Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Lyr Req: Jack Haggerty

DigiTrad:
FLAT RIVER GIRL
JACK HAGGERTY (2)
JACK HAGGERTY (3)


Related threads:
come all ye bold raftsmen/jack haggerty (3)
(origins) Origins: John Hackety / Jack Haggerty (26)
harmonica on mick hanleys jack haggerty (17)
Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Hagerty? / Jack Haggerty (4) (closed)
Chords Req: Jack Haggerty (2)


dwight@comgrafix.com 03 Apr 98 - 12:03 PM
Barbara Shaw 03 Apr 98 - 12:52 PM
Bruce O. 03 Apr 98 - 03:08 PM
Jon W. 03 Apr 98 - 04:15 PM
Barry Finn 03 Apr 98 - 06:25 PM
Dan Keding 03 Apr 98 - 09:00 PM
Art Thieme 03 Apr 98 - 09:04 PM
LaMarca 04 Apr 98 - 12:29 PM
Jon W. 07 Apr 98 - 12:04 PM
nielen@post8.tele.dk 27 Jun 98 - 02:32 PM
Bruce O. 27 Jun 98 - 02:57 PM
Barry Finn 28 Jun 98 - 11:10 PM
harpgirl 29 Jun 98 - 08:11 AM
Wolfgang 01 Jul 98 - 01:29 PM
harpgirl 12 Oct 98 - 03:59 PM
harpgirl 12 Oct 98 - 04:08 PM
GUEST,Bekki-- healing@frognet.net 12 Jul 00 - 10:09 AM
Dale Rose 12 Jul 00 - 10:36 AM
Gypsy 13 Jul 00 - 08:32 PM
GUEST,dgstone@accesswave .ca 25 Dec 00 - 07:13 PM
Bud Savoie 26 Dec 00 - 07:53 AM
raredance 26 Dec 00 - 05:18 PM
Joe Offer 26 Dec 00 - 05:49 PM
Joe Offer 26 Dec 00 - 06:02 PM
raredance 27 Dec 00 - 09:38 AM
Bat Goddess 27 Dec 00 - 01:22 PM
Branwen23 27 Dec 00 - 03:21 PM
raredance 27 Dec 00 - 06:13 PM
Branwen23 27 Dec 00 - 06:20 PM
raredance 27 Dec 00 - 06:26 PM
Bud Savoie 28 Dec 00 - 07:00 AM
raredance 05 Jan 01 - 10:45 PM
raredance 06 Jan 01 - 04:51 PM
Jeri 07 Jan 01 - 08:51 AM
raredance 07 Jan 01 - 11:56 PM
GUEST,Art Thieme 08 Jan 01 - 12:35 AM
raredance 09 Jan 01 - 09:28 PM
raredance 13 Jan 01 - 05:11 PM
raredance 15 Jan 01 - 06:40 PM
raredance 18 Jan 01 - 11:36 PM
raredance 23 Jan 01 - 09:17 PM
harpgirl 23 Jan 01 - 09:30 PM
raredance 23 Jan 01 - 11:18 PM
Gypsy 24 Jan 01 - 10:39 PM
GUEST,jeff in ma. 16 Feb 01 - 09:21 AM
raredance 16 Feb 01 - 11:23 PM
raredance 19 Feb 01 - 04:25 PM
Gypsy 19 Feb 01 - 05:35 PM
GUEST 14 Mar 01 - 03:27 PM
raredance 14 Mar 01 - 09:48 PM
GUEST,hg 14 Mar 01 - 10:21 PM
raredance 15 Apr 01 - 01:45 PM
GUEST,harpgirl 15 Apr 01 - 06:56 PM
raredance 15 Apr 01 - 08:37 PM
harpgirl 15 Apr 01 - 08:40 PM
raredance 15 Apr 01 - 10:15 PM
harpgirl 25 Feb 02 - 12:19 AM
Murray MacLeod 25 Feb 02 - 01:53 AM
Naemanson 25 Feb 02 - 10:00 AM
raredance 25 Feb 02 - 11:12 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: Jack Haggerty
From: dwight@comgrafix.com
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 12:03 PM

Does anyone have the lyrics to "Jack Haggerty"?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY^^
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 12:52 PM

JACK HAGGERTY

I'm a heartbroken raftsman, from Greenville I came
All my worth has departed with the lass I did fame
From the strong darts of Cupid I've suffered much grief
And my heart's broke asunder, I can get no relief.

Of my trouble I'll tell you without much delay
Of the sweet little lassie my heart stole away
She's a blacksmith's fair daughter on the black river side
And I always intended to make her my bride.

I worked on the river where the white waters roar
And my name I engraved on the high, rocky shore
From the boy that stands happy in the dark, burning stream
But my thoughts were on money, she haunted my dream.

I gave her fine jewels and finest of lace
And the costliest muslin her form to embrace
I gave her my wages all for to keep safe
I deprived her of nothing I had on this earth.

While I worked on the river I earned quite a stake
I was steadfast and steady and ne'er played the rake
For a ten fathom river I'm very well known
And they called me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the Ban.

She wrote me a letter which I did receive
And she said from her promise herself she'd relieved
For to wed with another she'd a long time delayed
And the next time I'd see her she'd no more be a maid.
^^


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Bruce O.
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 03:08 PM

There's also a version in DT in file FLATRVR


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY (from Touchstone)^^
From: Jon W.
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 04:15 PM

Here's another version, from the 1978 album "The New Land" by Touchstone (featuring Triona Ni Dombhnaill after her Bothy Band days). The liner notes say they found the words in an old book and made up their own tune.

JACK HAGGERTY
From the singing of Touchstone ("The New Land")

I'm a heart-broken raftsman, from Greenville I came,
All my virtue's departed, with a lass I did feign,
From the strong darts of Cupid I've suffered much grief,
And my heart's broke asunder, I can get no relief.

Of my troubles I'll tell you without much delay,
Of a sweet little lassie my heart stole away,
She's a blacksmith's fair daughter on the Flat River side,
And I always intended to make her my bride.

I worked on the river where the white waters roar,
And my name I engraved on the high rocky shore,
I'm the boy who stands happy on the dark whirling stream,
But my thoughts were on Molly, she haunted my dreams.

I gave her fine jewels and the finest of lace,
And the costliest muslins her form to embrace,
I gave her my wages all for to keep safe,
I deprived her of nothing I had on this earth.

While I worked on the river I earned quite a stake,
I was steadfast and steady and ne'er played the rake,
For on camp flat and river I very well know,
That they call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town.

'Til she wrote me a letter which I did receive,
And she said from her promise herself she'd relieve,
For to wed with another she'd a long time delayed,
And the next time I'd see her she'd no more be a maid.

