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Folk songs appropriate for medical students

Marylytel#seanet.com 26 Apr 98 - 12:11 AM
Art Thieme 26 Apr 98 - 12:25 AM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 26 Apr 98 - 06:46 AM
John Nolan 26 Apr 98 - 08:51 AM
Ralph Butts 26 Apr 98 - 09:05 AM
Sheye 26 Apr 98 - 10:35 AM
Barbara 26 Apr 98 - 11:51 AM
Alice 26 Apr 98 - 12:14 PM
Bruce O. 26 Apr 98 - 12:48 PM
Susan of DT 26 Apr 98 - 02:00 PM
dwditty 26 Apr 98 - 03:02 PM
Barry Finn 26 Apr 98 - 06:18 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 27 Apr 98 - 08:25 AM
Bert 27 Apr 98 - 09:03 AM
rosebrook 27 Apr 98 - 10:56 AM
Bill D 27 Apr 98 - 01:04 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 27 Apr 98 - 07:03 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 27 Apr 98 - 08:38 PM
northfolk 28 Apr 98 - 01:13 PM
Bruce O. 28 Apr 98 - 01:46 PM
judy 28 Apr 98 - 02:47 PM
judy 28 Apr 98 - 03:07 PM
Bruce O. 28 Apr 98 - 04:29 PM
Bruce. O. 28 Apr 98 - 04:31 PM
Paul Stamler 28 Apr 98 - 04:39 PM
Mary 28 Apr 98 - 05:16 PM
RS 28 Apr 98 - 10:11 PM
Pauline Lerner 28 Apr 98 - 11:16 PM
Catfeet 29 Apr 98 - 12:06 AM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 29 Apr 98 - 03:06 AM
Bruce O. 29 Apr 98 - 10:05 AM
Carl 29 Apr 98 - 11:22 AM
Bert 30 Apr 98 - 05:00 PM
Clarke 02 May 98 - 01:40 AM
Clarke 02 May 98 - 01:50 AM
alison 02 May 98 - 09:35 PM
alison 02 May 98 - 09:40 PM
Clarke 07 May 98 - 06:06 PM
Bill D 07 May 98 - 11:08 PM
Nora 08 May 98 - 12:36 AM
John in Brisbane 08 May 98 - 01:40 AM
Pauline Lerner 08 May 98 - 02:28 AM
Pauline Lerner 08 May 98 - 02:36 AM
Celtic-End Singer 08 May 98 - 09:12 AM
dick greenhaus 08 May 98 - 10:06 PM
Clarke 09 May 98 - 10:50 PM
'Berta' 10 May 98 - 08:42 PM
Kyra 10 May 98 - 09:13 PM
Mark Cohen 23 Jan 00 - 09:31 PM
Mark Cohen 23 Jan 00 - 09:37 PM
Mary in Kentucky 23 Jan 00 - 10:07 PM
Amos 23 Jan 00 - 10:38 PM
reggie miles 23 Jan 00 - 11:20 PM
Arkie 23 Jan 00 - 11:24 PM
Marymac90 24 Jan 00 - 01:39 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 24 Jan 00 - 09:14 AM
Nogs 24 Jan 00 - 03:23 PM
lamarca 24 Jan 00 - 03:54 PM
Jeri 24 Jan 00 - 05:13 PM
reggie miles 24 Jan 00 - 05:21 PM
dick greenhaus 24 Jan 00 - 10:41 PM
Mbo 24 Jan 00 - 10:47 PM
BillFisher 24 Jan 00 - 11:02 PM
Amos 24 Jan 00 - 11:10 PM
GUEST,sheila 24 Jan 00 - 11:17 PM
catspaw49 24 Jan 00 - 11:35 PM
John Moulden 25 Jan 00 - 08:26 AM
GUEST,blind desert pete 30 Jan 00 - 04:46 PM
Liz the Squeak 30 Jan 00 - 05:05 PM
Dave (the ancient mariner) 30 Jan 00 - 06:14 PM
Mark Cohen 30 Jan 00 - 06:30 PM
Mary in Kentucky 15 Feb 00 - 08:07 PM
Mary in Kentucky 15 Feb 00 - 08:12 PM
Crowhugger 15 Feb 00 - 08:39 PM
GUEST,Jim Dixon 16 Feb 00 - 01:57 PM
dick greenhaus 16 Feb 00 - 08:11 PM
Arkie 16 Feb 00 - 09:02 PM
Arkie 17 Feb 00 - 12:41 AM
GUEST,Jim Dixon 17 Feb 00 - 04:13 PM
GUEST,Mark Cohen 17 Feb 00 - 06:30 PM
Crowhugger 18 Feb 00 - 08:00 AM
Crowhugger 06 Apr 00 - 08:38 AM
GUEST,Philippa 17 May 00 - 02:28 PM
GUEST,David Richoux (KFJC FM) 26 Jun 02 - 12:17 AM
JohnInKansas 26 Jun 02 - 06:20 AM
GUEST,Fossil at home 27 Jun 02 - 05:51 AM
Genie 27 Jun 02 - 10:51 AM
Mrrzy 27 Jun 02 - 11:53 AM
DonD 27 Jun 02 - 12:37 PM
Susanne (skw) 28 Jun 02 - 04:26 PM
Cappuccino 28 Jun 02 - 04:37 PM
Genie 28 Jun 02 - 05:24 PM
redcogs 28 Jun 02 - 05:28 PM
Genie 28 Jun 02 - 10:13 PM
Jeanie 29 Jun 02 - 06:36 PM
Donuel 29 Jun 02 - 06:44 PM
GUEST,JTT 29 Jun 02 - 08:16 PM
Genie 29 Jun 02 - 11:17 PM
Genie 29 Jun 02 - 11:25 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 02 - 07:18 PM
maire-aine 03 Jul 02 - 09:00 PM
GUEST,another guest 03 Jul 02 - 11:07 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 04 Jul 02 - 09:01 AM
Mark Cohen 04 Jul 02 - 01:53 PM
Mark Cohen 04 Jul 02 - 02:07 PM
Deda 04 Jul 02 - 03:53 PM
GUEST,Argenine 05 Jul 02 - 03:48 PM
GUEST,Erin 05 Jul 02 - 07:30 PM
kytrad (Jean Ritchie) 06 Jul 02 - 06:03 PM
Nogs 20 Jan 03 - 02:03 PM
Rapparee 20 Jan 03 - 04:54 PM
Susanne (skw) 20 Jan 03 - 07:56 PM
Arkie 21 Jan 03 - 12:31 AM
Santa 21 Jan 03 - 02:58 PM
GUEST,Q 21 Jan 03 - 05:09 PM
Jim Dixon 12 Dec 03 - 12:40 AM
GUEST,Sean 12 Dec 03 - 05:11 AM
Howard Kaplan 20 Nov 05 - 09:30 PM
breezy 21 Nov 05 - 03:45 AM
robd 05 Oct 09 - 06:52 PM
Jack Campin 05 Oct 09 - 07:46 PM
Gweltas 05 Oct 09 - 08:14 PM
GUEST,fantum 06 Oct 09 - 08:13 AM
sing4peace 06 Oct 09 - 08:30 PM
GUEST,Edthefolkie 07 Oct 09 - 06:19 PM
GUEST,SoundJohn 21 Nov 09 - 07:43 PM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Nov 09 - 10:31 PM
beeliner 21 Nov 09 - 11:19 PM
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Subject: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Marylytel#seanet.com
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 12:11 AM

Hi ALL:

A friend of mine is putting together a group of folk songs that could be sung by medical students while going through medical school. I thought this might be a great place to get some suggestions. I have already checked the database but it is hard to know what to search for because so many different songs could fall into this type of category. Any song titles, lyrics or URL's would be appreciated. My friend has just retired from being a doctor after many years and is now trying to put something together to teach to medical students. He said it was many a times that folk music got him through many years ago when he was studying to become a doctor and he wants to share this with students today.

Thanks, Mary


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Art Thieme
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 12:25 AM

"Free And Equal Blues" --Josh White

Any of the songs by that urologist who sings the blues---Urethra Franklin ! ;-)


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 06:46 AM

Don't forget "Dr Freud". It is in the database. I was taught it while I was a mathematician for a biochemical research institute by somebody who was taught it..... It circulated through the medical and related schools and was recorded by (I think) the Kingston Trio.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: John Nolan
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 08:51 AM

And then comes the doctor, the worst of them all, Saying, "What's been the matter with you all the fall?" He'll tell you he'll cure you of all your disease, When the money he's got, you can die if you please, And it's hard, hard times. (Verse from Newfie song)


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 09:05 AM

The Doctor's Lament (you'll find it in the database) is a good place to start. I have a wonderful version by Oscar Brand which he calls simply "The Portions of a Woman."....Tiger


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Subject: Lyr Add: SHORTNIN' BREAD
From: Sheye
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 10:35 AM

SHORTNIN' BREAD

Mama's little babies love shortnin', shortnin'
Mama's little babies love shortnin' bread.
Mama's little babies love shortnin', shortnin'
Mama's little babies love shortnin' bread.

