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Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre

Haruo 02 Jul 02 - 01:35 PM
Mrrzy 02 Jul 02 - 01:46 PM
Mrrzy 02 Jul 02 - 01:49 PM
masato sakurai 02 Jul 02 - 02:22 PM
masato sakurai 02 Jul 02 - 02:42 PM
Malcolm Douglas 02 Jul 02 - 03:34 PM
nutty 02 Jul 02 - 03:41 PM
masato sakurai 02 Jul 02 - 07:12 PM
Haruo 02 Jul 02 - 08:09 PM
masato sakurai 02 Jul 02 - 08:16 PM
Richard Mellish 02 Sep 09 - 05:48 AM
Mrrzy 03 Oct 09 - 04:58 PM
GUEST,Bjarke 08 Dec 09 - 07:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Dec 09 - 09:27 PM
Richard Mellish 01 Oct 10 - 05:24 PM
Haruo 01 Oct 10 - 08:33 PM
Monique 01 Oct 10 - 11:45 PM
LadyJean 02 Oct 10 - 10:38 PM
MGM·Lion 03 Oct 10 - 08:29 AM
Tug the Cox 03 Oct 10 - 09:43 AM
Haruo 03 Oct 10 - 11:38 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Oct 10 - 02:52 PM
masato sakurai 04 Oct 10 - 09:52 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Oct 10 - 01:17 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Oct 10 - 01:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Oct 10 - 02:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Oct 10 - 02:12 PM
Tug the Cox 07 Oct 10 - 07:38 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Oct 10 - 02:28 PM
GUEST, Tom Bliss 24 Nov 10 - 08:03 AM
Monique 24 Nov 10 - 08:28 AM
Haruo 07 Dec 10 - 03:41 AM
framus 07 Dec 10 - 05:29 PM
Monique 07 Dec 10 - 06:59 PM
Haruo 07 Dec 10 - 08:23 PM
GUEST,Holger Terp 07 Mar 12 - 02:21 PM
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Subject: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Haruo
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 01:35 PM

In the High Germany, who wrote it? there's been a bunch of stuff relating to the French song "Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre", but so far only one stanza has been posted,
MALBROUCK S'EN VA-T-EN GUERRE

Marlbrough s'en va-t-en guerre,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Marlbrough s'en va-t-en guerre,
Ne sait quand reviendra.
Ne sait quand reviendra,
Ne sait quand reviendra.
Marlbrough s'en va-t-en guerre,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Marlbrough s'en va-t-en guerre,
Ne sait quand reviendra.

I'm starting this new thread so people who go by thread title rather than reading everything, and who may have something to add on this topic but no interest in who wrote High Germany, will see it. I guess additions might be more appropriate here (remember to change the subject line for your post to LYR ADD instead of LYR REQ).

Liland


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 01:46 PM

Il reviedra à Pâques... ou à la Trinité
La Trinité se passe... Malbrouck ne revient pas
Sa dame à sa tour monte... si haut qu'elle paut monter
Elle aperçoit son page... tout de noir habillé
O page ô mon beau page... quelles nouvelles apportez?
-Aux nouvelles que j'apporte... vos beaux yeux vont pleurer
Malbrouck est mort en guerre... est mort et entérré.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 01:49 PM

si haut qu'elle PEUT monter (so busy with the html forgot to check the actual spelling!) Also, the line I had bracketed in the French guillemets disappeared: it should read after Tout de noir habillé:
O page, ô mon beau page... quelles nouvelles apportez? Then you get Aux nouvelles que j'apporte, etc.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MALBROUGH S'EN VA-T-EN GUERRE
From: masato sakurai
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 02:22 PM

There're are lots of sites containing this song, whose title is usually "Malbrough s'en va-t-en guerre." One of the longest lyrics (from HERE) is:

MALBROUGH S'EN VA-T-EN GUERRE

Malbrough s'en va-t-en guerre
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Malbrough s'en va-t-en guerre
Ne sait quand reviendra (bis)

Il reviendra-z-à Pâques
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine
Il reviendra-z-à Pâques
Ou à la Trinité (bis)

La Trinité se passe,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
La Trinité se passe
Malbrough ne revient pas (bis)