To her mother Jane Tucker I laid all the blame,
For she caused her to leave and go back on my name,
For to cast off the riggings that God was to tie,
And to leave me a rambler 'til the day that I die.

So come all ye bold raftsmen with hearts stout and true,
Don't trust to a woman for you're beat if you do,
But if you do meet one with the darkest of curls,
Remember Jack Haggerty and the Flat River girl.

^^


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Barry Finn
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 06:25 PM

Dan McGinnis, a woodsman, raftsman & entertainer around the Flat River camps, wrote this in the early 1860's according to Doerflinger (see Shantymen & Shantyboys), 1872 says Mrs. Chickering. Dan was upset over a promotion of woods boss going to the younger George Mercer (a friend of Jack Haggery & Anne's sweetheart). Anne, the belle of Greenville & the daughter of a Flat River blacksmith hardly even knew Jack. Also see Viking Book Of Folk Ballads. Don't remember where I got this bit, but George left the Flat River camps because of all the riddicule taken as a result of the songs wide spread popularity. Barry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Dan Keding
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 09:00 PM

If you want some variations of Jack Haggerty and some background try these two books.

"Ballads and Songs of Southern Michigan", Edited by Emelyn Elizabeth Gardner and Geraldine Jencks Chichering, and "Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman" edited by William Main Doerflinger.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Art Thieme
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 09:04 PM

"Jack Haggerty And The Flat River Girl"

Though written in the first person, and with an entirely plausible story, this is actually a fictional story composed with 'malice aforethought'. The author was Dan McGinnis, a raftsman with entertaining talents from Greenville, Michigan, who is said to have written it as a means of hurting George Mercer, fiance of the ballad's heroine, who had been made foreman of the camp in which both McGinnis and Jack Haggerty worked. The jealous McGinnis used Haggerty's name although Anna Tucker, the young belle in question, had never shown any special attention to Haggerty. The song proved more humiliating to the Tucker family than to Mercer, and in order to protect the family's good name , mercer would not allow it to be sung in camp. We are indebted to Geraldine J. Chickering for having traced the history of this ballad.

These are the esteemed words of Ken Goldstein in his scholarly liner notes for Paul Clayton's Riverside LP _TIMBER-R-R-R Folksongs And Ballads Of The Lumberjack_ RLP12-648

Art Thieme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: LaMarca
Date: 04 Apr 98 - 12:29 PM

Just a compulsive correction of attributions...Touchstone did not compose the 3/4 waltz tune for Jack Haggerty. They got it from Mick Hanly, a fine Irish musician who found the words to Jack Haggerty/The Flat River Girl without a tune in the Viking/Penguin Book of Folksongs of the English-Speaking World. He made up the tune because he liked the song; Triona NiDhomnaill learned it and recorded it with Touchstone. It's become a waltz standard for ceilis here in DC.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Jon W.
Date: 07 Apr 98 - 12:04 PM

Thanks for the correction, LaMarca. I was just paraphrasing what I remembered from the liner notes--they probably give credit to Mick Hanly. I only remembered that the tune used by Touchstone wasn't original. The tune in the DT is quite different than Hanly's, does anyone know if it's the original?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Jack haggerty
From: nielen@post8.tele.dk
Date: 27 Jun 98 - 02:32 PM

Can somebody help me to find the lyrics to Jack Haggerty ? I´ve heard the song with Mick Hanly Jens, DK


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack haggerty
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Jun 98 - 02:57 PM

In DT as "Flat River Girl"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack haggerty
From: Barry Finn
Date: 28 Jun 98 - 11:10 PM

Touchstone recorded it & say that Mick found it in The Penguin Book of Folk Ballads & wrote the tune. Dan McGinnis (who wrote the song around the 1872 & was also an accomplished raftsman & enterainer in the Flat River camps), was bull about a promotion to woods boss was given to Anne's (the daughter of a blacksmith & the belle of Greensville, along the Flat River) honey, a younger man, George Mercer (not Jack Haggerty), & made up this song about Jack (who hardly knew Anne) as a prank & I believe it was George who left the Flat River area because of all the flack caused by the song.Collected by Geraldine Chickering (see Doerflinger's "Shantymen & Shantyboys" & the "Viking Book of Folk Ballads" Barry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGARTY (from Mick Hanley)
From: harpgirl
Date: 29 Jun 98 - 08:11 AM

How 'bout these...

I'm a heartbroken raftsman. From Greensville I came.
All my virtues departed with the lass I did feign.
From the storm gods of Cupid I've suffered much grief,
And my heart's broke asunder. I can get no relief.

Of my trouble I'll tell you without much delay:
Of a sweet little lassie my heart stole away.
She's the blacksmith's fair daughter on the (??) side,
And I always intended to make her my bride.

I worked on the river where the white waters roll,
And my name I've engraved on the hard rock on shore.
I'm the boy that stands happy on the dark flowing stream,
But my thoughts were on Molly. She haunted my dreams.

I gave her fine jewels, the finest of lace,
And the costliest muslins of all to embrace.
I gave her my wages all for to keep safe.
I deprived her of nothing I had on this earth.

While I worked on the river, I earned quite a stake.
I was steadfast and steady and ne'er played the rake.
On the Camflatin (?) River I'm very well known,
And they call me Jack Hagerty, the pride of their own.

Till she wrote me a letter which I did receive,
And she said from her promises she'd be relieved.
Oh, to wed with another she'd long time delayed,
And the next time I saw her, she'd no more be a maid.

To her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame.
Oh, she caused her to leave and go back on my name.
She cast off the riggin' that God was to tie,
And to leave me around here to the day that I die.

So come, all ye bold raftsmen, with hearts stout and true.
Don't trust to a woman, 'cause you're beat if you do.
But if you do meet one with blond flowing curls,
Just remember Jack Hagarty and the factory girl.

It's somewhere close to the Mick Hanley version.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 17-Oct-02.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack haggerty
From: Wolfgang
Date: 01 Jul 98 - 01:29 PM

Jens, these lyrics posted some months ago by Barbara Shaw are a bit closer to Mick Hanly's version than Harpgirl's version.

BTW; I like Hanly's tune much better than the original (?) in the DT database.

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY (from Viking Book of Folk..
From: harpgirl
Date: 12 Oct 98 - 03:59 PM

This has been nagging at me for several months. I found the version that Mick Hanley used in the Viking Book of Folk Ballads of the English Speaking World, which was in my library all along...The words as they appear in the book are:
JACK HAGGERTY


I'm a heartbroken raftsman,
From Greenville I came;
All my virtue's departed
With the lass I did fain.
From the strong darts of Cupid
I've suffered much grief;
My heart's broke asunder,
I can ne'er get relief.

