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Ballad of Davy Crockett

DigiTrad:
DAVY CROCKETT
DAVY CROCKETT [parody]
MOSES ROSE OF TEXAS
REMEMBER THE ALAMO
THE BALLAD OF DAVY CROCKETT
THE BALLAD OF DENNIS CONNER
THE BALLAD OF THE ALAMO
THE BALLAD OF TONYA HARDING


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Farewell to the Mountains (Davy Crockett) (23)
Obit:Fess Parker: Davy Crockett, Daniel Boone 2010 (56)
Lyr Req: Ole Swenson (parody of Davy Crockett) (19)
Lyr Req: Farewell to the Mountains (Davy Crockett) (64)
Lyr Req: Ballad of Davy Crockett parodies (6)
Lyr Add: David Crockett's Farewell Poem (11)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Ballad of Davy Crockett


voyager 27 Jun 02 - 03:02 PM
MMario 27 Jun 02 - 03:05 PM
greg stephens 27 Jun 02 - 03:08 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 27 Jun 02 - 03:59 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 27 Jun 02 - 04:17 PM
X 27 Jun 02 - 05:09 PM
catspaw49 27 Jun 02 - 07:33 PM
Bullfrog Jones 27 Jun 02 - 07:41 PM
greg stephens 27 Jun 02 - 07:50 PM
Bobert 27 Jun 02 - 10:07 PM
voyager 27 Jun 02 - 10:13 PM
catspaw49 27 Jun 02 - 10:17 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 27 Jun 02 - 10:23 PM
Haruo 27 Jun 02 - 10:36 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 27 Jun 02 - 11:01 PM
toadfrog 27 Jun 02 - 11:13 PM
Haruo 28 Jun 02 - 01:30 AM
GUEST,maryrrf 28 Jun 02 - 11:18 AM
GUEST,Melani 28 Jun 02 - 03:24 PM
Murray MacLeod 28 Jun 02 - 06:37 PM
Haruo 28 Jun 02 - 07:11 PM
catspaw49 28 Jun 02 - 07:57 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 28 Jun 02 - 08:33 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 28 Jun 02 - 08:37 PM
The Pooka 28 Jun 02 - 09:03 PM
voyager 29 Jun 02 - 09:07 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 30 Jun 02 - 10:18 PM
catspaw49 30 Jun 02 - 10:34 PM
Haruo 30 Jun 02 - 11:40 PM
The Pooka 01 Jul 02 - 12:05 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 01 Jul 02 - 07:00 AM
GUEST,mkebenn 01 Jul 02 - 11:02 AM
GUEST 27 Jan 04 - 04:29 PM
Strupag 28 Jan 04 - 06:05 AM
GUEST,Christopher Vondenhuevel 24 Sep 04 - 12:01 PM
clueless don 24 Sep 04 - 12:39 PM
Rabbi-Sol 24 Sep 04 - 01:17 PM
kendall 24 Sep 04 - 02:48 PM
Lighter 24 Sep 04 - 03:13 PM
GUEST,Guest G Mac 24 Feb 06 - 06:04 PM
Little Hawk 25 Feb 06 - 05:29 PM
MystMoonstruck 03 Sep 07 - 08:38 PM
MystMoonstruck 03 Sep 07 - 09:35 PM
pdq 03 Sep 07 - 10:52 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 04 Sep 07 - 08:55 AM
Stewie 04 Sep 07 - 07:52 PM
Songster Bob 04 Sep 07 - 08:10 PM
MystMoonstruck 04 Sep 07 - 10:40 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 05 Sep 07 - 08:42 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 05 Sep 07 - 09:02 AM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 05 Sep 07 - 12:18 PM
Cool Beans 05 Sep 07 - 12:30 PM
MystMoonstruck 05 Sep 07 - 06:02 PM
GUEST,sharx35 06 Aug 09 - 06:20 AM
bobad 06 Aug 09 - 06:54 AM
dick greenhaus 06 Aug 09 - 10:14 PM
GUEST,MtheGM 06 Aug 09 - 10:37 PM
GUEST,MtheGM 06 Aug 09 - 11:26 PM
GUEST,Mister Reader 21 Jan 17 - 11:52 AM
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Subject: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: voyager
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 03:02 PM

On a recent trip to EAST TENNESSEE, we visited
the birthplace of Davy Crockett (King of the Wild
Frontier). Unfortunately, the first sign which greets
visitors at the cabin door reads as follows -

"Contrary to 'The Ballad of Davy Crockett', made famous by Walt Disney
in the mid-fifties, David was not born on a mountaintop in Tennessee
His birthplace was located in a great valley, west of the
Applachian Mountains...
.

Needless to say, my travelling companion and I were shocked and dismayed ;->{
Fortunately, the sign did not dispute whether Davy "killed him a bar
when he was only 3"!

Dreams die hard

voyager


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Subject: RE: BS: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: MMario
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 03:05 PM

so - obviously it was a very short mountaintop.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: greg stephens
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 03:08 PM

Your grief was gall


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Subject: RE: BS: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 03:59 PM

My nephews rewrote The Ballad Of Davey Crockett when they were about 8 and ten:

Borned on a mountain top in Tennesee
Tore his pants on a Christmas Tree
Patched 'em up with some bubble gum
Along come a bear and he asked for some

       Davey, Davey Crockett
       King of the wild frontier

Slept on a table top in Joe's Cafe
Greasyest joint in the U.S.A.
Ordered a griddly, and that ain't all
The next thing I knew I was in City Hall

And I added a verse:

I went to see the Mayor just to set him straight
I found him swinging on the Pearly Gate
He charged me a dollar and he let me go
So I wandered on down to the Alamo

There's probably almost as much truth in that as there is in the Disneyized tv program. ;-)

Jerry



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Subject: RE: BS: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 04:17 PM

David Crockett family landed in Pennsylvania, and after a couple of years made their way to the Holston River area of SW Virginia. David and the other children made the trek. See David Crockett
There is a previous thread with much information.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: X
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 05:09 PM

Davy...Davy caught it and gave it to the wild frontier.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: catspaw49
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 07:33 PM

We had a pretty active 'Catter here for a long time who, as a young man, got paid to "dress like an Indian and run around in the woods" for the Disney movies. The necklace he wore eventually became the hatband he wears today.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Bullfrog Jones
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 07:41 PM

You'll be telling us next that he didn't really have three ears -- a left ear, a right ear and a wild front ear.

Boom Boom!


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: greg stephens
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 07:50 PM

Fess Parker caused a lot of laughs in France, fesse being the French for buttock.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Bobert
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:07 PM

LOL, Jerry.

In real life, Davey Crocket spent a good portion of his life running from Indians (First Nation folk) in fear of his life....

Bobert


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: voyager
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:13 PM

On the Fess Parker theme....

How many American kids grew up thinking that
Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone were twin brothers?
(and where are the Dan'l Boone songs, anyways)?

voyager


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: catspaw49
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:17 PM

I still contend that old Walt trained an entire generation of 60's radicals when he had our childhood hero tell us, "A man has to do what he thinks is right."