Madame à sa tour monte
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Madame à sa tour monte
Si haut qu'elle peut monter (bis)

Elle voit venir son page,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Elle voit venir son page
Tout de noir habillé (bis)

Beau page, mon beau page
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Beau page, mon beau page
Quelles nouvelles apportez ? (bis)

Aux nouvelles que j'apporte
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Aux nouvelles que j'apporte
Vos beaux yeux vont pleurer (bis)

Quittez vos habits roses
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Quittez vos habits roses
Et vos satins brochés (bis)

Monsieur Malbrough est mort
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Monsieur Malbrough est mort
Est mort et enterré (bis)

J'l'ai vu porter en terre,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
J'l'ai vu porter en terre
Par quatre-z-officiers (bis)

L'un portait sa cuirasse
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
L'un portait sa cuirasse
L'autre son bouclier (bis)

L'un portait son grand sabre,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
L'un portait son grand sabre
L'autre ne portait rien (bis)

A l'entour de sa tombe
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
A l'entour de sa tombe
Romarin fut planté (bis)

Sur la plus haute branche
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Sur la plus haute branche
Un rossignol chantait (bis)

On vit voler son âme
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
On vit voler son âme
Au travers des lauriers (bis)

La cérémonie faite
Mironton
La cérémonie faite
Chacun s'en fut coucher (bis)

Les uns avec leurs femmes
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
Les uns avec leurs femmes
Et les autres tout seuls !

J'n'en dis pas davantage
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine,
J'n'en dis pas davantage
Car en voilà-z-assez (bis)

~Masato


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Subject: Lyr Add: MALBROUK ÈVA-ST AL GUÊRE
From: masato sakurai
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 02:42 PM

On the song history, see THIS PAGE (in French).

A Walloon version (from HERE):

MALBROUK ÈVA-ST AL GUÊRE

I.
Malbrouk èva-st al guere
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Malbrouk èva à l' guêre
Ni sét ddja can rvinrè (treus côps)

II.
Rvinrè kécfiye a Påke,
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Rvinrè kécfiye a Påke,
Ûbin à l' Tinité (treus côps)

III.
La Trinité est hoûte
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
La Trinité est hoûte
Malbrouk n' è nin rivnu (treus côps)

IV.
Sa fame dins sa tour monte
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Sa fame dins sa tour monte
Po vèy s' i n' rivinrot (treus côps)

V.
Vèt rivnu on scalot,
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Vèt rivnu on scalot,
K' estot tor nwar moussi (treus côps)

VI.
O, vos, nosse bon scalot
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
O, vos, nosse bon scalot
Kénes novèles m'apwartoz (treus côps)

VII.
Les novèles ki dj' apwate,
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Les novèles ki dj' apwate,
Vos bês ouys front plorer (treus côps)

VIII.
Mossieu Malbrouk est mwârt
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Mossieu Malbrouk est mwârt
Est mwârt et atèré (treus côps)

IX.
Dj' l' ê veu pwarter el tère,
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Dj' l' ê veu pwarter èl tère,
Pa cwate bês oficîrs (treus côps)

X.
Li prèmî pwartot s' casse,
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Li prèmî pwartot s' casse,
Lu deuzime, su bouclî (treus côps)

XI.
Li treuzime pwartot s' dår,
Des crompîres, des navês, des rècines,
Li treuzime pwartot s' dår,
Et li katrime si spéye. (treus côps)

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 03:34 PM

The site where Masato found his first example credits no source for its text, but the song is commonly taught in French schools, so that isn't too surprising. It may well be spelled Marlborough nowadays, but the title in the past was Malbrouck. Henri Davenson (Le Livre des Chansons, 1955) prints a longer set (also with no source specified). All the verses posted by Masato are included (with some minor textual variations); the additional material fits in as follows:

Between verses 15 and 16 [above]:

Chacun mit ventre à' terre,
Et puis se releva,

Pour chanter les victoires
Que Malbrouck remporta.

Each one lay flat upon the ground
And then got up again

To sing of the victories
That Malbrouck won.

Between verses 17 and 18 [above]:

Ce n'est pas qu'il en manque,
Car j'en connais beaucoup:

Des brunes et des blondes,
Et des châtaignes aussi.

It's not that they had none,
For I know many of them:

Brunettes and blondes,
And chestnut-haired ones too.


