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To the Pines, To the Pines

DigiTrad:
IN THE PINES
IN THE PINES (BLACK GIRL)


Related threads:
Lyr Req: The Longest Train (9)
Origin: In the Pines (14)
Lyr Req: In the Pines (18)
Chord Req: In The Pines: Joan Baez version (6)
Lyr Add: In the Pines (Joan Baez/Leadbelly?) (23)
(origins) 'In the Pines' revisited (29)
Lyr Req: In the Pines (from Jimmie Davis) (11)


GUEST,Thonolan 28 Apr 02 - 06:26 AM
Eric the Viking 28 Apr 02 - 06:38 AM
Chris/Darwin 28 Apr 02 - 07:03 AM
Lanfranc 28 Apr 02 - 07:20 AM
GUEST,Thonolan 28 Apr 02 - 07:28 AM
Bonnie Shaljean 28 Apr 02 - 07:46 AM
masato sakurai 28 Apr 02 - 08:15 AM
masato sakurai 28 Apr 02 - 08:37 AM
Rolfyboy6 28 Apr 02 - 10:06 AM
Don Firth 28 Apr 02 - 12:23 PM
raredance 28 Apr 02 - 12:30 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 28 Apr 02 - 12:36 PM
Herga Kitty 28 Apr 02 - 02:00 PM
Watson 28 Apr 02 - 02:24 PM
Le Scaramouche 25 Sep 05 - 04:36 AM
GUEST 25 Sep 05 - 05:01 AM
John MacKenzie 25 Sep 05 - 05:50 AM
Flash Company 25 Sep 05 - 07:42 AM
GUEST,Georgina Boyes 25 Sep 05 - 08:03 AM
GUEST,Georgina Boyes 25 Sep 05 - 08:07 AM
Janie 25 Sep 05 - 07:32 PM
Peace 25 Sep 05 - 08:32 PM
Mr Happy 17 May 22 - 12:22 PM
GUEST,Roger 17 May 22 - 05:22 PM
leeneia 18 May 22 - 12:26 PM
The Sandman 18 May 22 - 01:50 PM
meself 18 May 22 - 02:03 PM
The Sandman 18 May 22 - 05:11 PM
meself 18 May 22 - 08:27 PM
PHJim 20 May 22 - 02:23 AM
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Subject: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: GUEST,Thonolan
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 06:26 AM

I know that Bascom Lamar Lunsford recorded this song in 1949. Also, both the Blue Sky Boys and Doc Watson have recorded this song under other names. Could anyone list some of the other performers who have recorded this song.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 06:38 AM

Is that "Black girl, black girl, tell me no lies, where did you sleep last night?" etc- Leadbelly did it didn't he?


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Chris/Darwin
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 07:03 AM

It is called "Where did you sleep last night?" on the Leadbelly LP I have, and he died in 1949. He says "my girl", not "black girl", although I first learned the song as "black girl". Goodness knows where!

Regards
Chris


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Lanfranc
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 07:20 AM

Joan Baez (and, if I remember aright, Burl Ives) recorded it as "Black Girl". More to the point is that the lyric is "In" rather than "To" the pines in order to make sense.

I thought at first that this could be a reference to a variant of the old chestnut:

"To the woods, to the woods!"
"No, anywhere but the woods"
"ANYWHERE but the woods?"
"To the woods, to the woods!"

but perhaps not

Alan


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: GUEST,Thonolan
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 07:28 AM

In the Blue Sky Boys version (entitled "Longest Train I Ever Saw"), it's sung as "through the Pines, through the Pines".

Quite a few variations, I'm sure.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 07:46 AM

Would you believe Pernell Roberts (late of Bonanza)? I'm SURE I heard him sing this on an old LP, decades ago, as "In The Pines" (second line "where the sun never shines - is that the one?) and it was not bad either. (I also saw him play King Arthur in a summer-stock production of Camelot!!)


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: masato sakurai
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 08:15 AM

Norm Cohen, Long Steel Trail: The Railroad in American Folksong (University of Illinois Press, 1981, pp. 491-502, under "The Longest Trail/In the Pines") gives quite a comprehensive discography, with title variants. Other indexes on the web include Folk Music Index ("in the pines" etc.), and The Traditional Ballad Index (only a handful). CD search such as glacenote may be helpful (Click here for the results).

