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Origins: The Hungry Army

mim 13 Jun 98 - 01:33 AM
Jim Dixon 20 May 05 - 07:29 PM
Peace 20 May 05 - 07:45 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 May 05 - 10:23 PM
Peace 20 May 05 - 10:37 PM
Peace 20 May 05 - 10:47 PM
Peace 20 May 05 - 10:49 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 May 05 - 11:56 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 May 05 - 03:00 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 May 05 - 02:18 PM
Peace 21 May 05 - 02:28 PM
GUEST,croc 19 Nov 06 - 01:06 PM
Peace 19 Nov 06 - 01:09 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Nov 06 - 02:30 PM
Lighter 19 Nov 06 - 04:48 PM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Nov 06 - 05:47 PM
Peace 19 Nov 06 - 05:53 PM
Peace 19 Nov 06 - 05:56 PM
Peace 19 Nov 06 - 06:08 PM
Peace 19 Nov 06 - 06:10 PM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Nov 06 - 10:10 PM
GUEST 20 Nov 06 - 05:23 AM
Jim Dixon 21 Nov 06 - 10:58 PM
GUEST,croc 30 Nov 06 - 04:15 PM
Mary Humphreys 30 Nov 06 - 04:58 PM
mark gregory 29 Jan 13 - 07:48 AM
selby 29 Jan 13 - 07:53 AM
GUEST,Lighter 29 Jan 13 - 08:12 AM
Steve Gardham 29 Jan 13 - 09:26 AM
Steve Gardham 29 Jan 13 - 09:35 AM
GUEST,Lighter 29 Jan 13 - 10:13 AM
zozimus 29 Jan 13 - 10:40 AM
Steve Gardham 29 Jan 13 - 10:56 AM
GUEST,999 29 Jan 13 - 11:11 AM
Joe Offer 08 Mar 18 - 11:27 PM
treewind 09 Mar 18 - 08:13 AM
GUEST,Mick Pearce (MCP) 09 Mar 18 - 05:23 PM
Steve Gardham 10 Mar 18 - 10:10 AM
Lighter 30 Oct 18 - 10:04 AM
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Subject: lyrics to Hungry Army
From: mim
Date: 13 Jun 98 - 01:33 AM

Does anyone know the lyrics to The Hungry Army? I believe it's a Civil War song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 May 05 - 07:29 PM

This page about Walter Pardon (1914-1996) from Norfolk, says he sang THE HUNGRY ARMY. It gives a quote:

Sound the bugle. Blow the horn.
Fight for glory night and morn.
Hungry soldiers, ragged and torn,
Just returned from the army.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Peace
Date: 20 May 05 - 07:45 PM

HUNGRY ARMY, THE - "When I was young and in my prime" Ch: "Sound the bugle, blow the horn - H S ragged and torn - Just returned from the Army" - tune is "Hilly-go Filly-go all the way" or "Chapter of Donkeys"- ROUD#1746 - Fortey BS 1860 (Broadwood papers at CSH) - PALMER RS 1977 p79 -- Walter PARDON, rec by Mike Yates, Knapton, Norfolk 1978: TOPIC 12-TS-392 1982/ TOPIC TSCD-664 1998


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Subject: Lyr Add: HUNGRY ARMY
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 May 05 - 10:23 PM

There is another song titled "The Hungry Army," an Irish song ca. 1885 of the Marine Artilery, when pay was 4d a day. In the Traditional Ballad Index. Roud 1746, but apparently not the 1746 of Folktrax, cited above by Brucie, or so different as to be unrecognizable.

Lyr. ADD: THE HUNGRY ARMY

The wind in thundering gales did blow
As I left my home in black October,
The rain and hail in torrents came
And the world, I thought, was surely over.
The reason was my colleen dhas
And I fell out about cousin Barney,
So I bid farewell to hungry Kells
And I went into Dublin to join the army.

Rad le whack, fol ol the dol, ol the dol, ol the dol ay,
Fol ol the dol, ol the dol addy.

