillings, or 35 pennies[2/11d] in the pound!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 09:08 AM

Thinking of rounding, when using computers, one needs to be sure of the rounding method used. Excel uses conventional rounding but I have run into programs -Deplhi springs to mind - where the round function works on bankers rounding which handles a final 5 in the decimal portion differently by rounding by towards the nearest even number (I think) so Excel would give:

Round(2.5,0) = 3
Round(3.5,0) = 4

but using Delphi, you would get:

Round(2.5) = 2
Round(3.5) = 4

Jon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: M.Ted
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 09:48 AM

This is not a mathematical problem, it is a tax problem! John-in-Kansas (a man of many resources, and much practical knowledge) has linked you to the appropriate downloadable sales tax tables--all of you math whizzes, take notice! If the "6.5%" sales tax table applies (In some counties, it is 7%) when the taxable amount is from $0.85-0.99, you are obliged to collect $0.06, but from $1.00 to $1.07, you collect $0.07-multiply everything out, subtract, and then just put on a fake mustache and beard and do all transactions in cash--


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 10:07 AM

Nathan, this problem is not as straightforward as it first appears. The hardest part for me was understanding the original question.

I worked in a lab where we had to calculate the amount of surfactant in a resinous emulsion, and it was the same type of problem. You know what the total weight should be, and you know what percentage of surfactant to one of the parts should be. It's just not a straightforward percent problem. As a matter of fact, I noticed two groups of people and how they calculated this, the Mudguard type (which includes me) and the Jon Freeman type (the engineers). Mudguard sets up an equation and solves for the unknown. Jon multiplies and divides, a sequential type thinking as opposed to the other wholistic type thinking. I observed that the people trained as engineers did this kind of calculation so much that their thought patterns were established to do it the fastest way. Also, one engineering-school-trained guy used an ancient Hewlett-Packard calculator that required him to enter the numbers, then enter the function to perform.

We joked that the best way to hide an invention was to put it in a patent for everyone to read. The descriptions of amounts of materials used are so convoluted and hard to interpret, it's hard to duplicate the process.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 10:15 AM

I meant to say operation instead of function.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 10:22 AM

Working tax out is dead easy! Just follow the instructions on the tax inspectors letter.

a) Work out how much you earned and

b) Send it to the tax office...

Hope this helps ;-)

Cheers

Dave the Gnome


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 10:44 AM

Did you ever notice that THE IRS spells THEIRS?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: IvanB
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 11:34 AM

Looking at the NC Sales & Use Tax report, it specifically states that the sales price should be the amount of gross sales without sales tax included. Therefore Jeep's friend needs a method to calculate the selling price before tax. That's exactly what Mudguard gave.

As far as the 'charts,' the NC chart states on the bottom that it is provided 'as a convenience to retailers' to help them figure out how much to collect on various sale amounts. The only connection the charts have to the ultimate reporting and paying of sales tax collections is that, if they are used, the retailer should be in the ballpark of the required amount when the report is filed. When the Semi-monthly tax report is filled out, it's the gross amount of sales for the period that counts and not the individual sales and the 'chart' amounts of tax on them. If you overcollect (which is almost guaranteed when the charts are used), you report the overcollection amount on a separate line of the tax form and include it with your payment. If you undercollect, you're SOL, 'cause you still gotta pay the 6.5%.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: GUEST,Lyle
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 02:53 PM

Not too bad, folks, BUT I just gave this problem to a group of 5th graders I'm working with, and 23 out of 24 got the right answer in about 2 minutes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: John Routledge
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 03:23 PM

Did they have as much fun though pondering the meaning of life and taxation as we know it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 03:30 PM

$100 = 106.5% price
$100/1.065 = price
price = $93.90
Not saying anything new just summarising for my brains sake.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Mr Red
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 04:31 PM

Dyscalculia Anonymouse Anyone?
what is dyspraxis anyway - SOED CD ROM don't know!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 05:27 PM

The Random House Unabridged Dictionary - CD ROM version defines dyspraxia as the "inability to perform coordinated movements."

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: harpgirl
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 09:38 PM

Okay Mary. I got a couple math problems for you. 1.find the vertex of x(squared)-2x+36 if the vertex is (-b/2a)


2.what is the slope if you have (3,2) for the first pair and (-1,2) for the second pair.


3.find the number of moles if you have 12.04x10(to the 24)


because big poppa pump is your hookup, holla if you hear me, your pal ja killer aka nathan dollar



Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Louie Roy
Date: 26 Feb 02 - 12:58 AM

Jeep Man you have received a number of ways to do this simple problem and the way I was taught when I was in the 5 th grade in 1934 and of course at that time there was no computer or calculators it was a done with a pencil and paper.I'll use your problem $100 tax included.You take $ 100 and divide it by 1.065 and that gives you an answer of $93.89673 round this off to 93.90.Now take 93.90 and times this by .065 this give you a figure of $ 6.1035 round this off to $6.10 Add 6.10+93.90 =100.It works the same long hand only a lot slower.Long hand you would start with 100 divided by 1.065 and since to divide with 1.065 you have to move the decimal point 3 places to the right so now you would have 100000 divided by 1065 if you divide this out you will find the answer is the same Louie Roy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Trevor
Date: 26 Feb 02 - 08:04 AM

If you turn the percentage figure into a vulgar fraction (cue for gags!), add the top number (I can't remember whether that's the numerator or denominator) and the bottom number together. That gives you the new bottom number, and the top number stays the same. This will then give you the fraction that has to be deducted from the tax inclusive price to calculate the tax-less price.

Eg Tax free price 1.00

25% tax (ie 1/4) 1.25

To work it back, 1+4 = 5, top number stays the same, therefore deduct 1/5. Lo and behold 1.25 - 1/5 =1.00.

So in your problem deduct 6.5/106.5.

Clear as mud eh?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 26 Feb 02 - 08:42 AM

Nathan, I can't holler 'cause I have no idea what you're talking about! Also, you're straining my poor ole brain...but since you were a good sport, I'll give it a try (without any referece books).

1) 1 (or 1,35 I forgot what the vortex is)

2) slope is 0, a horizontal line

3) 20


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: MATH PROBLEM
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 26 Feb 02 - 09:45 AM

Mary, I think the vertex is the highest or lowest point. I seem to remember using differentation to solve these so..

y = x^2 - 2x + 36
dy/dx = 2x - 2

at the turning point, dy/dx = 0 so

2x - 2 = 0
x = 1

substituting for x...
y = 1 -2 + 36 = 35

I hope thats right... that was about as far as I got with maths before walking out of school and it was a long while ago...

Jon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate


Next Page

 


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 22 February 1:26 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.