Three little babies, lyin' in bed
Two was sick and the other most dead
Sent for the doctor and the doctor said
"Give 'dem babies some shortnin' bread."

Mam's little babies...


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Barbara
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 11:51 AM

Try searching Mark Cohen (click). He's an ex medical student (that is to say Doctor) and has a bunch of stuff in the data base (click). If he's on the mailing list, I haven't checked yet, he also has a song that is simply (!) the names of prescription medicines set to the tune of Modern Major General from Pirates of Penzance.

Barbara


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Alice
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 12:14 PM

"St. James Infirmary"

"Locke Hospital"

"The Sailor Cut Down In His Prime"

"Streets of Laredo" "Bard of Armagh", "The Dying Cowboy"

"Unfortunate Lass"

"Barbara Allen"

"The Bad Girl"

"Put My Little Shoes Away"

"The Baggage Coach Ahead"

"Coo Coo U"

"The Unfortunate Miss Bailey"

Alice, in Montana


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bruce O.
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 12:48 PM

"The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out", Carl Sandburg


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Susan of DT
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 02:00 PM

Use the search box above. a search for @medicine got 17 hits and a search for doctor got over a hundred.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: dwditty
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 03:02 PM

Don't forget "Put the Lime in the Coconut" - Nilsson

Dr. Robert - The Beatles

Rock and Roll Doctor - Little Feat

The Dentist's Wife - Fred Koller


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Barry Finn
Date: 26 Apr 98 - 06:18 PM

The Black Cook, Barry


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Subject: Lyr Add: CHEWING GUM (Carter family)^^^
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 08:25 AM

Well if you want to get desperate there is the Carter Family's "Chewin Gum"

I wouldn't marry a lawyer
I'll tell you the reason why
every time he opens his mouth
He tells a great big lie

I wouldn't marry a doctor
I'll tell you the reason why
He rides around the countryside
makin' people die

I wouldn't marry a farmer
I'll tell you the reason why
because he has too much to eat
'specially pumpkin pie

Murray


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bert
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 09:03 AM

Found a Peanut


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: rosebrook
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 10:56 AM

Miss Lucy had a baby, she named him Tiny Tim.
She put him in the bathtub, to see if he could swim.

He drank up all the water, he ate up all the soap.
He tried to eat the bathtub, but it wouldn't go down his throat.

Miss Lucy called the doctor, Miss Lucy called the nurse.
Miss Lucy called the lady with the alligator purse.

"Mumps!", said the doctor, "measles!" said the nurse.
___________ said the lady with the alligator purse.

Maybe not the best to operate by, but awfully good for jumping rope! ; )

Rosebrook


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bill D
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 01:04 PM

from "When Dalliance was in Flower and Maidens Lost Their Head"

"From fair London town, there have lately come down,
"Four able physicians who never saw gown"
"Their physic is useful, their dosage is large
"And you may be cured without trouble or charge"

more to follow, gotta go double check to be sure I remember all the verses...


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 07:03 PM

Didn't Oscar Brand have a few bawdy medical student songs on some of his bawdy LP's?


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 08:38 PM

I wish I could remember more verses to this song:

Doctor and Doctor Jones
want to operate on Barney Google's bones
With the medics standing around his bed
Barney lifted up his head and said

(Cho)
Oh, how I wish I was in Peoria, Peoria, Peoria
You can pick a morning glory-a
right off the sidwalks of Peoria
Oh, how I wish I was in Peoria
Peoria today
(Alternate to last line) Peoria USA

Murray


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: northfolk
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 01:13 PM

Joel Mabus, is one of the finest musicians, songwriters in Michigan, is currently doing a song in his act, I am not sure that it is recorded, he rhymes acetaminophen with..? the song is a challenge to keep up with...audience love it. it certainly fits this category...wish I could give more details.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bruce O.
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 01:46 PM

Surgery was originally done by barber-surgeons and there are some barber ones noted in my broadside index. Do gelders' count, too?
'The Tunbridge Doctors' (Four Able Physicians) is in 'The New Academy of Compliments', 1669 (unique copy in Folger Shakespeare Library), and 'Wit and Drollery', 1682, and with music (Packington's Pound) in 'Pills to Purge Melancholy'. ABC's for 3 versions of "Packington's Pound" are B362-4 on my website.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: judy
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 02:47 PM

I think it was either Tom Lehrer (and possibly the Animaniacs) who I heard sing the periodic table elements to the tune of the Pirates of Penzance. I may have it somewhere.

enjoy! judy


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ELEMENTS (Tom Lehrer)^^
From: judy
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 03:07 PM

And here it is:

To the tune of "I am a modern Major General"

THE ELEMENTS

There's antimony, arsenic, aluminum, selenium,
And hydrogen and oxygen and nitrogen and rhenium,
And nickel, neodymium, neptunium, germanium,
And iron, americium, ruthenium, uranium,
Europium, zirconium, lutetium, vanadium,
And lanthanum and osmium and astatine and radium,
And gold, protactinium and indium and gallium,
And iodine and thorium and thulium and thallium.

There's yttrium, ytterbium, actinium, rubidium,
And boron, gadolinium, niobium, iridium,
There's strontium and silicon and silver and samarium,
And bismuth, bromine, lithium, beryllium, and barium.

There's holmium and helium and hafnium and erbium,
And phosphorus and francium and fluorine and terbium,
And manganese and mercury, molybdenum, magnesium,
Dysprosium and scandium and cerium and caesium.
And lead, praseodymium and platinum, plutonium,
Palladium, promethium, potassium, polonium,
And tantalum, technetium, titanium, tellurium,
And cadmium and calcium and chromium and curium.

There's sulphur, californium and fermium, berkelium,
And also mendelevium, einsteinium, nobelium,
And argon, krypton, neon, radon, xenon, zinc and rhodium,
And chlorine, carbon, cobalt, copper, tungsten, tin and sodium.

These are the only ones of which the news has come to Harvard,
And there may be many others but they haven't been discovered.

Thank goodnes I didn't have to type all that in! There's a Tom Lehrer website out there. Sorry don't have the URL

enjoy!
judy


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bruce O.
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 04:29 PM

There's one missing, not counting 3 that the last I knew didn't have names yet (104, 105, and 106). Lr above is #102.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bruce. O.
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 04:31 PM

Sorry, Lr is #103.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Paul Stamler
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 04:39 PM

Logan English recorded a song (by Oscar Brand?) called "The McBurney Square", which is an anatomically correct description of an appendectomy. The only release of which I'm aware is on a 2-LP set from Columbia Special Products in the '60s called "Medicine, Mind and Music". It's a real stitch.

Peace. Paul


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mary
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 05:16 PM

Thanks for all the replies so far...they are just perfect for what my friend, the newly retired doctor and soon to be folk song teacher, is looking for. As soon as I teach him how to post his own message, he jump in this discussion to! Thanks again and please keep posting the ideas.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: RS
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 10:11 PM

Then there's the old favourite anatomy review:

Head and shoulders, knees and toes
Knees and toes, knees and toes
Head and shoulders, knees and toes
Eyes, ears, mouth and nose!


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Pauline Lerner
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 11:16 PM

I was never a medical student, but I was a research biochemist for years. While spending hours dissecting rats, my colleagues and I amused ourselves by singing such songs as "Here I stand, heart in hand..." (Beatles), "I've got a lot of liver to do," "Dem bones gonna rise again," and "So lung, it's been good to know you." My apologies for grossing out all you non biomedical types.

Pauline


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Catfeet
Date: 29 Apr 98 - 12:06 AM

How about the Monty Python Disease song? That ought to count for some good STD's.

Catfeet


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 29 Apr 98 - 03:06 AM

I listened to the Carter Family song again. Between each of the verses I gave there is a chorus:

Chewin' chawin' gum
chawin' chewin' gum

This makes it a more self-contained song without the other verses.

Speaking of grossing out: There is an old parody on the popular song Jealousy called "Leprosy". I (happily) don't remember much of it--just one verse.

Leprosy, I suffer from leprosy
There goes my eyeball into my highball

but the rest isn't any better.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bruce O.
Date: 29 Apr 98 - 10:05 AM

Pauline, above, is also a fiddler.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Carl
Date: 29 Apr 98 - 11:22 AM

"Cod Liver Oil", not really medical, but sort of that. "Self-curing", at least for me. It cured me from listening pop-stuff only, for it has been on my first Dubliners record which made me become a folk freak (from the view of my friends...).


