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Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns

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All Hail the Power


Robin2 31 Mar 02 - 08:48 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 31 Mar 02 - 09:05 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 31 Mar 02 - 09:12 PM
Robin2 31 Mar 02 - 09:21 PM
masato sakurai 31 Mar 02 - 09:29 PM
Uncle Jaque 31 Mar 02 - 09:35 PM
Robin2 31 Mar 02 - 10:05 PM
masato sakurai 31 Mar 02 - 10:25 PM
Burke 01 Apr 02 - 10:27 PM
Robin2 01 Apr 02 - 10:46 PM
Uncle Jaque 02 Apr 02 - 01:20 AM
Burke 02 Apr 02 - 10:18 AM
Uncle Jaque 02 Apr 02 - 11:06 AM
Burke 02 Apr 02 - 05:04 PM
Robin2 02 Apr 02 - 10:21 PM
Uncle Jaque 02 Apr 02 - 11:37 PM
Burke 03 Apr 02 - 01:53 PM
Robin2 03 Apr 02 - 10:07 PM
Burke 03 Apr 02 - 10:59 PM
Uncle Jaque 04 Apr 02 - 12:13 AM
Snuffy 04 Apr 02 - 08:03 AM
Burke 04 Apr 02 - 10:29 AM
Irish sergeant 04 Apr 02 - 03:34 PM
MMario 04 Apr 02 - 03:37 PM
Uncle Jaque 07 Apr 02 - 11:53 AM
GUEST 03 Feb 12 - 07:04 PM
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Subject: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Robin2
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 08:48 PM

I received an email from a friend and thought you guys could help narrow the search some.She writes...
"screenplay about the "Bell Witch," a well-documented poltergeist haunting that took place on a Tennesse farm between 1817 and 1821, with a brief reprise in 1828......phenomena began as scratching, knocking, thumping noises and developed into physical effects, including attacks on certain members of the Bell family. Along the line, the poltergeist acquired a voice with which it could converse with the scores of people .....It delighted listeners with hymns of the time, sometimes in four-part harmony, but it also reportedly shocked them with quite a repertoire of cruder material....
.....tavern or riverboat songs, stuff soldiers of the Revolutionary War might have sung, popular music of the late 18th or early 19th Centuries that might have reached the frontier and found favor with rural folk, hymns that Baptist or Methodist congregations of the period sang in church -- pre-Civil War southern folk songs. Titles .........flesh out the Witch's character by giving it specific material to sing.

Boy, this is a broad subject, but not my specialty. I know there is an exhaustive supply of broadsides and hymns that can be found, but I'm asking if any mudcatters have any favorites in the DT that they could recommend that would fit the scope of the play, and narrow down the choices a bit. I'll email your choices along to her, with notes of where to find them in the DT.

Thanks!

Robin


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 09:05 PM

A couple of poems here: Bell Poems


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 09:12 PM

Go to Google and type in "Bell Witch" . Lots of stuff


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Robin2
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 09:21 PM

Thanks Dicho, interesting links!

My friend has already done her research, and has written the screenplay. So what she is looking for now is period ballads and hymns that she can include into the play. The one song mentioned by name in the accounts was "Row Me Up Some Brandy-o". She's looking for other songs, vulgar or religious, that could have been sung by the ghost at that time.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: masato sakurai
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 09:29 PM

"The following is a song that the "Witch" supposedly sang (sounds more like a Neil Diamond number to me, though)." (The Bell Witch of Tennessee -- Explanation).

Come my heart and let us try
For a little season
Every burden to lay by
Come and lets us reason.

What is this that casts you down?
Who are those that grieve you?
Speak and let the worst be known,
Speaking may relieve you.
Christ by faith I sometimes see
And he doth relieve me,
But my fears return again,
These are they that grieve me.
Troubled like the restless sea,
Feeble, faint and fearful,
Plagued with every sore disease,
How can I be cheerful?

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 09:35 PM

Ahoy, Robin!

I collect American Music from about 1800 through the Civil War Period, much of it Gospel and Sea - Chantey type material (there's a bit of a stretch, eh?). Rather than repeat the whole littany, I would suggest that you click on my "name" which should lead you to a long list of my previous postings on Mudcat in a number of threads which may well be illuminating to your quest.

