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Lyr Req: Regimental Songs

DigiTrad:
PRIDE OF PETROVAR


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Charmion 03 Mar 17 - 08:24 AM
Hrothgar 03 Mar 17 - 06:28 AM
GUEST,Christine Jordan 02 Mar 17 - 05:58 AM
GUEST,Christine Jordan 02 Mar 17 - 05:48 AM
GUEST,Murphy 20 Sep 11 - 07:27 AM
GUEST,stan nz 18 Aug 11 - 07:43 PM
MGM·Lion 01 Aug 11 - 12:36 PM
RoyH (Burl) 01 Aug 11 - 08:08 AM
MGM·Lion 01 Aug 11 - 06:04 AM
GUEST,stan nz 01 Aug 11 - 05:48 AM
GUEST,stan nz 01 Aug 11 - 05:32 AM
GUEST,Carol Beasley 17 Jun 10 - 03:47 AM
Kenny B (inactive) 08 Sep 08 - 04:44 PM
Steve Gardham 04 Sep 08 - 02:07 PM
Les from Hull 04 Sep 08 - 08:22 AM
Dave Hanson 04 Sep 08 - 02:22 AM
Dave Hanson 04 Sep 08 - 02:17 AM
Les from Hull 03 Sep 08 - 03:54 PM
Les from Hull 03 Sep 08 - 03:43 PM
Steve Gardham 03 Sep 08 - 03:42 PM
Les from Hull 03 Sep 08 - 03:26 PM
Valmai Goodyear 03 Sep 08 - 01:58 PM
Dave Hanson 03 Sep 08 - 02:51 AM
stormalong 03 Sep 08 - 02:20 AM
The Walrus 02 Sep 08 - 10:03 PM
Steve Gardham 02 Sep 08 - 05:10 PM
Dave Hanson 02 Sep 08 - 02:20 AM
Steve Gardham 01 Sep 08 - 04:41 PM
Liz the Squeak 18 May 07 - 05:12 PM
GUEST,Charmion's brother Andrew 18 May 07 - 03:12 PM
CET 15 May 07 - 06:48 PM
beardedbruce 15 May 07 - 09:43 AM
GUEST 15 May 07 - 09:37 AM
GUEST,JIM RACE 19 Feb 07 - 06:03 AM
The Walrus 01 Jun 02 - 03:43 AM
Dave Bryant 30 May 02 - 10:20 AM
Nigel Parsons 30 May 02 - 08:32 AM
Nigel Parsons 30 May 02 - 07:24 AM
Wilfried Schaum 29 May 02 - 09:12 AM
GUEST,Keith A o hertford at work 29 May 02 - 08:55 AM
Teribus 29 May 02 - 07:53 AM
ozmacca 29 May 02 - 05:42 AM
GUEST,Keith A at work 29 May 02 - 03:20 AM
GUEST 29 May 02 - 12:18 AM
Jon Bartlett 28 May 02 - 10:35 PM
GUEST,ozmacca 28 May 02 - 09:25 PM
Mr Red 28 May 02 - 04:32 PM
Paul from Hull 28 May 02 - 02:50 PM
HuwG 28 May 02 - 02:21 PM
Wilfried Schaum 28 May 02 - 09:48 AM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Charmion
Date: 03 Mar 17 - 08:24 AM

Hi, Christine:

Could you tell us how you know about "Roll Up, Gloucesters!", including where you heard about it, how you know its composer and lyricist, and its date of publication? Those are very precise details to know about a song that you have never seen sheet music for, and your source of information might help the Mudcat Hive Mind come up with a lead for you.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Hrothgar
Date: 03 Mar 17 - 06:28 AM

My father (a good Yorkshireman) served in the 16/5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, and they used to trot to that well-known loyalist air, "The Wearing of the Green".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Christine Jordan
Date: 02 Mar 17 - 05:58 AM

Not sure how these forums work but hope someone sees this message.
I am trying to find out more info about a song caled 'Roll Up Gloucesters!'. Music by Charles Lee Williams. Lyrics by F Montagu LLoyd. Written in 1915, probably about the Gloucestershire Regiment and a war rally for the troops. Thanks