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Bert
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 05:00 PM

Auntie Maggie's Remedy


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Clarke
Date: 02 May 98 - 01:40 AM

To Bill D,

Thank you for the portion of the song you sent regarding songs appropriate for medical students. This is what I am looking for. Could you send me more verses and possibly a source that I could track down? Please send any other songs or ideas you may have.

Thanks,

Clarke


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Clarke
Date: 02 May 98 - 01:50 AM

Art Thieme,

Thank you Art for your contribution to songs appropriate for medical students. Do you know where I can find any songs by Urethra Franklin?

Clarke


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: alison
Date: 02 May 98 - 09:35 PM

Hi,

My hubby reading over my shoulder just suggested

"The first cut is the deepest." "Fever" "Mac the knife",

"The foot bone's connected to the ankle bone.......etc."

or what about the Peter Sellars & Sophia Loren one...... "My heart goes boom-biddy-boom-biddy,boom-biddy-boom-biddy,boom-biddy-boom-biddy,boom boom boom!!" Possibly called, "Well goodness gracious me."

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: Lyr Add: LIKE A SURGEON (Weird Al Yankovic/Madonna
From: alison
Date: 02 May 98 - 09:40 PM

Hi, Here's another classic from Weird Al Yankovic. (Obviously sung to the tune of "Like a virgin."

LIKE A SURGEON
("Like a Virgin"/Madonna/1984)

I finally made it through med school.
Somehow I made it through.
I'm just an intern, I still make a mistake or two.

I was last in the class,
Barely passed at the institute.
Now I'm tryin' to avoid
Yeah, I'm tryin' to avoid
A malpractice suit.

Hey, like a surgeon,
Cuttin' for the very first time.
Like a surgeon,
Organ transplants are my line.

Better give me all your gauze, nurse,
This patient's fading fast.
Complications have set in,
Don't know how long he'll last.

Let me see that IV
Here we go, time to operate.
I'll pull his insides out.
Pull his insides out,
And see what he ate.

Like a surgeon, hey!
Cuttin' for the very first time.
Like a surgeon,
Here's a waiver for you to sign.
Wo-ho. Wo-ho. Wo-ho

It's a fact. I'm a quack.
The disgrace of the AMA
'Cause my patients die.
Yeah, my patients die
Before they can pay.

Like a surgeon, hey!
Cuttin' for the very first time.
Like a surgeon.
Got your kidneys on my mind.

Like a surgeon, ooh hoo, like a surgeon,
When I reach inside
With my scalpel,
And my forceps,
And retractors.
Oh ho. Oh ho. Ooh, baby,
Yeah, I can hear your heart beat
For the very last time.

Enjoy Slainte Alison


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Subject: RE: Folk songs sung by medical students and doctor
From: Clarke
Date: 07 May 98 - 06:06 PM

From: cgdaniels@mindspring.com (Clarke Daniels) Subject: Medical Folk Music

Hi, I am a cardiologist who has recently retired. I am very interested in collecting "medical folk songs" similar to those which I learned as a medical student in the 1950's. These were songs which were sung at parties or in the local bar on weekends.Examples which appear in the Digital Traditions are "Ballad of Lydia Pinkham,"Dr.Freud",and "Coming Down with Old VD.I am particularly interested in songs, known to medical students and doctors, which they remember from their student days. Information about when and where it was heard would be very helpful also. Even if you don't have direct information but could refer me to another source, I would greatly appreciate it.

Clarke Daniels MD


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Subject: Lyr Add: The Four Able Physicans^^
From: Bill D
Date: 07 May 98 - 11:08 PM

The complete verses to the song above...sorry I lost track of finishing it...from a set of records of Elizabethan bawdy songs put out by Oscar Brand in the 60s..There was also a songbook published with most of the songs in it...I have the book and the condensed set of records..

THE FOUR ABLE PHYSICANS

You maidens and wives and young widows rejoice
Declare your thanksgiving with heart and with voice
Since waters were waters, I dare boldly say
There ne'er was such cause for a thanksgiving day

"From fair London town, there have lately come down,
"Four able physicians who never saw gown"
"Their physic is pleasant, their dosage is large
"And you may be cured without danger or charge"

"They have a new drug that is called the close hug
Which will mend your complexion, and make you look smug
A soverign balsam which, once well applied
Though grieved at the heart, the patient ne'er died

In the morning you need not be robbed of your rest,
For in your warm beds this physic works best
And though, in the taking, some stirring's required,
The motion's so pleasant, you cannot be tired.

"On your back you must lie,with your belly raised high
And one of these doctors must always be nigh
Who still will be ready to cover you warm
For if you take cold, all physic doth harm.

On silver or gold they never lay hold
For what comes so freely should never be sold;
Then join with the doctors and heartily pray
Their power of healing will never decay.


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Subject: Lyr Add: You're Gonna Need That Pure Religion^^
From: Nora
Date: 08 May 98 - 12:36 AM

I checked, and "You're gonna need that pure religion" has a verse about a doctor.

ch:
Yr gonna need that pure religion
hallelu
Yr gonna need that pure religion
hallelu
Yr gonna need that pure religion
pure religion take you home to heaven
Yr gonna need that pure religion
hallelu

Mother & father by the bed a cryin
hallelu
Mother & father by the bed a cryin
hallelu
Mother & father by the bed a cryin
Said, Lord have mercy our child is dyin
Yr gonna need that pure religion
hallelu

Doctor standing lookin sad
hallelu
Doctor standin lookin sad
hallelu
Doctor standin lookin sad
Let the lord have mercy our child is dead
Yr gonna need that pure religion
hallelu

chorus

See that train comin round the curve
hallelu
See that train comin round the curve
hallelu
See that train comin round the curve
Now she is strainin every nerve
Yr gonna need that pure religion
hallelu

From Lucinda Williams
"Ramblin"
Smithsonian Folkways 1991 reissue

Nora


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Subject: Lyr Add: My God How the Money Rolls In^^
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 08 May 98 - 01:40 AM

I may have missed it, but I haven't seen any mention of 'My God How The Money Rolls In' with:

My brother's a medical student,
With instrument's long, sharp and thin,
He only knows one operation,
My God how the money rolls in.

Regards
John


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Pauline Lerner
Date: 08 May 98 - 02:28 AM

Another verse to "Oh Lord How the Money Rolls In"

My grandpa makes cheap prophylactics He punches their heads with a pin, My grandma does quickie abortions Oh Lord how the money rolls in.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Pauline Lerner
Date: 08 May 98 - 02:36 AM

This one probably doesn't fit the definition of a folk song (whatever that is), but it has been chanted by generations of med students to remember the names of the cranial nerves. Unfortunately, I only know the clean version. Maybe someone can help with the other, more popular version.

On old Olympus's topmost top, a Finn and German valtz and hop.

The first letter of each word is also the first letter of the name of a cranial nerve.

Pauline


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Celtic-End Singer
Date: 08 May 98 - 09:12 AM

I was very interested to learn of your compiling of a medical folksong collection. As a medical student myself it would be really great if you could send me a copy when it's all done. I'm quite willing to pay for any (reasonable) expenses etc. Cheers!


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 08 May 98 - 10:06 PM

Medical Mnemonics- (CRanial nerves) On old Olympus' towering top A fast-assed German Viewed a hop.

My favorite is the one for the bones in the foot:

Never lower Tillie's pants; mother may come home.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Clarke
Date: 09 May 98 - 10:50 PM

To Bill D,Nora , John in Brisbane, Pauline Lerner, Celtic-EndSinger,and Dick Greenhaus:

Thank you all for your contributions to "Songs Appropriate for Medical Students." The medical mnemonics was an excellent idea which had not occured to me. I became nostalgic as I recalled the names of the cranial nerves and the tarsal bones that I had so slavishly memorized long ago.

Celtic-Endsinger, If you will send me your email address, I will let you know when a compilation of these songs is available. Please put me in touch with any of your classmates that you think may have knowledge of further songs.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: 'Berta'
Date: 10 May 98 - 08:42 PM

To be awfully graphic: a student of Radiology needed to know the principles of electricity as they were applied to ionizating radiation; that is, OHM'S LAW: The angle of the dangle is directly proportional to the heat of the meat! Appologies to all.... 'Berta


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Kyra
Date: 10 May 98 - 09:13 PM

Try "My Favorite Diseases" by Mike Agranoff, sung to the tune of "My Favorite Things". If you'd like the lyrics, send me an Email at kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org and I'll send them to you. I warn you, though, my Email might be down. If it gets rejected, just send it again a day or so later and it should get through to me.