Of my trouble I'll tell you
Without much delay;
Of a sweet little lassie
My heart stole away.
She was a blacksmith's daughter
On the Flat River Side,
And I always intended
To make her my bride.

By occupation I was a raftsman
Where the white waters roll
My name I've engraved
On the high rocks and shoal.
I am the boy that stands happy
On the dark purling stream;
My thoughts were on Molly,
She haunted my dream.

I gave her fine jewels,
And the finest of lace;
The costliest muslins
Her form embraced.
I gave her my wages
All for to keep safe,
I deprived her of nothing
I had on this earth.

I worked on the river
Till I earned quite a stake,
Was steadfast, steady,
And ne'er played the rake.
O'er the camp, flat and river
I am very well known.
They call me Jack Haggerty
The pride of the town.

Till one day on the river
A letter I received.
She said from her promise
Herself she'd relieve.
To wed with another
She'd a long time delayed,
And the next time I'd see her
She'd never more be a maid.

To her mother,Jane Tucker,
I laid all the blame;
She caused her to leave me
And go back on my name,
To cast off the riggings
That God would tie,
And leave me a wanderer
Til the day that I die.

Now good-bye to Flat River
For me there is no rest.
I'll shoulder my peavy
And go further West;
I'll go to Muskegon
Some comforts to find,
And leave my old sweetheart
And Flat River behind.

Now come all ye bold raftsmen
with hearts stout and true,
Don't trust to a woman,
You're beat if you do!
But if you do meet one
With a dark chestnut curl,
Remember Jack Haggerty
And the Flat River Girl!

I sang my version of the Mick Hanley version which he of course seems to have changed, as well. I like the verse about going to Muskegon which he leaves out. I always thought it was an English or Irish song. The notes confirm Art's story, that it was a product of the Michigan woods and a spite song. Dan McGinnis was annoyed that George Mercer, a younger man, had been appointed woods boss over him. McGinnis and others concocted this song in 1872 about an affair between Haggerty, a good looking lumberjack at the camp and Anna Tucker, the belle of Greenville and Mercer's fiance.
And I'm going to sing it with the missing verse! harpgirl

^^


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: harpgirl
Date: 12 Oct 98 - 04:08 PM

Joe, could you put a space before Now goodbye to Flat River and one after the last line...thanks sweety, harpgirl


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: looking for 'Jack Haggerty'
From: GUEST,Bekki-- healing@frognet.net
Date: 12 Jul 00 - 10:09 AM

Jack Haggerty was recorded by Touchstone in the early 80's and I'm not sure where they got it. They did a mix of Celtic-American music, this is an early American piece.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: looking for 'Jack Haggerty'
From: Dale Rose
Date: 12 Jul 00 - 10:36 AM

Just above the threads are two search boxes. Enter Jack Haggerty in the one that says filter , set the age to three years and two other threads that discuss the song will come up. For a few more hits after that, enter Jack Haggerty in the box that says Digitrad and Forum search, and you'll get even more mentions, but you'll have to dig a bit more.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY^^^
From: Gypsy
Date: 13 Jul 00 - 08:32 PM

JACK HAGGERTY

I'm a heartbroken raftsman, from Greenville I came
All my virtues departed with a lass I did feign
From the strong darts of Cupid I've suffered much grief
And my heart's broke asunder, I can get no relief

Of my troubles I'lll tell you without much delay
Of a sweet little lassie my heart stole away
She's a blacksmiths fair daughter on the flat riverside
And I always intended to make her my bride

Well, I work on the river where the white waters roar
And my name I engrave on the high rock shore
I'm the boy who stands happy by the dark whirling stream
But my thoughts were on Molly, she haunted my dream

I gave her fine jewels, the finest of lace
And the costliest muslins, her form to embrace
I gave her my wages, all for to keep safe
I deprived her of nothing I had on this earth

While I worked on the river I earned quite a stake
I was steadfast and steady and ne'er played the rake
From camp and the river, I'm very well-known
And they call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town

She wrote me a letter which I did recieve
And she strayed from her promise, or so she believed
For to wed another she had long time delayed
And the next time I see her she no more be a maid

To her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame
For she caused her to leave and go back on my name
For to cast off the riggings that God was to tie
And to leave me a rambler till the day that I die

So come all you bold raftsmen with hearts stout and true
Don't trust in a woman, you'll bleed if you do
But if you do meet one with the darkest of curl
Remember Jack Haggerty and the flat river girl

This is the version that The Minstrels of Mayhem sing. A real favorite in our household. ^^^


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: GUEST,dgstone@accesswave .ca
Date: 25 Dec 00 - 07:13 PM

I am a songwriter in Halifax NS Canada, and a guy I play with in a band was trying to hunt this down, as to it's origin and what not...Thanks for the info


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Bud Savoie
Date: 26 Dec 00 - 07:53 AM

this story isn't fiction. It happens all the time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY'S FLAT RIVER GIRL
From: raredance
Date: 26 Dec 00 - 05:18 PM

Franz Rickaby in "Ballads and Songs of the Shanty-Boy" (1926, Harvard Univ. Press) includes three versions of this song. His version "A" is the longest at 13 stanzas. Note that stanzas 5 and 7 each have an extra couplet, so that would make the total equivalent to 14 stanzas.

JACK HAGGERTY'S FLAT RIVER GIRL

I'm a heart-broken raftsman, from Greenville I came.
My virtues departed, alas! I declaim.
The strong darts of Cupid have caused me much grief.
Till my heart bursts asunder I will ne'er find relief.

I am by occupation a raftsman where the Flat River rolls.
My name is engraved on its rocks, sands, and shoals.
In shops, bars, and households I'm very well known.
They call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town.

I'll tell you my trouble without much delay,
How a sweet little lassie my heart stole away.
She was a blacksmith's daughter from the Flat River side,
And I always intended to make her my bride.
Her eyes they resembled the calm smiling sea.
Her skin was as white as the lilies of Spain,
Or the wing of the sea-gull as he skims o'er the main.

Her form like the dove was so slender and neat.
Her hair hung in ringlets to her tiny white feet.
Her voice was like music or the sigh of the breeze,
As she whispered she loved me as we strolled through the trees.
I thought her my darling, - what a gem for a wife.
When I think of her treachery it near takes my life.

I worked on the river, I earned quite a stake.
I was steadfast and steady and ne'er played the rake;
But buoyant and happy on the boiling white stream,
My thoughts were of Annie, she haunted my dreams.

