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So who was Santa Anna?

DigiTrad:
GENERAL TAYLOR
ROUND THE BAY OF MEXICO
SANTIANA
SANTY ANNA
SANTY ANNA (2)


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Heave Away Santiana / Aweigh Santy Ano (69)
Lyr Req: Santy Anno / Santy Ano / Santy Anna (32)
Lyr Req: Gen. Taylor Ran Away, revisited (6)
(origins) Origins: Help: Santiano - Any Lore? (14)


Steve Parkes 24 Sep 02 - 08:14 AM
Wolfgang 24 Sep 02 - 08:29 AM
mack/misophist 24 Sep 02 - 09:33 AM
Mary in Kentucky 24 Sep 02 - 11:23 AM
Jon W. 24 Sep 02 - 11:35 AM
GUEST,Noddy 24 Sep 02 - 12:19 PM
X 24 Sep 02 - 12:44 PM
GUEST 24 Sep 02 - 12:53 PM
mack/misophist 24 Sep 02 - 11:02 PM
JJ 25 Sep 02 - 12:04 AM
Bert 25 Sep 02 - 12:29 AM
Peter T. 25 Sep 02 - 09:30 AM
GUEST 25 Sep 02 - 01:17 PM
Schantieman 25 Sep 02 - 01:43 PM
Dead Horse 25 Sep 02 - 02:33 PM
GUEST 25 Sep 02 - 03:23 PM
GUEST 25 Sep 02 - 04:17 PM
mousethief 25 Sep 02 - 10:02 PM
Steve Parkes 26 Sep 02 - 07:50 AM
GUEST,Q 13 Nov 02 - 02:40 PM
GUEST,Q 13 Nov 02 - 02:46 PM
BanjoRay 13 Nov 02 - 06:08 PM
Steve Parkes 14 Nov 02 - 09:16 AM
GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 01:40 PM
Irish sergeant 14 Nov 02 - 04:11 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 04:41 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 05:59 PM
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Subject: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 08:14 AM

Or Santiana, or "Santee, my dear Annie"? Why does he/they turn up in so many shanties? Years ago I didn't quite hear someone explain how he became a hero of working-class people, especially sailors due to some distorted perception of real events. Any ideas?

Steve


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Wolfgang
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 08:29 AM

An online article about ). Antonio López de Santa Anna

Wolfgang


SANTA ANNA, ANTONIO LÓPEZ DE (1794-1876). Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón, soldier and five-time president of Mexico, was born at Jalapa, Vera Cruz, on February 21, 1794, the son of Antonio López de Santa Anna and Manuela Pérez de Lebrón. His family belonged to the criolloqv middle class, and his father served at one time as a subdelegate for the Spanish province of Vera Cruz. After a limited schooling the young Santa Anna worked for a merchant of Vera Cruz. In June 1810 he was appointed a cadet in the Fijo de Vera Cruz infantry regiment under the command of Joaquín de Arredondo.qv He spent the next five years battling insurgents and policing the Indian tribes of the Provincias Internas.qv Like most criollo officers in the Royalist army, he remained loyal to Spain for a number of years and fought against the movement for Mexican independence. He received his first wound, an Indian arrow in his left arm or hand, in 1811. In 1813 he served in Texas against the Gutiérrez-Magee expedition,qv and at the battle of Medinaqv he was cited for bravery. In the aftermath of the rebellion the young officer witnessed Arredondo's fierce counterinsurgency policy of mass executions, and historians have speculated that Santa Anna modeled his policy and conduct in the Texas Revolutionqv on his experience under Arredondo. He once again served under Arrendondo against the filibustering expedition of Francisco Xavier Minaqv in 1817. The young officer spent the next several years in building Indian villages and in occasional campaigns, while he acquired debts, some property, and promotions. In 1820 he was promoted to brevet captain, and he became a brevet lieutenant colonel the following year. In March of 1821 he made the first of the dramatic shifts of allegiance that characterized his military and political career by joining the rebel forces under Agustín de Iturbideqv in the middle of a campaign against them. He campaigned for Iturbide for a time and was promoted to brigadier general. In December 1822 Santa Anna broke with Iturbide over a series of personal grievances, and he called for a republic in his Plan of Casa Mata in December 1822.

After serving as military governor of Yucatán, Santa Anna retired to civil life and became governor of Vera Cruz. In 1829 he defeated the Spanish invasion at Tampico and emerged from the campaign as a national hero. In the course of this campaign, he demonstrated several of his characteristic military strengths and weaknesses; he was able to pull an army together quickly and with severely limited resources, but he also combined elaborate planning with slipshod and faulty execution. He rebelled against the administration three years later and was elected president of Mexico as a liberal in 1833, but in 1834 he stated that Mexico was not ready for democracy and emerged as an autocratic Centralist. When the liberals of Zacatecas defied his authority and an attempt to reduce their militia in 1835, Santa Anna moved to crush them and followed up his battlefield victory with a harsh campaign of repression. In December 1835 he arrived at San Luis Potosí to organize an army to crush the rebellion in Texas. In 1836 he marched north with his forces to play his controversial role in the Texas Revolution. After his capture by Sam Houston'sqv army, he was sent to Washington, D.C., whence he returned to Mexico. He retired to his estates at Manga de Clavo for a time, then emerged to join the defense of Mexico against the French in December 1838 during the so-called "Pastry War." He lost a leg in battle and regained his popularity. He was acting president in 1839, helped overthrow the government of Anastasio Bustamanteqv in 1841, and was dictator from 1841 to 1845. Excesses led to his overthrow and exile to Havana.