When I arrived in Dublin town,
I crossed the Liffey, that splendid river,
At the castle yard a big black guard
Asked me to enlist, the blacks to skiver.
I did agree, then he gave me
A gun, but the weight of it soon did warm me,
So I hired myself to the powers of Guelph
To go and smash China along with the army.

Next morning the corporal roars out, 'March!
In the barracks of Chatham you'll soon be quartered.'
'By the powers, I'll see that you won't quarter me,
For I didn't join you here to be slaughtered.'
The sergeant then said that I should be made,
But I knew that the colonel was tipping me blarney ---
Och! the stripes I got on an awkward spot!
When my back was aching I cursed the army.

In a ship as big as a town we sailed,
In every hole and corner stuffing us,
To keep out the coul' I went into the houl'
By my sowl, it wouldn't hold half enough of us,
We were smothered to death for want of our breath,
And bursting with hunger, which didn't much charm me,
We were ordered to land and make a brave stand.
They might easy say 'Stand' to a hungry army.

On the field of battle I hadn't been long
Until I was wishing it all to be over;
To let a ball pass I sat down on the grass,
I didn't imagine myself in clover.
Och, that ball I can tell was a great bomb shell,
I got struck in the rere, but it didn't much harm me,
When to the next charge we got orders to march,
I'd a lame excuse for a halt in the army.

Unfit for the service, I got my discharge,
'Hook it, you cripple,'says uncle Toby,
'A pension you'll get, or if not, you'll be let
Go out to Kilmainham to be an old fogey.'
Och, should I live for four score years
With a fogey's fire all day to warm me,
I'll remember the day I got gunpowder tay
When I went up to Dublin to join the army.

colleen dhas- sweetheart.
the blacks to skiver- to bayonet the foreign foe of the Ethiopian race; to kill black men.
powers of Guelph- the reigning royal family of England.
Uncle Toby- an army phrase for the authorities in charge.
old fogey- an old soldier.
Kilmainham- Royal Hospital for old soldiers.
gunpowder tay- military rations.

With music. From Hamilton Hemingway, ex Royal Constabulary, from John Doyle, Kildare Rifles, c. 1885.
"Sam Henry's Songs of the People, " p. 86, The University of Georgia Press.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Peace
Date: 20 May 05 - 10:37 PM

The song mim seems to be looking for would likely refer to Lee's army which faced starvation in the 1864-5 winter. However, . . . .


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Peace
Date: 20 May 05 - 10:47 PM

http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:QplcscE3PSYJ:www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/libs/scua/broadsides_and_posters/song_sheets.shtml


I don't understand how to use the site, but there is apparently some sheet music available there.

The hungry army. Philadelphia: A.W. Auner.

It is cited in section two. (Rutgers Univ Library)


Sorry to be so clumsy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Peace
Date: 20 May 05 - 10:49 PM

www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/libs/ scua/broadsides_and_posters/song_sheets.shtml


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 May 05 - 11:56 PM

Not at American Memory or Levy. Not in Allan, "A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs." (1874)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 May 05 - 03:00 AM

Roud lists both the English and Irish songs under the same number, but they do seem to be unrelated. Roy Palmer (Rambling Soldier, 1977, 81) remarked that "the phrase 'Hungry Army' was virtually proverbial in the nineteenth century." Unsurprising that there should be two or more songs with that title.

One American song (noted in Indiana) of this name in Roud: Brewster, Southern Folklore Quarterly (1940) p.179, beginning "I wear a medal, as you see". That might be worth a look.

On the whole, copying Peter Kennedy's very abbreviated references here is a bad idea (unless they are suitably expanded). Very few people will understand them, and those who do can find them for themselves. This is not a personal criticism! I've told Joe Offer the same thing several times. I really do think it just confuses people.


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Subject: ADD: Burial of the Tough Beef in Galveston
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 05 - 02:18 PM

Lyr. Add: BURIAL OF THE TOUGH BEEF IN GALVESTON
(attrib. to Col. A. M. Hobby, CSA)

The Sabbath sun shown bright and fair,
The earth rejoiced in gladness:
But soon, ah, soon! the balmy air
Was pierced with sounds of sadness.