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Christine Jordan
Date: 02 Mar 17 - 05:48 AM

Hi. I've come across a song written in 1915 by Charles Lee Williams, ex organist at Gloucester Cathedral. Lyrics by F Montagu Lloyd, called 'Roll Up Gloucesters!'
I cannot find the lyrics or the music. Does anyone have any more information. I think it may have been a song to rally the troops during WWI. Thanks


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Murphy
Date: 20 Sep 11 - 07:27 AM

The Dublin Fusiliers as sung by Johnny McEvoy on Utube mentions Johnny Roche from Dolphins Barn and Willie Doyle, a priest from Dalkey both of whom died at Messin Ridge (or Messines Ridge). Are
these factual names or simply made up to suit the song?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,stan nz
Date: 18 Aug 11 - 07:43 PM

Further to my posting on the Green Howards regimental song, it is of course sung to the tune of the regimental march and anyone who wants to ally the words with the music can get the tune on the Green Howards Association web site.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 12:36 PM

I recollect from direct experience, burl, that it is indeed an excellent tune to march to. Marching to a band on a parade I remember as a delightfully stimulating experience, in fact; one of the few pleasures from the dismal days of training during Nat Svce.

Thanks for relating your experience of marching to the tune.

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 08:08 AM

Hello Michael, My Dad wasin the RASC during the war. Once when home on leave he told me that 'Wait for the Wagon' was the regimental march. Being a young boy at the time I said something like 'it doesn't sound like a marching tune'. He marched me up and down the garden path, while we both sang the song , and I came to believe him.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 06:04 AM

When I was in the Royal Army Service Corps, the regimental march was the tune of an 1850s Southern US parlor/minstrel song "Wait For The Wagon" ~~ it was said to have been a favourite tune of the Boer War General Sir Redvers Buller who originally formed the corps. The Corps no longer exists, having first been renamed the Royal Corps of Transport, and then amalgamated with several other support arms into the Royal Logistics Corps, whose march is called "On Parade".

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,stan nz
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 05:48 AM

Re. ard mhacha account of the case of Pvt Patrick McCaffrey. He shot the two officers at Fulwood Barracks,Preston,Lancashire a barracks still in use today I think as depot for the Kings Regiment and there is a long tradition that McCaffrey ghost still haunts the place.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,stan nz
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 05:32 AM

The Green Howards {now 2nd batt. Yorkshire regt.} has a regimental march 'The Bonny English Rose' with words:-
Old England's emblem is the rose there is no other flower
Hath half the graces that adorn this beauty of the bower
And England's daughter's are as fair as any bud that blows
What son of hers who hath not loved some bonny English rose.

There is at least one more verse but memory fails me.
I learned it as a sixteen year old bandboy of the 1st batt. band in 1949 at the regimental depot Richmond, Yorkshire .

The word 'blows' is correct, it is old English and means the same as blooms


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Carol Beasley
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 03:47 AM

When I was a little girl my Aunt sang a song that always made me cry. I'm in my 60's now and it still haunts me but I can't remember many of the words, so does any one out there know them please? It has these words in it.

Oh Lord it's only a Gloucester we send
To you this Gloucesters heart we send
He did not stay to realise that war was such a cruel thing
And now we lay him down to rest
Lord this Gloucester did his best

Hope someone can Help, kind regards Carol Beasley


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Kenny B (inactive)
Date: 08 Sep 08 - 04:44 PM

Does anyone know the english translation of the French Foreign Legion
March containing the legionaires code of honor known in English as Le Baroudeur


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 04 Sep 08 - 02:07 PM

Les,
I thought it was all about taking drugs!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Les from Hull
Date: 04 Sep 08 - 08:22 AM

While on the subject of songs mentioning regiments the song 'Ups and Downs' that starts

As I was goin' to Aylesbury all on a market day
A pretty little Aylesbury girl I met upon the way

possibly refers to the 69th Regiment of Foot (South Lincolnshires) whose nickname was the 'Ups and Downs'. Or possibly it doesn't.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 04 Sep 08 - 02:22 AM

