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Songs on homelessness: faith perspective

GUEST,Muggletonian 07 Nov 02 - 02:01 PM
GUEST,Iggy folk 07 Nov 02 - 02:25 PM
Wesley S 07 Nov 02 - 03:20 PM
sed 07 Nov 02 - 03:38 PM
Jeanie 07 Nov 02 - 03:54 PM
McGrath of Harlow 07 Nov 02 - 04:34 PM
Jeanie 07 Nov 02 - 05:13 PM
mg 07 Nov 02 - 05:15 PM
Burke 07 Nov 02 - 05:45 PM
nutty 07 Nov 02 - 05:56 PM
dick greenhaus 07 Nov 02 - 06:01 PM
GUEST,wdyat24 07 Nov 02 - 06:45 PM
Charley Noble 07 Nov 02 - 07:44 PM
InOBU 07 Nov 02 - 09:47 PM
GUEST,Muggletonian 07 Nov 02 - 09:59 PM
Nathan in Texas 07 Nov 02 - 10:11 PM
GUEST 07 Nov 02 - 11:42 PM
GUEST,RollingThunder 08 Nov 02 - 12:19 AM
Jeanie 08 Nov 02 - 08:09 AM
sian, west wales 08 Nov 02 - 08:27 AM
Peter T. 08 Nov 02 - 08:28 AM
Charley Noble 08 Nov 02 - 08:35 AM
sian, west wales 08 Nov 02 - 08:55 AM
wilco 08 Nov 02 - 10:09 AM
Charley Noble 08 Nov 02 - 05:39 PM
Genie 08 Nov 02 - 09:09 PM
Bert 09 Nov 02 - 01:29 AM
Hrothgar 09 Nov 02 - 04:18 AM
alinact 09 Nov 02 - 09:12 AM
The Shambles 09 Nov 02 - 02:23 PM
cujimmy 09 Nov 02 - 03:09 PM
Charley Noble 09 Nov 02 - 04:28 PM
Mudjack 09 Nov 02 - 06:07 PM
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Subject: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: GUEST,Muggletonian
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 02:01 PM

Hi Mudcatters,

It has been a while. Last year, I sought your help in locating songs for an Interfaith service dealing with hunger. I return to seek your help in locating songs dealing with homelessness.

I've already looked at the existing threads about homelessness; most of the songs mentioned are more documentary in nature than inspirational. I'm looking for something more rousing than depressing.

Any ideas you have would be appreciated.

Warmly,
Muggletonian


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: GUEST,Iggy folk
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 02:25 PM

Now don't laugh. I know this isn't folk or religious, but a lot of people found it inspirational. There's A Place For Us, from West Side Story. I know it's really Broadway ish but it's got a very catchy tune and decent lyrics.

iggy


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Wesley S
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 03:20 PM

You might look at a Christmas song by Judy Collins called "Come Rejoice" - it's the title song of one of her Christmas recordings.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: sed
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 03:38 PM

You have chosen a worthy endeavour: non-depressing songs about homelessness. I wrote one in 1981 called: Ain't Got No Home. Let me know if you'd like to see/hear it. sedberry3 AT yahoo.com
It's more of an ironic song with a variable chorus:

Ain't got no home; ain't got no home.
I live in my car; I'm on my own.
Ain't got no rent check hangin' over me.
Some think I'm crazy; some think I'm free.

Sometimes the cops are mean and vile;
they treat me like an errant child.
They wake me up with a 'rat tat tat!'
while I'm tryin' to take my nap.

   Everybody needs a place, a place where they can stay
   but us ramble-in' folksingers can't afford to live that way.
   So help me out with a shower, a meal or maybe two
   and I'll pull out my autoharp and play a song for you....

Ain't got no home; ain't got no house;
I live as simply as an ol' doormouse,
playin' music 'most ev'rywhere,
in pastures green and city squares.
and as I travel across this land
I'm tryin' hard to understand
the many ways people live:
how some folks grab while others give.

   Everybody needs a place, a place where they can stay
   but us ramble-in' folksingers can't afford to live that way.
   So help me out with a shower, a meal or maybe two
   and I'll pull out old guitar and sing a song for you....