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:23 PM

Where were these Indians he ran from- in Congress? Much nonsense about David Crockett was put out in that moronic Fess Parker series and in the tin pan alley song. Much better is the ballad David wrote himself.
Of course, Crockett never complained about the tales put forth by writers of the time; he thought the mythic stories would help him politically. He hated the familiar name Davy.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Haruo
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:36 PM

Where are the Dan'l Boone songs? Well, the tune of the only I ever heard is the background MIDI at my page about Daniel Boone in Esperanto. (Daniel Boone was my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-uncle, so I'm entitled...)

Liland


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 11:01 PM

Daniel Boone was not a politician; we hear less of him because he didn't get the word out. There is a song by George Hamilton IV, which I can't recall hearing.
His narrative: Boone


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: toadfrog
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 11:13 PM

Well, HERE is one daniel boone song, from ca. 1842. But I recall shortly after "Davy Crockett" became a hit in the early 50's, a song came out which seems like a knockoff:

Daniel Boone was the daddy of them all,
Was the daddy of them all,

Was the daddy of them all,
Daniel Boone heard the western ____________s call,
From the mountains to the Ohio!

Not apparently a very memorable song, as I can find no reference to it on the net, but one heard it quite a lot for several months.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Haruo
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 01:30 AM

toadfrog, do you have words to the first or a tune for the second?

Liland


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,maryrrf
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 11:18 AM

Well, I remember one Daniel Boone song that started out:

"Daniel Boone was a man, just a big man, and he fought for America to make all Americans free" and then something about "with his coonskin cap..." Wasn't there a television series ?


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,Melani
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 03:24 PM

Yes, Mary, that's the theme song for the TV show. I think Ed Ames sang it--at least he played Dan'l's Indian sidekick, whose name I forget. He had more polished accent and manners than Dan'l.

I have to confess--I loved that show, and also Davy Crockett. I recently got the video of the Davy Crockett series at Costco, and my kids were in hysterics over it. I guess you have to compare it to standard '50's TV. But hey, it was supposedly historical, and I liked anything along those lines. I mean, compare the '50's to any other period in history--I was bored to death for most of my childhood.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 06:37 PM

I seem to recall reading somewhere that the revered 50's rock 'n roll icon Pat Boone was a direct descendant of Daniel Boone. Then again I may just have imagined it ....

Murray


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Haruo
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 07:11 PM

Yes, Mary and Melani, the TV song you refer to is the one I have MIDIplaying in the background of my D. Boon page (repeat link; there's a link to the MIDI near the bottom of the page where it says "midio"). The fact that the text is in Esperanto (which you may not read) shouldn't affect the nostalgia value of the MIDI.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: catspaw49
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 07:57 PM

Murray, if you're from a large portion of the Appalachains, you probably can claim some heritage to Daniel Boone. I think he came from a family of 11 children and had 10 himself so when you start down the cousins route, it gets pretty broad. My maternal grandmother had a long written out "geneology" thing describing how she was related to him. Personally, I think Pat Boone was more closely related to Percy Milquetoast than Daniel Boone........what an asshole.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 08:33 PM

Catspaw, I protest!! A lover of the old Casper Milquetoast cartoons (if anyone here is old enough to remember them)

To get this thread back to the more musical, here is a link to the Farewell song David Crockett wrote after being defeated in his bid for a second term in the House of Representatives, and took off for Texas.

Farewell

Wasn't Pat Boone something assembled in the studios of a recording company?


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 08:37 PM

Gee, I've never done that before- I found one of Mudcat's duplicate threads, wiped out by chief broomwielder, Joe Offer.
Oh, well, try again: Farewell


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: The Pooka
Date: 28 Jun 02 - 09:03 PM

Pat Boone: Give 'im what fer, Catspaw! :)


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: voyager
Date: 29 Jun 02 - 09:07 AM

BTW -

David Crockett's birthplace was part of "the state"
of Franklin which was never admitted to the Union.

Oh well...so much for "Tennessee" ;->(


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Subject: Lyr Add: DAVY CROCKETT (from Vance Randolph)
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Jun 02 - 10:18 PM

A version of Davy Crockett (DT) by Sarah Ogan Gunning has a different ending in this version from Randolph, Ozark Folksongs.
Both are based on "Pompey Smash," an old minstrel tune: Lloyd's Ethiopian Song Book (London, 1847) and The Negro Singers Own Book, Philadelphia, 1846.

Lyr. Add: DAVY CROCKETT 2

Now, I'll tell you what I think of old Davy Crockett,
He's half horse, half coon, and half sky-rocket.
I met him one day a goin' out a-coonin'.
I ask him where he's goin' an' he said he's goin' huntin'.
Oh I ask him where's his gun, an' he said he had none.
Says I, Colonel Davy, how you goin' get 'em down?

Says he, Pompey Smash, just follow your Uncle Davy,
An' he'll soon show you how to grin a coon crazy.
We hadn't gone far till Davy thought he seen a squirrel
A-settin' on a pine-knot eatin' sheep sorrel.
Then I begin to laugh an' he began to grin,
Says he, Pompey Smash, let me brace against your heel!

So I stuffed out my heel an' I braced up the sinner,
An' Davy he begin to grin pretty hard for his dinner,
But the critter didn't move, an' he didn't seem to mind it,
But just kept a-eatin', an' didn't look behind it.
Now don't laugh, you big black calf,
For if you do, I'll bite you in half!

We fought half a day an' then agreed to stop it,
For I was badly whipped an' so was Davy Crockett,
When we looked for our heads, Gosh, we found 'em both a-missin',
For he bit off my head an' I'd swallowed his'n!

Text collected by G. E. Hastings, Fayetteville, AK, before 1938. From Vance Randolph, Ozark Folksongs, 1980 reprint, vol. 3, p. 167.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: catspaw49
Date: 30 Jun 02 - 10:34 PM

Well let's not forget my favorite character from the Disney series, Big Mike Fink, King of the River! He had a song too...........

King of the River

Listen to the Thunder
Hear the Winds roar
Hurricane's a-comin'
Board up the door
Load up the cannon
Call out the law
Worstest calamity
That folk ever saw
Girls run and hide
Brave men shivver
I'm Mike Fink
King of the River

(Chorus)
Oh, he's a ring-tail roarer
And a tough old alligator
Oh, he's a bulldog bully
And a real depopulator
Oh, what a fightin' devil
He'll spit right in your eye
He's gonna live forever
Born too mean to die


Spaw



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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Haruo
Date: 30 Jun 02 - 11:40 PM

Thanks, Spaw. It's been a long long time since I even thought of Mike Fink. Not sure I ever knew the tune, though. How'd it go?