~Masato


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: masato sakurai
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 08:37 AM

Sorry, the correct title is "Long Steel Rail."


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Rolfyboy6
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 10:06 AM

This is a Bill Monroe classic too. "In the Pines".


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Don Firth
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 12:23 PM

I've heard a recording of Leadbelly doing the song, and maybe he recorded it more than once, but when I heard it, it was definitely "black girl," not "my girl."

Then there's:--

To the woods!
No no!
To the woods!
No no!
To the woods!
I'll tell the vicar
I am the vicar
To the woods!

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: raredance
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 12:30 PM

Farther north a more appropriate version would be

In the spruce, in the spruce
Where the mooses run loose.

rich r


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 12:36 PM

Thread 39889 contains several more references to recorded versions and more variants: See In The Pines


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 02:00 PM

Wow, this brings back some memories (but not enough..) I think I remember a version that went, "Her husband was a railroad man, died at the driving wheel, they found his body all crushed and torn, under the twisted steel"


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Watson
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 02:24 PM

Yet another version - Jim Boyes dedicated his rewrite to Kurt Cobain. It was on the Coope Boyes and Simpson CD "What We Sing.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Le Scaramouche
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 04:36 AM

That is interesting.
Cobain's version is magnificent, very intense of course.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 05:01 AM

Dock Walsh did a great version (possibly from the 20's) and I've been told that Riley Puckett's version is great. It would be interesting to get a comprehensive list. I'll bet every version is a bit different. I've always wondered if this isn't originally two separate songs that were combined ages ago - one about the grisly train accident and the other about the girl on the run from a lover or a slave-master or whatever.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 05:50 AM

First person I heard singing this was the great Johnny Silvo.

Then there's

To the woods!
No No
To the woods!
No No
My Mother wouldn't like it
Your Mother's not getting it
To the woods!

Giok


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Flash Company
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 07:42 AM

Home again from Cornwall and nothing changes!
Seem to remember Big Bill Broonzy singing this one, as I recall he sang 'Black Girl'.

FC


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: GUEST,Georgina Boyes
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 08:03 AM

If anyone's having problems connecting with the link to the text for Jim Boyes' "Broken-hearted Among the Pines" that Watson provides, you could try -

thread.cfm?threadid=47038&messages=18


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: GUEST,Georgina Boyes
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 08:07 AM

Oops, should have been -

http://www.coopeboyesandsimpson.co.uk/b.htm

Sorry - Georgina


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Janie
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 07:32 PM

John and Dave Morris, from Ivydale, West Virginia also recorded it as "In the Pines."

Janie


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Peace
Date: 25 Sep 05 - 08:32 PM

IN THE PINES
(Alan Riggs)
« © '33 Giant Music »

In the pines in the pines where the sun never shines
And you shiver when the cold winds blow
In the pines in the pines where the green top entwines
With pillows of white when it snows

There's a song in my heart I remember from time
And it always brings mem'ries of home
Like the old country school and the church in the wildwood
And the walk through the pines all alone

There's an old swimming hole and a creek that we fished in
And the trails of the old beegle hounds
And the homecoming days and the family reunions
And the hymns that have kept me in ground

In the pines in the pines where the sun never shines...

In the poorest of life there are all kinds of timbers
And they all have the meaningful signs
For the willow is weak while the oak's strong and mighty
While the symbol of peace is the kind

In the pines in the pines where the sun never shines
And we shiver when the cold winds blow
**********

from

http://www.luma-electronic.cz/lp/b/Britt/britt_jimmie.htm


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: Mr Happy
Date: 17 May 22 - 12:22 PM

Re the Johnny Silvo version, I recall

Where did you get those high heeled shoes,
The dress you wore last time.
I got these shoes from an engineer,
The dress from down the line

Anyone have more verses from this version?


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: GUEST,Roger
Date: 17 May 22 - 05:22 PM

Also recorded by non other than Marianne Faithfull on the album Come My Way as Black Girl. Around 1965 if memory serves me right.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: leeneia
Date: 18 May 22 - 12:26 PM

My family had a New Christie Minstrel's album with this song on it. It wasn't "To the Pines", it was "In the Pines,"

In a junior-college library I came across a book by Alan Lomax with "In the Pines" in it. I'm pretty sure it was Alan Lomax.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 May 22 - 01:50 PM

In the Pines
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the album by The Triffids, see In the Pines (album).

