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Lyr Req: Tibbie Fowler / Tibby Fowler

Susan-Marie 30 Apr 98 - 03:09 PM
Bruce O. 30 Apr 98 - 05:52 PM
Frank in the swamps 03 May 98 - 06:26 AM
Teru 03 May 98 - 08:45 PM
Susan-Marie 04 May 98 - 12:56 PM
Jon W. 04 May 98 - 01:41 PM
Alice 22 Aug 02 - 01:17 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: TIBBIE FOWLER O' THE GLEN (from A Stewart
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 03:09 PM

I just heard this song on an Andy Stewart CD and what little of it I understand I think is hysterical. Can someone provide me with a translation? ALso, what do non-Scots singers do when performing a song in Scots dialect? I hestitate to try to imitate the Scots lyrics for fear of mangling them, but singing an "English" translation might also be considered heresy. Any advice?

Tibbie Fowler O' the Glen

Chorus:
Tibbie Fowler O' the Glen
There's ower mony wooin' at her
Tibbie Fowler O' the Glen
There's ower mony wooin' at her

Wooin' at her, puin' at her
Courtin' her and canna get her
Filthy elf its for her pelf
That a' the lads are wooin' at her

Ten cam' east and ten cam' west
Teb cam' rowin' ower the water
Twa cam' doun tha lang dyke-side
There's twa and thirty wooin' at her

There's seven but and seven ben
Seven i' the pantry wi' her
Twenty head about the door
There's ane and fourty wooin' at her

She's got pendles in her lugs
Cockle-shells wad set her better
High'heeled shoon and siller tags
And a' the lad are wooin' at her

Be a lassie e'er sae bleck
An she hae the name o' siller
Set her upo' Tintock tap
The wind will blaw a man up till her

Be a lassie e'er sea fair
An she want the penny siller
A flie may fell her i' the air
Before a man be evene'd till her

(repeat first verse and chorus)


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Subject: RE: Tibbie Fowler
From: Bruce O.
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 05:52 PM

It's an 18th century popular Scots song. pelf is money. but and ben -in and out. There's a couple I don't know. For song and tune see the Scots tune index on my website.


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Subject: RE: Tibbie Fowler
From: Frank in the swamps
Date: 03 May 98 - 06:26 AM

But and ben is kitchen and living room, although it can easily be taken as in & out, or back & forth. Puin is pulling. Lugs are ears. Siller is silver (money). How much of this song are you having trouble with? I'm not a quick or patient typist.

Scots who are working to defend and revitalize the Scots language (not Gaelic and CERTAINLY not a dialect of English) are also dispensing with the business of putting in apostraphes where letters are missing in the English tongue. As far as singing goes, my personal opinion is to please yourself. Sing with as close to a Scots mou as you can, change it to your own vernacular, or try for a compromise. If you sing a good song, and people take exception because they don't like your pronunciation, let 'em go hang.

Here are a few links which will be of interest, and very helpful.

"htttp://www" of course for all.

ourworld.compuserve.com/Homepages/k27/

ndirect.co.uk/~love/index.html

geocities.com/Athens/1615/rhahn/lowlands_scots.html

If I screwed up any of the urls, then I grant you "ane or twa skelps tae ma pow". But please don't be too mean.

Frank i.t.s.


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Subject: RE: Tibbie Fowler
From: Teru
Date: 03 May 98 - 08:45 PM

I have just tried to translante the lyrics into "English". Could anyone correct my mistakes? A lot of "Scottish" words have already become English ones which we can easily look up in an ordinary English dictionary. (e.g.: lad, lassie, pelf...)

Tibbie Fowler Of The Glen

Tibbie Fowler Of The Glen (Valley)
There's over many wooing (courting) at her
Tibbie Fowler Of The Glen
There's over many wooing at her

Wooing at her, pulling at her
Courting her and cannot get her
Filthy elf its for her pelf (money)
That all the lads are wooing at her

Ten came east and ten came west
Ten(?) came rowing over the water
Two came down the long dyke-side
There's two and thirty wooing at her

There's seven in and seven out
Seven in the pantry with her
Twenty head about the door
There's one and forty wooing at her

She's got pendles(?) in her ears
Cockle-shells would set her better
High-heeled shoes and silver tags
And all the lad are wooing at her

Be a lassie ever so bleck(??)
And she has(accepts) the name of silver
Set her upon Thintock top
The wind will blaw a man up till her

Be a lassie ever so fair
And she want the penny silver
A fly(?) may bite her in the air
Before a man be evened till her

Regards
Teru


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Subject: RE: Tibbie Fowler
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 04 May 98 - 12:56 PM

Frank and Teru - Thanks so much for your help! I think I get the gist of most of it now. I was having the most trouble with these two verses:

Be a lassie e'er sae bleck An she hae the name o' siller Set her upo' Tintock tap The wind will blaw a man up till her

Be a lassie e'er sea fair An she want the penny siller A flie may fell her i' the air Before a man be evene'd till her

But now I perceive that "bleck" must be the equivalent of "ugly", and since "siller" is "silver", the verses are comparing an ugly woman with money to a fair woman with no money. ANy thoughts on the significance of Tintock tap? And is "filthy elf" a common insult?

Frank, thanks for the info on the current perceptions of the Scots language. I'd be happy to stop putting in "'" every time a "g" goes missing at the end of a word! I also appreciate your thoughts on singing in the Scots language - you're right, if someone onjects to me singing "silver" instead of "siller", they're probably taking folk music way too seriously. I'll check out the URLs you gave me when I have a free hour or so to really enjoy them.


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Subject: RE: Tibbie Fowler
From: Jon W.
Date: 04 May 98 - 01:41 PM

I'm going to guess that Tintock is a mountain and tap is definitely top - my rule of thumb when dealing with Scots language is substitute O's for A's and you'll generally get the equivalent English word. So you set an ugly rich girl on the top of a mountain and the wind will blow a man up to her. (till=to)


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Subject: RE: Tibbie Fowler
From: Alice
Date: 22 Aug 02 - 01:17 PM

refresh


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