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BS: American English Bl**p*rs

GUEST 11 Apr 02 - 01:16 AM
jimlad 10 Apr 02 - 05:02 AM
jimlad 10 Apr 02 - 03:23 AM
Grab 09 Apr 02 - 01:31 PM
BanjoRay 09 Apr 02 - 09:50 AM
HuwG 09 Apr 02 - 09:26 AM
Yorkshire Tony 09 Apr 02 - 01:43 AM
E.T. 08 Apr 02 - 09:51 PM
GUEST,celticblues5 08 Apr 02 - 09:17 PM
Jon Freeman 08 Apr 02 - 09:14 PM
Hrothgar 08 Apr 02 - 07:36 PM
Mr Happy 08 Apr 02 - 12:02 PM
Gary T 08 Apr 02 - 10:07 AM
Midchuck 08 Apr 02 - 09:47 AM
Melani 07 Apr 02 - 05:20 PM
Penny S. 07 Apr 02 - 05:14 PM
GUEST 07 Apr 02 - 04:29 PM
jimlad 07 Apr 02 - 01:07 PM
Wotcha 07 Apr 02 - 12:01 PM
Kerstin 07 Apr 02 - 10:17 AM
Sorcha 07 Apr 02 - 10:06 AM
Cappuccino 07 Apr 02 - 04:39 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 06 Apr 02 - 07:46 PM
Jon Freeman 06 Apr 02 - 07:11 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 06 Apr 02 - 06:44 PM
The Walrus 06 Apr 02 - 06:18 PM
Roughyed 06 Apr 02 - 04:28 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 06 Apr 02 - 02:00 PM
Jon Freeman 06 Apr 02 - 12:56 PM
Liz the Squeak 06 Apr 02 - 08:29 AM
Jim Dixon 06 Apr 02 - 08:22 AM
Liz the Squeak 06 Apr 02 - 03:34 AM
Bert 06 Apr 02 - 02:36 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 05 Apr 02 - 11:10 PM
Mark Cohen 05 Apr 02 - 09:47 PM
lady penelope 05 Apr 02 - 09:32 PM
Robin2 05 Apr 02 - 09:28 PM
GUEST,Just Amy 05 Apr 02 - 08:25 PM
GUEST,Just Amy 05 Apr 02 - 08:23 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 05 Apr 02 - 08:20 PM
John Gray 05 Apr 02 - 08:09 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 05 Apr 02 - 07:54 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Apr 02 - 07:05 PM
GUEST,Dagenham Doc. 05 Apr 02 - 06:42 PM
Celtic Soul 05 Apr 02 - 06:37 PM
Jon Freeman 05 Apr 02 - 06:29 PM
Mark Cohen 05 Apr 02 - 05:59 PM
Burke 05 Apr 02 - 05:43 PM
jimlad 05 Apr 02 - 05:42 PM
Mrs.Duck 05 Apr 02 - 03:59 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Apr 02 - 01:16 AM

I believe a lot of these are just missed-spellings like in the spelling thread.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: jimlad
Date: 10 Apr 02 - 05:02 AM

Brian Johnstone collapsed in laughter when his fellow commentator,describing Ian Bothams missing an attempted hook shot to Square Leg which involved jumping over the top of the wicket thus "Botham only just managed to get his leg over then"

After the Oxford/Cambridge Boat Race(does anyone really care?). The Television commentator reported that "Lady Jane presented the Trophy and then kissed the cox of the winning team.

Jack Nicklaus's wife when asked whether Jack had any pre-match superstitions said "Jack always gets me to kiss his balls before teeing off".


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: jimlad
Date: 10 Apr 02 - 03:23 AM

Another cricketing tale,Brian Johnstone was heard to say "willis is trying to persuade Richards to have a slash outside his leg stump".


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Grab
Date: 09 Apr 02 - 01:31 PM

Even the alphabet is a problem. Brits pronounce the letter Z "zed", not "zee". Occasional blank looks from Americans when we forget that one.

There is a further generational thing though. My aunt once asked my cousin to "hump those pillows upstairs", which caused the collapse in hysterics of all family members under the age of 25! :-)

Graham.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: BanjoRay
Date: 09 Apr 02 - 09:50 AM

The best (worst?) fag one I heard was at Galax Old Fiddler's convention in 2000. I was in the crowd watching the string band competition with my mate Vic, when he turned to me and said "I could murder a fag". A large red necked guy in front of us turned around with a big grin and said, in what sounded to us like a texas accent, "me too, buddy, me too!". I think he meant it!