I think I may be getting the tunes mixed up as well, forty years on and a lot of booze...........well.

eric


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 04 Sep 08 - 02:17 AM

I stand corrected Les.

eric


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Les from Hull
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 03:54 PM

The Regimental Quick March: "Ca Ira"
The Regimental Slow March: "The Duke of York"
1st Battalion Quick March: "Yorkshire Lass"
1st Battalion Slow March: "God Bless the Prince of Wales"
2nd Battalion Quick March: "Bonnie English Rose"
2nd Battalion Slow March: "Maria Theresa"
3rd Battalion Quick March: "The Wellesley"
3rd Battalion Slow March: "Destiny"
4th Battalion Quick March: "On Ilkley Moor"
4th Battalion Slow March: "The Duchess of Kent"

Perhaps we can write some words to Ca Ira incorporating 'Yorkshire Green Wellingtons'!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Les from Hull
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 03:43 PM

The 9/12th Lancers still exist as the 9/12th Lancers. It's an armoured recce regiment. According to information on the internet the quick march is 'God Bless the Prince of Wales' and the slow march is Men of Harlech. They also use the Keel Row, the Irish Washerwomen and Rory O'More.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 03:42 PM

If they've amalgamated, Les, I wonder what their official 'marchpast' is now 'My Bonny Yorkshire Wellingtons'?

Walrus.
Course it is. The question remains, did the football fans get it from the advert or from the playing of military marches by brass bands in the intervals.

I'm still intrigued by the reference to 'The Old Grey Mare'. As I said I know lots of 'Old Grey Mares' (No cheeky comments please) but none of them would fit to the Caissons tune.
The most obvious American OGM is 'The Old Grey mare she ain't what she used to be, many long years ago.'


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Les from Hull
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 03:26 PM

Actually Steve, they are now called the Yorkshire Regiment, and now incorporate the traditions of the Green Howards and the Duke of Wellington's. I suppose that amalgamations like this make the band's repertoire much larger.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 01:58 PM

'Sussex by the Sea' is associated with the Royal Sussex Regiment and also with the Sussex Bonfire Societies. It is mostly about marching rather than about the county itself.

Valmai


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 02:51 AM

Hi Steve, I believe there were words but I cant remember the ' official ' ones.

eric


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: stormalong
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 02:20 AM

Colonel Burnaby - this is associated with the Blues and is also about the Camel Corps and Abu Klea.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: The Walrus
Date: 02 Sep 08 - 10:03 PM

I seem to remember the 'Hoover' ad using the US Artillery march "The Caissons Go Rolling Along"

W


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 02 Sep 08 - 05:10 PM

eric,
There are hundreds of 'Old Grey Mares'. Could you please be more specific, i.e., give us text of first verse? The reason for my interest is not directly militarily related; it has been used as a tune for terrace chants in British football and rugby. I'm rather hoping we are looking at a trad song here which became a military march.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 02 Sep 08 - 02:20 AM

The regimental march of my [ now defunct ] regiment the 9/12 Royal Lancers was a tune called ' The Old Grey Mare ' this was OK until Hoover vacuums used it for a TV advert,

All the dirt, all the grit,
Hoover gets it every bit,
Cos it beats as it sweeps as it cleans.

this chorus would sometimes spontaneously break out as we marched to the band, wonderful.

eric


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 01 Sep 08 - 04:41 PM

The Prince of wales Own regiment of Yorkshire have for their march past My Bonny Yorkshire Lass which you can see and hear warbled somewhat shakily by me at www.yorkshirefolksong.net

Strange that The Watersons should refer to Sykes' Artillery Regiment. The Scarlet and the Blue was certainly sung by all of the Sykes Regiment as it was by all of the RHA regiments, but the Waterson version comes from the Yorkshire dales and is very different to the Sykes version. (They sing Khaki, Sykes sing Scarlet)

Both of the above-mentioned songs date to the 1870s apparently.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 18 May 07 - 05:12 PM

I found a CD called 'Enlist for a soldier' which has a lot of songs about the army life on it, from the UK Civil War to present day.... If I ever find where I put it, I'll post an ISBN.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 18 May 07 - 03:12 PM

Although Great Big Sea has "poppie" overtones, they do a "Recruiting Sergeant", about the Newfoundland Regiment (then not yet "Royal") in the Great War. The lyrics follow:

Two recruiting sergeants came to the C.L.B.,
For the sons of the merchants, to join the 'Blue Puttees'.
So all the hands enlisted, five hundred young men --
Enlist, ye Newfoundlanders, and come follow me...

