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Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed in Blue (H Clifton)

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway) (13)
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Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue' (38)
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belfast 20 Oct 02 - 10:07 AM
Ed. 20 Oct 02 - 10:21 AM
John MacKenzie 20 Oct 02 - 10:36 AM
belfast 20 Oct 02 - 10:43 AM
belfast 20 Oct 02 - 10:49 AM
Leadfingers 20 Oct 02 - 12:12 PM
John MacKenzie 20 Oct 02 - 01:11 PM
GUEST 20 Oct 02 - 05:30 PM
GUEST 20 Oct 02 - 07:47 PM
belfast 21 Oct 02 - 08:30 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Jun 10 - 07:27 PM
Artful Codger 01 Jun 10 - 07:59 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: belfast
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 10:07 AM

When I was but a little child a record would occasionally be played on the radio. (I'm talking about the BBC here.) It was called "A dark girl dressed in blue". A humourous ditty, as they might have said then. Many years later looking at O'Neill's "Music of Ireland" I came across a tune with that title. Now, my sight-reading leaves a lot to be desired and anyway if you start going "la la la" in a public library, people stare. But it seemed similar. I thought no more about it. By the time I'd heard the tune in O'Neills I had forgotten what the song sounded like. This was before the days of the internet – possibly before the invention of the computer. Now I know that here at Mudcat little mysteries like this can often be solved. My unreliable memory tells me that the performer of the song was Paddy Roberts but it doesn't seem to be listed in any discographies. At this thread I found a brief reference to it with the suggestion that it was Stanley Holloway. I'm fairly sure it wasn't.

Does anybody out there know what I'm talking about?


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Subject: Lyr Add: FELLOW THAT LOOKED LIKE ME
From: Ed.
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 10:21 AM

Don't know if it helps, but I found the following on this page:

DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE, THE [2] (Cailin Dub Na Eadaig Gorm). Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Similar in character to version #1. The melody is very close to the old-time tune "Over the Waterfall." O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 403, pg. 70.

T:Dark Girl Dressed in Blue, The
M:C
K:D
d/e/ | fdge dc Ad/e/ | fdge d3 d/e/ |\
ff gg/e/ dd A>B | =cccA G3 F/G/ |\
AABG AD z A | dfec d3 F/G/ |\
AA BG/G/ AF DF/G/ | ABAF GE D3 |]**

FELLOW/FELLER THAT LOOKS LIKE ME, THE. AKA and see "The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue," "Punkin Head," "Over the Waterfall." Old-Time, Song. Evidently an American stage song, with a tune quite similar to the old-time standard "Over the Waterfall."

THE FELLOW THAT LOOKED LIKE ME

In sad despair I wandered, my heart was filled with woe.
While on my grief I pondered, what to do I did not know.
Since cruel fate has on me frowned, the trouble seemed to be,
There is a fellow in this town the very image of me.

(Chorus:)
Oh, wouldn't I like to catch him, wherever he may be,
Oh, wouldn't I give him particular fits, the fellow that looks like me.

One evening as I started up Central Park to go,
I was met by a man upon the road, saying, "Pay me the bills you owe."
In vain I said, "I owe you naught," he would not let me free,
Till a crowd came around and I paid the bills for the fellow that looked like me.

(Chorus)

One night as I was walking through a narrow street up town
I was caught by a man upon the road, saying, "How are you, Mr. Brown?"
He said his daughter I had wronged, though the girl I ne'er did see.
He kicked me till I was black and blue for the fellow that looked like me.

(Chorus)

Then to a ball I went one night just to enjoy the sport,
A policeman caught me by the arm, saying, "You're wanted down to court.
You've escaped me thrice, but this here time I am sure you can't get free."
So I was arrested and dragged to jail for the fellow that looked like me.

(Chorus)

I was tried next day, found guilty too, just to be taken down
When another policeman just stepped in with the right Mr. Brown.
They locked him up and set me free; oh wasn't he a sight to see?
The homeliest man that ever I saw was the fellow that looked like me.

The following variant in the lyrics was collected in tradition from Roscoe and Leone Parish:

Oh, wouldn't I like to catch him
Wherever he might be
The way I'd punch his punkin head
The fellow that looks like me.

