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Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions

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Caz 10 Sep 02 - 01:37 PM
MMario 10 Sep 02 - 01:39 PM
Mr Happy 10 Sep 02 - 01:47 PM
Joan from Wigan 10 Sep 02 - 02:01 PM
Clinton Hammond 10 Sep 02 - 02:10 PM
Mr Red 10 Sep 02 - 02:21 PM
Joan from Wigan 10 Sep 02 - 02:23 PM
Clinton Hammond 10 Sep 02 - 02:31 PM
GUEST 10 Sep 02 - 02:37 PM
Les from Hull 10 Sep 02 - 03:13 PM
Uncle_DaveO 10 Sep 02 - 03:27 PM
gnomad 10 Sep 02 - 03:40 PM
Tiger 10 Sep 02 - 03:59 PM
GUEST,Peter from Essex 10 Sep 02 - 04:03 PM
Bee-dubya-ell 10 Sep 02 - 04:25 PM
Oaklet 10 Sep 02 - 07:22 PM
Genie 10 Sep 02 - 09:46 PM
Kaleea 11 Sep 02 - 03:23 AM
Steve Parkes 11 Sep 02 - 03:36 AM
GUEST 11 Sep 02 - 03:39 AM
Dave Bryant 11 Sep 02 - 04:26 AM
smallpiper 11 Sep 02 - 04:56 AM
greg stephens 11 Sep 02 - 06:06 AM
GUEST,HelenJ 11 Sep 02 - 10:37 AM
Art Thieme 11 Sep 02 - 11:15 AM
weepiper 11 Sep 02 - 02:05 PM
Caz 11 Sep 02 - 02:19 PM
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MMario 11 Sep 02 - 03:07 PM
Oaklet 11 Sep 02 - 03:27 PM
GUEST,Arjay 11 Sep 02 - 05:17 PM
Mr Red 11 Sep 02 - 06:29 PM
alison 11 Sep 02 - 08:17 PM
Guessed 12 Sep 02 - 09:07 AM
GUEST,leeneia 12 Sep 02 - 10:37 AM
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Subject: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Caz
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 01:37 PM

I was wondering as to what people thought about the use of tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions. Is it OK to use them? The reason I'm asking is because apart from the signing, I can't join in the fun and if I don't know a song then all I can do is tap my leg. I want to join in with others making the music so can I use my tambourine and eggs?

Carole


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: MMario
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 01:39 PM

probably depends on

a) the session

b) the tune

some tunes just really do NOT need either. just as there are some tunes where the bones players should sit out.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Mr Happy
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 01:47 PM

caz,

The reason I'm asking is because apart from the signing, I can't join in the fun.

is there signing at your session?

the organisers must be very aware of disability issues, that's a great idea!


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 02:01 PM

I always take a number of percussion instruments to the folk club - ours is mainly singing rather than session tunes, but, as MMario says, everything depends on the tune/song being performed. Common sense should prevail. Sometimes a few of us will join in on guitars, while others join in on eggs, tambourine, claves or bodhran. On the other hand, a quiet or unaccompanied song or air should not be "percussed" (if that's the right word). A lot depends on who's leading the song too - if they're not all that confident, don't play along in case it puts them off, even if it's a lively number. And if I go to a club/session I've not been to before, I don't even get the percussion out of my bag until I've sussed out whether it's acceptable or not. If others are joining in with instruments, it's likely that percussion is acceptable - but watch out for facial expressions of disapproval, and be prepared to just clap your hands.

Joan


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Clinton Hammond
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 02:10 PM

Not in any session I've ever seen, but then again, I haven't seen many....

On the off chance there's a tam. in the crowd at a gig though, I do make sure the bouncers take it away... that and anybody 'playing' the spoons gets shown the door...