Liland


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: The Pooka
Date: 01 Jul 02 - 12:05 AM

Ha-HARRR, Mr. 'Spaw sirrr! (Yeah I know that's Long John Silll-verrr, but still) Up Mike Fink! My favorite also. King of the River *and*, perhaps the answer to the age-old question posed in another thread: "What the Hell's a Rolling King?"


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 01 Jul 02 - 07:00 AM

Bopb Dyer's Mike Fink song tops 'em all, in my opinion... recorded by him, as well as Dave Para and Cathy Barton and Ed Trickett. About the best chorus I've ever heard. Bob Dyer is an undiscovered genius and writes the best songs of anyone I know about the Midwest. Makes history the fun it should be.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,mkebenn
Date: 01 Jul 02 - 11:02 AM

Spaw, I always have sung that line(really, folks)as
" a real great populator"
lil' different meanin'
"give 'em one fer 'er,Davy...Mike


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett (& Mike Fink)
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Jan 04 - 04:29 PM

On the back of the 45 rpm "King of the River," was a song called "Pig Knuckles and Rice." The only words I remember are "Pig knuckles and rice tonight, you eat em once and you want em twice." This line repeats, and that's all that sticks in my mind, except for the tune. Are there any other words for the song?


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Strupag
Date: 28 Jan 04 - 06:05 AM

You've got it all wrong guys. The real words did not say that he was born there; They were referring to a peculiar shaped hill that you could see from his cabin.
They go "Banana Mountain Top in Tennessee"


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,Christopher Vondenhuevel
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 12:01 PM

There is some debate about whether the 14th refrain (section) is actually accurate or just made up for the "song".


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: clueless don
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 12:39 PM

Regarding the chorus of the Mike Fink song, I remember the line as "Pretty girls hide", rather than "Girls run and hide". But it wouldn't be the first time I have misremembered a lyric.

Earlier this year my daughter spent a little time learning about various American tall tale characters, and Mike Fink was quite prominent among them. She read a couple of Mike Fink tales, including one about the time he bested Davy Crockett in a shooting contest (if you read this tale, it turns out that Mr. Fink may have cheated a little, or at least bent the rules.)

Don


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Rabbi-Sol
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 01:17 PM

I remember there being a Jewish parody of Davy Crockett that was sung by Mickey Katz. It was about Duvid Crockett, who was born on Delancey Street, and raised on Gefilte fish & kosher meat. Some of the chorus words had Yiddish mixed in with them. If anyone has those lyrics, please post them here. Thanks. SOL ZELLER


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: kendall
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 02:48 PM

Ed Ames, man with a bull whip. Much more manly than a cow whip.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Lighter
Date: 24 Sep 04 - 03:13 PM

Richard Boone's publicity claimed he was a direct descendant of Dan'l's. Don't know about Pat.

Theme song went

Dan'l Boone was a man,
Yes a biiiiig man!
With an eye like an eagle and as tall as a mighty oak tree!
From the coonskin cap on the top of ol' Dan
To the sole of his rawhide sho-oe,
He was the rippin'est, roarin'st, fightin'est man
The Fron-tier ev-er knewwwwww!

Dan'l Boone was a man,
Yes a biiiiig man!
And he fought for America to make all Americans freeeee!
What a BOON,
What a DO-er,
What a DREAM-come-a-TRU-er was he!
What a BOON,
What a DO-er,
What a dream-come-a-TRU-er was heeeee!!!!!!


That's how I remember it anyway. The song was better than the show.
Fess Parker, not John Wayne, IS Davy Crockett.

Contrasting their depictions would be a nice term-paper topic....


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,Guest G Mac
Date: 24 Feb 06 - 06:04 PM

I was just passin' through here, and enjoyed the music, and rememberin' the lyrics, and havin a 'deja-vu' about the times we had wearin' our 'Davy Crockett hats' when we were kids in the '50s.

It gives me a certain satisfaction from readin' everything that's been written here that some things are set in stone, and you can count on 'em. Its obvious Davy Crockett earned himself quite a reputation, and it ain't goin' away - he earned it for keeps, and its a good one too! ...for bein' quite a "Character". Characters are a precious gift, and we can't have too many of them. They usually have a way of lookin' at things, and doin' things that make Life just plain fun, and help you keep things in perspective.

Bein' a Character doesn't mean a person can't have a serious side too, and Davy Crockett has one. I know one thing - he went to the Alamo and defended it with his Life, and that's what it ended up costin' him - an I bet he'd do it all over again! - and there ain't nothin more serious than that!

I looked through everything here, and didn't find this, so here goes, and with it, i'll leave you to ponder ~~c};

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Life of Colonel David Crockett, by Edward S. Ellis (Philadelphia: Porter & Coates, 1884)

Crockett was then the lion of Washington. I was a great admirer of his character, and, having several friends who were intimate with him, I found no difficulty in making his acquaintance. I was fascinated with him, and he seemed to take a fancy to me.

I was one day in the lobby of the House of Representatives when a bill was taken up appropriating money for the benefit of a widow of a distinguished naval officer. Several beautiful speeches had been made in its support ? rather, as I thought, because it afforded the speakers a fine opportunity for display than from the necessity of convincing anybody, for it seemed to me that everybody favored it. The Speaker was just about to put the question when Crockett arose. Everybody expected, of course, that he was going to make one of his characteristic speeches in support of the bill. He commenced:

"Mr. Speaker ? I have as much respect for the memory of the deceased, and as much sympathy for the sufferings of the living, if suffering there be, as any man in this House, but we must not permit our respect for the dead or our sympathy for a part of the living to lead us into an act of injustice to the balance of the living. I will not go into an argument to prove that Congress has no power to appropriate this money as an act of charity. Every member upon this floor knows it. We have the right, as individuals, to give away as much of our own money as we please in charity; but as members of Congress we have no right so to appropriate a dollar of the public money. Some eloquent appeals have been made to us upon the ground that it is a debt due the deceased. Mr. Speaker, the deceased lived long after the close of the war; he was in office to the day of his death, and I have never heard that the government was in arrears to him. This government can owe no debts but for services rendered, and at a stipulated price. If it is a debt, how much is it? Has it been audited, and the amount due ascertained? If it is a debt, this is not the place to present it for payment, or to have its merits examined. If it is a debt, we owe more than we can ever hope to pay, for we owe the widow of every soldier who fought in the War of 1812 precisely the same amount. There is a woman in my neighborhood, the widow of as gallant a man as ever shouldered a musket. He fell in battle. She is as good in every respect as this lady, and is as poor. She is earning her daily bread by her daily labor; but if I were to introduce a bill to appropriate five or ten thousand dollars for her benefit, I should be laughed at, and my bill would not get five votes in this House. There are thousands of widows in the country just such as the one I have spoken of, but we never hear of any of these large debts to them. Sir, this is no debt. The government did not owe it to the deceased when he was alive; it could not contract it after he died. I do not wish to be rude, but I must be plain. Every man in this House knows it is not a debt. We cannot, without the grossest corruption, appropriate this money as the payment of a debt. We have not the semblance of authority to appropriate it as a charity. Mr. Speaker, I have said we have the right to give as much of our own money as we please. I am the poorest man on this floor. I cannot vote for this bill, but I will give one week's pay to the object, and if every member of Congress will do the same, it will amount to more than the bill asks."