Cheers
Ray


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: HuwG
Date: 09 Apr 02 - 09:26 AM

A couple of years ago, I was roadying for a girl who was (then) a pub and club singer. She did a "Showcase" gig at the Bowling club in Chapel-en-le-Frith. "Showcase" gigs are attended by booking agents etc. and feature five or six acts who do a couple of numbers and then clear off stage to make way for the next act.

The first act was a five-piece band, who had a lot of equipment. As they finished, and began frantically stuffing leads and stands into various bags and cases, the Club's MC went to the house mike and said, "Give these lads a big hand, while they get their kit off!"

Some of the following acts asked whether a "Full Monty" was a compulsory part of the set.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Yorkshire Tony
Date: 09 Apr 02 - 01:43 AM

One of my favourites is told by an Australian friend who announced on a visit to Canada that he felt like sucking on a few cold tinnies. To an Australian a tinnie is a beer. I understand that it is an ice hockey player's groin protector in Cananda!


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: E.T.
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 09:51 PM

told by a paper manufacturer they carried four hundred and seventy two shades of "white" paper.

No wonder they have to "reach" for names.

One of the reasons for lack of plums in US is that the ones they ship are generally hard as rocks and about as tasty. Unless you have a friend with a tree, they're worthless. I've only found the purple skinned ones and an occasional red. I've been looking around nurseries a bit ever since a friend cut down hers due to black knot. (virus/fungus which attacks plums). Made good jam, pardon the expression, plum good jam!

Best blooper I had was spanish - my teacher in high school was telling this one - beware of words "sounding like English" - she couldn't understand fast enough and was saying "estoy muy embarassado" meaning unfortunately, that she was not embarassed but expecting.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: GUEST,celticblues5
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 09:17 PM

One more "fag" reference I have seen cause interesting looks from American audiences -

From the song, "Do you love an apple?" the line, "He stood on the corner, a fag in his mouth..."
quite a mental vision...;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 09:14 PM

Brian Johnston I think... Was it really that way round? I'd (probably wrongly) got it in my mind that Michael Holding was the bowler. I've looked on google and found it quoted both ways...

The other Willey one was (and again I can't be sure of the order except to say Dennis Lille must have been on the one caught) was Lilley caught Willey bowled Dilley.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Hrothgar
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 07:36 PM

And the cricket commentator said "the batsman's Holding, the bowler's Willey."


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Mr Happy
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 12:02 PM

We were staying with friends in Dusseldorf, Germany and it was their little daughters birthday.

My wife asked the girls mother what we should get as a gift, only to be regarded with an expression of horror.

It was then divulged that in German, 'gift' means poison.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Gary T
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 10:07 AM

At a Home and Garden Show, I heard an English presenter tell about the first time she told an American audience that she had a couple of nice boobs. That's when she learned that her word for minor injury (called a boo-boo here for young children) meant breast to us.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Midchuck
Date: 08 Apr 02 - 09:47 AM

This is a cross-post from the "Naming of Cats" thread.

We got two kittens last year, brothers, and named them Willie and Waylon (glad I did, now - Waylon lives on). The other day I wanted to get them in, and was on the back porch, yelling "Where's my Willie?"

My wife pointed out that it was a good thing we weren't in the UK.

Peter.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Melani
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 05:20 PM

My aunt had a school friend who married a Frenchman and went to live in France. When they came for a visit, the guy was the stereotypical suave, sophisticated Frenchman, charming everyone else at the dinner party with his urbane wit. After coffee, he excused himself, saying he had to go "tinkle" (American kiddie euphemism for "urinate"). The diners sat in surpried silence, except for my uninhibited aunt, who cracked up. "What's the matter?" he asked. "Isn't that the "in" thing to say?" "Oh yes," says my aunt. "It's very big with the two-year-olds." "Lisa!" he says, with an accusing glare at his wife, who was snickering quietly. He had unknowingly picked the term up somewhere, and she had never corrected him, thinking it was cute.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Penny S.
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 05:14 PM

A child's trick with a marrow - go out when it is zucchini sized with a knife, and cut your name on it. When it is big enough to eat, your name will be big, too. So you can't refuse it when it is served up on your plate, can you?

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 04:29 PM

When Malcom Rifkind was Secretary of State for Scotland he went to Japan the most senior Civil Servant (The Permanent Secretary at the Scottish Office) went with him.

They went introduced at functions as "Mr Rifkind and his full time typist" as the Japanese could not readily translate Permanent Secretary.

Davebhoy


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: jimlad
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 01:07 PM

An American foot ball Star was asked which he preferred grass or Astroturf He replied that he had never smoked Asroturf.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Wotcha
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 12:01 PM

I remember going to college in Oklahoma ... and mentioning that my mother (a fine and proper English lady) used to make the Sunday joint for the family ... I don't recall that we ever smoked the beef.