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Mr Red
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 02:21 PM

Well my red egg is on a stick and I have been known to use it as a (red) bodran beater.
It is all down to how loud and of course the tune.
If you have difficulty hearing your own instrument in the face of the massed melodeons or bodhrans then never worry.
If the hurdy-gurdy player stares at you stare back, but play more quietly.
hold the shaker so that all your fingers grip the body or better still wear leather gloves to cut the sound. Shake it less violently but tap your feet to help with the rhytm.
It may take time to be good enough to be "heard" so curb the enthusiasm.
Find an egg that is quieter - they are made in all weights for that reason.
most of all never feel excluded, or tell everyone (if they get snotty) what the session is like.
Or stand near the banjo and blame him(her) **BG**


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 02:23 PM

Gigs are a different kettle of fish altogether - definitely no percussion from the audience.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Clinton Hammond
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 02:31 PM

Not totally true Joan...

Let 'em clap their hands... stomp their feet, or bang their hands on the tables...

Just keep the frigg'n tambourines, spoons, and ashtrays away from 'em!

:-)


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 02:37 PM

Tambourines are used in traditional music from many places, including (but not limited to)Italy, Spain, North Africa, and the Middle East, find a group that plays this kind of stuff and you'll be welcome--

It would also be welcome in many American gospel circles, and of course it is still used quite a lot in certain kinds of rock music--jug band music would be a good place, as well--

I am not real sure about the shaky egg--

In a lot of ways, music is barrier free--no matter what limitations you have, there is always an instrument that you can learn to play well. The only true disability in music is the inability to keep a beat--


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Les from Hull
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 03:13 PM

Tambourines can be a bit noisy in a small session. You've got to learn to choose which tunes or songs suit your percussion style, and then do it quietly enough. so that you can just about hear it well enough yourself. We welcome percussion at our regular Friday session (Kingston, Cumberland Street, Hull - as I believe you're 'local'), and people there know well enough when it fits.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 03:27 PM

Surely (I think) if a bodhran is acceptable then other percussion instruments should be too, possibly including washboard, bones, castanets, and so forth. But judgment, judgment, judgment, and taste, taste, taste!

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: gnomad
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 03:40 PM

Done well, and at apropriate volume, percussion of most kinds (sorry, no spoons) can enhance many a session.

I suspect that hostility is frequently aroused by people who assume that because such instruments are often given to children there is no skill required to play them. The belief that everyone should join in can have horrid results when a lack of sense of rhythm is coupled to enthusiasm and a loud percussion instrument.

On the whole I'd say practise first at home, and when you do start to join others be prepared to judge their response and adjust accordingly.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Tiger
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 03:59 PM

A tambourine is perfectly legit, as long as it's used as an instrument, not a noisemaker. And I'm not saying you have to be a pro, either.

I can't imagine "Never Ending Song of Love" without one.

If it's only to allow non-musicians to participate, I think just singing along, hand clapping, or foot stomping is fine. It's also fine if you're dealing with kids and you want to encourage participation - fine.

But, if somebody I've paid to see puts on those ankle shakers and starts handing out rattling eggs, get out of my way!


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST,Peter from Essex
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 04:03 PM

The tambourine is perfectly valid in English music but only when you can play like Rabbity Baxter.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 04:25 PM

There are usually a few folks shaking tambourines and other thingies at our sessions. So far, they have all had the courtesy to stay in the "outer circle" a good bit away from the "real musicians". Nobody seems to mind as they all have a good time and buy a round every now and then. Wooden spoons are OK. Metal spoons are a no-no.

Bruce


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Oaklet
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 07:22 PM

At the Sloop in Barton on Humber tonight, we (again) smashed the chairs and tables and made cudgels out of the long bits of MDF. We spent the entire evening beating them against the walls of the pub, in a rythmic and shiftingly pulsating manner until a melodian player came in and ruined the session. He was skinned. We now have the makings of a bodrahanahahaahn when the pelt is cured. North Lincolnshire (UK) is like that sometimes. Ask smalleper.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Genie
Date: 10 Sep 02 - 09:46 PM

LOL, Oakley!

Re metal spoons, Bruce, I've heard a couple of marvelous spooners (spoonists?) who did a bang-up job (no pun intended) with metal spoons. For the lively Irish tunes, Bluegrass, etc., they sounded great.