The measured tread of feet was heard:
Then came the mourning column;
And hearts of all were deeply stirred
At sounds and sights so solemn.

The dead came first, a mangled mass,
A poor old cow's fore shoulders;
(Who died, they said, for want of grass,)
It frightened all beholders.

Some rushed away in wildest fright,
And all agreed in saying
They ne'er had seen just such a sight!
And some fell down to praying.

The muffled drum its mournful tale
Breathed o'er this beefy Mummucks:
But sadder, deeper, came the wail
From soldiers empty stomachs.

Then next came on, with arms reversed,
The troops; all thoughtful, slow and sad-
No money in their hungry purse,
No dinner to be had.

Their manly tears fell at their feet;
(The dead was not a sinner,)
But tears will flow o'er bread alone; no MEAT
For supper, breakfast- dinner.

They buried the dead with sober brow,
And thought of tomorrow's fast-
Thus rests the ancient gentleman cow,
(His fatless ribs) at last.

"Died, in the Butcher's Pen, at Galveston, on Saturday night, march 5, 1864, an ancient Gentleman Cow, in the 129th year of his age. Disease. Poverty. His remains were issued to the troops and buried by Col. Hobby's Regiment, in the Public Square, with military honors." Printed as an introduction to the poem.

Allan, the editor, comments: "The above verses celebrate the burial of some beef issued to Hobby's Regiment for rations- unfit for food. The soldiers buried it with humorous pomp on the Public Square, and Col. A. M. Hobby, who wrote some of the finest poems of the South during the war, is charged with having extemporized these lines."

Allan, Francis D., 1874, "A Collection of Southern Partiotic Songs Made During Confederate Times," pp. 169-170. Burt Franklin New York. Reprinted 1970, Lenox Hill; Burt Franklin: Research & Source Works Series 578. American Classics in History and Social Science 153.

This ranks with other great funerals, such as that of Miss Flora, in Dodge City, 1880s.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Peace
Date: 21 May 05 - 02:28 PM

OK, Malcolm. What would be a better thing to do? Serious.


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Subject: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: GUEST,croc
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 01:06 PM

Has any one got the words to this song please- as sung by Will Duke?
Thanks Croc


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE HUNGRY ARMY
From: Peace
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 01:09 PM

Only one I can find is this:

THE HUNGRY ARMY

When I was young and in me prime
I thought I'd go and join the line,
And as a soldier cut a shine,
In a lot called the hungry army.

CHORUS: Sound the bugle, blow the horn.
Fight for glory, night and morn.
Hungry soldiers, ragged and torn,
Just returned from the army.

Said the sergeant, "You are just the chap",
And placed a knapsack on my back.
Then sent me off to Ballarat,
To fight in the hungry army. CHORUS

Now I went out to drill one day,
The wind was rather strong that way;
In fact it blew the lot away,
This glorious hungry army. CHORUS

I've got a medal as you see,
The workhouse presented it to me,
For hanging fast to a rotten tree,
When the wind took the hungry army. CHORUS

They cut me hair with a knife and fork,
And curled it with a cabbage stalk;
They fed me up on cabbage broth,
To fight in the hungry army. CHORUS

They served it out in a large tin can,
A teaspoonful to every man;
I got so fat I could not stand,
To fight in the hungry army. CHORUS

They sent me out to drill recruits,
But they kicked me with their hob-nailed boots;
Oh, take, oh, take away these brutes'
Of this glorious hungry army. CHORUS

So now, kind friends, I must be off.
I think I smell the mutton broth.
Here comes General Howl and Scoff,
The head of the hungry army. CHORUS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 02:30 PM

See thread 5351 for more information about songs with that title, and a 19th c. ballad from Sam Henry's "Songs of the People."
Hungry Army

As remarked in that thread, there are more that one ballad, but the best known is the one in Henry, and another (19th c.) published in Glasgow, about a returning soldier who had been sent to 'smash China.'
Peace mentioned an American one in the Rutgers Collection, but it does not seem to be available on the internet.