At the beginning of the Mexican War,qv Santa Anna entered into negotiations with President James K. Polk. He offered the possibility of a negotiated settlement to the United States and was permitted to enter Mexico through the American blockade. Once in the country he rallied resistance to the foreign invaders. As commanding officer in the northern campaign he lost the battle of Buena Vista in February 1847, returned to Mexico City, reorganized the demoralized government, and turned east to be defeated by Winfield S. Scott's forces at Cerro Gordo. Secret negotiations with Scott failed, and when Mexico City was captured, Santa Anna retired to exile. In 1853 he was recalled by the Centralists, but again power turned his head. To help meet expenses he sold the Mesilla Valley to the United States as the Gadsden Purchase and was overthrown and banished by the liberals in 1855.

For eleven years he schemed to return to Mexico, conniving with the French and with Maximilian. After a visit from the American secretary of state, W. H. Seward, he invested most of his property in a vessel that he sailed to New York to become the nucleus of a planned invading force from the United States. Disappointed in his efforts, he proceeded towards Mexico, was arrested on the coast, and returned to exile. From 1867 to 1874 he lived in Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Nassau. During this time he finally abandoned politics and wrote his memoirs. In 1874 he was allowed to return to Mexico City, where he lived in obscurity until his death on June 21, 1876. He was buried at Tepeyac Cemetery, near Guadalupe Hidalgo. Santa Anna was married twice, to Inés García in 1825, and, a few months after the death of his first wife in 1844, to María Dolores de Tosta, who survived him.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Wilfred Hardy Callcott, Santa Anna (Hamden, Connecticut: Archon Books, 1964). Oakah L. Jones, Santa Anna (New York: Twayne, 1968). Jeff Long, Duel of Eagles: The Mexican and U.S. Fight for the Alamo (New York: Morrow, 1990). Antonio López de Santa Anna, The Eagle: The Autobiography of Santa Anna, ed. Ann Fears Crawford (Austin: State House Press, 1988). Antonio López de Santa Anna et al., The Mexican Side of the Texan Revolution, trans. Carlos E. Castañeda (Dallas: Turner, 1928; 2d ed., Austin: Graphic Ideas, 1970).

Wilfred H. Callcott


Copy-pasted from the link Wolfgang provided.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: mack/misophist
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 09:33 AM

Wolfgang's article is correct to the best of my knowlege. For those who noticed, sometimes he spelled his name with one 'N' and sometimes with two. That said, can any one answer the original question? I can't.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 11:23 AM

Regarding the shanty, Aweigh, Santy Ano, the Contemplator site (Lesley) quotes Stan Hugill here:

Hugill speculates that the tune does not concern the Mexican General Santa Ana, but Sainte Anne, patron saint of Breton seamen.

Regarding the different spellings of the name, perhaps they are due to the differences between the English and Spanish spelling for Anna and Ana.

I found some other interesting links about the Santa Anna of Texas history:

A comment here about the spelling of the name.

A song parody here, The Leg I Left Behind Me.

What Texans think about him here.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Jon W.
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 11:35 AM

Mary's post is very interesting. Folk process at work. None the less, many shanties about Santa Anna clearly refer to incidents in the life of the Mexican general. I suspect therefore that the sailors having had old songs passed down without full understanding of them, adapted the tunes and some of the words - or what they understood the words to be - to events of their own times. Most of the references reverse actual history vis a vis the victors in the conflicts between Mexico and Texas and the USA. Being British shanties, and the British sentiment in the mid 19th century being still firmly against the rebellious former colonies, this is understandable.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST,Noddy
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 12:19 PM

And I thought it was Santa Claus's sister.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: X
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 12:44 PM

Who is Santa Anna?

He's the guy who got his butt kicked by a handful of Texacans at the Alamo. Travis may have finally lost the battle at the Alamo but he still kicked Santa Annas butt.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 12:53 PM

Previous Thread 46588 has a lot of accurate information (and misinformation) you might want to peruse. Santiana


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: mack/misophist
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 11:02 PM

Regarding the spelling of Santa Ana; there is a legend in Texas, or perhaps only a folk tale, that before Sam Houston caught him he spelled his name with two 'n's. He supposedly felt so diminished by his failure that he shortened his name as a reminder.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: JJ
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 12:04 AM

Santa Anna was also the man who gave the world chewing gum. Someone else can link to the story of how Santa Anna's chicle came to Adams.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Bert
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 12:29 AM

Here's a song about how he got clobbered at San Jacinto.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Peter T.
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 09:30 AM

One of the older foreign demons in American demonology -- A Mexican patriot against an early demonstration of Yankee imperialism.

yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 01:17 PM

Not only Yankee imperialism but the worst kind of entrepreneuring buccaneers.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Schantieman
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 01:43 PM

If General Taylor gained the day and Santiana/Santa Anna ran away, why are we burying him?