He took his seat. Nobody replied. The bill was put upon its passage, and, instead of passing unanimously, as was generally supposed, and as, no doubt, it would, but for that speech, it received but few votes, and, of course, was lost.

Like many other young men, and old ones, too, for that matter, who had not thought upon the subject, I desired the passage of the bill, and felt outraged at its defeat. I determined that I would persuade my friend Crockett to move a reconsideration the next day.

Previous engagements preventing me from seeing Crockett that night, I went early to his room the next morning and found him engaged in addressing and franking letters, a large pile of which lay upon his table.

I broke in upon him rather abruptly, by asking him what devil had possessed him to make that speech and defeat that bill yesterday. Without turning his head or looking up from his work, he replied:

"You see that I am very busy now; take a seat and cool yourself. I will be through in a few minutes, and then I will tell you all about it."

He continued his employment for about ten minutes, and when he had finished he turned to me and said:

"Now, sir, I will answer your question. But thereby hangs a tale, and one of considerable length, to which you will have to listen."

I listened, and this is the tale which I heard:

Several years ago I was one evening standing on the steps of the Capitol with some other members of Congress, when our attention was attracted by a great light over in Georgetown. It was evidently a large fire. We jumped into a hack and drove over as fast as we could. When we got there, I went to work, and I never worked as hard in my life as I did there for several hours. But, in spite of all that could be done, many houses were burned and many families made homeless, and, besides, some of them had lost all but the clothes they had on. The weather was very cold, and when I saw so many women and children suffering, I felt that something ought to be done for them, and everybody else seemed to feel the same way.

The next morning a bill was introduced appropriating $20,000 for their relief. We put aside all other business and rushed it through as soon as it could be done. I said everybody felt as I did. That was not quite so; for, though they perhaps sympathized as deeply with the sufferers as I did, there were a few of the members who did not think we had the right to indulge our sympathy or excite our charity at the expense of anybody but ourselves. They opposed the bill, and upon its passage demanded the yeas and nays. There were not enough of them to sustain the call, but many of us wanted our names to appear in favor of what we considered a praiseworthy measure, and we voted with them to sustain it. So the yeas and nays were recorded, and my name appeared on the journals in favor of the bill.

The next summer, when it began to be time to think about the election, I concluded I would take a scout around among the boys of my district. I had no opposition there, but, as the election was some time off, I did not know what might turn up, and I thought it was best to let the boys know that I had not forgot them, and that going to Congress had not made me too proud to go to see them.

So I put a couple of shirts and a few twists of tobacco into my saddlebags, and put out. I had been out about a week and had found things going very smoothly, when, riding one day in a part of my district in which I was more of a stranger than any other, I saw a man in a field plowing and coming toward the road. I gauged my gait so that we should meet as he came to the fence. As he came up I spoke to the man. He replied politely, but, as I thought, rather coldly, and was about turning his horse for another furrow when I said to him: "Don't be in such a hurry, my friend; I want to have a little talk with you, and get better acquainted."

He replied: "I am very busy, and have but little time to talk, but if it does not take too long, I will listen to what you have to say."

I began: "Well, friend, I am one of those unfortunate beings called candidates, and ? "

"'Yes, I know you; you are Colonel Crockett. I have seen you once before, and voted for you the last time you were elected. I suppose you are out electioneering now, but you had better not waste your time or mine. I shall not vote for you again.'

This was a sockdolager... I begged him to tell me what was the matter.

"Well, Colonel, it is hardly worthwhile to waste time or words upon it. I do not see how it can be mended, but you gave a vote last winter which shows that either you have not capacity to understand the Constitution, or that you are wanting in honesty and firmness to be guided by it. In either case you are not the man to represent me. But I beg your pardon for expressing it in that way. I did not intend to avail myself of the privilege of the Constitution to speak plainly to a candidate for the purpose of insulting or wounding you. I intend by it only to say that your understanding of the Constitution is very different from mine; and I will say to you what, but for my rudeness, I should not have said, that I believe you to be honest. But an understanding of the Constitution different from mine I cannot overlook, because the Constitution, to be worth anything, must be held sacred, and rigidly observed in all its provisions. The man who wields power and misinterprets it is the more dangerous the more honest he is."

"I admit the truth of all you say, but there must be some mistake about it, for I do not remember that I gave any vote last winter upon any constitutional question."

"No, Colonel, there's no mistake. Though I live here in the backwoods and seldom go from home, I take the papers from Washington and read very carefully all the proceedings of Congress. My papers say that last winter you voted for a bill to appropriate $20,000 to some sufferers by a fire in Georgetown. Is that true?"

"Certainly it is, and I thought that was the last vote which anybody in the world would have found fault with."

"Well, Colonel, where do you find in the Constitution any authority to give away the public money in charity?"

Here was another sockdolager; for, when I began to think about it, I could not remember a thing in the Constitution that authorized it. I found I must take another tack, so I said:

"Well, my friend; I may as well own up. You have got me there. But certainly nobody will complain that a great and rich country like ours should give the insignificant sum of $20,000 to relieve its suffering women and children, particularly with a full and overflowing Treasury, and I am sure, if you had been there, you would have done just as I did."

"It is not the amount, Colonel, that I complain of; it is the principle. In the first place, the government ought to have in the Treasury no more than enough for its legitimate purposes. But that has nothing to do with the question. The power of collecting and disbursing money at pleasure is the most dangerous power that can be entrusted to man, particularly under our system of collecting revenue by a tariff, which reaches every man in the country, no matter how poor he may be, and the poorer he is the more he pays in proportion to his means. What is worse, it presses upon him without his knowledge where the weight centers, for there is not a man in the United States who can ever guess how much he pays to the government. So you see, that while you are contributing to relieve one, you are drawing it from thousands who are even worse off than he. If you had the right to give anything, the amount was simply a matter of discretion with you, and you had as much right to give $20,000,000 as $20,000. If you have the right to give to one, you have the right to give to all; and, as the Constitution neither defines charity nor stipulates the amount, you are at liberty to give to any and everything which you may believe, or profess to believe, is a charity, and to any amount you may think proper. You will very easily perceive what a wide door this would open for fraud and corruption and favoritism, on the one hand, and for robbing the people on the other. No, Colonel, Congress has no right to give charity. Individual members may give as much of their own money as they please, but they have no right to touch a dollar of the public money for that purpose. If twice as many houses had been burned in this county as in Georgetown, neither you nor any other member of Congress would have thought of appropriating a dollar for our relief. There are about two hundred and forty members of Congress. If they had shown their sympathy for the sufferers by contributing each one week's pay, it would have made over $13,000. There are plenty of wealthy men in and around Washington who could have given $20,000 without depriving themselves of even a luxury of life. The Congressmen chose to keep their own money, which, if reports be true, some of them spend not very creditably; and the people about Washington, no doubt, applauded you for relieving them from the necessity of giving by giving what was not yours to give. The people have delegated to Congress, by the Constitution, the power to do certain things. To do these, it is authorized to collect and pay moneys, and for nothing else. Everything beyond this is usurpation, and a violation of the Constitution."