Should you have any furthur questions, please feel free to get back to me (or any of the vast number of superior authorities on the subject who regularly haunt the Mudcat) here or drop me an E-mail at:

Also, try the LEVY Online Collection at:

http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/index.html

I have "discovered" some really moving pieces of music and poetry in the pages of these mouldering old books which has apparently been lost to obscurity for generations, and have enjoyed trying to "ressurect" some of them. Some of these scores have been scanned into digital graphics formats and could be made available as an attachment if you are interested.

If I may, I would entreat you to be very careful when dealing with matters of the Occult; there are Spiritual dynamics at work in this Universe which are very real and active; any mortal who lacks an appropriate respect for and knowledge of such matters toys with them at their own - somtimes eternal - peril. As long as your endeavor is purely theatrical, you should be reasonably safe... but all the same, please be very circumspect and cautious!


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Robin2
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 10:05 PM

Masato, thanks for the link! I sent it on to my friend, I think she can use it.

Uncle Jaque, thanks for reminding me about the Levy collection! I go surfing there for Civil War stuff all the time, but I'll check it out for this as well.

Any personal ballad favorites you could mention?

Robin


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: masato sakurai
Date: 31 Mar 02 - 10:25 PM

Check out "Boxes 108-113 (1801-1825)" at Levy: Browse the Collection.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Burke
Date: 01 Apr 02 - 10:27 PM

The words Masato gave you are by Joseph Hart, 1759 used for "The Grieved Soul" in the Sacred Harp. That tune is from 1859, so might not be completely appropriate.

Rural Tennessee in the time period you're dealing with used shape note music. There was even a book called Tennessee Harmony published in 1818. If you can track that down somehow, you'll have all the hymns you want.

Here are some folk hymns form the Southern Harmony that are probably good for the period you want. I've put in the date first published, if known. The melody for Southern Harmony is on middle staff if 3 parts & the tenor if 4.
Jefferson Published in Tennessee Harmony 1818.
Olney Published in Tennessee Harmony 1818.
Mear 1720, an 18th-19th cent. hymn standard
Ninety-Third Psalm 1812
Primrose 1812
Tribulation 1813
Detroit 1820
China 1801.
This is becoming a bigger project than I thought. The way I found these was to check the Chronological Index of the Sacred Harp beginning about 1811 then check the Southern Harmony to see if you can get the music there. I looked at 1810's especially because beginning then the tunes take on a definite folk tune feel. The earlier tunes I included are there because they are ones I know were almost ubiquitous at the time.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Robin2
Date: 01 Apr 02 - 10:46 PM

Burke,

Thanks so much, I had forgotten to check into shape note singing! One of my bandmates has the sacred harp book, I'll start in on it as soon as I can get it from him!

Thanks again everyone!

Robin


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 02 Apr 02 - 01:20 AM

Robin - It seems that I fluffed up my attempt to put my E-dress up on previous posting via HTML, so here it is in dumbkoff format for your copy & pasting at leisure:

UncleJaque@blackpowder.net

One of your previous posts indicates that you have a particular interest in "Civil War" Music; if so this we have in common, as I've always been a CW History and Music "Buff", and currently serve as a Fifer in the Field Music, 3rd regiment Maine volunteer Infantry, a nonprofit educational reenacting Community.

http://www.powerlink.net/mcgill/

My "specialty", if we might call it that, is in bringing the music of the period into our educational "Living History" programs as it communicates the human drama and pathos of the period and the events which defined it far better than the names and dates in traditional History texts ever can. We try to use not only authentic period or replica instruments in these presentations, but study and try to emulate the period vocal and instrumental techniques as well. If this sort of thing interests you and you might like to share some tunes, notes etc. do keep in touch.