In England the song is from the music hall era (Stanley Holloway) and is known as "The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue," though it was also popular in England and Ireland as a dance tune. Volo Bogtrotters. Document DOCD-8041, Al Hopkins and His Bucklebusters (originally recorded May 16, 1927).


from http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/master/fellowthatlookedlikeme.html

Fellow (Feller) That Looked Like Me, The

Old-Time, Song; Author- J. F. Poole;

CATEGORY: Fiddle and Instrumental Tunes DATE: 1867 (copyright)

RECORDING INFO: Volo Bogtrotters. Document DOCD-8041, Al Hopkins and His Bucklebusters (originally recorded May 16, 1927).

OTHER NAMES: “Feller That Looked Like Me,” "The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue," "Punkin Head," "Over the Waterfall."

SOURCES: The Fellow That Looks Like me [Laws H21] Native American Balladry, Amer. Folklore Society, Bk (1964), p240. Randolph 463, "The Fellow that Looks Like Me" (1 text); Kuntz, Fiddler's Companion, http://www.ceolas.org/tunes/fc;

NOTES: An American stage song, with a tune quite similar to the old-time standard "Over the Waterfall." In England the song is from the music hall era (Stanley Holloway) and is known as "The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue," though it was also popular in England and Ireland as a dance tune.(Kuntz, Fiddler's Companion, http://www.ceolas.org/tunes/fc).


LYRICS:
    In sad despair I wandered, my heart was filled with woe.
    While on my grief I pondered, what to do I did not know.
    Since cruel fate has on me frowned, the trouble seemed to be,
    There is a fellow in this town the very image of me.

    Chorus: Oh, wouldn't I like to catch him, wherever he may be,
    Oh, wouldn't I give him particular fits, the fellow that looks like me.

    One evening as I started up Central Park to go,
    I was met by a man upon the road, saying, "Pay me the bills you owe."
    In vain I said, "I owe you naught," he would not let me free,
    Till (sic) a crowd came around and I paid the bills for the fellow that looked like me.

    (Chorus)

    One night as I was walking through a narrow street up town
    I was caught by a man upon the road, saying, "How are you, Mr. Brown?"
    He said his daughter I had wronged, though the girl I ne'er did see.
    He kicked me till I was black and blue for the fellow that looked like me.

    (Chorus)

    Then to a ball I went one night just to enjoy the sport,
    A policeman caught me by the arm, saying, "You're wanted down to court.
    You've escaped me thrice, but this here time I am sure you can't get free."
    So I was arrested and dragged to jail for the fellow that looked like me.

    (Chorus)

    I was tried next day, found guilty too, just to be taken down
    When another policeman just stepped in with the right Mr. Brown.
    They locked him up and set me free; oh wasn't he a sight to see?
    The homeliest man that ever I saw was the fellow that looked like me.

    The following variant in the chorus lyrics was collected in tradition from Roscoe and Leone Parish:

    Oh, wouldn't I like to catch him
    Wherever he might be
    The way I'd punch his punkin head
    The fellow that looks like me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 10:36 AM

Yes Stanley Hollowayt definitely recorded a song of that name in the 50s or thereabout. Probably a different song.
Giok


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: belfast
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 10:43 AM

Thank you, Ed. That's the tune I was talking about although I've never come across those words. And I see from the note at the end of your posting that it was indeed Stanley Holloway who sang the song I remembered although my false memeory still insists that it wasn't. I think my problem is that I associate him with the over-the-top cockney of "My Fair Lady" and the song I recall was in more middle-class accent. But I wonder, did the music hall get the tune form the folk tradition or was it the other way about?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: belfast
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 10:49 AM

It was in the fifties! "I feel chilly and grown old."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: Leadfingers
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 12:12 PM

Hollowys 'Dark Girl Dressed in Blue@is a different song.In the Holloway he Changes a forged note for the girl and gets busted for it


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 01:11 PM

Leadfingers is right on that, it's in the tradition of songs like Quaire bungle rye.
Giok


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Subject: Lyr Add: DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 05:30 PM

This one predates Stanley Holloway, but it belongs in the Nineties music hall days, I think. From Bodleian Library,

DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE

When in Glasgow I arrived,
I had a pocketbook with me, well-filled with notes and gold,
I walked about from place to place its beauties for to view,
When all at once I chanced to see a dark girl dressed in blue.

Cho.
She was a nice gal, fal de riddle I day,
A beauty, fal de riddle oh,
She was so glad(?), fal de riddle I do,
A charmer, fal de diddle oh.

Her graceful leg and and fairy feet, and eyes like diamonds bright,
Her coal black hair and rosy cheek, they fill my heart with delight,
(four lines not readable)

Says I, "My dear, a crowded place does not agree with you."
"Oh, sir, ---- she to get out," said the Dark Girl dressed in blue.