The song by Duke and Quinn was written by Walter Pardon, but I don't have the lyrics to this copyright song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 04:48 PM

Walter Pardon, the great English "roots" singer? If it's him, I doubt he "wrote it."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 05:47 PM

Duke & Quinn recorded an arrangement of Walter Pardon's version of 'The Hungry Army', but of course Walter didn't write the song; it was printed on broadsides during the second half of the 19th century.

'Peace' doesn't say where he got the text quoted above, but it's identical to the one Roy Palmer printed in The Rambling Soldier (London: Peacock Books, 1977, 79-81) which was mainly a Fordyce broadside, with a fragment of text, and the tune, taken from Charlotte Few of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire (not Charlotte Fen as mis-printed in Palmer's book; her married name was Dann and her version of 'Lucy Wan' appeared in the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs); except that somebody has altered every instance of the word "my" to "me", perhaps under the misapprehension that this is compulsory in "folksong".

The Fordyce broadside, and others, can be seen at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads:

The Hungry Army.


Number 1746 in the Roud Folk Song Index.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Peace
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 05:53 PM

This link might be of interest--but it's not the song posted above.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Peace
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 05:56 PM

http://hicketypip.tripod.com/Songbook/hungry.htm

PARdon me. It is attributed to the "65th Regiment Song Book".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Peace
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 06:08 PM

"Sound the Bugle, blow the horn,
Fight for glory night and morn,
Hungry soldiers ragged and torn,
Just returned from the army."

from
here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Peace
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 06:10 PM

I think it's the Walter Pardon one Guest, croc is looking for.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 10:10 PM

That was what Q" and I were sort of driving at, yes. I don't know of any published transcription, but recordings of Walter singing it are available for sale, and can be found via Google.

It appears, for example, on Topic TSCD 664, Troubles They Are But Few - Dance Tunes & Ditties (part of the Voice of the People series). Notes at http://www.mustrad.org.uk/votp.htm indicate that Walter couldn't remember the whole song until he saw the set printed by Roy Palmer (how much he had remembered previously isn't stated). The tune he learned from his uncle Billy was the well-known 'King of the Cannibal Islands'.

Jim Carroll (among others) recorded the song from Walter, and perhaps he will look in to comment.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The glorious hungry army
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Nov 06 - 05:23 AM

As Malcolm wrote, Walter heard the song sung by his Uncle, Billy Gee (died in the mid - 1940s), but couldn't remember all of it. He filled in the missing bits from Roy Palmers book, The Rambling Soldier.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE HUNGRY ARMY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 Nov 06 - 10:58 PM

The broadside version has 8-line verses and a longer chorus.
From the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads Firth b.25(254):

THE HUNGRY ARMY

When I was young and in my prime,
I thought I'd go and join the line,
And as a soldier cut a shine
In a lot called the hungry army.
Said the sergeant, "You are just the chap,"
And placed a knapsack on my back,
Then sent me off to Ballarat,
To fight in the hungry army.

CHORUS: Sound the bugle. Blow the horn.
Fight for glory night and morn.
Hungry soldiers, ragged and torn,
Just returned from the army.
March, boys, march. The way is on before us.
Shout, boys, shout, and join me in the chorus.
March, boys, march. The foe is still advancing.
Cheer, boys, cheer, for the new and happy land.

I went to drill one fine day.
The wind was rather strong that way..
In fact, it blew the lot away,
This glorious hungry army.
I've got a medal, as you see.
The workhouse presented it to me
For hanging fast to a rotten tree
When the wind took the hungry army.

They cut my hair with a knife and fork,
And curled it with a cabbage stalk,
And fed me on cabbage broth,
To fight in the hungry army.
They served it out in a large tin can,
A teaspoonful to every man.
I got so fat I couldn't stand,
To fight in the hungry army.