I have given you an imperfect account of what he said. Long before he was through, I was convinced that I had done wrong. He wound up by saying:

"So you see, Colonel, you have violated the Constitution in what I consider a vital point. It is a precedent fraught with danger to the country, for when Congress once begins to stretch its power beyond the limits of the Constitution, there is no limit to it, and no security for the people. I have no doubt you acted honestly, but that does not make it any better, except as far as you are personally concerned, and you see that I cannot vote for you."

I tell you I felt streaked. I saw if I should have opposition, and this man should go talking, he would set others to talking, and in that district I was a gone fawn-skin. I could not answer him, and the fact is, I did not want to. But I must satisfy him, and I said to him:

"Well, my friend, you hit the nail upon the head when you said I had not sense enough to understand the Constitution. I intended to be guided by it, and thought I had studied it full. I have heard many speeches in Congress about the powers of Congress, but what you have said there at your plow has got more hard, sound sense in it than all the fine speeches I ever heard. If I had ever taken the view of it that you have, I would have put my head into the fire before I would have given that vote; and if you will forgive me and vote for me again, if I ever vote for another unconstitutional law I wish I may be shot."

He laughingly replied:

"Yes, Colonel, you have sworn to that once before, but I will trust you again upon one condition. You say that you are convinced that your vote was wrong. Your acknowledgment of it will do more good than beating you for it. If, as you go around the district, you will tell people about this vote, and that you are satisfied it was wrong, I will not only vote for you, but will do what I can to keep down opposition, and, perhaps, I may exert some little influence in that way."

"If I don't," said I, "I wish I may be shot; and to convince you that I am in earnest in what I say, I will come back this way in a week or ten days, and if you will get up a gathering of the people, I will make a speech to them. Get up a barbecue, and I will pay for it."

"No, Colonel, we are not rich people in this section, but we have plenty of provisions to contribute for a barbecue, and some to spare for those who have none. The push of crops will be over in a few days, and we can then afford a day for a barbecue. This is Thursday; I will see to getting it up on Saturday week. Come to my house on Friday, and we will go together, and I promise you a very respectable crowd to see and hear you."

"Well, I will be here. But one thing more before I say good-bye. I must know your name."

"My name is Bunce."

"Not Horatio Bunce?"

"Yes."

"Well, Mr. Bunce, I never saw you before, though you say you have seen me; but I know you very well. I am glad I have met you, and very proud that I may hope to have you for my friend. You must let me shake your hand before I go."

We shook hands and parted.

It was one of the luckiest hits of my life that I met him. He mingled but little with the public, but was widely known for his remarkable intelligence and incorruptible integrity, and for a heart brimful and running over with kindness and benevolence, which showed themselves not only in words but in acts. He was the oracle of the whole country around him, and his fame had extended far beyond the circle of his immediate acquaintance. Though I had never met him before, I had heard much of him, and but for this meeting it is very likely I should have had opposition, and had been beaten. One thing is very certain, no man could now stand up in that district under such a vote.

At the appointed time I was at his house, having told our conversation to every crowd I had met, and to every man I stayed all night with, and I found that it gave the people an interest and a confidence in me stronger than I had ever seen manifested before.

Though I was considerably fatigued when I reached his house, and, under ordinary circumstances, should have gone early to bed, I kept him up until midnight, talking about the principles and affairs of government, and got more real, true knowledge of them than I had got all my life before.

I have told you Mr. Bunce converted me politically. He came nearer converting me religiously than I had ever been before. He did not make a very good Christian of me, as you know; but he has wrought upon my mind a conviction of the truth of Christianity, and upon my feelings a reverence for its purifying and elevating power such as I had never felt before.

I have known and seen much of him since, for I respect him ? no, that is not the word ? I reverence and love him more than any living man, and I go to see him two or three times every year; and I will tell you, sir, if everyone who professes to be a Christian lived and acted and enjoyed it as he does, the religion of Christ would take the world by storm.

But to return to my story. The next morning we went to the barbecue, and, to my surprise, found about a thousand men there. I met a good many whom I had not known before, and they and my friend introduced me around until I had got pretty well acquainted ? at least, they all knew me.

In due time notice was given that I would speak to them. They gathered around a stand that had been erected. I opened my speech by saying:

"Fellow citizens ? I present myself before you today feeling like a new man. My eyes have lately been opened to truths which ignorance or prejudice, or both, had heretofore hidden from my view. I feel that I can today offer you the ability to render you more valuable service than I have ever been able to render before. I am here today more for the purpose of acknowledging my error than to seek your votes. That I should make this acknowledgment is due to myself as well as to you. Whether you will vote for me is a matter for your consideration only."

I went on to tell them about the fire and my vote for the appropriation as I have told it to you, and then told them why I was satisfied it was wrong. I closed by saying:

"And now, fellow citizens, it remains only for me to tell you that the most of the speech you have listened to with so much interest was simply a repetition of the arguments by which your neighbor, Mr. Bunce, convinced me of my error.

"It is the best speech I ever made in my life, but he is entitled to the credit of it. And now I hope he is satisfied with his convert and that he will get up here and tell you so."

He came upon the stand and said:

"Fellow citizens ? It affords me great pleasure to comply with the request of Colonel Crockett. I have always considered him a thoroughly honest man, and I am satisfied that he will faithfully perform all that he has promised you today."

He went down, and there went up from the crowd such a shout for Davy Crockett as his name never called forth before.

I am not much given to tears, but I was taken with a choking then and felt some big drops rolling down my cheeks. And I tell you now that the remembrance of those few words spoken by such a man, and the honest, hearty shout they produced, is worth more to me than all the honors I have received and all the reputation I have ever made, or ever shall make, as a member of Congress.

"Now, Sir," concluded Crockett, "you know why I made that speech yesterday. I have had several thousand copies of it printed and was directing them to my constituents when you came in.

"There is one thing now to which I will call your attention. You remember that I proposed to give a week's pay. There are in that House many very wealthy men ? men who think nothing of spending a week's pay, or a dozen of them for a dinner or a wine party when they have something to accomplish by it. Some of those same men made beautiful speeches upon the great debt of gratitude which the country owed the deceased ? a debt which could not be paid by money, particularly so insignificant a sum as $10,000, when weighed against the honor of the nation. Yet not one of them responded to my proposition. Money with them is nothing but trash when it is to come out of the people. But it is the one great thing for which most of them are striving, and many of them sacrifice honor, integrity, and justice to obtain it."