Ain't got no home; ain't got no home.
I live in my car; I'm on my own.
Ain't got no rent check hangin' over me.
Some think I'm crazy; some think I'm free.

I was actually livin' in my Citroen 2CV6 wagonette when I wrote it, no, it was before that when I lived in a 1967 Pontiac Tempest Station wagon. My landlady had evicted me for popping corn in my basement kitchen. The song was published in about the 4th issue (of 48) of Songletter(TM)

As Woody G. wrote to the effect:
this song is protected by iron clad copyright # 35261728390948376251425364809; anyone caught singin' it will sure be a friend of mine. (c) 1981 Steve Sedberry


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Subject: ADD: The People of God
From: Jeanie
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 03:54 PM

Here's something rousing, positive and inspirational. If you are in Britain, you will find this one in "Baptist Praise & Worship":

The People of God

'Moses, I know you're the man,' the Lord said;
'You're going to work out my plan' the Lord said.
'Lead all the Israelites out of slavery,
and I shall make them a wandering race called the people of God.'

Chorus:
So every day, we're on our way,
For we're a travelling, wandering race, we're the people of God.

'Don't get too set in your ways,' the Lord said;
'Each step is only a phase,' the Lord said.
'I'll go before you and I shall be a sign
to guide my travelling, wandering race called the people of God.'

(Chorus)

'No matter what you may do,' the Lord said,
'I shall be faithful and true,' the Lord said,
'My love will strengthen you as you go along,
For you're my travelling, wandering race, you're the people of God.'

(Chorus)

'Look at the birds in the air,' the Lord said,
'They fly unhampered by care,' the Lord said;
'You will move easier if you're travelling light,
For you're my travelling wandering race, you're the people of God.'

(Chorus)

'Foxes have places to go,' the Lord said,
'But I've no home here below,' the Lord said,
'So if you want to be with me all your days,
Keep up the moving and travelling on, you're the people of God.'

(Chorus)

[Written by Estelle White and published Stainer & Bell]

I have at least one more song to suggest, "Guest Muggletonian" - more to follow !

All the best,
- jeanie


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 04:34 PM

Sydney Carter songs.

Especially maybe When I needed a Neighbour and Standing in the Rain and I come Like a Beggar, and John Ball and George Fox...

Hell, Sydney Carter songs.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Jeanie
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 05:13 PM

Here are some more: There is a good collection of songs in 'Feast of Life' - written as a 'musical of hope' by Garth Hewitt for the charity Christian Aid for the year 2000 "to send out the message that the new millenium should be about joy, justice, hope and compassion for all. All are included in the feast of life".
Details on: http://www.onthewall.org/ca/feastoflife.html

More to follow ...

- jeanie


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: mg
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 05:15 PM

Dan O'Hara..in the frost and snow I stand with my matches in my hand..

mg


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Burke
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 05:45 PM

Unfortunatley, all I can think of is "I'm a stranger, Heaven is my home" type songs. They can be rousing, but maybe not what you want to say.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: nutty
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 05:56 PM

How about Streets of London


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 06:01 PM

One of the best has to be Ian Robb's Homeless Wassail. Yes, it's in DigiTrad.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: GUEST,wdyat24
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 06:45 PM

Gary Lawless of Gulf of Maine Books and Blackberry Press, here in Brunswick, Maine, has inspired poetry workshops for the homeless people of Maine. He has published their poems also. The proceeds ofcourse go to the poets. Many of the homeless visit Gary in his store. Gulf of Maine Books, an independent bookseller, is a haven for street poets and Bowdoin professers alike...even me. I even think he has a website, but I better check on this. "I'll be back!" It is probably titled gulfofmainebooks.(something.)

wdyat24


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Charley Noble
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 07:44 PM

Hi, Sed! Long time since I met you at the Peoples Music Weekend, back in the 1980's.

Let's see "homelessness." Somewhere in the 300 or so housing and neighborhood organizing songs in my collection there should be something appropriate:


Words and music by Malvina Reynolds
© 1950 by Schroder Music Co.

No House


Oh, the cat has a house,
And the rat has a house,
And the dog and the mouse and the flea;
And the snail has a house,
And the whale has a house,
And they all have a house but me.