It's hard for me to imagine a song where loud clapping would not detract but a tambourine would. Can you folks think of an example?

Egg shakers can tend to have a Latin sort of sound, which can alter the feel of an Irish or Appalachian or c/w song. But I've used them in bluegrass sessions and they seem to be fine.

My pet peeve, though, with ANY rhythm instrument -- including foot tapping and hand clapping is when I'm trying to use a back beat and folks keep clapping on 1 and 3.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Kaleea
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 03:23 AM

For the most part, those such percussion "instruments" are for rhythm band for kids to learn how to (hopefully) keep a steady beat, or for special effects during a tune--especially nifty gourd shakers in "Latin," & "island," & "African" music. It is extremely distracting to the musicians as well as the folks attempting to listen when the spoon/bones/tambourine/shaker/whateverdrum/s are engaged! It is not necessary for everyone to have to play all the time! If the session has much singing, then sing along, but please do not use the noise makers. It is not acceptable at most "sessions," Irish or bluegrass. When there is a very good "bones" player, they usually play on only one or two tunes, and stand up & put on a real show. Why don't you seek out a good music educator (they often attend & play at sessions!) & learn how to play one of the fine musical instruments common to the "session" which you enjoy attending?


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 03:36 AM

I hate it when people clap along with a song! But I remeber dear old Sydney Carter would sometimes accompany his unaccompanied voice by gently beating on a sort of small tom-tom-like drum with a morris bell-strap. But he could get away with it!

Steve


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 03:39 AM

Like with any instrument you should only join in if you are competent to do so. The big bugbear with these instruments is that their sound cuts over the other instruments and so can be very intrusive. You should be aware that these instruments impose the rhythm you're playing - and that might not fit with the intentions of whoever is leading the song/tune. They can be very distracting, and so it is essential that you follow the good advice given above and keep them at low volume. So long as you do that and make sure they don't dominate then I don't think anyone can take too much exception.

I personally think that the most important thing is to be consistent in what you are doing. I have a friend who picks up their (loud) shaky egg & shakes along for about half a verse, then she stops for a bit of a chat, then starts up again, then stops again all within one song ......
That drives me completely mad, and I think it is appalling manners - especially as she is joining in uninvited & with people she doesn't even know that well. I feel that it ruins the song that someone has spent time preparing.

Because these are such distinctive and potentially dominating instruments I think they should be used sparingly throughout the evening (otherwise you risk every song/tune ending up sounding the same). For example ou shouldn't launch in by default every time there is a lively song/tune.

Anyway - in answer to the original question - yes its fine to join in (and I hope you have loads of fun with it) - but because of the nature of the instrument you need to keep it low and exercise a bit of common sense.

If someone asks you not to use them on a particular song please bear in mind that they have probably put a lot of thought into how they want to present the song, or they might want to vary the rhythms, or they might just be crap at being accompanied - so don't take offence and feel unwelcome. Assuming you're sensitive about what you're doing (and you will be because otherwise you wouldn;t have started the thread) then you should be welcomed. Have a great time!


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 04:26 AM

In music sessions especially English Country Dance band style ones, a bit of percussion is usually welcome. For some of the slower tunes especially things like O'Carolyn waltzes pecussion can be a bit of a problem unless the players are good.

In song sessions any extra accompaniment should normally only be with the permission of the singer. Obviously certain songs (ie Wild Rover) are usually suitable for everyone to jam in on, but keep your eys on the singer(s) - DON'T TRY TO CHANGE THEIR TEMPO/RHYTHM and if they're looking daggers at you - DESIST. I once had a bodhran "player" insist on thumping away when I was singing "Grey Funnel Line" - afterwards she told me that she'd only just bought it and wanted to practice as much as possible. I suggested a suitable place - which was eminently suitable as it had a supply of tissues for the flood of tears which my advice produced !