You know you are having marrow, since it is steamed and best served covered in white sauce ... yummy. Zuccinni is best fried or used in Italian dishes.
Cheers,
Brian


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Kerstin
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 10:17 AM

I am from Sweden. Mayby that is an excuse as good as any. Writing to friends in Scotland some errors were made by me. Worm-soup instead of warm soup Yellow pies with pork = peas I shall fries the soup = freeze beer with the soap= soup I know how happy they are reading my letter. And if they are happy, I am. But, when I am back in Scotland the 20th of April I must try to find something to tease back


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Sorcha
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 10:06 AM

Thread creep alert!
"Blue" Doberman Pinschers are called Isabella, at least in the US. Personal opinion is that they are uglier than sin.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Cappuccino
Date: 07 Apr 02 - 04:39 AM

Just to hoik this thread back to the subject, with a true story. As Mrs Duck carefully pointed out, the American 'fanny' is different from the British use of the word, although very close on the female anatomy.

When I was working for a daily paper some years back, a beautiful American movie star was in Britain doing a photo-shoot. Many of our British photographers were calling out requests for her to look this way, that way, would she pose this way or that way, etc.

Being helpful, her American manager called out: 'sure, guys, just pat her on the fanny and she'll do anything for ya!'

A very rare momnent of stunned silence from the British press.

- Ian B


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 07:46 PM

Small zucchinis here usually sliced and quick-fried or eaten raw in salads.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 07:11 PM

Dicho, I agree we have drifted but... I've just looked at a couple of gardening books. They both say that the courgette is simply a small marrow (although they do say that there are breeds with more fruit that are specailly grown for picking small). So I guess zucchini = courgette or marrow to me depending on the size - seems to tally with your 2lb samples which I feel sure would be called marrows over here. As for the cooking, I find marrow a bit bland but they can be nice stuffed and baked. Pip uses vegetarian mixes for the stuffing as she does with aubergine/eggplant and peppers.

Swan, I've not seen any greengages in a while. Pip used to make a nice jam with them.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 06:44 PM

The color is "isabelline," a gray color. Isabelline is used for gray in Colombia and probably most Spanish-speaking countries. (No particular shade). Carmelite, for the Carmelites, is used for brown in Colombia and some other Latin countries.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: The Walrus
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 06:18 PM

Liz,

There is one colour that can only be imagined "Isabella". Apparantly one of the Spanish queens (or princesses, I can't remember which) took a vow not to change or wash her shift until a some town or other, lost in battle was recovered. It took something like three years, the colour refers to the colour of the linen on removal.
I don't think I'll paint my living room Isabella.

Walrus (Sorry for the lack of detail, but my memory has gone on strike)


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Roughyed
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 04:28 PM

Greengages are usually sweeter than ordinary plums. They are delicious and well worth trying if you see them. They seem quite rare. I once was out in the German countryside with a German and remarked about the view "There's a lot of mist about" My friend replied "Yes, it must be the farm." Mist means manure in German apparently.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 02:00 PM

Jon, too cold here yet for there to be much interest in gardens. Indoor starting is underway. Your photo of marrow looks like zucchini, but colors of varieties vary greatly! Seed catalogues offer zucchini with skins varying from pure gold to striped to dark green in color. We used "Goldrush" (golden yellow). Depending on growing conditions, we let some get to about 2 pounds. A favorite way of using them is to halve them, remove seeds, take out some of the pulp and stuff the halves with ground meat, chopped onion, the scooped-out pulp, seasoning, and bake. Ginger and garlic are often added to the seasoning. Very tasty! An English friend here grew marrows (Thompson and Morgan seed, of course) but it seems to me that the skin had more white. I believe the hybridists have them all mixed anyway. There are standards for naming colors (Munsell, etc.) but these systems appear only in academic works.
Names of some colors can be quite old (artists' paints) and are known only to those who paint or have an interest in art. Bismarck brown, Chinese white, etc. The names we see in paint stores are invented by the publicists and last only a few years, causing headaches to those who want to match colors they have used in the past.
Plant names are a real mine field unless the scientific name is used. Popular names vary from area to area, let alone from country to country.
There be thread creep here.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 12:56 PM

Thanks Dicho and Jim. I have scanned a picture of what I would consider to be typcial looking marrows and put it here. I have also scanned the bit on the squash on offer in the seed catalogue I mentioned and put it here.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 08:29 AM

The green plum is a greengage. Sharper and smaller than an ordinary plum.

Having just decorated part of our bedroom in a colour called Lulu, I'm wondering if there is someone out there called Lulu who is that shade of magenta?