Sla/n, Kyra


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Subject: Lyr Add: The Formulary Song^^
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 09:31 PM

I just discovered this thread when I put my name in the search box while looking for something else, and I'm happy to refresh it, as it's right up my artery--er, alley. Here is my piece called "The Formulary Song", which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1977, when I was a senior medical student. I sent a copy to Tom Lehrer, and he replied, "As a lifelong apostle of plagiarism, I certainly have no objection."
^^^
T he Formulary Song
by Mark Cohen
(to the tune of "I Am The Very Model of a Modern Major-General" by Gilbert and Sullivan, with acknowledgement--but no apology--to Tom Lehrer)

There's Aldomet and Atromid and Antivert and Atarax
And Dexamyl and Donnagel and Demerol and Dulcolax
There's Tylenol and Tegretol and Riopan and Regitine
And Pertofrane and Pavabid and also Pyribenzamine

Now if you're down there's Dexedrine and Benzedrine and Elavil
And if you're up there's Librium and Valium and Vistaril
There's Thorazine and Stelazine for calming schizophrenics with
There's Seconal for sleeping and for mania there's Eskalith

There's Benadryl and Gelusil and Placidyl and Peritrate
And Decadron and Parafon and Sinequan and Sorbitrate
And Miltown, Motrin, Medrol, Maalox, Myleran and Miradon
And Mycostatin, Micronor, Mandelamine and Mylicon

There's Omnipen and Principen and Tegopen and Torecan
And Betapen and Versapen and Pyopen and Percodan
There's Robitussin, Garamycin, also Butazolidin
And Furadantin, Coricidin, even Triaminicin

There's Dimetane and Dimetapp and Dymelor and Dimecol
And Diuril and Dialose and Diamox and Disophrol
There's Darvocet for headaches when you'd really rather stay at home
But if the other end is sore, the one you need is Proctofoam

I know you're getting weary and my song is getting pretty grim
With all these pharmaceuticals from Actifed to Zyloprim
But just imagine what would happen if I tried to fan the flames
By starting over once again and using all generic names
(Like hydrochlorothiazide and phenylpropanolamine
And propylthiouracil . . . I think you see just what I mean!)

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 09:37 PM

Oops! (I know doctors aren't supposed to say that, but what the hell...) I must have goofed and left out one line. Here's the corrected verse; maybe Joe can fix the original. Please?

There's Benadryl and Gelusil and Placidyl and Peritrate
And Decadron and Parafon and Sinequan and Sorbitrate
And Miltown, Motrin, Medrol, Maalox, Myleran and Miradon
And Mycostatin, Micronor, Mandelamine and Mylicon


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 10:07 PM

Thanks Mark for the Formulary Song. I'm sending it to my two favorite pharmacists. BTW, one bawdy version of the cranial nerves starts with Oh, Oh, Oh. I can't remember the rest. Also, "Dry Bones" above (the shin bone connected to the knee bone) has some alternate lyrics.

Mary


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Amos
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 10:38 PM

Now the doctah said, he said son you don't need no pills (2x)
Just a handful of nickels and a jukebox will cure your ills.
========

And:
===================
She went down to the doctor, to see what she could find
To see what she could find, o Lord, to make her old man blind!

O feed him eggs, and marrow bone, feed them to him whole,
And soon he'll be so gosh0darned blind that he won't see you at all!

(Eggs and Marrow Bone, trad., recorded by Richard Dyer-Bennett)
======================


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: reggie miles
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 11:20 PM

There's one that a friend Larry Heagle wrote called Vasectomy that seems to work well in medical settings.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Arkie
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 11:24 PM

How did Some Little Bug is Going to Get You Someday get left out of this?

Cho: For some little bug is going to get you someday.
Some little bug will creep behind you some day.
Then he'll send for his bug friends
And all your troubles they will end,
For some little bug is gonna find you someday.

It's in the database.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Marymac90
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 01:39 AM

Cocaine's for horses, not for men

Doctor said it'd kill me but he didn't say when

Cocaine, messin' around my brain

I was looking to see if I had a recording by some male member of People's Music Network of an extremely funny song describing a proctoscopic examination, but I don't think I do. Perhaps it wasn't so much the lyrics as the ASL interpretation, but it had us all ROTFL.

Another song performed at People's Music Network that same year was one by Ruth Pelham about breast cancer, something about your body being fine and lovable with 2 breasts, 1 breast, or no breasts.

What I did find when I was looking for the above were a couple of tapes I have by Mark Levy, featuring songs like "Every Sperm does not Deserve a Name" "Babies are Replacable" and "Waldeheimer's Disease".

Another group I know from People's Music Network is The Disabled in Action Singers. Their tape features "National Healthcare Blues", "Housecalls", and other related songs.

Ray Korona recorded a song called "Send me an Ambulance". He's also with People's Music Network, which, BTW, is meeting this coming weekend in Queens, NYC. Anyone who wants info about the PMN concert Friday, or workshops Sat and Sun, or these songs, please message me.

Peter Alsop wrote a kids' song called "My Body's no bodies Body but Mine", and Marcie Boyd added more adult lyrics to the chorus.

Hope this is helpful.

Mary McCaffrey


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 09:14 AM

Wel they may not be folk but I can recycle some suggestions from a previous Hallowe'en thread:
When you grow too old to scream (I'll have you to dismember)
Hey there (You with the bolt through your neck)
for plastic surgeons:
I'd grown acustomed to that face
and for cloners:
I want a girl just like the girl that married dear old dad
And one that would really suit most medical students:
I want a blow-up doll that I can call my own, the one the other fellows cannot steal [when I get home at night I will inflate her...]
If I ever have to go to hospital, I was only joking,guys!
RtS


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Nogs
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 03:23 PM

And to remind the prospective doctors that they are not gods in everyone's eyes:

From Nottingham Ale: And you doctors who more execution have done with powder and potion and bolus and pill . .

From 'A pint of old peculiar':
Forswear I say their physics all, let no such doctors rule 'yer
The one true cure, the nostrum sure,
A pint of Old Peculiar

Also from 'Delia's Gone':
Sent for the Doctor, doctor came too late,
Sent for the minister to lay out Delia straight

Nogs (MD)


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: lamarca
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 03:54 PM

There are a couple of songs about Burke and Hare, the infamous body-snatchers of Edinburgh - they stole bodies to sell to the medical school for dissection. When business picked up, they stopped waiting for already dead bodies, and started "helping" local bums become corpses...

One version is in the DT here.

There's a different song on the same topic performed by Ed Miller on his "Live at the Cactus Cafe" CD - the chorus goes:

Burke and Hare were a terrible pair,
Their deeds were beyond belief
For they worked underground in Edinburgh town
The cruelest kind of thief.

Then there's the old-time single entendre song, "Then It Won't Hurt No More", about a young lady who goes to the doctor/dentist to fix what ails her. It doesn't seem to be in the DT, but Double Decker Stringband does a fine rendition of it on one of their albums. If I get time later, I'll transcribe it.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Jeri
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 05:13 PM

From a former Public Health weenie - there's a song by Tom Lehrer called something like "I gave it to Agnes," but I can't find it in the DB, so I may have the wrong title. I seem to recall it's in a his book, and I seem to recall I have the book...somewhere.

I can't believe nobody's mentioned this, to the tune of "Yesterday," but I can't find it in the DB either. I'm sure there are more verses:

Leprosy
All my parts are falling off of me
I'm not half the man I used to be
Oh, I think I have leprosy
Why my nose had to go I don't know
It didn't say
...(can't remember)...
Syphilis
Now it even hurts to take a piss (poetic license - not technically correct)
Oh, how did I end up like this
I think I have syphilis...

And I used to sing this when I was learning how to do fecal exams in a school for vet technicians. To the tune of "Feelings" -
Feces, nothing more than feces...


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: reggie miles
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 05:21 PM

Arkie, an excellent choice. Someone who works in a sterilization unit for a local hospital just asked me for a copy of my rendition of "Some Little Bug". So they could use it as part of a class to train newbies to the profession.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 10:41 PM

If you search for @doctor in DIgiTrad, you'll get 13 hits. If you search for songs that mention doctor or doctors. you'll get well over 100. Not to mention gems like Our Baby Died Last Night. And all of the variations of UInfortunate Rake that have our hero perishing of syphilis, or white mercury (a cure for syphilis0) or pila cotia (Ltin for white mercury.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mbo
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 10:47 PM

Know all about that Proctofoam...if only Tom new how deadly serious "sore" can be.

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: BillFisher
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 11:02 PM

By the Time I Get to Pharynx

A song about STD's: Careless Love


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Amos
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 11:10 PM

Stereotypical student MD's should be required to learn "It's Only A Wee-Wee, So What's All the Fuss?".

A.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,sheila
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 11:17 PM

Edinburgh folkies and medical students used to sing Stuart McGregor's 'Sandy Bell's Man', about a young girl led astray by an Edinburgh medic.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: catspaw49
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 11:35 PM

Probably a little more for undertaker's but also can work for the medico's, I posted this one awhile back...CLANK HERE...Kinda' the story of my life.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: John Moulden
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 08:26 AM

Try the Poem - by Thomas Hood called "Mary's Ghost" singable to various Irish tunes - pick your own - It's about body snatching and anatomy.