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: smallpiper
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 04:56 AM

Oakley wasn't joking!! But its okay the landlord has shares in MFI and no one will miss the melodion player, but it will take a long time to cure his pelt as its a bit thick - being a melodian player it would have to be. As to shaky eggs and tambourines - all the above counts as a way of joining in, fine (although personally I'm not so sure about tamb's) but as has already been said quietly is the watch word.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: greg stephens
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 06:06 AM

"If you can't play a tune, dont try to accompany it"


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST,HelenJ
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 10:37 AM

I don't like hand clapping mainly because the 'clappers' try to beat you to the beat and you find yourself playing faster and faster till you haven't enough fingers to cover the keys in the 'allotted' time.

HelenJ


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Art Thieme
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 11:15 AM

They have a place in Kindergarten and pre-school sessions. After that, they are simply annoying. Try listening to the music and the words to the songs.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: weepiper
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 02:05 PM

I quite like a well-used shaky egg. And to all the snotty people who think they and tambourines etc are only for kids, you just haven't heard it done properly. I think percussion on an otherwise unaccompanied song would be a mistake unless the singer specifically requests it. (I know a guy who accompanies himself on the bodhran when he sings) But in a big session with several tune players you'll usually be welcome... so long as you don't play a) really loudly b) out of time with everybody else c) when you've been asked not to. But the same applies for any session instrument.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Caz
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 02:19 PM

Thanks folks you've given me some good, sound advice. I've only just acquired the instruments (am I OK to call them instruments?) and because I'm aware of the amount of noise they can make I wondered how many people would find them acceptable at sessions. I also agree with you Gnomad when you say "...that hostility is frequently aroused by people who assume that because such instruments are often given to children there is no skill required to play them." I know that some people don't like them and obviously I'll use judgement etc.

Oakley, I don't believe you!

Well Kaleea, I have been learning the Violin/fiddle for the last 18 months but do not feel I yet have the confidence to take it to a session. My main instrument is my voice and when the singing stops I want to still join in the fun, when appropriate. Are you telling me that I should just keep quiet?

Guest, thank you for your comments and your sensitivity in the final paragraph.

As for those who think they are for children, I disagree. I've seen some fantastic tambourine and shaky egg players. I've seen them used with sensitivity and vitality, I've heard them being used to lift a song/tune and to add a different texture. I have practised with them in terms of rhythm, noise etc and it's my opinion that they take skill to use.

Carole


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: smallpiper
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 02:44 PM

You are absolutely right I wouldn't even attempt to try it and I'm a piper!

Weepiper long time no hear from how you doing babe?


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: MMario
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 03:07 PM

The only true disability in music is the inability to keep a beat--

I've been trying to tell people for years....


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Oaklet
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 03:27 PM

Caz, 'tis true. I didn't add that all the furniture-smashing beaters were naked and daubed in blue woad. I wish all sessions were like it.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST,Arjay
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 05:17 PM

Folks, can we accept that we're agreed that percussion instruments are an asset on some songs/arrangements and not on others?   Also that if someone is leading a song, the other singers and players should participate in a way that supports whatever style, rhythm and tempo they choose.

--------------------

Kaleea,  "sessions," can be an umbrella term for song circles, jam sessions, and similar kinds of informal participatory music gatherings, righ?

When you suggest "learn[ing] how to play one of the fine musical instruments common to the "session" which you enjoy attending," I'm not sure if I catch your meaning.  I play guitar -- and many "sessions" I participate in are very much overloaded with guitars;  in jams where there is no bass player or percussionist, I often find that the group tends to become a little bit rhythmically challenged.  (It's hard for some folks to know which banjo, fiddle, or mando player to follow if a couple of players are not quite on the same page as the others.)  Some groups are better at keeping a tight rhythm than others.  A percussionist (or bass player) with a good sense of rhythm can be a real asset, precisely because their beat stands out as "signal" against the "noise" of 10 guitars playing at the same time.
Once the song leader has established the rhythm and tempo they want, the rhythm instrument can help the group stay on that rhythm.

In other groups the singers, guitarists, etc., don't seem to need the percussion.  Maybe these groups have more seasoned jammers.  (Or maybe they've just played the same songs with each other a lot of times in the past.