I think you have a lot to work with here already so I won't confuse you furthur, but will keep an eye out for interesting stuff from the period you mention. I get the impression that there was a bunch of sacred / liturgical music composed during the late 18th Century, but original composition seems to have fallen off considerably until around the mid 1830s, as publications between those times seem to contain pretty much the same material. In the mid-1840s we see some original material both sacred and secular, with an apparent obsession in topical / lyric content with death and dying, and hopes of the afterlife. It is not until the 1850s I notice more topical diversity with romantic, political (the Hutchinson Family for example), protest and patriotic music leading up to the ACW when more music was written in America than at any other time in our history before or since. Of course a lot of the "Folk" music, including "drinking songs" and Sea Chanteys may have come about somewhat spontaniously somewhere in there, but many were lost or not written down / published for years after their conception, and the origin of many of them remains a mystery. I would speculate that most of the songs heard during said "haunting" were most likely "oldies" from a much earlier period, perhaps even traditional favorites from the "Old Country" which had been around for Centuries even then. Many of the ancient English ballads, or at least recognizable remnants or developments of them, were still being recorded in Appalachia and the Ozarks well into the 20th Century.

I hope that your Friend's production works out well!

Have fun!


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Burke
Date: 02 Apr 02 - 10:18 AM

Robin, the current Sacred Harp gives 1st date of publication right on the page, which will be a big help to avoid later music.

Tell your friend to also get hold of the reprint of the The Missouri Harmony. It was first published in 1820 & most of what's in it was in the earlier Kentucky Harmony. Everything that was added later is in a separate supplement, so anything in the main body of the book should be OK. Lots of the tunes are also in Southern Harmony & Sacred Harp, but it has more 4 part harmonies. There are also some wonderful minor tunes that are not in the Sacred Harp.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 02 Apr 02 - 11:06 AM

Burke; Thanks for the link to The Missouri Harmony; I may have to order it, since there is sort of a "gap" in my collecton around that era. Does it include lyrics or just the scores? Is it in shape-note / part harmony? I'm trying to pull some of my reenacting Pards together into a harmony - singing "Glee Club" which was very popular in mid 1800's society as well as among the Troops of both sides during the "War of Southern Independance" as it is sometimes known.

In some of my 1830-50's songbooks, they will have several sets of alternate lyrics to the same tune, some of them by noted Poets of the day such as STORRS and WATTS, and some of the "forgotten" lyrics to even some of the tunes which endured to our times are quite interesting & evocative.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Burke
Date: 02 Apr 02 - 05:04 PM

Shape note with harmonies. All tunes have at least one verse of words. Many have only one. When you come across these, it's usually because there was an expectation that the singers would have the rest in a standard metrical psaltar or hymn book. If the words were from a less standard source more verses would have been provided. An example from Southern Harmony is the way Mear(link above) has 1 verse but Alabama has 8. Some of the sources at CCEL can turn up added verses. Collection of Hymns, for the Use of the People Called Methodists is especially good for Wesley's Hymns. Watts is there too, but it just does not seem to have a 1st line index.

If you haven't done so, try to get a few word only books from a used book store. They don't usually cost much & usually have at least a 1st line index. This will get you additional words for many of the hymns as well.

I really love the texts of some of those old hymns as well. I can't imagine a modern hymnal having these words, but they sure do fit the way I feel sometimes:

Christ by faith I sometimes see
And he doth relieve me,
But my fears return again,
These are they that grieve me.
Troubled like the restless sea,
Feeble, faint and fearful,
Plagued with every sore disease,
How can I be cheerful?


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Robin2
Date: 02 Apr 02 - 10:21 PM

Uncle Jaque,

Thanks for the link to your civil war page...do you mind if I add it to my civil war link pages on my website? My band and I make it to about 9 reenactments a year here in KY, TN and OH. My email is Rltpb971@cs.com

Burke, thanks for the links on The Missouri Harmony, and your thoughts on finding verses. I think I have plenty to pass along to my friend at this point. As for bawdy music, I tend to agree that much of the early broadsides were probably still be sung at the turn of the 19th century, and would be appropriate for the screenplay.

Robin


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 02 Apr 02 - 11:37 PM

Thanks for the E-Dress, Robin; I'll be droppping you a line and, if you don't mind, add you to my "Music" Mail list. I have a policy not to send stuff to anyone unless they request it or it seems apppropriate on an individual basis, and keep NORTON AV and firewall up and updated at all times. both incoming and outgoing E-mail is scanned.
We'd be honored to have the 3rd Maine's site link on your site, and if you would drop our Webmaster / Chaplain "Charlie" McGillicuddy an E-mail (link on site) I'm sure he would be glad to link your site on ours as well. I didn't catch your URL, by the way - could we have a link here perhaps? I'd like to visit & bookmark it! You may have noticed the extensive listing of international Revwar & ACW Reenacting Fife & Drum Corps / field Musics on our Field Music page. By the way, I'm the chubby old bearded guy with the fife on the right front of the FM photo there.