Davenson remarks that the song first became popular in 1781, as sung by a Dame Poitrine who was at the French Court for the job of nurse to the Dauphin. It rapidly became the height of fashion, and Beaumarchais used it in his Mariage de Figaro. Davenson also notes considerable correspondences with Le Prince d'Orange, upon which the song may well have been based. He also quotes a text of Le Duc de Guise, which also has noticeable resemblances, but points out that it did not appear in print until 1785, and that authorities disagree as to whether it is a possible source of Malbrouck or itself derived from that song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: nutty
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 03:41 PM

I'm not sure where this broadside from the Bodleian fits in but it seems to be based on the above song and is dated as being published between 1780 and 1812

Chanson de Marlbrook


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: masato sakurai
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 07:12 PM

On the history:

"The melody [of "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" etc.] was originally associated with the Malbrouk song, the words of which appear in a collection of street songs, Chansons, Vaudevilles et Ariettes Choisis par Duchemin, published by Valleyre, on p. 10 under the title La Mort de M. de Marlb'roug; BN. The collection is not dated but is believed to be between 1762 and 1778. The song is also said to have been referred to in a play by Charles Simon Favart, Les Rêveries Renouvellées des Grecs performed and printed in 1779 in Paris, p. 26; however, there is an error in the citation, and the reference cannot be confirmed in the copy at BN.
"Commencing early in 1783, there was a rash of printing of the Malbrouk melody under that title or the title Marlbourouck, or other variation, apparently brought about when a nurse sang it to one of Marie Antoinette's infants as a lullaby about 1781. Mercure de France lists at least 10 printings by different publishers in 1783-1784, not all with words, the earliest of which in May 31, 1783, p. 240, is entitled Air de Marlbourouck, with nine variations for piano, published by Levasseur, Paris; no copy has been located. Other French editions were printed without name of publisher, and there were many early foreign printings. Various contemporary French and other editions are at BN, COP, BM and JF."--(James J. Fuld, The Book of World-Famous Music, 4th ed., Dover, 1995, p. 231)

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Haruo
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 08:09 PM

The spelling is about as variable as they get, but it seems to me after perusing a lot of Google lists that the French sites tend towards Malbrouck and the English sites (even though they're presenting a French text) towards Marlbrough, occasionally even Marlborough. If there were more American sites, we'd probably see an occasional Marlboro... Thanks to all who have contributed so far.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: masato sakurai
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 08:16 PM

Sheet music edition at the Levy Collection.

Title: Malbrouk, A Celebrated French Air with variations for the Piano Forte.
Composer, Lyricist, Arranger: Composed By C. Meineke.
Publication: Baltimore: John Cole, n.d..
Form of Composition: theme and variations
Instrumentation: piano
Dedicatee: Dedicated to Miss E.A. Frick
Plate Number: 386
Call No.: Box: 041 Item: 024

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 02 Sep 09 - 05:48 AM

I have a CD "over havet" by the Danish/Faroese group Sulskær. Track 12 is entitled "Mallebrok" and described thus in the booklet:
"En version af den gamle danske sang Mallebrok.
- The theme of this old Danish song is unfortunately too familiar. A young man goes to war and never returns."

It was some time before the penny dropped for me, that this is a Danish version of Malbrouck, even with a somewhat similar tune and second line.

My posting now is prompted by my having heard a Swedish version last night at Sharp's Folk Club (sung by a lass who is half English and half Swedish). The tune and second line are similar to the Danish version. I will try to get hold of at least some of the words.

Richard


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 04:58 PM

A la plus haute branche / un rossignol chantait is also a line from another very well-known French song, A la claire fontaine.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: GUEST,Bjarke
Date: 08 Dec 09 - 07:06 PM

For what it's worth, here it is - a staple of my childhood...

The Danish version is at once silly, sad and fierce, maybe that's what was needed after the crushing defeat of the War of 1864 (attenfireogtres) against Prussia - basically the end of Denmark as a military player on the world stage (for a long time, anyway).

The lyrics - basically, Mallebrok is killed in the war of 1864.

He is carried to the grave by 4 gentlemen.

One carries his rifle, one his sword, one his shirt, the last one doesn't carry anything.