I would have dressed her in jewels and the finest of lace,
In the choicest muslins her form would embrace.
I thought not of sorrow, of trouble or gloom,
My heart light and happy as the rays of the moon.
I gave her my wages, the same to keep safe;
I begrudged her of nothing I had on this earth.

One day on the river a letter I received.
She said from her promise herself she'd relieved
My brain whirled with anguish, it near drove me mad.
My courage all left me, I wished myself dead.

"I have no doubt this letter will cause you surprise,
And for disappointment must apologize.
My marriage to another I've a long time delayed,
And the next time you see me I shall ne'er be a maid."

To her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame.
She caused her to leave me and blacken my name.
She cast off the rigging that God would soon tie,
And left me a wanderer until the day that I die.

I will bid farewell to virtues divine.
I'll live in debauchery, fast women, and wine.
I'll leave Flat River, there I ne'er can find rest.
I'll shoulder my peavy and start for the West.

Now come all you young fellows with hearts brave and true,
Don't believe in a woman: You're beat if you do.
But if ever you see one with a brown chestnut curl,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

Now my song it is ended, I hope it's leased all.
I sail in a packet that sails from White Hall.
The canvas is hoisted, and the wind blowing free,
As over the ocean sails Jack Haggerty.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Joe Offer
Date: 26 Dec 00 - 05:49 PM

Looks like we have only one version of the song in the database, Flat River Girl, where Jack is named Haggarty. We planted one, and harvested a hundredfold....
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Joe Offer
Date: 26 Dec 00 - 06:02 PM

Rich, are you missing a line in the third verse? Looks like there's a couplet with half missing.
-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 27 Dec 00 - 09:38 AM

Sure Joe, call attention to my horrible typing, and then you have to be right about it. Verses 3 and 4 ran together, probably about the time I did a quick copy and paste because I thought I was about to lose my internet connection. Verse 3 ends with :
".....make her my bride."
Verse 4 begins with the line:
Her face was as fair as the rose on the lea.
Her eyes they resembled......

Now that you found the error, you have to go and fix it. then you can delete this and your previous message and no one will know what a sleuth you are and what a slouch I am. Thankin' ye.
I should add that the long version was originally collected from Mr. C L Clark of Greenville, MI around 1923. The Flat River is located in Michigan. The hand written version that Mr. Clark gave to Rickaby had at the bottom "As written and sung by Jack Haggarty." No mention is made of the original author, although he was also from Greenville. Rickaby adds a quote from Mr. Clark that embellishes the legend of the song, but doesn't necessarily add to the facts of the song's origin.
from C L Clark:
"I found one old-timer who told me that this song was sung by thousands of men of the Flat River, which flows through Greenville, and on the big river [Big Muskegon], and by farm girls in this neighborhood....Jack Haggarty was a lumberjack, and from a man who used to run a livery stable and rent him horses I have learned that he was not quite so rough as most of those birds, and was a little more dressy. Also wasn't very stong on fighting. In other words, he wqas a sort of gentleman lumber-jack. I believe he died about eight years ago [1915]. Thousands of people hereabouts knew and sang the song, and many knew the heroine."

Rickaby stated that evey man who sang or recited the ballad to him claimed to have known Jack Haggarty himself. Some unusual variations of lines that Rickaby found include:

"the strong darts of cupid" changing to "a dartsman of cubic."

"my heart it's asunder" changing to "my heart's a broken cinder."

"Flat River" changing to "Platt River"

"to her mother, Jane Tucker," changing to "her mother, Jane, took her."

the girls' name is also variously, Anne, Annie, Anna, Hannah, Molly and probably some more.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 27 Dec 00 - 01:22 PM

Okay, but what about the version that follows a very similar story (and some lines) but starts out:

"I came on the river in 1804
I carved my name on the high rocky shore
Consorted with gamblers, raftsmen, and whores
My name is Jack Haggarty; I'm the pride of Kilgore.

He lays all the blame on "her mother, Jane Tucker" too.

Bat Goddess


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Branwen23
Date: 27 Dec 00 - 03:21 PM

Rich-

I'd be interested to know what the melody does on those extra couplets you've given us... Does it just act like the beginning of another verse?


-Branwen-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 27 Dec 00 - 06:13 PM

Branwen- It's real hard to tell from from the book. Mostly because Rickaby did not include a tune for his version "A". He has tunes for versions B and C and also has a version D tune with no lyrics but a first verse. What you suggest is certainly an option. I think more frequently in these situations the last two lines of the tune would be repeated.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Branwen23
Date: 27 Dec 00 - 06:20 PM

groovy... thanks, rich


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 27 Dec 00 - 06:26 PM

A couple more things to add quickly. E C Beck in "Lore of the Lumber Camp" has 5 text versions of "The Flat River Girl", noe of which have extra couplets in the stanzas. They have as few as 5 and as many as 12 verses. Beck describes it as probably the third most popular song among Michigan lumberjacks, behind "Jam at Gerry's Rock" and the "Lumberman's Alphabet". He says the song is sung to several tunes and he could not dtermine what tune McGinnis originally used. The tunes Edith Fowke collected in Ontario were mostly variations of "Villikens & His Dinah"

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Bud Savoie
Date: 28 Dec 00 - 07:00 AM

Villikens and his Dinah = Sweet Betsy from Pike.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Rickaby)
From: raredance
Date: 05 Jan 01 - 10:45 PM

Notice in most of these versions the notion of going "out West" to get away from it all. The trek from Greenville to Muskegon is about 50 miles.

FLAT RIVER GIRL (Rickaby "B", sung by Mr. Arthur Milloy, Omemee, ND)

1. I'm a broken-hearted raftsman, from Granesville I came.
I courted a lassie, a lass of great fame.
But cruel-hearted Cupid has caused me much grief.
My heart it's asunder, I can ne'er find relief. 2. My troubles I'll tell you without more delay.
A comely young lassie my hear stole away.
She was a blacksmith's only daughter from Flat River side
And I always intended for to make her my bride.

3. I bought her rich jewels and the finest of lace,
And the costliest of muslins it was her I'd embrace.
I gave her my wages for her to keep safe.
I begrudged her of nothing that I had myself.

4. My name is Jack Haggartty where the white waters flow.
My name it's engraved on the rocks on the shore.
I'm a boy that stands happy on a log in the stream.
My heart was with Hannah, for she haunted my dreams.

5. I went up the river some money to make.
I was steadfast and steady, I ne'er played the rake.
Through ---- and -----* I am very well known.
They call me Jack Haggarty and the pride of the town.
(*names of two small towns near Muskegon)

6. One day on the river a letter I received,
That it was from her promises she would be relieved.
She'd be wed to a young man who a long time delayed,
And the next time I'd see her she would not be a maid.