When we got out of the omnibus, we walked arm in arm together,
Then she made free to ask of me, if I'd got a father or mother,
"O yes, says I, "and a grandmother too, but pray miss, what are you?"
"I'm head engineer in a milliner's shop," said the dark girl dressed in blue.

As we walked on, says I, "you're much fatigued, I think,
Will you go into this public house, and have a glass of drink,
To pay for which she declared she would, saying, ""Sir, oblige me do,
To change this note, I refuse could not, this dark girl dressed in blue.

The change for her I did obtain, she says, "Sir, excuse me pray,
Remain here for a short time, I shan't be long away."
Scarce had she gone, a policeman came saying, "Please, sir, I want you,
That was a forged note just now changed, where's the dark girl dressed in blue.

Then to the station I was marched, and before the ballies took,
And there I told them I had lost my watch and pocketbook,
They placed a lady at the bar, quite different to my view,
For in deep mourning she was rigged, not a dark girl dresed in blue.

They raised her eil, to my surprise, I was taken alll aback,
Her dress it was reversible, a sky blue and deep black,
The charge it likewise was reversed, they believed my statement true.
They acquitted me, but sixty days gave the dark girl dressed in blue.

So all young gents I pray beware, and a warning take by me,
For young ladies are not always what they appear to be,
Examine well each shawl and dress, the lining likewise too,
Or a transformation scene you'll have, like the dark girl dressed in blue.

Is this what they used to call a cautionary tale?

Ballads Catalogue 2806 c. 14 (72), Bodleian Library.

OR- do ye want the Irish version? Picky, aren't you? One, 19th century (late), printed in Cork.

DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE (2)

From the village way in Bowlingglass to Dublin I came
To take a view of Nelson's Pillar and all places of great fame,
But what I suffered, since I came, I now will tell to you,
But I lost my heart, and senses too, through the dark girl dressed in blue.

When I landed in Dublin, was August the tenth,
My heart feels ready to burst, when of that I ever think,
I went in a sixpenny omnibus to Sandy Mount it's true,
Upon the right hand side of the door- sat a dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do,
A charmer, fol de riddle eh.

When we arrived in Sandy Mount, t'lady looked strange,
The conductorm he said, "Sixpence, ma'am," She said, I have no change;
I've no less than a five pound note, whatever shall I do?
Said I, "Allow me to pay,' O thank you sir, said the dark girl dressed in blue.

We chatted ant talked as onward we walked about one thing or the other,
She asked me too, Oh, wasn't kind, if I had a father or mother?
Oh yes, says I, and a grandmother too, but pray miss, what are you?
Oh, I'm a chief engineer of a milliner's shop, said the dark girl dressed in blue.

And so on. Ballads Catalogue, Harding B 26(117). Go to Bodley and enter dark girl in the first search blank that appears when you click on Browse/Search. You will get both broadsides plue girl in green (a follow-up), etc.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Oct 02 - 07:47 PM

A version published in Boston is at American Memory. List Dark Girl

DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE.

Sung by BILLY MORRIS. Words published by permission of G. D. RUSSELL, & Co. owners of the copyright of the words and music, where the Piano Copy can also be obtained.

From a village in New Hampshire to Boston here I came,
To see the exhibition and places of great fame;

But what I suffered since I came I now will tell to you,
How I lost my heart and senses too, through a dark girl dressed in blue.

CHORUS: She was a nice girl, fol de riddle I do,
She was a charmer, fol de riddle eh...........Repeat.

'T was on a Friday morning, the first day of August,--
When of that day I ever think, my heart is ready to bust,--
I got into an omnibus the city to ride through,
On a seat by the right-hand side of the door sat a dark girl dressed in blue,

She was a nice gal, &c.