They sent me out to drill recruits,
But they kicked me with their hob-nailed boots.
Oh, take, oh, take away these brutes
Of this glorious hungry army.
Now, kind friends, I must be off.
I think I smell the mutton broth.
Here comes General Howl and Scoff,
The head of the hungry army.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: GUEST,croc
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 04:15 PM

Thanks everybody - that's great.
x


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Mary Humphreys
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 04:58 PM

I have recently been working on the manuscripts of Ella Bull which contain the songs collected from Charlotte Few of Cottenham and sent to Percy Merrick in 1904. The Charlotte Few ( Dann) version has only a four-line chorus - the "March boys march" section is omitted. Like Walter Pardon, she had very few words of the verses, but remembered the chorus in its entirety.
Her tune is quite different from Walter Pardon's.
I think it is fascinating that the only two versions that have been recorded from oral tradition are from East Anglia - one having been recorded only in manuscript form ( Charlotte's) & the other on tape. As far as I know there are no others reported.
Mary


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: mark gregory
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 07:48 AM

I recently came across this song from the 1850s with and Australian reference in the first verse


The Hungry Army

When I was young and in my prime,
I thought I'd go and join the line,
And as a soldier cut a shine,
In a lot called the hungry army;
Said the sergeant you are just the chap,
And placed a knapsack on my back,
Then sent me off to Ballarat,
To fight in the hungry army.

Sound the bugle, blow the horn,
Fight for glory, night and morn:
Hungry soldiers, ragged and torn,
Just returned from the army.

March, boys, march, the way is on before us,
Shout, boys, shout, and join me in the chorus,
March, boys, march, the foe is still advancing,
Cheer, boys, cheer, for the new and happy land.

I went to drill on one fine day,
The wind was rather strong that way,
In fact it blew the lot away,
This glorious hungry army;
I've got a medal as you see,
The workhouse presented it to me,
For hanging fast to a rotten tree,
When the wind took the hungry army.

They cut my hair with a knife and fork,
And curled it with a cabbage-stalk,
And fed me on some cabbage broth,
To fight in the hungry army;
They served it out in a large tin can,
A tea-spoonful to every man,
I got so fat I couldn't stand
To fight in the hungry army.

They sent me out to drill recruits,
But they kick'd me with their hob-nail'd boots,
Oh take, oh, take away these brutes,
Of this glorious hungry army;
Now, kind friends, I must be off,
I think I smell the cabbage broth;
Here comes old general Howl and Scoff,
The head of the hungry army.

From James Hepburn A Book of Scattered Leaves 2001, pp. 407-408.

cheers


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: selby
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 07:53 AM

Brilliantly sung by Mick Ryan when he was with Crows. On the LP no Bones or Grease i think
Keith


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 08:12 AM

What looks like the same text is (surprisingly) in "Agnes Wallace Little Diamond Songster" (N.Y.: W. E. Hilton, n.d.). The book seems to have been published shortly after the American Civil War.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 09:26 AM

The'Irish' ballad was printed by Glasgow Poet's Box in 1871, that's the one that starts 'The Wind in thundering gales did roar' (also by Sanderson of Edinburgh)

The well-known one as sung by Mick Ryan, and indeed Will Duke and Dan Quinn, 'When I was young and in my prime' was printed by Pearson of Manchester and both Fortey and Disley of London. There's a no-imprint printing on the Bodl. ref 2806 c 8(288)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 09:35 AM

Whilst we're on can anyone remind me of the earliest name of the tune?
Tommy Armstrong used it for 'Up at Stanla Market' and I think it's also 'The Fyemous Fiery Clockface'. I'm sure there's an earlier song though. Oh, and it's a dance tune, but can't remember the title.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 10:13 AM

Q's "Burial of the Tough Beef" (above) is a parody of Charles Wolfe's once familiar "The Burial of Sir John Moore after Corunna."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: zozimus
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 10:40 AM

Hi Steve,
The Irish version first appeared in the Dublin Comic Songster,by John Duffy 1845. It was written by Dublin singer James Kearney and re-appears in the Henry Collection as mentioned above. The only difference being Kearney uses the line "Be the Powers of delph" whereas the version in Henry changes this to "The powers of Guelph". The song is about the Opium War 1835. However, Kearney or someone else re-wrote it about the Crimean War, and this is the version you mention above found in The Poet's Box. We thus have 2 songs with the same title and the same opening line, which is a challenge to our search engines!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 10:56 AM

A challenge indeed. Thanks for the correction.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: GUEST,999
Date: 29 Jan 13 - 11:11 AM

The Hungry Army

When I was young and in me prime
I thought I'd go and join the line,
And as a soldier cut a shine,
In a lot called the hungry army.