What sort of a band do you have? Brass or "string"? I noodle around on the Clairon D' Ordnance (Infantry Bugle) and an old euphonium borrowed from the Drum Major, which is kind of hard to play while laughing hystaricly at myself at the same time... I'm planning to go skipping through camp one of these mornings about 0530 wearing regulation red flannel union suit, fuzzy moose slippers and Turkish fez, playing "Revile" on the euphonium with all 3 valves down and try to make it to the woods before anyone gets a musket loaded. Any bets?

I have a passionate dream of someday playing the Bb Saxhorn Over-the-Shoulder Tuba; just LOOOve the sound those things put out! Won't be happening any time soon, methinks.

Burke - Isn't it amazing how we kind of get used to those starched, structured old Hymns, then all of a sudden come accros one like you post just flowing with honest, credible, living angst? It's like someone speaking to us from the heart beyond the grave, and the Centuries, and touching something deep within us. Thats' what I find so facinating about this study; it really puts a heartbeat into History, doesn't it?

I think that with the Baptist theological "revolution" in the late 18th Century, we begin to see an acceptance of genuine critical, intellectual scrutiny of established religious beliefs. Particularly with the "Free-Will" Baptist tradition, it was no longer considered heretical to publicly confess questions, fears, or doubts as the lyrics you share certainly seem to do. Perhaps Unitarian Universalists had something to do with this evolution as well, as I suspect the "Quakers", who were (and still are) a very progressive Faith Tradition, may well have. In such movements, emotional and Spiritual testing were not only accepted, but in some instances actually encouraged under the assumption that the Kingdom of God, if it indeed is the ultimate Truth as it purports to be, is quite able to withstand critical scrutiny, and that a loving Creator who endowed his creation with the ability to inquire, anylize, excersize free will and think would tolerate said creation in the reasonable and honest excersize of those God - given attributes. Pretty radical idea, even in our times in some circles; but there obviously were those with the courage to write, sing, and even publish songs reflective of that "humanized" perspective on the Faith.

Here are the lyrics to what was reputed to be President "Abe" Lincoln's favorite song from the late 1700's, "Greenfields" (I'm pretty sure it's in one of the "Harmony" books you mention); Where the song you share sort of takes us from "comfort" into the tunnel of "doubt", this one seems to escort us through the tunnel and out the other side back into the Light:

John Newton 1779
Melody - Lewis Edson

1.

How tedious and tasteless the hours
When Jesus no longer I see;
Sweet prospects, sweet birds, and sweet flowers,
Have all lost their sweetness to me;
The midsummer sun shines but dim,
The fields strive in vain to look gay;
But when I am happy in him,
December's as pleasant as May.

2.
His name yields the richest perfume,
And sweeter than music his voice;
His presence disperses my gloom,
And makes all within me rejoice;
I should, were he always thus nigh,
Have nothing to wish or to fear;
No mortal so happy as I,
My summer would last all the year

3.
Content with beholding his face,
My all to his pleasure resigned,
No changes of season or place
Would make any change in my mind:
While blest with a sense of his love,
A palace a toy would appear;
And prisons would palaces prove,
If Jesus would dwell with me there.

4.
Dear Lord, if indeed I am thine,
If thou art my sun and my song,
Say, why do I languish and pine?
And why are my winters so long?
O drive these dark clouds from my sky,
Thy soul cheering presence restore;
Or take me to thee up on high,
Where winter and clouds are no more.

************************** The melody to "Greenfields" is really sweet; I have arranged it for tinwhistle and Irish open-holed flute, and I think it would be lovely with a string Quartet featuring a bass viol, which was a popular New England "pre-organ" Church instrument in the late 1700's - early 1800's.. The local Baptist Church here in Yarmouth, Maine (Est. 1798) used one in it's early days which was recently miraculously recovered from a private collection and is now on display at our Historical Society Museum here in town.