The last stanza is:

The day does dawn, the cock does crow It's time for us to part, You'll always be my lover Though some doctor has my heart You need not go weep on my grave And think that there I be There ain't a single atom left Of my anatomy.

Hood wrote another body snatching poem called "Jack Hall" and Robert Southey wrote the wonderful "Surgeon's Warning" - perhaps not singable but great stuff.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,blind desert pete
Date: 30 Jan 00 - 04:46 PM

RE: Crainial nerves. Oh Oh Oh to touch and feel a girls vagina such heaven


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 30 Jan 00 - 05:05 PM

Touching on the surgeon/barber theme, try the DigiTrad and look up 'Sweeney Todd the Barber'..... guaranteed to keep you off the pork pies for a while.... and amusing to boot.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Dave (the ancient mariner)
Date: 30 Jan 00 - 06:14 PM

Melanie Safka's version of Psychotherapy. And the Id goes marching on. Yours,Aye.Dave


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 30 Jan 00 - 06:30 PM

Mbo, I didn't mean to downplay the seriousness of the affliction, it just fit well that way. You raise a good point, though. Medically related humor is always tricky because you're dealing with people's pain and distress. Unfortunately, medical training is stressful and medical students often tend to attack others' weaknesses when they feel inadequate. I'm afraid it's part of the human condition--it's certainly not limited to medical students--and I confess to doing my share. (That's one reason I don't perform my VD song anymore.) Much of what is considered humorous by some people is offensive to some people in some contexts at some times. But we keep muddling through, hopefully with good humor, and can try not to offend but to amuse.
Sorry for the sermon...it just broke out.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 08:07 PM

I found a wonderful book titled The Biochemists' Songbook which puts the words to 19 different biochemical processes (or syntheses or whatever) to the tunes of "well-known" songs. I am certainly not a biochemist, but this little book looks like a gem! Here's the book info and a table of contents. My source (college student) says it's available from BarnesandNoble.com but not Amazon.com. There are complex biochemical diagrams, music notation and an average of ten verses for each song.

The Biochemists' Songbook
2nd edition
by Harold Baum
foreword by Sir Hans Krebs
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 1995
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data ISBN 07484 04163
Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication data are available

CONTENTS:

The Michaelis Anthem -- Tune: The Red Flag
The Praise of E.M.P. -- Tune: The British Grenadiers
Waltz Round the Cycle -- Tune: Waltzing Matilda
&$223; Oxidation -- Tune: There is a Tavern in the Town
The Battle Hymn of the Aerobes: The Battle Hymn of the Republic
The Chemiosmotic Theory -- Tune: The Eton Boating song
Photosynthesis -- Tune: Auld Lang Syne
Blood Sugar -- Tune : The Road to the Isles
The Glyoxylate Cycle -- Tune: The Lincolnshire Poacher
The Pentose Phosphate Shunt -- Tune: Macnamara's Band
Fatty Acid Biosynthesis -- Tune: Men of Harlech
We're Here Because Urea -- Tune: The Bold Gendarmes
Protein Biosynthesis -- Tune: My Bonny Lies Over the Ocean
Haem Biosynthesis -- Tune: A Policeman's Lot is not a Happy One
Metaboliam of Odd-Number Carbon Fatty Acids -- Tune: Tit Willow
Regulation of Ketogenesis -- Tune: Clementine
Purine Biosynthesis -- Tune: Camptown Races
Cholesterol Biosynthesis -- Tune: Cwm Rhondda
A Cautionary Carol -- Tune: Good King Wenceslas


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 08:12 PM

Make that fourth one ß Oxidation


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Crowhugger
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 08:39 PM

Lovely loco locus!


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Feb 00 - 01:57 PM

Well, they call me the doctor (yeah, yeah!) In my neigborhood (yeah, yeah!) But my baby she calls me (yeah, yeah!) Doctor Feelgood (yeah, yeah!)

Sorry, I can't remember any more.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 16 Feb 00 - 08:11 PM

Mary in Kentucky-

Don't list 'em; post 'em!


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Subject: Lyr Add: SURGERY (Oscar Brand)
From: Arkie
Date: 16 Feb 00 - 09:02 PM

How about this one?

SURGERY by Oscar Brand

Why not be an operator,
Cut it now and sew it later,
Surgery is where the heavy dough is.
If a patient's got ptomaine,
You can free him from the pain,
Soon as you discover where the toe is.

Chorus:
Surgery, surgery,
First you cut and then you stitch
Cut it out and you'll be rich;
Surgery, surgery,
There's no peril, Keep it sterile,
Surgery

Why waste time in diagnosis,
Life can be a bed of roses
And you never have to work your rear off
Your stream of life will soon be ripple-less
If he comes down with Erysipelas
All you have to do is take his ear off

Chorus:


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Subject: Lyr Add: APPENDECTOMY COUNTRY STYLE (Oscar Brand)
From: Arkie
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 12:41 AM

Or how about this?

APPENDECTOMY - COUNTRY STYLE
Oscar Brand

Wash your hands and get them dry,
Keep them clean and keep them high,
When you're sure that you are able,
Promenade up to the table and get that appendix, lay it bare,
We're doing the McBurney Square.

Now drape that patient neat and tight,
Bare the quadrant of the lower right,
Do si do and careful all, while you make an incision in that wall.
Right hand under if you dare
Doing the McBurney Square.

Swing that knife blade, with a toss,
Along the muscles, not across,
With your fingers then induce the pertoneum to work loose,
You mustn't rip and you mustn't tear
Doing the McBurney Square.

When the cavity's been breached,
The secum and appendix reached,
Put a purse string suture on the base and sprinkle guaze pads round the place,
Duck for the oyster, I declare
Doing that McBurney Square.

With a pertoneal cuff inside,
Crush, ligate and then divide
Swing your partner, I'll swing mine, paint the stump with iodine,
Now force it back again with care
Doing that McBurney Square.

Tie the purse string very tight,
Suture the pertoneum right,
Let those muscles settle in, then count the pads and close the skin,
Salute the patient, collect your fee,
You've done the Appendectomy.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 04:13 PM

After posting the above excerpt of "Doctor Feel-Good" I spent a good deal of time searching the web for the lyrics. I never succeeded, but I was able to find out this much: It was written by Willie Lee "Piano Red" Perryman (1911-85), recorded by him in 1961, and published as a single on the Okeh label (#7144). It became a big hit, so that Perryman subsequently adopted "Doctor Feelgood" as his stage name, and when he brought out an album in 1962, it was called "Doctor Feelgood and the Interns." Fascinating, huh?

Now perhaps someone with more skill or determination than I will continue the search. I'm giving up.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Mark Cohen
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 06:30 PM

Thanks, Arkie! I'll have to learn these and do them for my surgeon friends.

Aloha (from Eugene Oregon today)
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Crowhugger
Date: 18 Feb 00 - 08:00 AM

I always wondered how surgeons were trained.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Crowhugger
Date: 06 Apr 00 - 08:38 AM

KT, maybe something here...


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 17 May 00 - 02:28 PM

I once had a physics prof who taught us a song to the tune of Men of Harlech, which incorporated some formulas to memorise.
Reviewing anatomy and physiology on-line today, I found a muscle song included in the outline notes at http://www.cs.ndsu.nodak.edu/~revie/notes/bio131/apch10.htm
If you don't want to read all the notes do a search for the word "song" on the page. I expect you may find other songs if you go to the home page and look through the other biology notes at this site.

I was at a waulking song workshop with Anna Martin recently. She showed us how the songs kept the rhythyms for fulling the tweed and I was wondering if I could work up a song sequence to do massage by. There's a challenge for someone, the rhythyms have to flow from effleurage through to hacking and cupping and back to effleurage. ... although I've always said I don't like to hear music while giving or receiving massage, that it's too distracting.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,David Richoux (KFJC FM)
Date: 26 Jun 02 - 12:17 AM

Hi, I just happened to find this site & forum while researching a favorite song. Earlier in the thread someone mentions "SOME LITTLE BUG IS GOING TO FIND YOU" and the Mudcat database gives this reference to the lyric:

Note: Surprisingly enough, this dates back to the 1890s. Brad Kincaid recorded it in the 30's, Phil Harris recorded it in the 1940s. Sally Rogers recorded it on Love Will Guide Us, Flying Fish. RG

From what I know about this song, it was written in 1915 (maybe it was influenced by the influenza epidemic of that year) Music by: Silvio Hein Lyrics by: Benjamin Hapgood Burt and Roy Atwell for a Franz Lehar Operetta "Alone At Last" and made popular by Roy Atwell. You can see a image of the song sheet at http://www.parlorsongs.com/issues/2000-9/2000-9.asp

BTW, There is a fine recording of this song by Eubie Blake and Ivan Harold Browning that was recorded in 1972.

Standard disclamers apply - this info came off the internet, after all...