"In the Pines", also known as "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?", "My Girl" and "Black Girl", is a traditional American folk song originating from two songs, "In the Pines" and "The Longest Train", both of whose authorship is unknown and date back to at least the 1870s. The songs originated in the Southern Appalachian area of the United States in the contiguous areas of Eastern Tennessee and Kentucky, Western North Carolina and Northern Georgia.[1][2]

Versions of the song have been recorded by many artists in numerous genres, but it is most often associated with American bluegrass musician Bill Monroe and American blues musician Lead Belly, both of whom recorded very different versions of the song in the 1940s and 1950s.[3]

In 1964, a version of the song by English Beat music group the Four Pennies reached the top-twenty in the United Kingdom.[4] A live rendition by American grunge band Nirvana, based on Lead Belly's interpretation, was recorded during their MTV Unplugged performance in 1993, and released the following year on their platinum-selling album, MTV Unplugged in New York.[5][6]

   


      

Early history

Like numerous other folk songs, "In the Pines" was passed on from one generation and locale to the next by word of mouth. In 1925, a version of the song was recorded onto phonograph cylinder by a folk collector. This was the first documentation of "The Longest Train" variant of the song, which includes a verse about "The longest train I ever saw". This verse probably began as a separate song that later merged into "In the Pines". Lyrics in some versions about "Joe Brown's coal mine" and "the Georgia line" may refer to Joseph E. Brown, a former Governor of Georgia, who famously leased convicts to operate coal mines in the 1870s. While early renditions which mention the head in the "driver's wheel" make clear that the decapitation was caused by the train, some later versions would omit the reference to the train and reattribute the cause. As music historian Norm Cohen pointed out in his 1981 book, Long Steel Rail: The Railroad in American Folksong, the song came to consist of three frequent elements: a chorus about "in the pines", a verse about "the longest train" and a verse about a decapitation, but not all elements are present in all versions.[7][8]

Starting in 1926, commercial recordings of the song were made by various country artists. In her 1970 Ph.D. dissertation, Judith McCulloh found 160 permutations of the song.[9] As well as rearrangement of the three frequent elements, the person who goes into the pines, or who is decapitated, is described as a man, woman, adolescent, husband, wife, or parent, while the pines can be seen as representing sexuality, death, or loneliness. The train is described as killing a loved one, as taking one's beloved away, or as leaving an itinerant worker far from home.[7]

The folk version by the Kossoy Sisters asks, "Little girl, little girl, where'd you stay last night? Not even your mother knows." The reply to the question, "Where did you get that dress/ And those shoes that are so fine?" from one version is, "From a man in the mines/Who sleeps in the pines."[7]
Cover versions
Bill Monroe

Bill Monroe's 1941 and 1952 recordings, both under the title "In the Pines", were highly influential on later bluegrass and country versions. Recorded with his Bluegrass Boys and featuring fiddles and yodelling, they represent the "longest train" variant of the song, and omit any reference to a decapitation. However, as Eric Weisbard writes in a 1994 article in The New York Times, "...the enigmatic train is almost as frightening, suggesting an eternal passage: 'I asked my captain for the time of day/He said he throwed his watch away.'"[7]
Lead Belly

Due to the popularity of Lead Belly's versions, he is often erroneously cited as the song's author, such as by Kurt Cobain, who introduced Nirvana's 1993 MTV Unplugged rendition as being by his "favorite performer," then telling an anecdote about attempting to purchase Lead Belly's guitar. According to the American folklorist Alan Lomax, Lead Belly learned the song from an interpretation of the 1917 version compiled by Cecil Sharp, and by the 1925 phonograph recording.


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: meself
Date: 18 May 22 - 02:03 PM

I'm surprised that in twenty years, no one has yet answered the question raised in the second post: "Is that "Black girl, black girl, ...?"


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 May 22 - 05:11 PM

yes, it is


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: meself
Date: 18 May 22 - 08:27 PM

Thank you!


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Subject: RE: To the Pines, To the Pines
From: PHJim
Date: 20 May 22 - 02:23 AM

Lead Belly has recorded it using "Black Girl", "Little Girl" and "My Girl".

This fellow's version was heavily influenced by The Animals' cover of "The House Of The Rising Sun".

"Little Girl" influence by The Animals


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