Let's keep singing Their old Songs...
...In remembrance of Him...
and in remembrance of Them.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Burke
Date: 03 Apr 02 - 01:53 PM

Uncle Jaque,

I did not dig up that verse I quoted. It's the 2nd for the hymn the 'Bell Witch' sang & that masato posted. I suspect that the original has more verses that bring one back to a more position of comfort.

Greenfields is indeed in the Sacred Harp. With the same tune, but called Contrast, and words it can be found in Methodist hymnals as late as ones published in the 1930's. I think the tune may still be in the Meth. hymnal with different words.

... More when I have time.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Robin2
Date: 03 Apr 02 - 10:07 PM

Burke,

A question for you...many of titles(for instance Primrose, and China) seem to have no bearing on the hymn itself. Any ideas why some of the tunes have these seemingly unrelated titles?

Robin

PS I have passed all of this on to my friend, and she is thrilled to have so much to work with. She's still looking for bawdy songs from the period, so if you have any suggestions of the more lighter entertainment of the day, please let me know!


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Burke
Date: 03 Apr 02 - 10:59 PM

In English hymnody tunes are given names independently of the words. This is because they were usually written separately & mixing and matching words and tunes of the same meter was expected.

Sometimes a set of words becomes tied so completly to one tune that alterations just don't seem right, but there's always a possibility of new words to an old tune or a new tune for old words.

There are dozens of tunes used with While Shepherd's Watched Thier Flocks by Night. People could not just say let's sing it, they'd have to specify which tune.

Just look at the first page of the 1st line index of the Sacred Harp and see how many times "All hail the power of Jesus Name" or "Am I a Soldier of the Cross are used."

Tune names themselves are a combination of names meaningful to the composer or just picked up along the was. Coronation really was written to go with "All Hail the Power..." with the last line "Crown him lord of all" so the name makes sense. Many are geographical references, perhaps written for a special event or singing school held there. Nehemiah Shumway lived in eastern New York & wrote tunes with the names Schenectady & Ballstown (both near Albany). Some of the tunes in Sacred Harp are named for friends of the composer. Timothy Swan, who wrote China, also wrote one called Poland so I guess he liked using country names.

If you dig around in books enough, you can find the same tune with different names or the same name for different tunes. Sacred Harp has 2 Jordans & 3 Parting Friends. Greefields mentioned by UJ is also call Contrast. Sacred Harp has a tune called Sacred Throne, which fits the words in the book, but most hymnals call it Avon or Martyrdom and use it with "Alas an did my Saviour bleed."

The Shape Note books really were written as tune books with a set of words given, but only as a suggestion as to what words worked. Because they were produced to convey the music the title of the tune is given pride of place. You will find the tune names in more ordinary hymnals, it's just that they are placing the emphasis on the words so the first line usually becomes the title. There were many books published with just words.

This system began to break down during the 19th cent. as more & more hymnals were published with music & all the verses meant to be sung. With the development of gospel songs in the late 19th cent. the word & tune writing became much more tightly linked so it's hard to imagine mixing & matching the way it was done earlier.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 04 Apr 02 - 12:13 AM

Robin; I would think that the Digitrad Database would have some of those "bawdy" songs your Amigo is looking for. A couple of Sea-Chanteys of that genre' come to mind, and I think you will find them there or on previous postings via search;

Cruisin' 'Round Yarmouth

The Afterguard and the Topperman

Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth

One-Eyed-Reily (it's another typically paired anotomical feature what's missing in most versions I hear)

Since these are the type that were originally communicated by oral tradition from Shantyman to Shantyman etc. long before they were written or printed, I don't think anyone really knows their exact time of origin for sure.

Now Burke; here's a question for ye, and as clever as ye obviously are, now, I'll bet ye know it sure;

What is the significance of the notation typical to these early Hymns such as "7's and 8's" "L.M." (Which I think stands for "Long Measure"),"C.M." "S.M."(Common & Short Measure?), 11s, "7s., 4 or 8 lines" ("Prussia"), "7s.Double" etc.?
A Pastor friend once tried to explain this to me years ago, but I was unable to comprehend or remember much of it. I'm beginning to feel like a bit of an Idiot for not knowing this sort of thing, y'see.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Snuffy
Date: 04 Apr 02 - 08:03 AM

The 7s and 8s refer to the number of syllables in each line of the hymn. CM, LM & SM are just shorthand ways of saying some of the more common ones. D means double (i.e repeat everything).