At the grave, there is no hole.

The priest gives a speech and says nothing.

So now he's laying in the grave chewing his tobacco.

And when the tobacco gets old, he takes another dip :)

Mallebrok er død i krigen
fili-ong-gong-gong og tinge-linge-ling.
Mallebrok er død i krigen i attenfireogtres.
I attenfireogtres,
i attenfireogtres.
Mallebrok er død i krigen i attenfireogtres.

Han blev til graven båren
fili-ong-gong-gong og tinge-linge-ling.
Han blev til graven båren
af fire hædersmænd...


Den ene bar hans sabel
den anden hans gevær.

Den tredje bar hans skjorte
den fjerde ingenting.

Og da de kom til graven
så var der ingen hul.

Og præsten holdt en tale
han sagde ingenting.

Nu ligger han graven
og tygger på en skrå.

Og når den så bli´r gammel
så ta´r han sig en ny.


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Subject: Lyr Add: CHANSON DE MARLBROOK
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Dec 09 - 09:27 PM

Nutty menioned this broadside; a variation in English.

Lyr. Add: CHANSON DE MARLBROOK

Great Marlborough's not dead,
Miron-ton-ton miron,
Great Marlborough is not dead,
As it was by some long said,
As it was by some &c.
Great Marlborough is not dead,
Miron-ton &c.
Great Marlborough is not dead,
Miron-ton &c.
Great Marlborough is not dead,
As it was by some long said,
But comes with renoun,
Miron-ton, etc.
To tell what he has done, &c.
In battle he has slain,
Miron-ton etc.
The pride of France and Spain,etc.
Buremonde, likewise Venlo,
Miron-ton etc.
With ease he made come to, etc.
And Stevensworth with Liege,
Miron-ton etc.
Could not endure his seige, etc.
Linburgh and famous Bonne,
Miron-ton etc.
He clearly made his own, etc.
The Frenchmen cry'd Marblieu!
Alas! what could they do etc.
At Shelenburgh the fame,
Miron-ton etc.
Increasing still his fame, etc.
In Blenheim's fated field,
Miron-ton etc.
His enemies must yield, etc.
The battle it was hard, etc.
He took the great Tallard, etc.
And everyone must know,
Miron-ton etc.
He laid our lillies low, etc.
At Ramilies again,
Miron-ton etc.
He dy'd with blood the plain, etc.
In triumph now he comes,
Miron-ton etc.
With trumpets, flag and drum, etc.
Then Marlborough is not dead,
Miron-ton etc.,
Then Marlborough is not dead,
A false report has said,
A false etc.
Then Marlborough he is not dead, etc.
Miron-ton etc.,
Then Marlborough is not dead,
As false report has said.

Johnson Ballads 353, J. Evans, London, c. 1780-1812.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 01 Oct 10 - 05:24 PM

I've just come back to this thread. I should have refreshed it with more info before now.

First, here is the Swedish version that I mentioned, with a translation by Hedvig, who sang it at Sharp's. One delightful twist is that the refrain, which AFAIK is pure nonsense in the original French, has morphed into having one real word in Swedish. Isn't the Folk Process wonderful?

Major Brack skull' till kriget sig fara
*Major Brack was off to war*
: Mili-tam tam tam militärna
*'Militam- tam tam tam the military'*
Major Brack skull' till kriget sig fara
*Major Brack was off to war*
Han for från sin gemål
*He parted from his spouse*
Han for från sin gemål
*He parted from his spouse*
Han for från sin gemål
*He parted from his spouse*
Major Brack skull' till kriget sig fara
*Major Brack was off to war*
Han for från sin gemål
*He parted from his spouse*

Jag kommer igen till påska
*I will come again (in time) for Easter*
Eller midsommardagen förvisst
*Or midsummer's day for sure
*
När som påska var förliden
*When Easter had passed*
Major Brack kom ej igen
*Major Brack did not come back*

Frun gångar sig ut till att titta
*The wife goes out to watch/look*
På högan berg hon står
*On the high hill/mountain she stands
*
Och fick hon se ungersven komma
*And she saw the 'young swain'/page coming*
I sorgse var han klädd
*In mourning was he dressed*