Chorus:

The sign on every building says:
"No children wanted here."
When I grow up the sign will say:
"Landlords kindly stay away."

Oh, the pig has a pen,
There's a coop for the hen,
And the bird has a nest in the tree;
The snake has a hole,
And so does the mole,
But there's no kind of place for me. (CHO)

Oh, the cow has a house,
And the sow has a house,
And Truman has a broad balcony;
There's hangers for planes,
Roundhouses for trains,
Garages for cars,
Taverns for bars,
And buildings for stores
With seventeen floors,
And money enough for three world wars,
But they couldn't build a house for me.

Notes to above: No House


        One of the pleasant surprises in putting together this songbook was coming across this song by Malvina Reynolds (best known for writing "Little Boxes") in a dusty copy of Sing Out! magazine. The editors introduced the song as follows:

"No House" just arrived from Los Angeles, coming as a direct response to the first issue of Sing Out! It's on the West Coast hit parade – of the progressive movement, that is.

A West Coast children's chorus was formed in the early 1980's to revive this song, whose basic message on the housing shortage and discrimination against children is unfortunately as true today as it was back in 1950.


Then there's:

Words by David Arkin, © Coalition for Economic Survival
Tune: traditional The Boll Weevil Song

Just Lookin' for a Home


I came to California,
I came to settle down,
I got me an apartment
On the other side of town.

Chorus:

Just lookin' for a home,
Just lookin' for a home;
Just lookin' for a home,
Just lookin' for a home.

I work just like a beaver
To feed the wife and kids;
High prices sure have got me down,
They put me on the skids. (CHO)

The bankers up the prices,
The landlords up the rent,
And so, between the two of them
I haven't got a cent. (CHO)
I'm down here at my wit's end,
I try to make ends meet;
That's how it is with all of us
Way up and down the street. (CHO)

We gonna get together,
To see what we can do;
They'll be no more evictions,
We'll fight before we're through. (CHO)

If anyone should ask you
Who's singin' this old song?
Just say that we're the people
And that we come on strong. (CHO)


Notes to above: Just Looking for a Home


        The "Ballad of the Boll Weevil," which folklorist Alan Lomax traced back to 1905, has been the model for many parodies dealing with housing shortages. A more recent version was composed by David Arkin and distributed in California by the Coalition for Economic Survival.

Then there's Merle Travis' "No Vacancy" from the 1940's but if you're really interested in something uplifting, I might find something in the chapter entitled "Mansions in the Sky."

Cordially,
Landlady's Daughter, not to be confused with Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: InOBU
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 09:47 PM

MUGGLETONIAN!!!! You are the first I have met! We Quakers, are sometimes distinguished from Mugglelonians! Are you really one? Are there more???? I have a song about homelessness (and other faces of the American sickness...) under the thread A song for the end of America, it is a current thread so you sould have no problem finding it. Cheers Larry


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: GUEST,Muggletonian
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 09:59 PM

Hi all,

Thanks for the many great suggestions; please keep them coming.

Larry, in all honesty I can only say that I am a Muggletonian manquee. I do aspire...

Jeanie, your suggestions and leads are really helpful.

Thanks all.

Cheers,
Muggletonian


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Subject: ADD: You Wonder Why I'm a Hobo
From: Nathan in Texas
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 10:11 PM

YOU WONDER WHY I'M A HOBO
(Haywire Mac or Carson Robison)

You wonder why I'm a hobo, and why I sleep in a ditch.
It ain't because I'm lazy, nope, I just don't want to be rich.
I could eat from dishes; it's only a matter of choice.
But when I eat from an old tin can, there ain't no dishes to wash.

Diddiley-dum dee-diddley di-de-do,
Diddley-dum dee-day.

Well, I could be a banker, if ever I wanted to be,
But the very thought of an iron cage is too suggestive to me.
And I could be an accountant, and always balance my books,
But readin' figures ruins the eyes and glasses spoil my looks.

I could be a conductor and never have a wreck,
But any kind of a railroad man to me is a pain in the neck.
And I could ride in a Pullman, but there it is again!
The plush they put on those Pullman seats
Tickles my sensitive skin.

I could be a doctor; my duty I'd never shirk.
But if I doctored a railroad bull, he'd never go back to work!
And I could be a broker, without the slightest excuse,
But look at 1929, and tell me what's the use?