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 26 Jun 02 - 06:20 AM

I recently overheard an unknown member of the audience who seemed to have several verses that were "cute," although I only caught:

To the tune of (Come to me my) Melancholy Baby -

Never give Viagra to a lawyer,
'Cause it only makes them tall...

Anyone recognize it?

John


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Fossil at home
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 05:51 AM

Loudon Wainwright III: "I went to the Doctor".

Must be on his website somewhere.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Genie
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:51 AM

"...and the doctor said, "Give 'em jug band music. It's bound to make 'em feel just fine!"

§;- D


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mrrzy
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 11:53 AM

I had Dr. Freud by the Gateway Singers at the Hungry I, but I wouldn't be surprised if the KTrio did it too.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: DonD
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 12:37 PM

Learned men that use the pen
Have writ your praises high
You sweet poteen from Ireland green
That's made from corn and rye.
So away all pills, it'll cure all ills
Be you Christian, Pagan or Jew
Take off your coat, open up your throat
To the dear old mountan dew.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 04:26 PM

How about 'Pills' or 'Cholesterol', both by Glaswegian Adam McNaughtan? And 'Cod Liver Oil' (the one without the Orange Juice - the music hall song made popular by The Dubliners)?
I'd love to know which songs Clarke chose and how the students reacted to them!

BTW, the 'Burke and Hare' song Iamarca quoted far above was written by Robin Laing.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Cappuccino
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 04:37 PM

In Edinburgh once I saw a great band of medical students, playing under the name of The Peristalsis Five.

It is, apparently, the movement of the bowel.

- ian B


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Genie
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 05:24 PM

Isn't there a punk or grunge band called "Smegma?"


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: redcogs
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 05:28 PM

How about 'Digging graves is my delight a digging graves for you to lie in every morning every night I makes me living from the dying


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Genie
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 10:13 PM

I know it's not a folk song, but Miss Adelaide's Lament (from Guys and Dolls) is perfect for med students.  Miss Adelaide (Sky Masterson's moll) keeps reading medical textbook descriptions of "post nasal drip" and other sinus cavity ailments and their relation to socio-emotional issues.  Each verse of these descriptions ends with

"in other words, ...
a person can develop a cold."

Then there's another non-folk one that's relevant:
"Doctor, Doctor, gimme the news!<BR>
I gotta bad case o' lovin' you!"


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE PHYSICIAN (Cole Porter)
From: Jeanie
Date: 29 Jun 02 - 06:36 PM

As we've moved into "non-folk," here's "THE PHYSICIAN," music and lyrics by Cole Porter, recorded by Gertrude Lawrence 1933:

Once I loved such a shattering physician,
Quite the best looking doctor in the state.
And his bedside manner was great.
When I'd gaze up and see him there above me,
Looking less like a doctor than a Turk,
I was tempted to whisper, "Do you love me,
Or do you merely love your work?"

He said by bronchial tubes were entrancing,
My epiglottis filled him with glee,
He simply loved my larynx
And went wild about my pharynx,
Be he never said he loved me.

He said my epidermis was darling,
And found my blood as blue as could be,
We went through wild ecstatics
When I showed him my lymphatics,
But he never said he loved me.

And though, no doubt,
It was not very smart of me,
I kept on a-wracking my soul
To figure out
Why he loved every part of me,
And yet not me as a whole.

With my esophagus he was ravished,
Enthusiastic to a degree,
He said 'twas just enormous,
My appendix vermiformis,
But he never said he loved me.

He said my cerebellum was brilliant,
And my cerebrum far from N.G.,
I know he thought a lotta
My medulla oblongata,
But he never said he loved me.

He said my maxillaries were marvels,
And found my sternum stunning to see,
He did a double hurdle
When I shook my pelvic girdle,
But he never said he loved me.

He seemed amused
When he first made a test of me
To further his medical art,
Yet he refused
When he'd fix up the rest of me,
To cure that ache in my heart.

I know he thought my pancreas perfect,
And for my spleen was keen as could be,
He said of all his sweeties
I'd the sweetest diabetes,
But he never said he loved me.

He said my vertebrae were "sehr schoene,"
And called my coccyx "plus que gentil,"
He murmured "molta bella"
When I sat on his patella,
But he never said he loved me.

He took a fleeting look at my thorax,
And started singing slightly off-key,
He cried, "My Heaven strike us",
When I played my umbilicus,
But he never said he loved me.

As it was dark,
I suggested we walk about
Before he returned to his post.
Once in the park,
I induced him to talk about
The thing I wanted the most.

He lingered on with me until morning,
Yet when I tried to pay him his fee,
He said, "Why, don't be funny,
It is I who owe you money,"
But he never said he loved me.

Some of the cranial nerve mnemonics listed above would have been a lot easier to learn than the one were taught at school for 'O' Level Human Biology:
"Old opticians occasionally trot triumphantly around fairs auctioning green vases and hydrangeas" - I always thought the actual names of the nerves would have been easier to remember than that sentence!

- jeanie

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 1-Jul-02.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Donuel
Date: 29 Jun 02 - 06:44 PM

The TV show Scrubs has had lots of digusting medical school songs.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 29 Jun 02 - 08:16 PM

In haste - I haven't read the whole thread, so sorry if this is a repeat:

Oh doctor, oh doctor, oh Dr De Jong
Your cod liver oil is so sweet and so strong
Oh Dr De Jong, I'll go down in the soil
If my wife don't stop drinking your cod-liver oil

and many other bawdy verses.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Genie
Date: 29 Jun 02 - 11:17 PM

For patients who've just been stabbed with a hypodermic:

"I've got you under my skin..."

Then there's the classic "Found a peanut." Among the umpteen kazillion verses, you find:

"It was rotten (x3) just now...
"Ate it anyhow (x3) just now ...
"'Pendicitis (x3) just now...
"Operattion (x3) just now...
"Died anyway (x3) just now... (etc.)

Genie


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Genie
Date: 29 Jun 02 - 11:25 PM

For cardiologists:
How Can You Mend A Broken Heart?

For Pharmacists:
Love Potion Number Nine

For Dermatologists:
Poison Ivy

For Psychiatrists:
Me and My Shadow ... not a soul to tell our troubles to...
You're Just In Love (Irving Berlin) : "I hear singing and there's no one there; I smell blossoms and the trees are bare; All day long I seem to walk on air. I wonder why...


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 02 - 07:18 PM

See DOCTOR BROWN.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: maire-aine
Date: 03 Jul 02 - 09:00 PM

Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake, maybe. "It could kill a man twice after eatin' a slice...."


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,another guest
Date: 03 Jul 02 - 11:07 PM

Paddy Kelly's brew---verse 2 It will cure the rheumatism it will cure a wheezy chest it will cure away the gout and gallstones too toothach headache backache losing hair and all the rest fallen arches corns and bunions and the flu.

and it tastes as sweet as honey as it trickles down your throat its pure and clear its just like mountain dew it would make a fellow sing tho he didnt have a note wont you try a drop of Paddy Kelly's brew


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 09:01 AM

Kevin Barry

Regards


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Subject: Lyr add: Sir John and the Magic Castle
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 01:53 PM

Here's one that I wrote when I was a medical student. I don't believe I've posted them before. It's a parody of "Fair Margaret and Sweet William", which I believe is a Child ballad; I'll leave it to Masato or one of the other scholars to figure out which! Warning: not for the faint-hearted.

[A brief explanation: My medical school, Penn State U.'s Hershey Medical Center, was a gleaming white building that was built in the middle of a cornfield outside Hershey, Pennsylvania (Chocolate Town, USA), so from a distance it really does look a bit like a magic castle. Anyone who's been to a major medical center won't need any more explanation of the song. Oh...3rd and 4th year medical students in the hospital were called "clinical clerks".]