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Little Hawk
Date: 25 Feb 06 - 05:29 PM

Wow. Great story!


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: MystMoonstruck
Date: 03 Sep 07 - 08:38 PM

My maternal grandfather sang a Davy Crockett song, but, shamefully, no one stepped in to carry one singing these songs. I have one very poor recording of it, so I can't even include all of the words. Some of them I was stunned to see at this site, but this was the second half of the song; the rest sounds like it was made up of bits and pieces of other songs. On this thread, I saw more familiar words, but they still do not duplicate my granddad's song, which was recorded by a professor at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Illinois, along with other songs, including the family's version of "Sweet Betsy from Pike" and one he called "Old Mickey Flannagan's Bull Pup".

This isn't exactly what Daddy Claude sang, but it's fairly close:
DAVY CROCKETT

I'll tell you of a fight that I had with Davy Crockett,
He was half and half horse and half kill-rocket.
I met him a-going out a-cooning .
Said I, "Where' s your gun?"
Said he, "I have none."
Just then l sald.
"How you going to kill a coon?"
Said he, "Pompey Smash, come and go along with Davy
And l'll show you mighty quick how to grin a coon crazy."
We hadn't went very far until we saw a squirrel
Sitting on a pine log, eating sheep sorrel.
He backed both ears and he brayed like a sinner.
And Colonel Davy Crockett was a-grinning for his dinner.
"Take care of black calf
And don't you laugh,
l'll back both ears.
And l'll bite you in half."
I took off my coat and laid down my ammunition.
Said I. "Davy Crockett, I'll cool your ambition.
We fought about a half a day and then agreed to drop it.
For I was badly whipped and so was Davy Crockett.

Recorded by Sarah Ogan Gunning, Folk Legacy

The following lyrics are in a post far above this one:
A version of Davy Crockett (DT) by Sarah Ogan Gunning has a different ending in this version from Randolph, Ozark Folksongs.
Both are based on "Pompey Smash," an old minstrel tune: Lloyd's Ethiopian Song Book (London, 1847) and The Negro Singers Own Book, Philadelphia, 1846.

Lyr. Add: DAVY CROCKETT 2

Now, I'll tell you what I think of old Davy Crockett,
He's half horse, half coon, and half sky-rocket.
I met him one day a goin' out a-coonin'.
I ask him where he's goin' an' he said he's goin' huntin'.
Oh I ask him where's his gun, an' he said he had none.
Says I, Colonel Davy, how you goin' get 'em down?

Says he, Pompey Smash, just follow your Uncle Davy,
An' he'll soon show you how to grin a coon crazy.
We hadn't gone far till Davy thought he seen a squirrel
A-settin' on a pine-knot eatin' sheep sorrel.
Then I begin to laugh an' he began to grin,
Says he, Pompey Smash, let me brace against your heel!

So I stuffed out my heel an' I braced up the sinner,
An' Davy he begin to grin pretty hard for his dinner,
But the critter didn't move, an' he didn't seem to mind it,
But just kept a-eatin', an' didn't look behind it.
Now don't laugh, you big black calf,
For if you do, I'll bite you in half!

We fought half a day an' then agreed to stop it,
For I was badly whipped an' so was Davy Crockett,
When we looked for our heads, Gosh, we found 'em both a-missin',
For he bit off my head an' I'd swallowed his'n!

Text collected by G. E. Hastings, Fayetteville, AK, before 1938. From Vance Randolph, Ozark Folksongs, 1980 reprint, vol. 3, p. 167.

THIS IS MY DADDY CLAUDE'S VERSION of "DAVY CROCKETT":
On a old high bluff in the state of Indiana,
Well-a there's where I lived chucked up in a shanty,
And old massa licked me nearly every morning
When I grabbed boat and paddle and
Jumped aboard a skiff
Upon a river drift;
Killed a-many carp and never niggard less.

Once 'pon a drift, I spied an alligator,
And I jumped in the boat, and I shucked a sweet potater.
Well I couldn't figure out just how I could fix him.
Then I brought me up a brick
Well I fotched him such a lick
It was nothin' but a pine knot upon an oak stick.

Now little Miss Puck married little Willy Wheezer;
Never do you think that-a Billy would deceive her;
He grabbed up the cash, and he shake 'em in his pocket,
And you can't fool around while I sing you "Davy Crockett". [My guess is the song title.]
And all at once he cried;
He's gone off forever on the Philadel-fee-eye [the pronunciation].

Now. one early morning just before the day was broken,
I thought to meself I heared the frogs croakin';
I jumped up, poked me head through the window,
And the moon rushed in like a fire upon the timber
In the d'rection of the noise
By jings! I'll tell you I was one of those boys.

Now I'll tell you of my folks; I'll tell you of my sermon;
I'll tell you where I come from and where I got my learnin'.
I's a redhot, overginned, second best to none
On this side son
By jings! Without my head, I weighed a half a ton.

I'll tell ya of a fight I had with Davy Crockett;
He's a half-coon, half-hoss, rest skyrocket.
And I met Colonel Davy, and Davy goin' huntin'.
Says I, "Colonel Davy, where is your gun?"
Says he, "I got none."
"How ya gonna kill a coon without one?"

Follow 'long with Davy, and Davy's gonna show you how to grin a coon.
Critter followed Davy. Davy saw a squirrel
Settin' on a pine knot eatin' sheepy shirrell (sheep sorrell)
Well he eat 'm and he eat 'm, and he didn't 'pear to mind him
And he eat 'm and he eat 'm, and he never looked behind him
Well he surely must be dead.
We could see the bark flyin' all around the creature's head.

Both went up for the truth to discover
[I absolutely cannot interpret some of the words due to background noise. I plan to contact an aunt who might know the words.]
...if it wasn't a pine knot as big as any barrel.
Says I, "Colonel Davy, that-a surely ain't no squirrel."

"You big man john, giddyup poor beggar, eat a bushel parched corn
Swim-a Salt River back'ards. You kill nine niggers, [not PC~Sorry!]
You curly-faced calf, you better not laugh.
I'll pin back me ears and I'll bite you in the half."

Laid down my gun, throwed down my amminition (sic)
Says I, "Colonel Davy, I'll cool your ambition."
And then we locked arms.
Thought my breath was gone.
I's never held so tight since the hour I was born.

Then we fit for half a day, and then we 'greed to stop it;
I was badly licked, and so was Davy Crockett.
And when we went to find our heads, both heads was missin',
And he'd bit off my head, and I'd swallowed his'n.
And then we did agree
For to leave each other be.
I's awful hard for him, and so was he for me.

What the family always wondered about is the variety of topics; only the last portion is about Davy Crockett though his name or the name of the song appears in the third stanza. My granddad's people not only settled in Illinois but also Pike County, Missouri, from which they became latecomer 49ers in California. My theory is that the song developed around the campfires, where singers united bits and pieces of other songs into the final family product. The tune has an uneven rhythm at times, and the words seem to break up the tune, as if the two are being forced together. The stanzas don't follow the same pattern, with the long and short lines.