I could be a soldier, and hold my rifle steady,
But why should I go volunteer? They'll draft me when they're ready.
You wonder why I'm a hobo, and why I sleep in a ditch;
It ain't because I'm lazy, nope, I just don't want to be rich.

    Note from Joe Offer (16 Oct 2011): Most other sources identify the songwriter as Haywire Mac, but Sandy Paton said he thought the songwriter was Carson Robison. The song is often called "You Ask Me Why I'm a Hobo."


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Nov 02 - 11:42 PM

King of the Road. Gentle on My mind.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: GUEST,RollingThunder
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 12:19 AM

The truth is - homelessness is depressing NOT rousing. It's a national disgrace.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Jeanie
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 08:09 AM

Here's a song adapted and arranged by Mudcatter IanB for the CD "Compassion Road" by Caleb's Mission, produced in aid of the charity Health Help International:

The liner notes read: "A great song of brotherly love, particularly the last verse, but its origin is a complete mystery. We found the words on some obscure website, but who wrote it or what it sounded like, we haven't a clue; so we adapted the words slightly and put a tune to it."

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO OLD LUKE

Luke was an old hand at making his way,
He smelled of old whisky and he needed a shave;
His home was an alley off Eighth Avenue,
And if you had a minute - or an hour or two,
He'd tell you the gospel according to Luke.

Luke carried his Bible in a brown paper bag,
He wiped off his brow with a dirty old rag,
He'd tell you straight out just the way he believed,
I remember the morning he first preached to me,
He said:'Faith in the good Lord is all that you need'.

He said:'Give to your brother if he is in need,
Offer up thanks for the things you receive.
There's treasure in heaven for the generous few',
And that was the gospel, according to Luke.

Just a week ago Wednesday, I saw him again,
Down at the mission, surrounded by friends,
Handing out all the coins he'd collected that week,
Luke could practise just what he preached,
He said: 'You guys need this a lot more than me'.

He said: 'Give to your brother if he is in need,
Offer up thanks for the things you receive.
There's treasure in heaven for the generous few',
And that was the gospel, according to Luke.

So I took him for breakfast at the Good Eats Cafe,
Bacon and eggs, hot toast and tea.
He was hungry and ragged, hadn't eaten in days,
But I was the one who felt out of place
When he folded his hands, bowed his head and said Grace.

Recording and chords available, if you are interested, Muggletonian.

Cheers,
- jeanie


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: sian, west wales
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 08:27 AM

We used to sing something which might be suitable in our folk services. I see that it's discussed here

I always thought it was one of our nicest Christmas pieces ... The idea of small but meaningful gestures making a world of difference.

sian


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Peter T.
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 08:28 AM

Tramp on the Street, in the DT, is one of the best homeless/faith songs ever written. yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Charley Noble
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 08:35 AM

Well, here's a more spiritual one but it's really not clear to me what you're looking for:

Notes: Saints Delight


        This graceful hymn dates back to 1709, being composed by Isaac Watts. Its original title was "The Hopes of Heaven Our Support Under Trials on Earth" which although to the point was quite a mouthful. Among the folk song community, the song is probably better known as "On My Journey Home." Congregations in Southern Appalachia have sung this song for well over 200 years, following the melody and harmony in their "shape-note" hymnals. I'd like to hear this song presented some day at a Congressional hearing on housing reforms.

Words and music by Isaac Watts, 1709


SAINTS DELIGHT


When I can read my title clear
To mansions in the skies,
I'll bid farewell to every fear
And wipe my weeping eyes.

Chorus:

I feel like, I feel like,
I'm on my journey home;
I feel like, I feel like,
I'm on my journey home.


Should earth against my soul engage,
And fiery darts be hurled,
Then I can smile at Satan's rage
And face a frowning world. (CHO)

Let cares like a wild deluge come,
Let storms of sorrow fall;
So I but safely reach my home,
My God, my heaven, my all. (CHO)

There I shall bathe my weary soul,
In seas of heavenly rest,
And not a wave of trouble roll,
Across my peaceful breast. (CHO)

Cordially,
Landlady's Daughter


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: sian, west wales
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 08:55 AM

Peter T. reminded me of the Lightfoot song, Home from the Forest which is more 'bitter-sweet' I suppose.