So 8.7.8.7D would be an eight line verse with alternate lines of 8 and 7 syllables. "While Shepherds Watched" would be 8.6.8.6 (which is probably CM or SM).

Note that the tunes may contain more (or occasionally fewer) notes than there are syllables in the poem - Alleluia is only four syllables, but can be many more notes than that.

WassaiL! V


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Burke
Date: 04 Apr 02 - 10:29 AM

Snuffy's explanation is correct. This is your clue for what tunes to try with what words. Many hymnals have a meter index, probably a vestige of when more text/tune switching was done.

CM=Common Meter=8,6,8,6 (Amazing Grace, While Shepherds, Gilligan's Island, Dundee-a tune used multiple times in most hymnals)
LM=Long Meter=8,8,8,8 (Praise God From Whom all blessings flow,I know that my Redeemer lives, Old Hundred)
SM=Short Meter=6,6,8,8(I love thy kingdom, Lord; St. Thomas) PM=Particular (or Peculiar) Meter. A rare meter or one open to different interpretations.

The expectation is a 4 line hymn, so 7's & 8's is short for 7,8,7,8. 11's is 4 lines of 11 each. 7's double is 8 lines of 7.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 04 Apr 02 - 03:34 PM

Robin; While not a bawdy song or a hymn, "The hunters of Kentucky" Was very popular in the period of the Bell Witch occurences and should be in the digitrad. Keep in mind this was the period just after the War of 1812 and Andy Jackson was almost a demigod in Tennessee to some anyhow. I would think the Witch would avoid hymns and as I recall, was quite fond of popular songs such as "The Hunters of Kentucky and the afore mentioned "One Eyed Reilly. Uncle Jaque I would also be interested in your link. Would you PM it to me? And by the way, will yopu be at Antietam this year? Neil


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: MMario
Date: 04 Apr 02 - 03:37 PM

Hunters of Kentucky


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 11:53 AM

Burke & Snuffy:
Much obliged, Pards; that is a big help! We have several sets of lyrics which I can't seem to match up with a suitable melody, and vis. versa. Now I can do what they apparently did; "mix & match"!

One such jem is an old tune which I think I pirated off of "Southern Harmony"; "Delight" - a really catchy tune (especially for that time, when a lot of music was sort of nondescript and monotonous). As long as both the lyrics and Melody are "period", I suppose switching some around would be in keeping with the tradition of the time, eh?

Burke; if by "Link" you mean the 3rd Maine Website, it is:

http://www.powerlink.net/mcgill/

Although a goodly part of the 3rd Maine (including some of our Florida Pards from Co. "F") will be attending, I am not planning to. I'm getting a little too lame & decrepid for that game, and don't do the big out-of-State events anymore, although I am hoping to make at least one "last hurrah" for Gettysburg 2003, even if it kills me (as it well might).

The Third will be encamped with the USV as a Regular Line Company this year, and I hope that you will get over and visit them. They are a top-rate bunch, and you are sure to enjoy their company as much as I do. We even have a few folks of the Irish persuasion, and the old Harp insignia can be found on several forage caps along the line.
If by any chance you are berift of a home Unit to fall in with at Antietam and you know your Hardee's pretty cold, there well may be a spot in the 3rd Maine's line for ye, lad! You will be hard pressed to find a sharper of better-drilled outfit on the Field, methinks, and one which you will be proud to take the field with if you can demonstrate to the First Sgt. that you are up to it - which I rather sense that you well may be.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: early 19th century ballads and hymns
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Feb 12 - 07:04 PM

Though all of this, and enjoying it all, does anybody actually know WHERE the lines "Row me up some brandy O" occur?

I've looked through my admittedly limited library (Oscar Brand, Sing Out, etc. and am drawing a blank.

Don't suggest sites, if you know where the lines are, name the song!

Thanks

A great, great, great, grandson of THAT John Bell!

BOO!


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