SIR JOHN AND THE MAGIC CASTLE
lyrics (c)1976 Mark Cohen, tune trad (Fair Margaret and Sweet William)

Sir John awoke on a gray morning, he felt so terribly bad
"I have a pain in my belly," he said, "the worst I've ever had"

He dragged himself out of his bed and found his friend William Brown
"Oh, take me to that white castle now, that stands in Hershey Town"

"Oh have no fear, Sir John dear friend, oh have no fear" said he
"I'll take you to that magic castle now, and better you'll soon be"

"Oh take me there with haste, my friend, for I am terribly sore"
He gave a cry that cracked the sky, and then he gave one more

They rode so fast and they rode so far, the castle soon they spied
But they had to go through a twisted maze, before they got inside

The signs they misdirected them, the door was very well hid
Sir John stopped once to bring up his lunch, and was quite glad he did

At last they came upon the door, but when they stepped within
A demon there was sitting in a chair, on its face an evil grin

"Oh demon what want you of us?" said William bold and brave
"My friend Sir John is so very ill, he's almost in his grave"

"It is not much I want of you," the demon said with a smirk
"Your name, your age, your next of kin, where you live, and where you work

Then you must fill out all these forms, and press full hard with your pen
Sign here, and here, and also here" -- Sir John threw up again

They took Sir John into a room, and thirteen people came in
And each one had a different idea of what was wrong with him

Said one, "Let's have him swallow this tube, and then I'll look within"
Said another, "No, the only way we'll know is by opening up his skin"

Then up there spoke a third-year clerk: "Sir, when was your last stool?"
"Why, four days ago," said good Sir John, "and I'm regular, as a rule"

The clerk then donned his rubber glove, the rest you surely can guess
Said a happy Sir John, "Of all you wise men here, this young one is the best"

I'll end my story here and now, but please remember my friend
The third-year clerk who saved the day, with a finger in...The End

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 02:07 PM

Here's the original, and the tune: Fair Margaret and Sweet William, Child 74 (page includes MIDI). The tune is apparently one of two versions collected by Cecil Sharp.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Deda
Date: 04 Jul 02 - 03:53 PM

A fun thread! The one just above it when I opened it was "falorum dingdorum" (from "Maids when you're young") which has some great lyrics for anatomy students.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Argenine
Date: 05 Jul 02 - 03:48 PM

Jeanie, thanks for that Cole Porter song! The man had a way with words, din't 'e?


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Erin
Date: 05 Jul 02 - 07:30 PM

I THINK I've read all the entries so far....and I didn't see the following parody of "Side By Side" (some people know it as "Oh, We Ain't Got a Barrel of Money")

Well, I got married last Friday
My new wife stood beside me
When the guests had all gone
We stood alone
Side by Side

We really knew we were wed then
So we got ready for bed then
When her false teeth and hair
She laid on a chair
Side by Side

One tin leg to follow,
one glass eye so small
Then she unscrewed her left arm
And put it on the chair by the wall

Well, here I stand broken hearted
Most of my wife has departed
So I slept by the chair
There was more of her there
Side by Side


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: kytrad (Jean Ritchie)
Date: 06 Jul 02 - 06:03 PM

I haven't time to read all above carefully, but I don't think this one was mentioned: "Pretty Sally," and old ballad often sung by Horton Barker, and a beauty. Sad, though.

Another which I used to sing for medical students- it always made them laugh: Leadbelly's, "Irene, Goodnight," which has the verse:

I love Irene, God knows I do,
Love'er till till the seas run dry-
But if Irene turn'er back on me,
I'll take morphine and die!


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Nogs
Date: 20 Jan 03 - 02:03 PM

the wordsto the song that northfolk was referring to above 4/28/98 can be found at http://www.joelmabus.com/1097_lyrics.htm#druggist


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Rapparee
Date: 20 Jan 03 - 04:54 PM

Someone has probably set this to music, since it was popular eith the children of the time:

Up the close and down the stair
But and ben w' Burke and Hare
Burke's the butcher Hare's the thief
And Knox's the boy who buys the beef.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 20 Jan 03 - 07:56 PM

Rapaire, I've heard it sung by Nancy Nicolson, but have been looking for a recording for years without success. 'Burke and Hare' on Robin Laing's Edinburgh Skyline CD is a different song.


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Subject: Lyr Add: COCONUT (Harry Nilsson)
From: Arkie
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 12:31 AM

COCONUT
Harry Nilsson

Brother bought a coconut. He bought it for a dime.
His sister had another one. She paid it for a lime.

She put the lime in the coconut. She drank them both up.
She put the lime in the coconut. She drank them both up.
She put the lime in the coconut. She drank them both up.
She put the lime in the coconut. She called the doctor, woke him up

And said, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, to relieve this belly ache?"
I say, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take,"
I say, "Doctor, to relieve this belly ache?"
"Now let me get this straight:

"Put the lime in the coconut. You drank them both up.
Put the lime in the coconut. You drank them both up.
Put the lime in the coconut. You drank them both up.
Put the lime in the coconut. You called your doctor, woke him up,

And say, "Doctor, ain't there nothing I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, to relieve this belly ache?"
I say, "Doctor, doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, dooooctor, to relieve this belly ache?"

Put the lime in the coconut. Drink them both together.
Put the lime in the coconut, then you feel better.
Put the lime in the coconut. Drink them both up.
Put the lime in the coconut and call me in the morning.

Wouh wouh wouh wouh wouh.
Brother bought a coconut. He bought it for a dime.
His sister had another one. she paid it for a lime.

She put the lime in the coconut. She drank them both up.
She put the lime in the coconut. She called the doctor, woke him up.

Say, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, to relieve this belly ache?"
I say, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say "Doctor! Let me get this straight:

"You put the lime in the coconut, drink them both up.
You put the lime in the coconut, drink them both up.
You put the lime in the coconut, drink them both up.
Put the lime in the coconut. you such a silly woman!,

Put the lime in the coconut. Drink them both together.
Put the lime in the coconut, t ain't there nothing I can take hen you feel better.
Put the lime in the coconut. Drink them both down.
Put the lime in the coconut, and call me in the morning."

"Woo Woo, ain't there nothin' you can take?" I say,
"Woo Woo, to relieve my belly ache?"
You say, "woo woo, ain't there nothin' I can take?" I say,
"Woo woo, to relieve your belly ache?"

You say, "yah yah, ain't there nothin' I can take?" I say,
"Waah waah, to relieve this belly ache?"
I say, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take?"
I say, "Doctor, you such a silly woman!,

"Put the lime in the coconut. Drink them both together.
Put the lime in the coconut, then you feel better.
Put the lime in the coconut. Drink them both up.
Put the lime in the coconut, and call me in the moooooorning.

"Yes, you call me in the morning,
If you call me in the morning, then X5


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Santa
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 02:58 PM

Strawhead tend to end their act with a rousing rendition of "Here's to the Colo-Rectal Surgeon" complete with gestures that really cannot be repeated on a family forum.

The chorus goes something like

"Here's to the Colo-Rectal Surgeon,
Misunderstood and much-maligned
Slaving away in the heart of darkness
Working where the sun don't shine."

The verses are fortunately gone beyond recall.....but they certainly amused the medical member of this family (and the non-medical ones).


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Subject: Lyr Add: ANYBODY ILL?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 05:09 PM

Lyr. Add: ANYBODY ILL?

I am a learned surgeon, and my name is Doctor Quack,
My draughts and pills, to cure your ills, I carry on my back,
My med'cines are the nastiest that ever cured a pain,
If once you've tasted them I know you'd ne'er be ill again.

Chorus:
Then oh, my! Anybody ill, anybody ill,
Anybody ill, oh my Hi!
I'm Doctor Quack, quack, quack-a-ka-quack,I cure you of any attack,
I've syrup of squills and I've camomile pills,
And my name is Doctor Quack.

I've lotions for the measles and I've powders for the croup.
I cure the girls of whooping cough by taking off their hoop,
My plaisters are so very strong, they draw out all your teeth,
And last week drew a ton of coals from here to Hampstead Heath.

I've pills for the complexion if you rub it in at night,
If you've been red as beetroot, in the morning you'll be white,
They'll cure a smoky fire and take away the kettle's boil,
They're made of railway grease and soap, Dutch cheese and castor oil.

I've got a syrup you can take for tooth ache in the nose,
I've powders for a wooden arm, and pills for timber toes.
I stop the mouths of scolding wives, their double teeth I draw,
I clap a padlock on their tongues which makes them hold their jaw.

I've ointment for a mother-in-law, she swallows half a pound,
She'll never trouble you again for she will sleep so sound,
Who'll have a gross of leeches? Shall I put them on your back?
You won't- then he must go elsewhere to trade, must Doctor Quack.

I've heard a doctor sing this to MacNamara's Band, and do the chorus with a little music hall-minstrel hop. Quite funny.

Bodleian Library, printed by R. March, 1881-1884, Firth b.28(4a/b)


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE FUNNY FARM (Homer & Jethro)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Dec 03 - 12:40 AM

Lyrics transcribed from the sound file at http://www.geocities.com/u2page6/

THE FUNNY FARM (tune: When Johnny Comes Marching Home)
(As sung by Homer & Jethro)

I took a short vacation on my doctor's good advice.
Four men in white escorted me. They treated me so nice.
They strapped me in a jacket till I couldn't move an arm,
An' now I am patient out at the funny farm.

CHORUS: The nurses drink. The doctors drink. The patients do the same.
While we are psychoanalyzed, we sip our pink champagne.
Before I'd sell my padded cell, I'd amputate my arm.
I'd be a lunatic to ever leave the funny farm.