I was also going to suggest the hymn, "Forever with the Lord" and have come up with a lot of versions on the 'net, but not exactly the one I know (old Methodist one). The Lutheran online hymnal has the words, but divided into verses of 4 lines instead of 'my' 8 line version, so presumably a different hymn tune. (and I like the old tent-revival tune which I know.) The Cyber Hymnal has slightly different words (not as relevant), no "nearer home" chorus, and uses Terra Beata - still not the one I'm thinking of.

sian


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: wilco
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 10:09 AM

My vote would go for "Tramp On the Street." It is my favorite song. Everytime that I sing it, I cry. One of my children, who was mentally ill and an addict, lived on the streets for years.
    I'm very active in the Alliance for the Mentally Ill, and I use this song frequently.
    Molly O'Day, a 1930's scountry singer at WNOX in Knoxville, TN., popularized this song. Later, it became associated with Wilma lee Cooper, and Roy Acuff. I can't find an O'Day copy.
    I've added another stanza to it.

Our sons and daughters, our sisters and brothers,
our fathers and mothers, our spouses and lovers.
The junkies and drunks, neglected and beat,
Our mentally ill, left to die on the street.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Charley Noble
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 05:39 PM

This one has some bite in it, and is based on actual events. Sorry that I can't provide the tune but the music is included the old Broadside publication:

Notes: Together, We Can Move Mountains

        This organizing song was put together by Beverly Grant, one of the founding members of the New York City music group called The Human Condition. It's an unusual song in this collection as it celebrates the victory of a rent strike, and one at a massive co-operative housing complex:

In 1975-76 a rent strike at Co-Op City in the Bronx involved upwards 60,000 people, most of whom had never participated in any type of organized struggle. I was asked to write some music for a film relating to this successful strike, and in listening to taped interviews with rent strikers, was moved by the statement of a young Puerto Rican woman who said, "Together, we can move mountains!"

What could be more fitting than to end this collection of housing and neighborhood organizing songs with this inspiring song.

Together, We Can Move Mountains

(Words and music by Beverly Grant
© 1976 Human Condition Music
In Broadside, #165, pp. 18)

Chorus:

Together, we can move mountains;
Alone, we can't move at all;
Together, we can move mountains;
Alone, we can't move at all.


You know, people, sometimes we despair
When we think we're alone and nothing's gonna change;
We get stepped on, abused, ignored and confused,
Made to suffer and told we're the blame. (CHO)

The ones who get rich, while we scrape to get by,
Know our unity means their defeat;
So they set as against one another, sister and brother, color 'gainst color,
Keeping us weak; they're keeping us weak. (CHO)

From the smallest seed a mighty tree can grow,
With its roots planted firmly in the ground;
We've got to reach for the sun, only then will we know
All the love and the beauty and the life to be found. (CHO)

Cordially,
Landlady's Daughter


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Genie
Date: 08 Nov 02 - 09:09 PM

Kathy Mattea has a song on her Christmas album called "Just Another Homeless Family," which is about Mary and Joseph and Jesus. I don't know if she wrote it.

Garrison Keillor (or someone on his staff) also rewrote the lyrics to Christina Rosetti's "In The Bleak Midwinter," giving it a modern big city setting. One line goes:
"Who is this stranger
Sleeping in cardboard?
So says the Gospel,
It is Christ The Lord."

You can find the lyrics at prairiehome.org, and probably an audio clip of the song as well.

Also check out Stephen Foster's "Hard Times Come Again No More" and Phil Ochs's "There But For Fortune." I'd imagine both are in the DT.

Genie


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Bert
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 01:29 AM

My Gawd Muggletonian,

I don't know what you can find rousing about being homeless. Ramblin' Boy by Tom Paxton is about the most rousing that I can think of and it's still a pretty sad song.

Make a good song challenge though.

I'm happy to be sleeping where its bloody freezing cold
my socks are getting smelly and I'm dirty and I'm old...