Sound the bugle, blow the horn.
Fight for glory, night and morn.
Hungry soldiers, ragged and torn,
Just returned from the army.

Said the sergeant, "You are just the chap",
And placed a knapsack on my back.
Then sent me off to Ballarat,
To fight in the hungry army.

Chorus

Now I went out to drill one day,
The wind was rather strong that way;
In fact it blew the lot away,
This glorious hungry army.

Chorus

I've got a medal as you see,
The workhouse presented it to me,
For hanging fast to a rotten tree,
When the wind took the hungry army.

Chorus

They cut me hair with a knife and fork,
And curled it with a cabbage stalk;
They fed me up on cabbage broth,
To fight in the hungry army.

Chorus

They served it out in a large tin can,
A teaspoonful to every man;
I got so fat I could not stand,
To fight in the hungry army.

Chorus

They sent me out to drill recruits,
But they kicked me with their hob-nailed boots;
Oh, take, oh, take away these brutes'
Of this glorious hungry army.

Chorus

So now, kind friends, I must be off.
I think I smell the mutton broth.
Here comes General Howl and Scoff,
The head of the hungry army.

Chorus

#########################################

Sorry if this repeats an earlier post. In a hurry.

The lyrics are from

http://hicketypip.tripod.com/Songbook/hungry.htm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Hungry Army
From: Joe Offer
Date: 08 Mar 18 - 11:27 PM

The Traditional Ballad Index has two entries for "The Hungry Army":

Hungry Army (I), The

DESCRIPTION: Having fought with his sweetheart, the Irishman enlists in the army. He quarrels with his NCOs, then is sent off to (China?) in a boat too small and ill-equipped for the soldiers. Sent into battle, he is injured and discharged
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1925 (Sam Henry collection); c. 1856 (broadside NLScotland, L.C.Fol.178.A.2(054))
KEYWORDS: soldier battle injury disability
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (2 citations):
SHenry H92, p. 86, "The Hungry Army" (1 text, 1 tune)
DallasCruel, pp. 158-161, "The Hungry Army" (1 text, 1 tune)

Roud #19105
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, 2806 b.11(27), "The Hungry Army" ("The wind in thundering gales did roar"), unknown, n.d.
Murray, Mu23-y1:097, "The Hungry Army," James Lindsay (Glasgow), 19C
NLScotland, L.C.Fol.178.A.2(054), "The Hungry Army," James Lindsay (Glasgow), c.1856

NOTES: The notes to broadside Bodleian 2806 b.11(27) make the subject "War, Opium War, 1840-1842, Ireland"
Broadside Murray Mu23-y1:097 has the site of the war in China and the battle simply "on the field of battle."
Broadside NLScotland L.C.Fol.178.A.2(054) has the site of the war in Russia, rather than China; the singer is wounded November 5 at Inkerman. - BS
Last updated in version 4.2
File: HHH092