Steve


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Dead Horse
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 02:33 PM

AND why did they bury him off Cape Horn? Surely the gravediggers would have drowned ;-)


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 03:23 PM

General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (1794-1876) is buried in Mexico.
He was defeated at the Battle of San Jacinto, not at the Alamo. After his capture, he was released by Houston, who was afraid that General Vicente Filasola, an Italian in the Mexican service, was marching at the head of a strong force and could overturn the victory.
The clause of the treaty that recognized the Republic of Texas states "That the President Santa Anna, in his official character as head of the Mexican nation, and the generals Don Vicente Filasola (and others named) do solemnly acknowledge, sanction and ratify the full, entire, and perfect independence of Texas, with such boundaries....." See-
Santa Anna


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 04:17 PM

Are we to believe that the Texans won at the Alamo? Not the way I heard it!


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: mousethief
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 10:02 PM

Geez, I was going to say Mary's mum, but clearly that's not the answer sought.

Alex


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 26 Sep 02 - 07:50 AM

Gosh, thanks guys--lots of useful info to digest (except maybe yours, Alex!)

Steve


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 13 Nov 02 - 02:40 PM

No one has answered Steve Parkes question at the top of this thread, nor can I, but Someone, in this or another thread, suggested the "SantyAnna" of the shantys somehow derived from Saint Ann.
Scroll down to the section called Devotion to Saint Ann and read about the sailors devotion to her (Legend says she supposedly is buried at Apt, France, where a shrine exists). Saint Ann
Perhaps St. Ann and the General are both involved in the shantys.

Stephen Collins Foster wrote an instrumental piece called "Santa Anna's Retreat From Buena Vista." Does anyone know it??


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 13 Nov 02 - 02:46 PM

Didn't clear the cache. http://www.themass.org/novena/life.htm: St. Ann


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: BanjoRay
Date: 13 Nov 02 - 06:08 PM

Someone told me recently that the Yellow Rose Of Texas was a mullatto prostitute who extracted information (and, I presume, other substances) out of General Santa Anna and kept the texans informed - either that or she kept him happy and delayed his war-making.
A good old fiddle tune, anyway.
Cheers
Ray


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 09:16 AM

I've ssen the movie and bought the CD of "The buena Vista Social Club", and very good they were, too ...


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 01:40 PM

A James "Sparky" Rucker started the tale (nonsense) that the "Yellow Rose" was Santa Anna's mulatto girl friend and gave his plans to the Texans. (See Traditional Ballad Index, CUFresno).
The song was published in 1858 by William A. Pond, the author listed as "J. K." It seems to be a minstrel song (both were darkies- "sweetest rose of color this darkey ever knew). Cox (Folk Songs of the South, #128) refers to Christy's "Plantation Melodies # 2" p. 52 and other minstrel song books.
The song was very popular during the War Between the States. Along with other favorites such as "Lorena" and "Cora Lee," the song is included in a wartime volume (1864) called "Songs of Love and Liberty," by a "North Carolina Lady." The words there (p. 35) are the same as those printed by Cox. The little book is on the internet in the University of North Carolina series, "Documenting the American South." See: Yellow Rose


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 04:11 PM

Guest Q;
I believe the song you refer to as "Cora Lee" is actually "Aura Lee" unless you refer to something else.
   WHile "Santy Anno" may indeed have started as a pean to Saint Anne, the lyrics (Both British and American) clearly imply General Santa Ana de Lopez. Kindest regards. Neil


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 04:41 PM

"Cora Lee" is "Cora Lee." A great old song!

Cora Lee (part) from p. 36 of "Songs of Love and Liberty."
Years have fled since last I saw thee,
Standing by the cottage door, Ringlets bright as golden sunbeams,
Floating o'er thy pale young brow,
But thy smile is ever with me,
Though I'll see thee never more,
And thy form, ah! fancy's fair dreams,
Ne'er can bring one like thou. etc.

Aura Lea (Poulton and Fosdick) (sometimes Aura Lee)
When the blackbird in the spring
On the willow tree
Sat and rocked, I heard him sing
Singing Aura Lea, Aura Lea.
Aura Lea, Aura Lea,
Maid of golden hair
Sunshine came along with thee
And swallows in the air. etc.


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Subject: RE: So who was Santa Anna?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 05:59 PM

Should add- "Cora Lee" lyrics by J. W. Beazell, music by H. B. Brown, 1853.


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