How wonderful to find these pieces of the song! Maybe I should check out "Pompey Smash", although that name doesn't appear in the family version.


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Subject: Lyr Add: POMPEY SMASH
From: MystMoonstruck
Date: 03 Sep 07 - 09:35 PM

I know that doubleposting is frowned upon at some forums, but I did locate these lyrics for "Pompey Smash", which still doesn't solve the mystery of the family's extra stanzas. I'm new to the Net, so I might find the answers yet.

POMPEY SMASH(1834).....The Everlastin' and Unkonkerable Skreamer

Now I'll tell you 'bout a fight I had wid Davy Crockett
Dat haff hoss, haff kune, an haff sky rocket,
I met him one day as I go out a gunnin,
I ax him whar he guine, an he say he guine a kunein,
Den I ax him whar he gun, and he say he got nun,
Den I say, Davy, how you guine to hunt widout one.

Den says he, Pompey Smash, just come along ob Davy
An I'll dam soon show you how to grin a koon crazy
Well, I follow on arter, till Davy seed a squirrel,
Settin on a pine log, eatin sheep sorrel,
Den he stop rite still, and he gin for me to feel,
Says he, Pompey Smash, let me brace agin your heel.

I stuck out my heel, an I brace up de sinner,
An den Davy gun to grin hard for his dinner,
But de critter didn't move -- nor didn't seem to mine him,
But seem to keep a eatin, and neber look behine him.
At lass, Davy sed, he ralely must be dead,
For I seed de bark fly all 'bout de kritter's head.

Den we boph started up, de truth to diskiver,
An may de debil roast ole Pompei Smash's liber,
If it wa'nt a great not, 'bout as big as a punkin,
Saz I, kurnel Davy, does you call dis skunkin.
Heah! Heah! Heah!!!
Den sez he, you black kaff, now I tell you doan laff,
If you do I'll pin your ears back, an bite you in haff.

I throde down my gun, an I drop my amynishin,
Sez I, kurnel Davy, I'll cool you ambishun,
He back both his years, an puff like a steamer,
Sez he, Pompey Smash, I'm a Tennessee skreemer,
Den we boph lock horn, an I tink my breph gone,
I was neber hug so close, since de day I was born.

We fought haff a day, an den we greed to stop it,
For I was badly whipt, an so was Davy Crockett,
When we look for our heds, gosh, we found 'em boph missen,
For he'd bit off mine, an' I'd swallow'd hissen.
Den boph did agree for to leff de oder be,
For I was rather hard for him, an so was he for me.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BALLAD OF DAVY CROCKETT
From: pdq
Date: 03 Sep 07 - 10:52 PM

THE BALLAD OF DAVY CROCKETT
From the film "Davy Crockett, King Of The Wild Frontier" (1954)
(George Bruns / Tom Blackburn)

Born on a mountain top in Tennessee
Greenest state in the land of the free
Raised in the woods so he knew ev'ry tree
Kilt him a b'ar when he was only three
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier!

In eighteen thirteen the Creeks uprose
Addin' redskin arrows to the country's woes
Now, Injun fightin' is somethin' he knows,
So he shoulders his rifle an' off he goes
Davy, Davy Crockett, the man who don't know fear!

Off through the woods he's a marchin' along
Makin' up yarns an' a singin' a song
Itchin' fer fightin' an' rightin' a wrong
He's ringy as a b'ar an' twice as strong
Davy, Davy Crockett, the buckskin buccaneer!

Andy Jackson is our Gen'ral's name
His reg'lar soldiers we'll put to shame
Them redskin varmints us Volunteers'll tame
'Cause we got the guns with the sure-fire aim
Davy, Davy Crockett, the champion of us all!~

Headed back to war from the ol' home place
But Red Stick was leadin' a merry chase
Fightin' an' burnin' at a devil's pace
South to the swamps on the Florida Trace
Davy, Davy Crockett, trackin' the redskins down!

Fought single-handed through the Injun War
Till the Creeks was whipped an' peace was in store
An' while he was handlin' this risky chore
Made hisself a legend for evermore
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier!

He give his word an' he give his hand
That his Injun friends could keep their land
An' the rest of his life he took the stand
That justice was due every redskin band
Davy, Davy Crockett, holdin' his promise dear!

Home fer the winter with his family
Happy as squirrels in the ol' gum tree
Bein' the father he wanted to be
Close to his boys as the pod an' the pea
Davy, Davy Crockett, holdin' his young'uns dear!

But the ice went out an' the warm winds came
An' the meltin' snow showed tracks of game
An' the flowers of Spring filled the woods with flame
An' all of a sudden life got too tame
Davy, Davy Crockett, headin' on West again!

Off through the woods we're ridin' along
Makin' up yarns an' singin' a song
He's ringy as a b'ar an' twice as strong
An' knows he's right 'cause he ain' often wrong
Davy, Davy Crockett, the man who don't know fear!

Lookin' fer a place where the air smells clean
Where the trees is tall an' the grass is green
Where the fish is fat in an untouched stream
An' the teemin' woods is a hunter's dream
Davy, Davy Crockett, lookin' fer Paradise!

Now he's lost his love an' his grief was gall
In his heart he wanted to leave it all
An' lose himself in the forests tall
But he answered instead his country's call
Davy, Davy Crockett, beginnin' his campaign!

Needin' his help they didn't vote blind
They put in Davy 'cause he was their kind
Sent up to Nashville the best they could find
A fightin' spirit an' a thinkin' mind
Davy, Davy Crockett, choice of the whole frontier!

The votes were counted an' he won hands down
So they sent him off to Washin'ton town
With his best dress suit still his buckskins brown
A livin' legend of growin' renown
Davy, Davy Crockett, the Canebrake Congressman!

He went off to Congress an' served a spell
Fixin' up the Governments an' laws as well
Took over Washin'ton so we heered tell
An' patched up the crack in the Liberty Bell
Davy, Davy Crockett, seein' his duty clear!

Him an' his jokes travelled all through the land
An' his speeches made him friends to beat the band
His politickin' was their favorite brand
An' everyone wanted to shake his hand
Davy, Davy Crockett, helpin' his legend grow!

He knew when he spoke he sounded the knell
Of his hopes for White House an' fame as well
But he spoke out strong so hist'ry books tell
An' patched up the crack in the Liberty Bell
Davy, Davy Crockett, seein' his duty clear!

When he come home his politickin' done
The western march had just begun
So he packed his gear an' his trusty gun
An' lit out grinnin' to follow the sun
Davy, Davy Crockett, leadin' the pioneers!

He heard of Houston an' Austin so
To the Texas plains he jest had to go
Where freedom was fightin' another foe
An' they needed him at the Alamo
Davy, Davy Crockett, the man who don't know fear!

His land is biggest an' his land is best
From grassy plains to the mountain crest
He's ahead of us all meetin' the test
Followin' his legend into the West
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier!