And who the hell decided that colour would be called 'magnolia'. There are several magnolia trees near me, and not one of them is anywhere near as insipid a colour as the paint 'magnolia'.

I'd like to know who came up with 'Belgian White' too.... I thought that was a rabbit, but no, it's a paint shade. Looks like ecru to me.

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 08:22 AM

I assume it's called an eggplant because it's shaped like an egg. Aubergine wouldn't be recognized in the US as the name of a color either. We'd probably call it "plum" -- but the people who invent colors and the names for them have a vocabulary all their own. Ever looked through a bundle of color samples from a paint store? It's fascinating just to see what names they've come up with.

Which reminds me-- there's a type of green plum which I've seen in Britain but never in the US-- its name escapes me right now.

Re zucchini/courgette: It appears that Americans have adopted the Italian word while the British have adopted the French one.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 03:34 AM

"Lastly, when the Australian Grand Prix took place some years ago a team was sponsored by Durex,which turned out to be what Aussies call Scotch Tape or Sellotape.The Durex logo was blanked out and replaced by LRI (London Rubber Industries)".

I seem to remember a picture of this car, in the pits, with a burst tyre!!! Great advertising!!!!

Why is it called an eggplant? It looks nothing like an egg. At least it's aubergine in colour, although, like orange, which came first, the colour or the fruit?

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Bert
Date: 06 Apr 02 - 02:36 AM

I remember when I first came to The States a very attracive young lady leaned back in her chair after a large meal and announced "I'm Stuffed". Fortunately the context allowed me to not misunderstand.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 11:10 PM

I remember that faggots were small sticks of wood to be burnt in a stove in the western States. That was a long time ago and I doubt that young people would know that meaning.
Both zucchini and courgette appeared in the OED for the first time in 1987, but they date to about 1930 in English. Zucchini is used in Australia as well as in the USA and Canada.
Sidewalk as a paved walk at the side of a street came into usage in the early 18th C. in England, spread to America, and became obsolete in England where pavement "rules" (an English usage that has spread to America).


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 09:47 PM

So that would mean that "faggot" as a derogatory term for a homosexual man might be a back-derivation from "fag", rather than the latter being a shortened form of the former. Interesting--can anyone confirm this? Of course, (keeping this musical) the Italian fagoto (I may have the ending of the word wrong), meaning a bundle of sticks, is also used to mean "bassoon". This caused the bassoon players in our school orchestra no end of grief! And, to complicate matters, that word is derived from the Latin fasces, whence comes the anatomic term "fascia" and the political term "fascist"--named for the party which took its name from the Roman symbol of authority, a bundle of sticks bound up with an axe. Now aren't you glad that's all straight? (Pun intended)

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: lady penelope
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 09:32 PM

Coo I must live in very cosmopolitan place ( Walthamstow in London ). We get squash ( like a small deformed pumpkin,ie same colour different shape ) zuccini are indeed courgettes, which are , indeed, very small marrows. We also get loads of stuff I don't even know the names of and haven't a clue how to cook apart from sweet potato and yams.

Americanisms.......I must insist it's a 'pavement' and moving stairs are 'escalators', other than that, I must watch too much american T.V. But I must also admit to being an evil Londoner by making Americans try to pronounce various place names before I'll tell them where they are! Oh come on,tell me it's not funny to make them say Ly-ses-toor ( Leicester - pronounced "lester") over and over again?

TTFN M'Lady P.

"Fag" originally meant servant in a very derogatory way. Because of its use in public schools ( in England ) it became an alternative word for homosexuals.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Robin2
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 09:28 PM

Not English, but with the Danes we had this happen

We were playing in Denmark, and my guitar playing husband commented, "Heck, there's my pick on the floor." Upon which one Danish gentleman told my husband to quit bragging. Seems "pick" is the Danish slang for a man's equipment.

Now I know why the Dane's that visited took all my pencils with "picking and grinning" etched on them.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: GUEST,Just Amy
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 08:25 PM

P.S. Isn't squash a game with a racket?


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: GUEST,Just Amy
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 08:23 PM

I learned to spell from my British Grandmother and therefore spelled colour and favourite incorrectly on all my spelling tests in grade (grammar) school.

British Aubergine is Eggplant in the US.

British Bumbag is a funny pack in the US.

The British exit signs do not say exit. They say "Way Out," which an old hippie like me thought was the most hilarious thing in all of England.

A bit Peckish in UK means a bit hungry in the US.