If you are suggesting learning  the bodhran instead of using an egg shaker or tambourine, it's apples and oranges.  Why should someone who wants to play simple rhythmic accompaniment have to buy an expensive instrument and learn complex drumming patterns?   And a bodhran would be just as much out of place in some kinds of music as a maraca is in others.

-----------------

I guess I don't understand the blanket animosity some of you have toward maraca-type instruments, tambourines, bones, spoons, etc.  They are all "folk" instruments.  (And, guest,  one advantage of the egg shakers is that they can be played very softly and unobtrusively.)   The song circles I attend are seldom limited to a particular genre (e.g., Irish), and the music may range from bluegrass to c/w to Celtic to Child Ballads to chanties to Woody Guthrie and other 20th C. folk songwriters, etc.  Mostly it's some sort of "folk" music (or old time country), but sometimes it may include calypso, reggae, show tunes, African or Mexican music, rhythm and blues, rockabilly, etc.

What Uncle DaveO. said.

And Dave Bryant and wee piper, you took the words out of my mouth -- i.e., it is not just tambourines, shakers, etc., that can be a detraction.  Too many (or too loud) rhythm guitars can totally drown out any intricate picking that the leader uses to accompany a song -- not to mention impose their own rhythm  and tempo on the song.  And singers who overpower rather than support and blend with the song leader's voice can also ruin a song.
 

So, greg, are you saying there should be no percussionists unless they can also play melody instruments?


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Mr Red
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 06:29 PM

Uncle_DaveO
washboard and taste? You are thinking of the oxymoron thread surely **BG**
Chris "Yorkie" Bartram plays his with hair brushes with bobbled bristles at sessions and with spoons in his cajun band
context is all.
I stand by the assessment that if the other instuments are louder than you then consideration is being applied.
As your brain anticipates the bangs it tends to mute the sensation in the overall assessment but being aware of that and being nearer your bangs than the other instuments' bangs should restore the judgement.
anyway I don't play my washboard just now - I ran out of red paint! But I have a cunning plan......


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: alison
Date: 11 Sep 02 - 08:17 PM

I'd go with a shakey egg because you can't play a tambourine quietly!!

played quietly I don't mind either PROVIDING that they don't try to change the tempo / rhythm...... and shakey eggs can sound great with blues songs....

but in the wrong hands they can wreck a session (as can any instrument in the wrong hands)

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Guessed
Date: 12 Sep 02 - 09:07 AM

try slipping a bit of cardboard between the cymbals. cut the cards (ha) to half way & sellotape the slit (OK you lot in OZ stop laughing) to keep it in. In effect produce a third cymbal of card. Experiment with plastic &/or cut the aluminium from beer cans for same to get a bit louder. Foam rubber on the skin until you get the feel for the volume.
Best of luck and what session had you in mind?


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 12 Sep 02 - 10:37 AM

Caz: if you want to bring your percussion to a session open to the public, go ahead. Practice at home with records until it sounds musical, and don't drown others out.

And remember, it is not your responsibility to assure that every single person there is perfectly happy about it. If we all had to do that, there would never be any sessions.

Bruce: Re "they have all had the courtesy to stay in the "outer circle" a good bit away from the "real musicians". Would real musicians be those playing the raspy fiddle, the whistle that squeaks in the top range, the accordion or autoharp that's never been tuned in its entire history, or the flute that can't play the low notes? All of these are common at sessions, yet we don't set ourselves up as music police and try to drive them away from the fun.

Must have something to do with how much the instrument cost. Not very logical, is it?


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: gwonya
Date: 12 Sep 02 - 11:40 AM

Garcia and Grisman put Joe Craven and his Shakin Eggs to effective use on The Thrill Is Gone, Friend Of The Devil and, I believe every other song on their 1991 release. Possibly one of my desert island picks. Here's my advice however : never over play percussion. keep it simple and don't solo between tunes.Really tasteful drummers are pretty hard to come by as most non drummers know all too well. - Clapping along during songs I never quite understood. Lame.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST,john fom ull
Date: 12 Sep 02 - 04:18 PM

hello, i like to playing my tamberrine, and i am lerning the shaky egg as well.john


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Genie
Date: 12 Sep 02 - 11:59 PM

gwonya, ("Clapping along during songs I never quite understood. Lame.")