The second verse of While London Sleeps is not too bad, but the last verse gets too close to the miserable truth of poverty.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Hrothgar
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 04:18 AM

Hobo's Lullaby


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: alinact
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 09:12 AM

"Waiting For The Hard Times To Go" - Jim Ringer.

Allan


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: The Shambles
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 02:23 PM

Islands and Oasis


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: cujimmy
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 03:09 PM

Brian Peters wrote a very powerfull song called " Shelter from the storm ", which I would thoroughly recomend.


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Subject: RE: Songs on homelessness: faith perspective
From: Charley Noble
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 04:28 PM

"Hard Times Come Again No More" by Stephen Foster does merit serious consideration. But who is this program being presented to? To your congregation, to some group that wants to do something about homelessness, to the homeless themselves, or all of the above? I'm not sure you've been very clear on that.

Here's another one from the Mudcat threads that vividly described the homelessness, and empathy for the homeless:

Homeless Brother

I was walkin' by the graveyard last Friday night
I heard somebody yellin', it sounded like a fight
It was just a drunken hobo, dancin' circles in the night
Pourin' whisky on the headstones in the blue moonlight;
So often have I wondered where their sorrows cannot show
Where the police cannot find them, where the wanted man can go;
There's freedom when you're walkin' even though you're walkin' slow

Chorus:
Smash your bottle on the gravestone and live while you can,
That homeless brother is my friend.

It's hard to be a pack rat, it's hard to be a 'bo,
But livin's so much harder where the heartless people go;
Somewhere the dogs are barking and the children seem to know
That Jesus on the highway was a lost hobo;
And they hear the holy silence of the temples in the hill
And they see the ragged tatters as another kind of frill
And they envy him the sunshine and they pity him the chill
And they're sad to do their living for some other kind of thrill.

(chorus)

Somewhere there was a woman, somewhere there was a child,
Somewhere there was a cottage where the marigolds grew wild;
But somewhere's just like nowhere, when you leave it for a while
You'll find the broken hearted when you're travelin' jungle style;
Down the bowels of a broken land where numbers live like men
Where those who keep their senses have them taken back again
Where the night stick cracks with crazy rage
Where mad men don't pretend
Where wealth has no beginning and poverty no end.

(chorus)

The ghosts of highway royalty have vanished in the night
The Whitman wanderer walking toward a glowing inner light
The children have grown older and the cops have gripped us tight
There's no spot 'round the melting pot for free men in their flight;
And you who live on promises and prosper as you please
The victim of your riches often dies of your disease
He can't hear the factory whistle, just the lonesome freight train's wheeze
He's livin' on good fortune, he ain't dyin' on his knees.

Chorus:
Smash your bottle on the gravestone and live while you can
That homeless brother is my friend.
That homeless brother is my friend.


"It's a long song, typing with two fingers. I took it from the sleeve of the album 'Homeless Brother' from 1974. By the way, what's a Whitman wanderer?"

Cordially,
Landlady's Daughter


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Subject: Lyr Add: I REMEMBER LOVING YOU (from Utah Phillips
From: Mudjack
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 06:07 PM

This song is one I use to reflect feelings for the homeless, I mean those that are homeless beyond their control, not the social burdens that stand out on the street corners with their signs looking to make a hundred bucks a day.
Mudjack

I REMEMBER LOVING YOU
As recorded by Utah Phillips on “The Telling Takes Me Home” (1997)

1. I look at my brown suitcase, think of all the places that I been:
The railroad yards and prison guards, all the dumpy little towns along the stem,
And the whispering of the people as they watch every move that I go through.
I remember all these things; mostly I remember loving you.

CHORUS: I remember loving you,
Back when the world was new,
And I think you loved me too.
I remember loving you.

2. The buckskin smells, so the people tell, as we huddled in the boxcar from the rain,
Flashing lights that cut the night, the railroad bulls that pulled us off the train,
When the winter's cold and the Norther blows, I’m huddled in the corner till I’m blue.
I remember all these things; mostly I remember loving you. CHORUS

3. The winter streets where the frozen sleet comes soaking through the cardboard in my shoes,
Where the Promised Land might be a place where a man could find free cigarettes and booze,
And the alleyways full of ragged strays, the doorway wine I tell my troubles to,
I remember all these things; mostly I remember loving you. CHORUS TWICE


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