{the great Mac Wiseman had a Top 10 hit with this song}


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Subject: Lyr Add: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 04 Sep 07 - 08:55 AM

Thanks, pdq & Myst. One thing to note when adding lyrics to the Mudcat in the Forum is to change the subject with Lyr Add: for that message. That way the song harvesters (those who compile the DT database) can locate songs newly added to the system. (Actually, the version in the DT of the Ballad of Davy Crockett is much shorter than what pdq has given us. Thanks for the update)


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Sep 07 - 07:52 PM

Chubby Parker made a delightful recording of 'Pompey Smash' under the title 'Davy Crockett' in 1931. You can find it reissued on the second disc of the marvellous collection The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Songster Bob
Date: 04 Sep 07 - 08:10 PM

Actually, Davy WAS born on a mountaintop AND in a valley (it was a steep mountain, and his mom's head was uphill at the start).

Sorry 'bout that.

Bob


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: MystMoonstruck
Date: 04 Sep 07 - 10:40 PM

I'm new to PC talk, so I'm not sure that I understand about where Lyr Add: is supposed to be placed. Would I do this only if it's something like my granddad's song? For example, I would not do it for the "Pompey Smash" lyrics, right? I thought they might already be somewhere on the site. Do I replace "RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett" with "Lyr Add:"? Do I use the [b][/b] to bold?

There are so many things I need to learn about the Net and forums.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 05 Sep 07 - 08:42 AM

Hi Myst. To explain, when we post lyrics to a thread, in the line that says Subject:, you can modify that so the part that says RE: would be changed by the poster to say Lyr Add:.

This way those people designated to search the forum for new additions can locate all Messages which have "Lyr Add:" in the subject line.

To explain the Mudcat, it consists of two parts, the message forum which you are using, plus a database of songs which has been around for roughly 20 years, called the Digital Tradition. There is a link that tells you about Mudcat/DT history up top in the Links section.


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Subject: RE: a Little History
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 05 Sep 07 - 09:02 AM

Here are some threads for you to look at, Myst, to give you some understanding 8-) of Mudcatters

Mudcat History
About the Digital Tradition
Permathread Index of interesting topics
Posting Lyrics information


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 05 Sep 07 - 12:18 PM

I remember one of my cousins in Texas wearing a coonskin cap during the Davy Crockett mania spawned by the Disney series. I watched the mini-series and, several years later, saw some episodes of Daniel Boone, with Ed Ames playing his sidekick, Mingo. Flash forward to a Johnny Carson late night show, where Ed Ames, dressed as Mingo, demonstrates his prowess with the tomahawk. Showing Johnny the proper grip, he aimed at a full size male cutout several feet away on the stage. For those who never saw the clip, the axe cleaved the personal parts of the unfortunate dummy. The audience laughter which followed was the longest recorded in TV history to that time.

Years later, I found myself at a winery in the Santa Ynez Valley, north of Santa Barbara. There, I had a chance meeting with the owner, Fess Parker. He was a very astute businessman, with a degree from the University of Texas. No rube he, Fess owns hotels, ranch land and the winery, among other things. I marketed his brand for a couple of years afterward. He also likes to sing, by the way, which connects him in some minute way with this thread - should that matter.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: Cool Beans
Date: 05 Sep 07 - 12:30 PM

My daughters were always impressed by young Davy Crockett's carpentry skills. He built him a bar when he was only three. That's the way they heard it, anyway.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: MystMoonstruck
Date: 05 Sep 07 - 06:02 PM

I just came back from reading about how to post lyrics, and I'm so confused. It might take several more readings before I understand. Perhaps it's the ADHD with a heavy dose of fibrofog, but I am very confused by some of the "computerese". I see HTML, for example, but have no idea what it means. I think I know how to make a link. If I place a link to the song above, would I just use the address at the top of my screen as the link? I hadn't seen any lyrics with the "Lyr Add:", so I wasn't aware I should use that.

I shall try very hard to follow rules. If I oops, it isn't from carelessness or that I don't care. I count myself fortunate to have found this site. I'm a newbie to the Net but not to the music. By the time I was in my early teens in the Sixties, I was gathering songbooks, making my own songbooks with the help of my keyboard organ (later double keyboard as I continued my studies), and buying albums (no cassettes yet). Work in a factory put an end to my organist skills when I developed severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in both hands and arms (affects me up to the shoulders). Guitar was out and the pennywhistle, too. Then, about eight years ago at Bristol Renaissance Faire (near Kenosha, Wisconsin), I splurged and bought a bowed psaltery, inspiring me to learn many of the songs I had collected. It was while I was hunting for songbook contents that I found my way here. The "Mudcat" caught my attention then the thread for "Davy Crockett"--this one. My enthusiasm got the best of me. I apologize--which I expect to do a lot. Maybe this site will help me find where those other stanzas came from.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,sharx35
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:20 AM

toadfrog, were you ever able to track down that Daniel Boone song from the 50's?


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: bobad
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:54 AM

A Jewish "Davy Crockett" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwczIc4FNV0


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 10:14 PM

"Bet-ty, Betty Crocker
Queen of the A&P"


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,MtheGM
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 10:37 PM

Two points:

i. Many interesting children's parody versions of Disney ballad from time the movie first appeared can be found in Peter & Iona Opie's definitive work for Oxford UP, 'The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren' [1959].

ii. And, as matter of interest, the 'Yankee clipper ship' on which the narrator ships in The Leaving Of Liverpool ? "Davy Crockett was her name".


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,MtheGM
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 11:26 PM

Further to above: should stress that the parody versions in the Opie book are all British children's renderings.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of Davy Crockett
From: GUEST,Mister Reader
Date: 21 Jan 17 - 11:52 AM

Daniel Boone (The Daddy Of Them All)

Found by searches on Yahoo and Google

http://www.worldcat.org/title/song-of-daniel-boone-the-daddy-of-them-all/oclc/499148355
The song of Daniel Boone (the daddy of them all)
Author:         Enoch Light; Lewis Davies
Publisher:         New York : Record Songs, Inc., 1955.

https://www.amazon.com/Song-Daniel-Boone-Daddy-Them/dp/B00C8A3N5Y
The Song of Daniel Boone, the Daddy of Them All Paperback ? 1955
by Enoch; Davis, Lew Light (Author)
3090. SHEET MUSIC. 1955. 3 p. 12.00x9.00. SONG. Words and Music by ENOCH LIGHT and LEW DAVIS.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9FrgpQVGq8
Ken Carson version

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhZzZoG42ls
Dick Lee version

https://www.discogs.com/Loren-Becker-With-Enoch-Light-Orch-Chorus-Brigadiers-The-Song-Of-Daniel-Boone-The-Daddy-Of-Them-All/release/1872170
Loren Becker With Enoch Light Orch & Chorus* / The Brigadiers ‎? The Song Of Daniel Boone (The Daddy Of Them All)


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