They crossed the broad Atlantic in the brave Florizel,
And on the sands of Suvla, they entered into hell
And on those bloody beaches, the first of them fell...
Enlist, ye Newfoundlanders, and come follow me.

CHORUS:
So it's over the mountains, and over the sea
Come, brave Newfoundlanders, and join the 'Blue Puttees';
You'll fight the Hun in Flanders, and at Galipoli
Enlist, ye Newfoundlanders, and come follow me.

The call came from London, for the last July drive
"To the trenches with the regiment, prepare yourselves to die"
The roll call next morning, just a handful survived.
Enlist, ye Newfoundlanders, and come follow me.

CHORUS

The stone men on Water Street still cry for the day
When the pride of the city went marching away.
A thousand men slaughtered, to hear the King say,
'Enlist, ye Newfoundlanders, and come follow me.'

CHORUS (x2)

Enlist, ye Newfoundlanders, and come follow me


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: CET
Date: 15 May 07 - 06:48 PM

Another song to add is "Vive la Canadienne", the Regimental Marchpast of the Royal 22e Regiment (the Vandoos) - a very good song, and much older than the regiment which was formed in World War I.

Edmund


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: beardedbruce
Date: 15 May 07 - 09:43 AM

http://www.musicweb.uk.net/classrev/2005/Sep05/Empire_4768063.htm

Has it on the cd-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 15 May 07 - 09:37 AM

Hi
Came across this site by accident. Would love to have the words to "Bravo Dublin fusiliers" if you have them.
anthony.ofarrell@gmail.com

Thanks


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,JIM RACE
Date: 19 Feb 07 - 06:03 AM

Would dearly like to get complete lyrics of a song that goes...

I mind the time, my old chapeau, when once you graced my pate.
Hi ho, many a year ago, we rode along together, you and I, my old chapeau.
Faith, we turned the heads of half the pretty girls we used to know,
10, 20, 30, 40, 50 years ago.

I'm waiting now, my old chapeau, the call to bivouac,
Where every beggar answers roll, but ne'er a one comes back.
Then let this be my epitaph, where'er they lay me low:
Here lies a jolly light dragoon who loved his old chapeau.

james.h.race@homecall.co.uk


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Subject: Lyr Add: SAVOUNEEN DEELISH
From: The Walrus
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 03:43 AM

To revive this thread.

This song is not strictly a "Regimental" song in the terms of naming and praising a regiment, but, in its day (the Napoleonic period) it was very popular with the 88th Foot (later the Connaught Rangers - aka "The Devil's Own")

SAVOUNEEN DEELISH (dearest darling?)

Oh the moment was sad, when my love and I parted,
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!
As I kissed off her tears I was near broken hearted
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!
Wan was her cheek, which hung on my shoulder,
Damp was her hand, no marble was colder
I felt that I never again should behold her.
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!

When the word of command put our men into motion
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!
I buckled my knapsack to cross the wide ocean,
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!
Brisk were our troops, all roaring like thunder,
Pleased with the voyage, impatient for plunder.
My bosom with grief was almost torn asunder
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!

Long I fought for my country, far, far from my true love
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!
All my pay and my booty I hoarded for you, love.
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!
Peace was proclaimed, escaped from the slaughter,
Landed at home, my sweet girl I sought her,
But sorrow, alas, to her cold grave had brought her,
Savourneen deelish, Eileen oge!


I hope this has a place on this list.

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 30 May 02 - 10:20 AM

The Sussex regiment's march was of course "Sussex by the Sea".