7. Then adieu to Flat River. For me there's no rest
I'll shoulder my peavy and I'll go out West.
I will go to Moskeegan some pleasures to find,
And I'll leave my own darling of Flat River behind.

8. So come all ye jolly raftsmen with hearts stout and bold,
Don't depend to the women; you're left if you do.
For if you chance to meet one with dark chestnut curls,
You will think of Jack Haggarty and his Flat River girl.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY (from Rickaby)
From: raredance
Date: 06 Jan 01 - 04:51 PM

JACK HAGGERTY (Rickaby "C", sung by Mr W H Underwood, Bayport, MN)

1. I'm a heart-broken raftsman, from Greensville I came.
.....................................................
The strong darts of Cubit have caused me much grief.
My heart's broke within me. I can ne'er get relief.

2. I will tell you my story without much delay.
'T is of a neat little lassie my heart stole away.
She was a blacksmith's daughter on the Flat River side,
And I always intended to make her my bride.

3. My occupation is raftsman when the white waters roll.
My name is engraved on the rocks and sand shores.
Through shabbers and housetops I'm known of renown,
And they call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town.

4. I dressed her in jewels and the finest of lace,
The costliest muslins herself to embrace.
I gave her my wages for to keep safe.
I begrudged her of nothing I had on this earth.

5. To her mother, Jane Tucker, I owe all the blame.
She has caused her to leave me and go back on my name.
She has cast off the riggin' that God would soon tie,
And has left me to wander till the day that I die.

6. I'll bid adieu to Flat River. For me there's no rest.
I will shoulder my peavy and I will go West.
I will go to Muskegon some comfort to find,
And I'll leave my own sweetheart on Flat River behind.

7. So come all you bold raftsmen with hearts stout and true,
Don't depend on the women, you're beat if you do.
For when you meet one with a dark chestnut curl,
Oh, remember Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

Here we have "Cubit" throwing the darts
I don't know what "shabbers" means in v.3.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Jeri
Date: 07 Jan 01 - 08:51 AM

We do a version of song in our session, but the tune is different. See Bat Goddess's post. I'll try to knock it out in MIDIText.

It won't do much good without the lyrics of the other version, though. I wonder if anyone (hello Bat Goddess) had it on tape somewhere...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERY (from Rickaby)
From: raredance
Date: 07 Jan 01 - 11:56 PM

JACK HAGGERY (Rickaby "D", sung by Ed Springstad, Bemidji, MN

I'm a heart-broken raftsman, from Greenville I came.
My usual departure, alas! I detain.
The strong darts of Cubit they gave me much pain,
And with the loud thrills of thunder I ne'er can find rest.

Not much to this one, except that it did come with a tune. Words seemed to have been altered to something that "sounds like" the commone words. the second line doesn't make much sense compared to other versions. Old "Cubit" is here again and the typical "heart breaks assunder" phrase has become "loud thrills of thunder". Poor fellow certainly wouldn't find rest with all that noise going on.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: GUEST,Art Thieme
Date: 08 Jan 01 - 12:35 AM

rich r,

Thanks for reminding me of that one. After that it's much easier to see how the incomprehensible lyrics that the Carter Family used for "Wildwood Flower" might've evolved into being. Ain't the morphing workings of the oral tradition a marvelous thing?

Art Thieme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY (from Edith Fowke)
From: raredance
Date: 09 Jan 01 - 09:28 PM

This text is from "Lumbering Songs from the Northern Woods" by Edith Fowke (1970). Fowke said she collected a number of fairly similr versions around Ontario. One of the Ontario versions by John Leahy can be found on the Folkways recording FM4052. Leahy has the young lady's name as Lucy who was a lockmaster's daughter and had "dark auburn curls". Another Ontario version relocated the song's setting to Gravenhurst, a town in Ontario. Fowke also adds that the song was known in Maine at least by 1890. Verse 3 in the text below has all the earmarks of someone who has forgotten part of the lyric and repeats some lines to fill the the space while trying to think of the next verse. Anybody who has ever sung has probably found themselves in that predicament at least once. "vows" replaces "riggings" as the item that God what have tied.

JACK HAGGERTY (Edith Fowke, sung by Tom Brandon, Peterborough, Ontario)

1. My name is Jack Haggerty, from Glensville, I came.
There's no one to control me so there's no one to blame.
I'll tell you a story without no delay
Of a pretty fair maiden who stole my heart away.

2. My name is Jack Haggerty, I'm a raftsman by trade.
My name is engraved on the rocks and sandbars.
I'm the boy who stands high where the white water foams,
But the thoughts of dear Anna keeps crossing my mind.

3. She is won, and I took her from the Flat River side.
I truly intended to make her my bride.
She's the blacksmith's daughter from the Flat River side.
And I truly intended to make her my bride.

4. I gave her fine silks and the nicest of lace,
The costliest of muslin herself to embrace.
I gave her my wages herself for to keep;
I deprived her of nothing I had on this earth.

5. One day on Flat River a note I received
Saying dear Anna she had me deceived.
She had married another who had long been delayed,
And the next time I met her she'd ne'er be a maid.

6. Now it's on her old mother I place all the blame.
She always intended to blacken my name.
She'd have soon broke the vows that God would have tied,
Causing me for to wander till the day that I died.

7. So adieu to Flat River - for me there's no rest.
I'll shoulder my peavey and go to the west.
I'll go to Muskegon some comfort to find,
Leaving Flat River and dear Anna behind.

8. So come all you young raftsmen with hearts kind and true,
Don't trust any woman - you're beat if you do,
And if you find one with those dark chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (trad Wisconsin)
From: raredance
Date: 13 Jan 01 - 05:11 PM

This version was collected in Wisconsin. The girl is a miller's daughter with bright golden curls and the town is Gransville.

FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Peters' "Folksongs Out of Wisconsin", sung by Dan Grant, Bryant WI)

1. I'm a broken-hearted raftsman from Gransville I came.
All joys are departed, all virtues the same,
Since the clear skies of Cupid have caused me my grief,
My heart's well nigh broken, I can ne'er find relief.

2. My occupation, I'm a raftsman where the Flat River flows.
I've printed my name on both rocks and the shore.
In shops, farms and households I'm very well known,
They call me Jack Haggarty, the pride of my town.

3. My story I'll tell you without much delay.
A neat little lassie my heart stole away.
She was a miller's daughter, close by riverside
And I always intended to make her my bride.