Tag bort eder gyllene scharlakan
*Remove your golden 'scharlakan' (type of posh wool, usually scarlet)*
Major Brack uti kriget är död
*Major Brack out at war has died
*
Han blev till graven buren
*He was carried to his grave*
Av fyra höga män
*By four tall men*

Den ene bar hans vapen
*One bore his weapons*
Den andre bar hans svärja (svärd)
*The other bore his sword*
De två bar honom själv
*The two bore (major Brack) himself.*

Now concerning the Danish version:
The words posted by GUEST,Bjarke are quite different from those on the CD that I mentioned. I shan't attempt to transcribe the latter. The only bit I can make out is the line
"Mallebrok han kom ikke hjem"
i.e. "Mallebrok/Marlbrouck/Marlborough he came not home"

I may be able to get a Danish-speaking friend to transcribe it some time.

Richard


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Haruo
Date: 01 Oct 10 - 08:33 PM

I think tune to "The Man Who Hath Plenty of Good Peanuts" is an elaboration (and parodic devastation) of the tune to "Malbrouck". N'est-ce pas?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Monique
Date: 01 Oct 10 - 11:45 PM

The song crossed the Pyrenees and is known as "Mambrú se fue a la guerra", (a Spain version) then crossed the Atlantic (a South America version). You'll note that the Spanish "Qué dolor, qué dolor, qué pena" (lit. "What a pain, what a pain, what a grief/sorrow") reminds of Beaumarchais' lyrics "Que mon cœur, que mon cœur a de peine" ("How sorrowful my heart is")


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: LadyJean
Date: 02 Oct 10 - 10:38 PM

And in the Southern Appalachians they sing:

Moll Brooks come out of the water
Moll Brooks come out of the water
Moll Brooks come out of the water
Until you've learned to swim
Until you've learned to swim
Until you've learned to swim.

Moll brooks come out of the water, until you've learned to swim.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 03 Oct 10 - 08:29 AM

I should think that "For he's a jolly good fellow" is one of the most widespread and oft-sung of the songs to this tune. Why do you guys across there have a different last line from the one we sing over here? Is "And so say all of us" not a idiom you use. This is not meant critically or controversially ~~ "Which nobody can deny" is a perfectly good line and fits the tune just as well. I am just exercised as to WHY this difference.

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 03 Oct 10 - 09:43 AM

Also know it as 'We won't go home till the morning' there is a Bidford morrid dance of thst nsme to the tune.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Haruo
Date: 03 Oct 10 - 11:38 AM

I think I first learned it as

The bear came over the mountain x3
To see what he could see".
And all that he could see x2
Was the other side of the mountain
the other side of the mountain x2
was all that he could see.

(even before I learned "For he's a jolly good fellow")


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Oct 10 - 02:52 PM

Wikipedia-
American version
.....which nobody can deny.

British and Australian version
.....and so say all of us.

Like Haruo, the one I first learned was the bear version, and when forced to sing "For he's ....." at some affair, I catch myself ending

For he's a jolly good fellow
was all that he could see.

Makes no sense, but memory works in peculiar ways.

Masato's links show that the tune was used as early as 1563 (and perhaps much earlier than that).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: masato sakurai
Date: 04 Oct 10 - 09:52 AM

Beethoven incorporated the tune in his Wellington's Victory.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WE WON'T GO HOME TILL MORNING
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:17 PM

Lyr. Add: WE WON'T GO HOME TILL MORNING
Pub. Oliver Ditson, Boston, c. 1842

1
We're all met here together,
We're all met here together,
We're all met here together,
To eat and drink good cheer,
To eat and drink good cheer,
To eat and drink good cheer.

Chorus:
For we won't go home till morning,
We won't go home till morning,
We won't go home till morning,
Till day light does appear.

2
We'll sing, we'll dance and be merry,
We'll sing, we'll dance and be merry,
We'll sing, we'll dance and be merry,
And kiss the lasses dear;
And kiss the lasses dear;
And kiss the lasses dear.
3
The girls we love them dearly,
The girls we love them dearly,
The girls we love them dearly,
And they love us, 'tis clear;
And they love us, 'tis clear;
And they love us, 'tis clear.
Chorus:

Coda:
Away, away, away
Away, away, away.
For now we must be going,
For now we must be going,
For now we must be going,
Away, away, away.