SAPPER - my dad (who was an RSM in the RE) always used to sing part of "Oggie Land" with "Hurrah for the CRE".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 30 May 02 - 08:32 AM

Lyrics now added in separate thread Tim, The Dragoon Nigel


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 30 May 02 - 07:24 AM

I don't see any mention of "Tim the Dragoon", words by "Q" (A T Quiller Couch) and music by C Villiers Stanford. Don't see it in the DT either, I'll probably post it here shortly!

Nigel


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 29 May 02 - 09:12 AM

ozmacca - I didn't find the nickname licht bob, only the English version
Light Bobs, The: The Somerset Light Infantry. (Fraser/Gibbons - my post of May 27 - pg. 190

Looking it up I also had a glimpse at the Greys:
Greys, The: The Scots Greys. The regiment, when first raised in Scotland in 1781 [scil. 1681, W.S.] as the "Royal Regiment of Scots Dragoons", was uniformed in stone-gray coats, there being, an official document states, not enough red cloth procurable in Scotland for all the men. The mounting of the regiment on grey horses dates from about 1700. The sobriquet "Greys" was well established before 1750, as contemporary letters and documents show. pg. 186.
The Lincolnshire Regiment got their nickname "Poachers" in allusion to their regimental march "The Lincolnshire Poacher" (forgot to note the page, somewhere between 190 and 209).

Wilfried


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Keith A o hertford at work
Date: 29 May 02 - 08:55 AM

Thanks Bill, anyone else have an opinion?

The story of Pte Hovenden of the 58th can be found by typing hovenden and 1year into the filter, along with an attempt by me to commemorate him in song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Teribus
Date: 29 May 02 - 07:53 AM

Couldn't see anything in the song that puts a date or period to it. Although definitely written in the dialect of the N-E of Scotland, there is no reason to automatically qualify that the regiment she refers to has to be Scottish (Example: "There once was a troop of Irish Dragoons cam marchin' doon through Fyvie-O" - N-E Scotland identified as the area, non-scottish cavalry regiment).

If the song pre-dates French Revolutionary/Napoleonic times by about fifty years, an alternative Scottish cavalry regiment to the Scots Greys did exist - 17th Light Dragoons (raised 1759 - disbanded 1763).

In an earlier link on this thread there is a site that lists songs of the Napoleonic era. One of the songs mentioned was "The Female Drummer" - no doubt it was sung by soldiers during the Napoleonic Wars - one version actually mentions "the seige of Valenciennes" (1795), but the song is older than that! Earliest I have been able to trace is around very early 1700's and the reign of Queen Anne

"When I was a young girl, age of sixteen
I from me parents ran away and went to serve the Queen"

The same might be true of "The Lichtbob's Lass".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: ozmacca
Date: 29 May 02 - 05:42 AM

Keith, I'm not sure if a light (or any other weight) horse trooper would fit the bill here, would it? Given that the song is Scottish, and apparently around Napoleonic time or later, the object of maidenly desire is more likely to be an infantryman, seeing that the only regiment of scottish horse were the Greys with no yellow facings. Not definite by any means, but likely, no? And I have a vague remembrance that the Lichtbob was a recognised nickname for one regiment... Can't remember and can't trace it... Must be chewing too many aluminium mess tins.

By the way, is anybody keeping a listing of all these songs, and would it be worth setting up some sort of data base sub-sect.... I'm an amateur at all this techy stuff, so this is a cry for organisational HELP!!!