4. Her form, like a lily, was slender and neat.
Her hair hung in ringlets to her tiny white feet.
Her voice was as sweet as the wind on a leaf.
Her skin like the breast of the white smiling sea.

5. I took her to supper, to parties and balls.
Sunday morning went riding from the first time I call.
I called her my darling, what a gem for a wife!
When I think of her treachery, I could forfeit my life.

6. I dressed her in the finest of muslins and lace
And the finest of jewels that I could encase.
I gave her my wages, the same to keep safe.
I begrudged her of nothing I had on the place.

7. I worked on the river and saved a lot of stake.
I was steadfast and steady and ne'er played the rake.
I was buoyant and smiling on the stiff boiling stream.
Her face was before me, it haunted my dream.

8. One day on the river a note I received.
She said from her promise herself she released.
She'd wedded a love she long since delayed
And the next time I'd see her she'd not be a maid.

9. Now getting this note sure caused some surprise.
When I think of her now it brings tears to my eyes.
For it filled me with anger and made me half mad.
I'm weary and heartsick and wish myself dead.

10. But it were on her mother I lay on the blame,
She'd wrecked both our lives and blackened my name.
She' thrown off the rigging that God would soon tie
And made me a loner 'til the day that I die.

11. On the banks of Flat River I no more can rest,
So I told them my feeling and pulled for the west.
I will go to Muskegon, a new job to find.
I'm leaving Flat River and a false love behind.

12. Come all jolly raftsmen, so brave and so true
Don't love a young girl, you'll be beat if you do.
When you see a sweet lassie with bright golden hair
Then remember Jack Haggarty and his Flat River girl.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JACK HAGGERTY (from Robert D Bethke)
From: raredance
Date: 15 Jan 01 - 06:40 PM

This version was collected in New York. The town is Glenville, the girl is Hannah, "riggings" has become "rigors" in verse 5 and that whole line is now a bit odd and borders on nonsense. The second line of verse 1 is also unusual

JACK HAGGERTY (from: "Adirondack Voices" by Robert D Bethke, 1982 U. Illinois Press, as sung by Hamilton Ferry of Childwold)

1. I'm a broken-down raftsman, from Glenville I came,
And the last words of parting, and the last toils of fame,
For the sharp darts of Cupid, oh, they cause me much grief,
For my heart is asunder, and I can't find relief.

2. I'd worked on the river and I'd earned quite a stake,
Being steadfast and steady, I had ne'er proven the race
'Cause of the boy that was happy, by the bright, whirling stream,
And my thoughts were with Hannah, and she haunted my dreams.

3. Now, I'll dress my bride up in the finest of lace,
And the finest of silk herself to embrace;
Now, I gave her my money for me to keep safe;
I denied her of nothing that I have on this earth.

4. One day on the river, now, a note I received
Saying from her promise herself she'd relieve.
She'd been wed to a young man, not a great while of late,
And the next time I'd see her she would not be a maiden.

5. Now, it's to her mother I lay all the blame,
She told her forsake me, go back on my name;
For she uncast all rigors for God would soon tied,
And left me to wander till the day that I died.

6. Now it's good-bye, Flat River, and the girl I love best,
I'll shoulder my peavey and I will go west;
I'll go to Muskegon, some comfort to find,
And leave my only true love on the Flat River behind.

7. Now, come all ye good shantyboys with hearts kind and true,
Don't trust any woman, you'll be beat if you do;
And if ever you see one with those dark chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and the Flat River girl.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE COWBOY'S FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Beck)
From: raredance
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 11:36 PM

Here's a really unusual one, a cowboy version of a lumberjack song

THE COWBOY'S FLAT RIVER GIRL (E.C. Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camps" , collected from Stanley Wheaton, Fort Stockton, TX)

1. I'm a bold cowboy, from Salt Creek I came.
While virtue's departed, alas I'm profane.
In the cold ports of Cuba I'm very well known
As a roving young cowboy, and Beeville's my home.

2. I'll tell you my troubles without further delay,
How a pretty young lassie my heart stole away;
She was a farmer's daughter on the Salt Creek side,
An I always intended to make her my bride.

3. I worked for Wood and Kennendent and earned quite a stake;
I stood fast and steady and ne'er played or drank.
I sent Emma my wages the same to keep safe
And begrudged her nothing that I had on earth

4. One bright Sabbath morning a letter I received.
She said from her promise she had long been relieved.
And had married another she long had delayed,
And the next time I saw her she would ne'er be a maid.

5. It's down on Salt Creek for me there's no rest:
I'll saddle Old Joe, and I'll pull further west;
I'll go through Muskogee some good times to find
And leave my old sweetheart with another behind.

6. Come all ye bold cowboys, to you I'll be true:
Don't depend on a woman, 'cause you're beat if you do.
But if you ever see one with a dark auburn curl,
Remember Jim Oxford and the Salt Creek girl.

"small darts of Cupid" -> "cold ports of Cuba"
Muskegon >> Muskogee, OK which is a long way north of Beeville,TX; not west.
Emma, farmer's daughter with auburn hair, the Salt River girl
"alas I'm profane" (and what cowboy isn't?)
Beeville is in south Texas.
Jack Haggarty is now Jim Oxford
Beck adds in his comments: "Whether some lumberjack began punching Texas cattle or some vaquero started riding Michigan logs cannot be stated with certainty, but the chances are that another damn Yankee went South."

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Beck)
From: raredance
Date: 23 Jan 01 - 09:17 PM

4 days and no Jack Haggerty variants. I must be falling behind.

FLAT RIVER GIRL (Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camps" version A from Bill McBride)

1. I'm a broken-hearted raftsman, from Greenville I came.
I courted a lassie, a lass of great fame.
But cruel-hearted Cupid has caused me much grief;
My heart it's asunder, I can ne'er find relief.

2. My troubles I'll tell you without more delay,
A comely young lassie my heart stole away;
She was a blacksmith's only daughter from Flat River side,
And I always intended for to make her my bride.

3. I brought her rich jewels and the finest of lace;
With the costliest of muslins it was her I'd embrace.
I gave her my wages for her to keep safe;
I begrudged her nothing that I had myself.

4. My name is Jack Haggerty where the white waters flow;
My name it's engraved on the rocks of the shore.
I'm a boy that stands happy on a log in the streams.
My heart was with Hannah, for she haunted my dreams.

5. I went up the river some money to make;
I was steadfast and steady, I ne'er played the rake.
Through Hart and through Shelby I am very well known:
They call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town

6. One day on the river a letter I received
That it was from her promises herself she'd relieved;
She'd be wed to a young man, who a long time delayed,
And the next time I'd see her she would not be a maid.