Hungry Army (II), The

DESCRIPTION: The singer enlists and is sent to Ballarat. The men are so thin a strong wind "blew the lot away"; the singer gets a medal for surviving. He eats cabbage broth. Utensils are only used to cut hair. Sent to drill still strong recruits, he is beaten.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: before 1886 (broadside, Bodleian Firth b.25(254))
KEYWORDS: army ordeal starvation Australia humorous
FOUND IN: Britain(England(Lond))
Roud #1746
RECORDINGS:
Walter Pardon, "The Hungry Army" (on Voice14)
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Firth b.25(254), "The Hungry Army" ("When I was young and in my prime"), W.S. Fortey (London), 1858-1885; also Firth c.19(219), 2806 c.8(288), "The Hungry Army"
NOTES: Hall, notes to Voice14: "Servicemen also have the gift of moaning, and 'The Hungry Army', set in mid-nineteenth century Australia, is a typical squaddie beef at conditions and authority."
Ballarat is in Victoria, Australia, about 65 miles east of Melbourne. - BS
According to Andrew and Nancy Learmouth, Encyclopedia of Australia (article on Ballarat in the second edition), the Ballarat region was not opened for settlement until 1837, during a drought. The population remained small until the 1851 gold rush; in 1851 "a septuagenarian digger named John Dunlop discovered the richest field of all, at Ballarat" (see Robert Hughes, The Fatal Shore, p. 562). I suspect that this is what brought Ballarat to the broadside-writers' attention -- especially since the British government charged the large fee of 30 shillings a month for a gold license (Hughes, p. 562),meaning that they needed some sort of law and order in the area. But gold rushes are almost always attended by squalor, since there are few supplies in the area. Hence, presumably, this song. But we note that it has mentions absolutely nothing about Australia except the name "Ballarat." I assume it is in fact an older piece adapted to the Australian gold rush.
Roud lumps this with "The Hungry Army (I)." But while the theme is the same, the plot is different enough that Ben Schwartz and I both believe it should be split. - RBW
File: RcHunAr2

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I did not find a version of this song in the Digital Tradition.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Hungry Army
From: treewind
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 08:13 AM

Since this thread's been resurrected, here's our version:
The Hungry Army (Mary Humphreys and Anahata)

(the scene of the action in the first verse got slightly modernized)


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Hungry Army
From: GUEST,Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 05:23 PM

Here's Walter Pardon's version, very similar to the Firth broadside posted by Jim above. The tune is The King Of The Cannibal Islands, as mentioned above by Malcolm I think.

Mick




THE HUNGRY ARMY

When I was young and in my prime,
I thought I'd go and join the line,
And as a[1] soldier cut and shine
In a glorious hungry army.

  Chorus:
  Sound the bugle[2], Blow the horn.
  Fight for glory night and morn.
  Hungry soldiers, ragged[3] and torn,
  Just returned from the army.


The sergeant says, "You're just the chap,"
And placed a knapsack on my back,
They sent me off to Ballarat,
To fight in the hungry army.

They sent us out to drill one day,
The wind was rather strong that way.
In fact, it blew the lot away,
The glorious hungry army.

I've got a medal here you see,
The workhouse presented to me
For hanging on a rotten tree
When the wind blew away the army.

They cut my hair with a knife and fork,
They curled it with a cabbage stalk,
They fed me up on cabbage broth,
To fight in the hungry army.

They dished it out of an old tin can,
A teaspoonful for every man.
I got so fat I couldn't stand,
To fight in the hungry army.

They sent me out to drill recruits -
They kicked me with the[4] hob-nailed boots.
Oh, take away those awful brutes
From the glorious hungry army.

And now my friends I must be off.
I think I smell the mutton broth.
Here comes General Howl-and-Scoff,
The head of the hungry army.


[1] - could be a very reduced 'the' pronounces as just 'e
[2] - always definite Norfolk pronounciation as 'boogle'
[3] - sometimes pronounced just as ragg'd
[4] - could be a reduced 'their' with ending lost


Source: Walter Pardon, album A Country Life, or Voice of The People, vol 14: Troubles They Are But Few


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Hungry Army
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 10 Mar 18 - 10:10 AM

It's bound to be close to the broadside, Mick. Both Walter's dad and his Uncle Billy got their songs from their father who got them from broadsides.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Hungry Army
From: Lighter
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 10:04 AM

The text of the "Sound the bugle, blow the horn" version, as given above by Jim Dixon, appeared in "Tony Pastor's 201 Bowery songster" (N.Y.: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1867), p. 55.

"The Hungry Army," presumably the same text, appeared earlier in a book I haven't seen, "The Frisky Irish Songster" (N.Y.: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1862).


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