When we arrived on Tremont St., this lady looked so strange,
The conductor asked her for her fare, said she I have no change,
I've nothing less than a five-dollar note, O dear what shall I do!
Said I, "Allow me to pay," "O, thank you, sir," said the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

We chatted and talked as we onward walked, about one thing or the other,
She asked me, too, O wan't it kind? if I had father or mother.
O yes, says I, and a grandmother, too; but pray, Miss, who are you?
O, I'm chief engineer of a milliner's shop, said the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

We walked along for an hour or two, through the buildings near and far,
Till we came to the grand refreshment room, I went straight up to the bar.
She slipped in my hand a five-dollar note, I said what are you going to do?
O, don't think it strange, I must have some change, said the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

I called a waiter and handed him the note, said go bring the change of that;
The waiter he bowed and touched his hair,--this waiter wore no hat.
In silver and gold five dollars he brought, I gave him coppers a few,


And the change of the note I then did hand to the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

She thanked me and said, I must away, farewell till we meet again,
For I've to go to Pimlico to catch the Brighton train.
She quickly glided from my sight, and soon was lost to view;
I turned to leave, when by my side stood a tall man dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

This tall man said, excuse me, sir, I'm one of the division,--

That note was bad, my duty is to take you on suspicion.
Said I, for a lady I obtained the change, said he, are you telling me true?
Where's she live, what's her name? said I, I don't know,--she's a dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

My story they believed, that I had been deceived, but said I must hand back the cash;
I thought it a sin, to part with the tin, and away went five dollars smash.
So all young men take my advice, be careful what you do,
When you make the acquaintance of ladies strange, especially a "dark girl dressed in blue."

She was a nice gal, &c.

Sold at Wholesale by HORACE PARTRIDGE,
No. 27 Hanover Street, Boston.


Stamped: 265


Handwritten: 127264
08


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: belfast
Date: 21 Oct 02 - 08:30 AM

There's no shortage of stuff in the Bodleian, is there? The version beginning "From the village way in Bowlingglass to Dublin I came" reminds me a little of "Down by the Tarnyard side".

Strange the paths to which a poor memory of a radio programme will lead you.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE (H Clifton)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 07:27 PM

From the sheet music at The British Library Online Gallery:


THE DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE
Harry Clifton

1. From a village away in Leicestershire to London here I came
To see the Exhibition and all places of great fame;
But what I suffer'd since I came, I now will tell to you,
How I lost my heart and senses too thro' a dark girl dress'd in blue

CHORUS: She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do,
A charmer, fol de riddle eh.

2. 'Twas on a Friday morning, the first day of August.
When of that day I ever think, my heart feels ready to bust.
I went in a six-penny omnibus to the Exhibition of sixty-two.
On a seat by the right-hand side of the door sat a dark girl dress'd in blue.

3. When we arriv'd in the Brompton Road, the lady look'd so strange.
The conductor he said, "Sixpence, ma'am!" Said she, "I have no change.
I've nothing less than a five-pound note. Whatever shall I do?"
Said I, "Allow me to pay." "Oh, thank you, sir!" said the dark girl dress'd in blue.

4. We chatted and talk'd as we onward walk'd about one thing or the other.
She ask'd me too—Oh, wasn't it kind?—if I had a father or mother.
"Oh yes," says I, "and a grandmother too, but pray, miss, what are you?"
"Oh, I'm chief engineer in a milliner's shop," says the dark girl dress'd in blue.

5. We walk'd about for an hour or two thro' the buildings near and far,
'Till we came to the grand refreshment room. I went straight up to the bar.
She slipp'd in my hand a five-pound note. I said, "What are you going to do?"
"Oh, don't think it strange. I must have change," said the dark girl dress'd in blue.

6. I call'd a waiter and handed him the note, and said, "Please change me that."
The waiter bow'd and touch'd his hair, for this waiter wore no hat.
In silver and gold five pounds he brought. I gave him coppers a few,
And the change of the note I then did hand to the dark girl dress'd in blue.

7. She thank'd me and said, "I must away. Farewell till we meet again;
For I've to go to Pimlico to catch the Brighton train."
She quickly glided from my sight and soon was lost to view.
I turn'd to leave, when by my side stood a tall man dress'd in blue.

8. This tall man said, "Excuse me, sir. I'm one of the X Division.
That note was bad. My duty is to take you on suspicion."
Said I, "For a lady I obtain'd the change." He said, "You are telling me true.
Where's she live? What's her name?" Says I, "I don't know. She was a dark girl dress'd in blue."

9. My story they believ'd. They thought I'd been deceived, but they said I must hand back the cash.
I thought 'twas a sin as I gave them the tin, and away went five pounds, smash!
So all young men, take my advice. Be careful what you do
When you make the acquaintance of ladies strange, especially a dark girl dress'd in blue.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed in Blue (H Clifton)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 07:59 PM

I recently posted the Clifton lyrics, along with MIDIs prepared from the sheet music, in this thread:
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=109555#2905183

Click to play (melody)

Click to play (full)


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Mudcat time: 19 April 11:51 AM EDT

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