I can't help feelin' sorry for the guy right next to me.
He thinks that he's a refrigerator, strange as it may be.
The doctors don't believe it an' I think that he's a fake,
But when he opens up his mouth, the light keeps me awake. CHORUS

A guy thinks he's a chicken, but I'm sure that he is wrong.
He sits out in the chicken coop an' cackles all day long.
The doctor never tries to cure him though he begs and begs,
For they get sixty cents a dozen when they sell the eggs. CHORUS

[Recorded by Homer & Jethro on "Fractured Folk Songs," 1964; and "The Playboy Song," 1968.]


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Sean
Date: 12 Dec 03 - 05:11 AM

The Humours of whiskey
Tippin it up to Nancy


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Subject: Lyr Add: A NOTE OF THANKS TO DR. REES
From: Howard Kaplan
Date: 20 Nov 05 - 09:30 PM

Five years and ten months ago (January 2000), Marymac90 posted this paragraph:
I was looking to see if I had a recording by some male member of People's Music Network of an extremely funny song describing a proctoscopic examination, but I don't think I do. Perhaps it wasn't so much the lyrics as the ASL interpretation, but it had us all ROTFL.
I found her posting today while following links from another thread ("Where can I buy leeches & medical songs"), and I am pleased to be able to provide more details. I wrote A Note of Thanks to Dr. Rees in 1994, and you can click on the link to find a lead sheet and a MIDI file of the melody. Here are just the lyrics:

Doctor Rees (colon): I'm writing this letter
To thank you for what I have recently learned.
After our talk, I now understand better.
That would not be so, had you not been concerned.
Needing more facts, I perused the collection
The library keeps; I found quite a good book.
So now, I know much about rectal inspection,
Though rectums are places I rarely need look.

When we succeed with this change we've been trying,
When few folk will smoke, through persuasion and laws,
We'll see a change in statistics of dying,
With lung cancer being a less prominent cause.
Next behind lungs on the list as a locus
Where tumours develop, in rich lands like these,
Are rectum and colon, and so we must focus
On them, in our work of preventing disease.

Some say it helps to consume much more fibre
And rarely eat Häagen-Dazs, lamb chops, or Brie;
Those vegetarians I've met in cyber-
Space out on the Internet tend to agree.
But, for the millions who won't change their diet,
Although that would also be good for the heart,
There is a technique, if they're willing to try it,
That often ensures no malignancies start.

The flexible sigmoidoscope was invented
To enter our guts through the holes in their ends
Where feces well coloured and gases ill scented
Both exit the body. It threads through the bends
In the sigmoid, the part of the colon just over
The rectum that's shaped like an "S", and can go
Inside the left colon. It's used to discover
Conditions for which, perhaps, no symptoms show.

Polyps are growths that should not be occurring.
The ones in the bowel, when young, are benign,
But they can enlarge, and there's danger deferring
Removal, because, when they're old, they malign.
Most bowel polyps, statistics have shown us,
Are found near the sigmoid. A primary care
Physician can look for them, and, as a bonus,
Remove them, by using a scope and a snare.

Fibres bring outside light in to illumine;
An image is focused on fibres of glass.
Three millimetres wide, there's enough room in
The biopsy channel for thin tools to pass.
One has a loop on its end, which is tightened
To snare polyps' bases, then current's applied,
And heat cuts their stalks as the flesh becomes whitened.
A biopsy's made from the parts that weren't fried.

And so, Doctor Rees, thanks again for these verses
That I'd not have written without your request.
We, who must visit physicians and nurses,
Should try to keep current with what they suggest.
As it ascends, up that slippery slope in
The base of my gut, every three years or two,
When I feel the flexible sigmoidoscope in
My rectum, I'll surely be thinking of you.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: breezy
Date: 21 Nov 05 - 03:45 AM

'Transplant calypso' written awhile ago by Jeremy taylor doesnt appear to have been mentioned here

Jeremy -who had a big hit with 'Ag Pleez deddy' - will be appearing at the Windward Folk club at the Comfort Hotel in St Albans UK on Sunday 27th Nov 2005

on Fri 25th it'll be george papavgeris


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Subject: Terrible Operation Blues,RE: for medical students
From: robd
Date: 05 Oct 09 - 06:52 PM

So sad I missed this one, but since these threads may yet serve a useful purpose someday. And, a quick search of the site finds only a single mention of the song, but no words. I first heard Magpie sing it, and they credited Homer Clemons and his Texas Swing Billies.


TERRIBLE OPERATION BLUES
Thomas A. Dorsey aka. Georgia Tom - 1930

Bring in the next patient, nurse

Get up on this table, pull off that gown
Raise up that right leg, let that left one down
Pull off them stockings, that silk underwear
The doctor's got to cut you, mama, don't know where
You got two or three tumors, shaped like a cube
Two or three leaks in your inner tube
Bring on that ether, bring on that gas
The doctor's got to cut you, mama, yas, yas, yas
The doctor knows to fix it, the doctor knows just what to do

Oh doctor, can I have a glass of water?
Oh, not now
Oh doctor, I'm so sick!
Sh, be quiet, doctor ain't gonna hurt you
Oh, what you gonna do with that long knife?
Oh, that's just the doctor's tools
Oh doctor, what you gon' do with that saw?
Oh, we take off legs with that, that's all
Ooooh!
Be quiet, now, just a moment
There you are, the doctor's through!
Oh doctor, what did you take out of me?
Oh, just a minute, I'll tell you, dear

Four monkey wrenches, two horse-shay
Pair of old britches and a bale of hay
Your ribs were kinda loosened, they moved about
If I hadn't sewed you up, everything woulda fell out
I put in new tubes, tightened up the exhaust
Went into your hood and cleaned your spark plugs off
Your body's kinda weak, don't be hard
From now on you'll be careful with them there connection rods
Alright, doctor!

The doctor knows to fix it, the doctor knows just what to do
Gee, doctor, but I feel better
That so?
Yes, I feel kinda like I wanna do a little messin' 'round
Fine, go ahead!
Ooooh, my my my my
That's the way patients do that come to this hospital

Your body's kinda weak, don't be hard
From now on you'll be careful with them there connection rods
Alright, doctor!
The doctor knows to fix it, the doctor knows just what to do


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Jack Campin
Date: 05 Oct 09 - 07:46 PM

Tom Lehrer's song about the epidemiology of STDs: I Got It From Agnes.


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Gweltas
Date: 05 Oct 09 - 08:14 PM

How about "Lily The Pink" and her wonderful "Medicinal Compound " ??


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,fantum
Date: 06 Oct 09 - 08:13 AM

PILLS OF WHITE MERCURY straight out of the database


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: sing4peace
Date: 06 Oct 09 - 08:30 PM

Here's one my Dad wrote to the tune of "The Rickets Hornpipe"

Rickets, berri-berri and pellagra too
Can be caused by not enough of vitamins in you
Lousy vision after dark
And even colds and flu
These symptoms can be caused they say
By lack of vitamins in you.

You may think you're having fun
But without the vitamin [pronounced vita-mun]
Your bones get soft they start to itch
Your ankles weigh a ton
So if you have to go to sea for any length of time
Be sure that once a week
You get to eat
a carrot and a lime.

Forget about psychiatry and don't go on a binge
Eat a navel or a temple or valencia orange.

----

(Yes! that does rhyme the word orange. Anybody who knew Jody Gibson knew that you just couldn't tell him a thing couldn't be done without him setting about to prove you wrong.)

--

Joyce


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: GUEST,Edthefolkie
Date: 07 Oct 09 - 06:19 PM

Hey thanks Robd, it 's great to see the words of "Terrible Operation Blues". That takes me back a bit, Georgia Tom's version (was there a lady on it too?) made me larf out loud when I first heard it.

Got it on vinyl or tape somewhere but I can't remember what, when, where or how! MIGHT be on a Mike Raven compilation album (Mike used to do a blues programme on BBC radio 40 years ago)


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Subject: Nice to meet all of you
From: GUEST,SoundJohn
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 07:43 PM

Hey! Thanx for this beautiful place of the Inet!!


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 10:31 PM

a few songs here -
Lyr Add: The Colorectal Surgeon's Song- see Haruo's initial post for the title song 'Working where the sun don't shine' aka The Colorectal Surgeon's Song

Bob Bolton's post of 10 Mar 04 - 11:51 PM for 'Rectal Bleeding Calypso' Words & Music ©: John Dengate

Clinton Hammond's post of 30 Jan 05 - 04:47 PM for chords

I'll try to get copies of John Dengate's other medical masterpieces "Solar Melanoma Blues" (tune - Nobody loves you when you're down and out) & "Because I neglected dental hygiene" (sung thru his new dentures!)

sandra


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Subject: RE: Folk songs appropriate for medical students
From: beeliner
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 11:19 PM

It's kind of a long thread, so I might have missed it, but did anyone mention "Oh Doctor" by Malvina Reynolds, on the "Another County Heard From" album?
    Thread closed because it's been a target for a heavy barrage of Spam. If you have something to add to the discussion, feel free to start a new thread on this topic.
    -Joe Offer-


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