7. Then adieu to Flat River. For me there's no rest:
I'll shoulder my peavey, and I'll go out West;
I'll go to Muskegon some pleasures to find,
And I'll leave my own Flat River darling behind

8. So come all you jolly raftsmen with hearts stout and true,
Don't depend on a woman; you're sunk if you do.
And if you chance to see one with dark chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: harpgirl
Date: 23 Jan 01 - 09:30 PM

...I've been folloiwng your progress with variants rich and I appreciate it! I love singing this song! harpgrrrl!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 23 Jan 01 - 11:18 PM

Hey "harpgrrrl", you're still reading these. have to love ya for that. It's also a test of Joe Offer's harvesting abilities, but he doesn't know that. Who knows, maybe this is it or maybe there will be more.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Gypsy
Date: 24 Jan 01 - 10:39 PM

Terrribly impressed. Glad to know that i am not the only one to collect all variants of a tune. Gotta admit, ye got me beat!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: GUEST,jeff in ma.
Date: 16 Feb 01 - 09:21 AM

I've been looking for this song to sing for quite some time. And now,well,do you really need another variant? Thank you all for your help.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Beck)
From: raredance
Date: 16 Feb 01 - 11:23 PM

I thought you'd never ask. Here's another one. LIne 2 of the first verse seems to be the wild card in a number of versions. Here his "name is departed" but they still manage to call him Jack Haggarty. Verse 4 has costly "raiment" where "muslins" usually appears. Verse 8 mentions a broken "rigon", likely a corruption or "rigging".

FLAT RIVER GIRL (Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camps" version B, from Jake Fry of Middleton, MI)

1. I'm a brokenhearted raftsman, from Greenville I came.
My name is departed, the loss is my fame.
In shop and in household I am very well known:
They call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town

2. I'll tell you my troubles without more delay,
How a sweet little lassie my heart stole away;
She was a blacksmith's daughter from the Flat River side,
And I always intended for to make her my bride.

3. Her form like the dove it was dainty and neat;
Her hair hung in ringlets to her pretty white feet.
She was a blacksmith's daughter from the Flat River side,
Her words were like music o'er the rise of the tide.

4. I dressed her in muslins in the finest of lace;
In the costliest of raiment her form I embraced.
I called her my jewel, what a gem for a wife!
When I think of her treachery it near takes my life

5. I know all the country where the Flat River rolls;
I know all its sand bars, its rocks and its shoals.
I'm the boy that stands happy on the white rolling streams:
My thoughts were on Anna; she haunted my dreams.

6. I worked on the river, I earned quite a stake;
I was steadfast and steady' I played not the rake.
I gave her my wages, the same to keep safe;
I begrudged her nothing that I had on this earth.

7. One day on the river this letter I received
She said from her promises herself she'd relieved;
To wed with her true love, this long time delayed,
And the next time I'd see her she would not be a maid.

8. To her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame;
She has caused her to leave me and go back on my name;
She has broken the rigon that God would soon tie
And caused me to wander till the day that I die.

9. Farewell to Flat River, For me there's no rest:
I'll shoulder my peavey, and I will go West;
I'll go to Muskegon some comfort to find,
And I'll leave my own Flat River darling behind

10. Come all you old rivermen with hearts strong and true,
Don't depend on a woman; you are beat if you do.
If ever you see one with brown chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and the Flat River girl.

until next time

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Beck)
From: raredance
Date: 19 Feb 01 - 04:25 PM

Some Guest tried to start another Jack Haggarty thread. What better way to celebrate the renewed interest, than with another version?

FLAT RIVER GIRL (Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camps" version C, from Carl Lathrop of Pleasant Valley, Sam Hackett of Wheeler, harry Blackman of Breckenridge, and Henry Babcock of Alma.). This same version is also in Sandburg's "American Songbag". It is a short version that starts with what is usually the last verse and basically repeats it again at the end in verse 5, so the story is really truncated.

1. Come all you fine young fellows with hearts so brave and true,
Never depend on a woman; you're lost if you do.
But if you chance to see one with long brown chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

2. Her form was like the dove, so slender and neat;
Her long brown chestnut curls hung to her tiny feet.
Her voice was like the music or murmurs of the breeze
As she whispered that she loved me as we strolled among the trees.

3. She was a blacksmith's daughter from the Flat River side,
And I always had intended for to make her my bride.
But one day on the river a letter I received
Saying that from her promise herself she had relieved.

4. To her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame.
She caused her to leave me and to blacken my name.
I counted her my darling, what a lady for a wife!
When I think of her treachery it nearly takes my life

5. Come all you fine young fellows with hearts so brave and true,
Never depend on a woman; you're lost if you do.
But if you chance to see one with long brown chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Gypsy
Date: 19 Feb 01 - 05:35 PM

Ooohhh....Rich, ye're me hero!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Mar 01 - 03:27 PM

Did anyone ever midi or abc the Hanly tune?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Beck)
From: raredance
Date: 14 Mar 01 - 09:48 PM

FLAT RIVER GIRL (Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camps" version D from George R Rice of Reed City)

1. I'm a brokenhearted raftsman, from Greenville I came.
My virtue is departed; by a lass I'm defamed.
The cruel darts of Cupid have caused me much grief;
Till my heart bursts asunder, I shall ne'er find relief.

2. By occupation I'm a raftsman where the white waters roll;
My name is engraved on the rocks and sand shoals.
Through shop, bar and housetop I'm very well known;
They call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town

3. Of my troubles I'll tell you without more delay,
How a sweet little lassie my heart stole away;
She's a blacksmith's daughter by the Flat River side
And I always intended for to make her my bride.

4. I called her my darling, what a gem for a wife!-
When I think of her treachery it near takes my life.
I took her to suppers, to parties, to balls;
And Sunday boat riding was my first early calls.

5. Her form like the dove it was slender and neat;
Her hair hung in ringlets to her tiny white feet.
She told me she loved me as we strolled through the town,
Her voice soft as music or the rays of the moon.

6. I dressed her in jewels and the finest of lace;
In the richest of muslins her form I encased.
I gave her my wages for her to keep safe,
And begrudged her nothing upon this earth's face.

7. I worked on the river and earned quite a stake;
I was steadfast and steady; I ne'er played the rake
I'm the boy that stands happy on the white rolling streams:
My thoughts were of Anna; she haunted my dreams.

8. One day on the river a letter I received,
Which said of her promises herself she'd relieved.
My brain whirled with anguish which near set me mad;
This world seemed so dreary that I wished I was dead.

9. "No doubt but this letter will cause some surprise;
And for disappointments I must apologize.
For to wed my true lover I've a long time delayed,
And the next time you see me I will not be a maid."