The site shows a picture of sheet music arranged for piano forte by William Clifton, 1842, Oliver Ditson.
We Won't Go

Section on American Songs, other than by Stephen Foster.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:27 PM

The sheet music of "We Won't Go Home Till Morning" at American Memory. "A favorite glee for three voices, partly written and arranged for the piano forte by William Clifton."
Ms date "Filed March 11, 1842, Deposited March 11, 1842."


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Subject: Lyr Add: WE WON'T GO HOME TILL MORNING (English)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Oct 10 - 02:05 PM

Lyr. Add: WE WON'T GO HOME TILL MORNING English
(Bodleian, bet. 1797-1834)

Brave boys, let's all be jolly:
A fig for melancholy-
Since grieving's all a folly,
'Tis folly to grieve, that's clear:
While good humour each face is adorning,
While sorrow in glee we are scorning.
We won't go home till morning
Till daylight does appear!
We won't go home till morning,
Till daylight does appear!
Till daylight, etc.
We won't go home till morning,
Till daylight does appear!
2
When first the vine was planted,
A boon to man was granted-
The world became enchanted,
And sorrow in fright took wing:
But to keep her for ever away boys,
We to Bacchus our homage must pay, boys.
So here while we may let us stay, boys,
And out of pure gratitude sing-
We won't go home, etc.
3
Great Jove was a hearty good fellow,
As poets of old could tell, O-
With nectar he used to get mellow-
(And no doubt it was jolly good stuff!)
Such examples we cannot but follow,
Then hogsheads of wine let us swallow,
Till we beat the old gentleman hollow.
But never cry 'Hold, enough!'
So we can't go home till morning-
We won't go home, etc.
4
What the pleasure of wine surpasses,
When bright in the sparkling glasses?
'Tis quaffed to the beautiful lasses-
Oh! rich are the joys that spring;
Since the brightest pleasure on earth, boys,
Must in the full wine cup have birth, boys,
Brave Bacchus will join in our mirth, boys,
And merrily, merrily sing--
We won't go home, etc.

Walter, Printer, Durham. On sheet with Land! Land!
Firth b.26(501), bet. 1797-1834. Bodleian Collection.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Oct 10 - 02:12 PM

The author is cited as W. H. C. West for the Bodleian copies of "We Won't Go Home Till Morning." Performer J. B. Holmes. On the copy Firth c.22(37), "To the tune of "The Rakes of the Town."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 07:38 PM

Great research, Q. I'm guessing the Bodlian version is the source for the Bidford Morris tune. Now... what were the words to 'The Rakes of the Town'?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 02:28 PM

The title "Rakes of the Town" confuses me.
In the poem/song "The Lark in the Morning," a verse (many variants) has the lines-
"As they were coming home from the rakes of the town,
The meadow being all mown and the grass had been cut down.
As they should chance to tumble all on the new mown hay
Oh it's kiss me now or never this bonnie lass would say."
(And it ensued just what one would expect-)

The other meaning, the unscrupulous, libidinous males of the town, I couldn't find under that title as a song. Not found in the Bodleian.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: GUEST, Tom Bliss
Date: 24 Nov 10 - 08:03 AM

I'm working on Malbrouk - the Jersey French version at the moment, and came upon this which suggests the song is far older. (Source here)

Malbrouk or Marlbrough (Marlbro'), does not date from the battle of Malplaq'uet (1709), but from the time of the Crusades, 600 years before. According to a tradition discovered by M. de Châteaubriand, the air came from the Arabs, and the tale is a legend of Mambron, a crusader. It was brought into fashion during the Revolution by Mme. Poitrine, who used to sing it to her royal foster-child, the son of Louis XVI. M. Ar'ago tells us that when M. Monge, at Cairo, sang this air to an Egyptian audience, they all knew it, and joined in it. Certainly the song has nothing to do with the Duke of Marlborough, as it is all about feudal castles and Eastern wars. We are told also that the band of Captain Cook, in 1770, was playing the air one day on the east coast of Australia, when the natives evidently recognised it, and seemed enchanted. (Moniteur de l'Armee.)           1
               
"Malbrouk s'en va-t-en guerre,
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine;
Malbrouk s'en va-t-en guerre.
Nul sait quand reviendra.
Il reviendra z'a pâques—
Mironton, mironton, mirontaine …
Ou à la Trinité."