When there was a merger, they renamed all the Sav-On Pharmacies in California OSCO until they found out that it sounds like the word for bad medicine in Spanish.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 08:20 PM

A hooker is also a boat- or a drink of liquor.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: John Gray
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 08:09 PM

In Oz, and in the UK, a Hooker is a position in a rugby team.

JG/FME


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 07:54 PM

The problem with squash is that it is rejected by so many people that they have no idea of the kinds available. Marrows of two kinds are certainly grown in the States.
Squashes, pumpkins and gourds are all members of the Cucurbita and thus closely related. All of them came from the Americas. Now there are so many selected varieties and hybrids that boundaries are blurred. Summer squash include the yellow (generally necked) and the "green" which include vegetable marrows, pattypan and zucchini. Winter squash are generally rougher-skinned and include acorn, Hubbard, and a host of others including marrow (not vegetable marrow) just to cause confusion. Spaghetti squash often shows up here (inside stringy); I don't know to which group it belongs. In the fall, a lot of winter squash come into the stores with hybrid, patented names, again, causing confusion to the uninitiated. In addition to eating winter squash as Jim Dixon does, the cooked pulp can make wonderful pies, used like pumpkin or sweet potato.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 07:05 PM

Since I've never actually seen a squash OR a marrow in Britain, I'm not quite convinced they're the same thing. I figure we need some pictures to straighten things out once and for all.

I found this cool web site: The Cook's Thesaurus.

(Squash is divided into 2 groups: Summer Squash and Winter Squash.)

But despite all the pictures, I'm still confused about what a marrow is. On the Summer Squash page, that green object above the words "vegetable marrow" and left of the word "tinda"—what is it? A vegetable marrow or a tinda?

I ask my British friends: do you see a picture here that looks like a marrow?

The type I'm most familiar with is the acorn squash (near the top of the winter squash page). We cut them in halves or quarters, scoop out and discard the seeds and the stringy stuff they're attached to, sprinkle a little brown sugar on them, and bake them. When you eat them, you scoop the fleshy part out with a fork or spoon. You don't eat the green rind.

Technically squash are fruits since they contain seeds. But most people think of them as vegetables because they're not very sweet. (The brown sugar makes them more palatable.) I notice The Cook's Thesaurus calls them "fruit vegetables" along with cucumbers, tomatoes, etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: GUEST,Dagenham Doc.
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 06:42 PM

Over there it's a dick. But don't confuse knickers with knockers. Although they both tend to lose their elasticity in time.

Doc.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Celtic Soul
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 06:37 PM

The Walrus penned: "Why? What do 'merkins call potatoes baked in their skins then?"

And I add: :::BWA-HAHAHAHAHAAAAAAAA!!!!::: That's rather a good one right there. A "merkin" is a pubic wig. No, I am not making that one up, either.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 06:29 PM

I'm puzzled over the marrow/ squash bit that Lynn has re-rasised. What would people in the US call something that looks like zucchini/ courgettes but is a lot bigger say 18" and even bigger in length? Over here, that is a marrow.

I'm not sure how marrows, squashes, etc. are related but over here, to the best of my knowledge, in common terms, we know marrows, courgettes and pumpkins for something to get called a squash, it would normally have to be something other than these vegatables.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 05:59 PM

Creeping along, another Spanish/English mishap with significant economic consequences: Back in the 60s, when Chevrolet came out with the Nova, they couldn't understand why sales were so low in Puerto Rico, where they generally had a fairly large share of the market. Until someone realized that "No va" = "It doesn't go"! Creeping back, I imagine the following would make no sense to a Brit: "Better to be pissed off than pissed on!"

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Burke
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 05:43 PM

Then a bumbag would be a fanny pack or a waist pack.

I understand a lot a Spanish speakers got a big kick out of a local Italian/American politician named La Pola.


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: jimlad
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 05:42 PM

I have caused consternation in the past with the problem of "two nations divided by a common language" as Winston Churchill said.

I once told my US friend Joannie,"I will knock you up in the morning",meaning I would give her an early morning call.

I told my 6 year old daughter to stop "rooting about in a drawer". She was rummaging in it,but Joannie gave me a strange look.

My Canadian mate David collapsed laughing when I said I had been "working like a Trojan for the past week". It means working hard to us.

Lastly, when the Australian Grand Prix took place some years ago a team was sponsored by Durex,which turned out to be what Aussies call Scotch Tape or Sellotape.The Durex logo was blanked out and replaced by LRI (London Rubber Industries).


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Subject: RE: BS: American English Bl**p*rs
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 05 Apr 02 - 03:59 PM

Lol Dicho, no a bumbag is one of those bag on a belt type things which I think you Americans call a fanny bag. However that word refers to a different although not far removed part of the anatomy overhere hence my comment.


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