10. On her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame;
She has caused her to leave me and to blacken my name.
She has cast off the rigging that God soon would tie
And left me to wander till the day that I die.

11. Now farewell to Flat River. For me there's no rest:
I'll shoulder my peavey, and I will go West;
I will go to Muskegon some comfort to find,
And leave my old true love and Flat River behind.

12. Now come all you jolly raftsmen with hearts stout and true,
Don't depend on a woman; you're beat if you do.
And whenever you see one with long chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

This is one of the longer texts. Our hero is known from all the housetops, sounds like a Santa thing. He also has taken to engraving his name on the sand shoals which is probably not the ideal way to be remembered for a long time. He goes all out to entertain his love with dinners, dances, and boat rides. He also displays the most anguish with whirling madness and suicidal thoughts, but he seems to make it to Muskegon like all the others.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: GUEST,hg
Date: 14 Mar 01 - 10:21 PM

...I appreciate your scholarship, rich. I am continually impressed with your research and always look for your posts. I still love the music aspect of the forum... thanks for keeping it alive...hg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: FLAT RIVER GIRL (from Beck)
From: raredance
Date: 15 Apr 01 - 01:45 PM

Another lumberjack song thread reminded me I wasn't finished here.

FLAT RIVER GIRL (Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camps" version E, from Mrs. Alice S Vaughan opf Greenville, MI. Mrs Vaughan got her version of the song from John Tucker, the brother of Anne Tucker Mercer)

1. I'm a heartbroken raftsman, from Greenville I came.
My virtue's departed; and also my fame.
Tis the strong darts of Cupid have caused me much grief;
My heart bursts asunder, I can ne'er find relief.

2. Occupation, I'm a raftsman, where the white waters roll;
My name is engraved on lake, sand and shoal.
From Six Lakes to Greenville I'm very well known;
And they call me Jack Haggerty, the pride of the town

3. I will tell you my troubles without more delay,
How a bright little lassie my heart stole away;
She was the blacksmith's fair daughter on the Flat River side
And I always intended to make her my bride.

4. Her form like the dove it was slender and neat;
Her hair hung in ringlets to her tiny white feet.
Her voice sweet as music, her eyes a dark brown,
I told her I loved her as we strolled through the town.

5, I dressed her in jewels and the finest of lace;
In the costliest of muslins her form I embraced.
I gave her my wages, the same to keep safe,
And begrudged her nothing I had on this earth

6. I took her to suppers, to parties, to balls;
Out riding Sunday morning, my first early call.
I called her a jewel, what a name for a wife!-
When I think of her treachery it near takes my life.

7. I worked on the river; I made quite a stake;
I laid by my wages, I ne'er played the rake
I was the boy that was happy on the swift rolling stream:
My thoughts were of Anna; she haunted my dreams.

8. One day on the river a letter I received,
Saying from her promises herself she'd relieved.
"My marriage to another I've a long time delayed,
And the next time you see me I'll ne'er be a maid."

9. To her mother, Jane Tucker, I lay all the blame;
She has caused her to leave me, to darken my name.
She cast off the rigging that God would soon tie
And left me a wanderer until the day that I die.

10. Farewell to Flat River. For me there's no rest:
I'll shoulder my peavey, and then I'll go West;
I will go to Muskegon some comfort to find,
Farewell to Flat River, and the gay girls behind.

11. Come all you brave raftsmen with hearts stout and true,
Don't depend on a woman; you're beat if you do.
And if ever you see one with brown chestnut curls,
Just think of Jack Haggerty and his Flat River girl.

This is a fairly complete version without many unusual phrases. We do discover that Anna had brown eyes, she went to the suppers and dances, but just regular rides, no boat rides. there is a little extra geography, as he is known from "Six Lakes to Greenville". He has also taken to engraving his name on the lake, even more ephemeral than the sand. I choose not to comment on the "Farewell to Flat River, and the gay girls behind" line.

happy easter

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: GUEST,harpgirl
Date: 15 Apr 01 - 06:56 PM

Interesting variation Rich. I think verses four and six seem to change the song alot.. Jack becomes a dandy rather than a river rat. I like it when he engraves his name on the "high rocks on/f shore". I did it myself all around the North Channel and Georgian Bay when I was a girl...harpgrrrl


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 15 Apr 01 - 08:37 PM

Good point to make, although I think I would argue that verses 4 & 5 of Beck "D", immediately preceding, express pretty much the same sentiments. Maybe dapper Jack lurks in both of those. Georgian Bay in L Huron? Good you're not one of those red-eyed Wiarton girls.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: harpgirl
Date: 15 Apr 01 - 08:40 PM

yup...red eyed Wiarton girls?????


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 15 Apr 01 - 10:15 PM

Drift warning!

Sorry for being obscure, it'a a line from "White Squall" by Stan Rogers

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: harpgirl
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 12:19 AM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 01:53 AM

The tune that Touchstone sing this to (composed by Mick Hanly ?) is the same as Brian McNeill used for "The Back of the North Wind*.

Murray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: Naemanson
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 10:00 AM

This is all very well but there are no chords for any of these versions. I have only heard the Touchstone version but these others all look inviting to me. Which one do we have the chords for? And if it isn't the Touchstone version then I guess the midi file needs to be added also.

This is a little like the old books where the collector faithfully writes down the lyrics of the songs but say little to nothing about the tune. For those of us who don't write music these books are fascinating from an intellectual point of view but little help if we want to sing the songs.

Thanks for the thread, by the way. I don't want to leave anyone with the impression that I don't appreciate what has been said so far. As with most of the human race, I just want more.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Jack Haggerty
From: raredance
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 11:12 PM

The old books are not without their tune lines. Cazden et al. "Folk Songs of the Catskills"; Doerflinger, "Songs of the Sailor and Lumbermen"; Glass & Singer "Songs of Forest and River Folk"; Peters, "Folk Songs Out of Wisconsin"; Fowke, "Lumbering Songs from the Northern Woods"; Gardner & Chickering "Ballads and Songs of Southern Michigan" all contain a melody line. Beck "Lore of the Lumber Camp" has 2 tunes. Beck's tunes are reprinted in Goodin, "Sounds of the Lake and Forest, Michigan Folk Songs". Rickaby "Ballads and Songs of the Shanty-Boy" has 3 tunes (one of which is the same as one of Beck's). A version has been recorded by Paul Calyton on "Timber-r-r! Folksongs and Ballds of the Lumberjack" (1957, Riverside RLP 12-648). clayton, in turn, says his version is based on a Library of Congress recording by John Norman of Michigan.

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 23 October 5:23 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.