The name Malbrouk occurs in the Chansons de Gestes, and also in the Basque Pastorales.

The Jersey version was collected by Kennedy, but he doesn't mention any of the above.

Tom


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Monique
Date: 24 Nov 10 - 08:28 AM

Would that mean that the song crossed the Pyrenees from South to North and not from North to South as we currently think it did?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Haruo
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 03:41 AM

it's all BABM to me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: framus
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 05:29 PM

I'm afraid I know nothing about the lyrics for this, but you may know that Beethoven used it in "the Battle of Victoria"(the battle symphony),
and the tune is definitely For he's a jolly good fellow.
Cheers, Davy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Monique
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 06:59 PM

They report in French what Tom tells in English in "Notes pour l'histoire de la chanson" (1861) page 94 to 96. They say the song would go back to the Middle Ages, that it originated in the Middle East and was probably brought to Spain and France by soldiers of king James the 1st of Aragon and king Louis the 9th (St Louis) of France.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: Haruo
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 08:23 PM

My comment about BABM is now lacking in context. Joe or a clone has removed the KOI-8-looking gobbledygook that I was referring to. BABM, to share knowledge Monique and I were uniquely privy to heretofore, is an artificial, a priori language constructed by a Japanese philosopher and published by him in 1962. Extracts from the book can be found on this webpage. Here is the Wikipedia article about it. I think it is much more "Greek" than "Greek", so I use it occasionally in a variant of "It's all Greek to me". It's pronounced "boh-ah-boh-moo", since it uses the Latin alphabet as a (presumably kana-inspired) syllabary.

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Malbrouck s'en va-t'en guerre
From: GUEST,Holger Terp
Date: 07 Mar 12 - 02:21 PM

Original Danish text:

The broadside is published in several Danish editions, first as "Een nye Viise om General Malbrochs Krigsbedrifter og Død" / "A new song on General Malbrochs war deeds and death" print undated by P. Horrebews Enke in Store Fiolstræde No. 204 and by L. N. Svares Enke in Store Kannikestrædet No. 39. and the music is published in: "Blandinger for Sang og Claveer - Som et Anhæng til det første Bind" / "Mixtures for singing and piano - As an addition to the first volume", Copenhagen 1787 which is photographed in Henning Urups dissertation Dans i Danmark / Dance in Denmark, 2007, pp. 104.(In Google Books) Urup mentions the song as "le Marlboroug" or Le Malbroch (count. Danse) as a dance tune to a contra dance in 2/4 rhythm and not in the later 6/8 beat. I'm not good at reading sheet music, but the melody looks right.The mixtures for singing and piano comes from Sorø Academy Library, and is probably now at the Royal Library in Copenhagen.
The dance and music are also in Elizabeth Burchenal's Folk dances of Denmark: Containing seventy-three dances (1915).
- http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924019899586

Malbroch i Leding farer,
Miro ton ton ton, miro tene;

Malbroch i Leding farer,
Hans Hu til Orlog stod.

Han kommer hjem til Paaske,
Til St. Hansdag forvist.

St. Hansdag var forgangen,
Malbroch kom ei igien.

Hans unge Frue ganger,
Paa høie Loft at staae.

Hun seer den unge Svend kommer,
I Sort saa var klæd.

Hvad Nyt, hvad Nyt fra Krigen?
Hvor gaaer det min Gemahl?

Din Rosens Kind vil blegne,
Naar du mit Budskab hør.

Afføre din Skarlagen,
Og al din Prydelse.

Malbroch er død i Krigen,
Og lagt i sorte Jord.

Han blev til Graven baaren,
Af fire Høvedsmænd.

Den første bar hans Sabel,
Den anden bar hans Skiold.

Den tredie bar hans Harnisk,
Den fierde ingen Ting.

Der han til Graven var baaren,
Gik vi alle hiem igien.

Mænd gik med deres Qvinder,
Jeg eene gik igien.

Finn Alfred's version of a modernization of the original Danish text is here together with other Danish peace songs.
http://www.arnehansen.net/dialog/fred/100821-01-FinAlfredMallebrok128s.htm


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