Is there anybody out there?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,Keith A at work
Date: 29 May 02 - 03:20 AM

All the usual suspects will know this , but it is worth saying that a lichtbob (light bob) was a light horseman.
Keith (not as light as I was)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 29 May 02 - 12:18 AM

Thinking about the "British Grenadiers". I'd reckon it's pretty well definite that it refers to the "new" arm of service when grenades came into use around the mid 1600's or so, and companies were formed in line regiments. Don't the verses talk about "leaders march with fusees / and we with hand grenades"? By the time the Grenadier guards were a separate unit, the actual use of the primitive grenade had pretty well ended - around the 1750's (?), but the name was retained for those sections acting as stormtrooper squads or light companies for the regular infantry. The grenade didn't make a real re-appearance until the 1914-18 war


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Jon Bartlett
Date: 28 May 02 - 10:35 PM

The 72nd Light Infantry in BC generated an anti-song, made by coalminers in Nanaimo to take the piss out of the poor stoops who were coming to defend the rights of capital: "Bowser's Seventy-Twa". Bowser was the Attorney-General at the time (1913-14). I don't remember if I posted it to DT.

"The Glen Whorple Highlanders", the regimental song of the Seaforth Highlanders: first verse as follows:

"There's a braw fine regiment as ilka man should ken/They're devils at the fechtin', they hae cloured a sicht o' men/And hae supped muckle whisky when the canteen they were ben/The hielandmen frae braw Glenwhorple."

Chorus: "Heuch Glenwhorple Hielandmen/Great strong whisky-drinkin' Hielandmen/Slainte wor Glenwhorple."

Seven verses in all. Which I'll post if people want it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: GUEST,ozmacca
Date: 28 May 02 - 09:25 PM

Wilfried, I take my hat off to the organising genius who came up with that lot! Interesting co-incidence - while "matrosen" were German sailors, a "matross" was a british artillery rank in the 1600 - 1700s

Just found another regimental song. "The Lichtbob's Lassie" is a Scottish song about a girl who intends to dye her petticoats red and face them with yellow, to match her lover's uniform. The text (as I have it anyway) is in a north-east Scotland dialect - Aberdeenshire) Could these be the 26th Cameronian's? Specialist help required...... Walrus?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Mr Red
Date: 28 May 02 - 04:32 PM

ch there were the Light Guards & Cavalry, Mallitia men & volunteers,
Queens Bays, Scots Greys, some of our Infantry.
the Royal Marines, the Engineers, the Coldstream Guards, the Fuselliers,
the Hundred & Ninth Malitia and the Royal Artiliary

see my site for the full text look for "Old England She Needs Soldiers"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Paul from Hull
Date: 28 May 02 - 02:50 PM

I believe 'The British Grenadiers' does refer to the Grenadier Companies of the Regiments, because it's said that the song pre-dates Waterloo. (which might be obvious anyway, if there are dates that prove the songs existence prior to that?)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: HuwG
Date: 28 May 02 - 02:21 PM

In the Britsh Army, some regiments still have regional associations and titles. The Royal Anglian Regiment (usually referred to as the Royal Angle-Irons), have "THE LINCOLNSHIRE POACHER" as their regimental quick march. Details in this blue clicky thing

The now-defunct Yorkshire Volunteers sang "On Ilkla' Moor bah't 'at".

Not regional, but the Royal Tank Regiment's march is "Little Willie", which commemorates the name of the first prototype tank.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Regimental Songs
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 28 May 02 - 09:48 AM

ozmacca - The German Marine Corps had 3 Batallions, called I. - III. Seebataillon = Sea Batallion.
III. Seebataillon was stationed in Kiautschou, with 2 depot companies and 1 depot battery in Cuxhaven.
The bataillon in Tsingtau (Kiautschou) consisted of:
4 foot companies
1 mounted company
1 Navy Field Battery (Marinefeldbatterie)
1 Navy Engineer Company (Marinepioniercompagnie)
There also was a heavy artillery detachment called Matrosenartillerie = sailors artillery, about 200 men.
To understand those German names you must know that:
engl. Navy = germ. Marine
engl. Marine = germ. Seebataillone (pl.), the single soldier: Seesoldat (sea soldier).
All branches manned by real Navy (not Marine) personnel are distinguished by Matrosen- (sailors), e.g. the Matrosenartillerie as above or Matroseninfanterie, sailors fighting as infantry, but they must not be mistaken for Marines.
The German Feldartillerie was always mounted, the Fußartillerie (Foot Artillery) was the heavy artillery.
Yeah, that was the military logic of the Imperial Navy.

Wilfried


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