Did you ever watch (listen to) a good Gospel choir?

Genie


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: gwonya
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 12:22 AM

organized clapping by performers sure I'll buy that. Gospel music...yep I'll buy that too. But when I'm asked to put my hands together and clap along...well I may as well be hitting a metal pot over my head with a wooden spoon.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: WyoWoman
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 06:56 PM

It absolutely depends on the type of jam, and the type of music, and the individual song. And the subltey or lack of it with which one plays. If it works, it's cool. If it don't, it ain't.

I took a tambourine to a bluegrass jam years ago when I didn't know nuttin. I'm completely surprised I lived over it. I know now what a close call it was because I've gotten to know a bunch of musicians since then and I've rarely known bluegrassers to be so restrained.

But for gawd's sakes if someone is trying to do a sensitive, quiet solo, stash the shakey stuff. Of course, as a singer who actually does try to sound relatively decent during jams, I could say the same thing of about 12 of the 15 guitars in the circle. At least don't keep flailing away at them at full volume when you've got a singer about to bust a vocal chord to sing over you.

there's a guy in our musical circles who plays musical saw. It's fun every now and then, but he doesn't seem to read the social cues that say, "Enuff."

--ww


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Leadfingers
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 09:00 PM

The problem is that some people have a lack of a sense of proprtion.ANY instrument played too loud or too often at a session can be detrimental-even if its one that I am playing when I've had a beer too many.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 14 Sep 02 - 02:41 AM

As many have said, it's a matter of common sense. The bodhran--in its various forms---can be a very versatile instrument. Tipper-type and technique are the keys there, with the approval of other musicians, of course. I cannae find any problem with the shakey egg---mainly cuz I cannae hear the dampt things anyway! Tambourines, washboards, bones etc. are acceptable ---indeed, can be an asset--when well handled in the proper situation. All too often, when in a scenario which involves a sound system, you can run into a soundman who has a yen to hear a particular instrument over the rest---and when that happens to be a percussion instrument, be it bodhran or whatever, you have a recipe for calamity! Iain Macintosh has stock advice at every gig at which an unknown Bodhran case appeared--"Take that thing oot o' its case an' I'll hae ye wearin' it like a horse's collar"!


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Caz
Date: 14 Sep 02 - 04:22 PM

John, my friend, where have you been? It was you who gave me the idea of getting the tam and eggs in the first place! Now look at what you've started!

To those who don't appear to mind about percussion at sessions I'm very grateful to you. You have given me a lot to think about and great advice, thanks.

However, those of you who are against the tam and eggs, what's your problem? How would you react if I turned up with one arm and couldn't so obviously "...play one of the fine musical instruments..." (see Kaleea's entry)? Or think how I would feel if I was very shy, or had low self-esteem and felt I had to "...stay in the "outer circle" a good bit away from the "real musicians"."

How many times have you been to a session when a "real musician" has been so far up his/her own bum that they have taken over the session and not given two hoots for the rest of the people there? Not all percussionists, likewise other musicians, are wrapped up in their own noise you know. And who says that these instruments are for kids? I think they can be fun. What's wrong with having a bit of fun and joining in? Providing I use the protocol what's the problem?


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Genie
Date: 14 Sep 02 - 09:23 PM

Well said, Wyo and Caz.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 15 Sep 02 - 01:18 PM

My experience at seeions has taught me that it makes little difference--nobody's listening, anyway. Especially the musicians.


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Subject: RE: Tambourines and shaky eggs at sessions
From: Leadfingers
Date: 15 Sep 02 - 09:05 PM

When did musicians ever listen at sessions?Except when you didn't know what the hell was happening,but sure as Hell weren't going to stop playing,whateverit was.


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