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Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas

DigiTrad:
MOSES ROSE OF TEXAS
THE GIRL WITH THE WATERFALL
THE YELLOW ROSE OF TAEGU
THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS (2)
THE YELLOW ROSS OF TEXAS
YELLOW ROSE OF SAIGON


GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 04:05 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 04:12 PM
curmudgeon 14 Nov 02 - 04:19 PM
MMario 14 Nov 02 - 04:22 PM
masato sakurai 14 Nov 02 - 05:57 PM
masato sakurai 14 Nov 02 - 06:08 PM
JedMarum 14 Nov 02 - 06:09 PM
masato sakurai 14 Nov 02 - 06:11 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 06:22 PM
Art Thieme 14 Nov 02 - 06:45 PM
catspaw49 14 Nov 02 - 07:05 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Nov 02 - 07:37 PM
masato sakurai 15 Nov 02 - 04:24 AM
Nigel Parsons 15 Nov 02 - 05:34 AM
Nigel Parsons 15 Nov 02 - 05:40 AM
Pooby 15 Nov 02 - 03:30 PM
Lonesome EJ 01 Jan 07 - 04:59 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 02 Jan 07 - 01:00 AM
katlaughing 02 Jan 07 - 01:11 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 02 Jan 07 - 01:19 AM
katlaughing 02 Jan 07 - 01:23 AM
Acme 02 Jan 07 - 01:35 AM
GUEST,Spot (without cookie for some reason!!) 02 Jan 07 - 07:38 AM
oldhippie 02 Jan 07 - 11:52 AM
dick greenhaus 02 Jan 07 - 03:59 PM
Hrothgar 03 Jan 07 - 06:33 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Jan 07 - 02:56 PM
GUEST,Spot(sans cookie again-wossup wi' it?) 03 Jan 07 - 03:24 PM
oldhippie 03 Jan 07 - 06:35 PM
Lonesome EJ 03 Jan 07 - 07:28 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Jan 07 - 07:36 PM
Lonesome EJ 03 Jan 07 - 07:50 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Jan 07 - 08:25 PM
Hrothgar 04 Jan 07 - 04:18 AM
Lighter 04 Jan 07 - 11:56 AM
Lighter 04 Jan 07 - 01:28 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Jan 07 - 01:48 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Jan 07 - 02:07 PM
Lighter 04 Jan 07 - 03:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Jan 07 - 10:39 PM
Acme 05 Jan 07 - 01:30 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Jan 07 - 12:55 PM
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Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Jan 09 - 02:11 PM
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banjoman 06 Jul 11 - 05:24 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 04:05 PM

I can find no thread devoted to this song. The lyrics below are close to the version (unnumbered in the DT) but the original "darkey" is substituted for the "soldier" of the DT. "Some" questions are answered here, and I hope other answers will be found.
The version here is from the original sheet music printed by Firth and Pond, New York, 1858, by "J. K."

THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS

1. There's a yellow rose in Texas that I am going to see.
No other darkey knows her, no darkey only me;
She cried so when I left her, it like to broke my heart,
And if I ever find her we never more will part.

CHORUS: She's the sweetest rose of color this darkey ever knew.
Her eyes are bright as diamonds; they sparkle like the dew.
You may talk about your Dearest May and sing of Rosa Lee,
But the yellow rose of Texas beats the belles of Tennessee.

2. Where the Rio Grande is flowing, and the starry skies are bright,
She walks along the river in the quiet summer night;
She thinks if I remember, when we parted long ago,
I promis'd to come back again, and not to leave her so.

3. Oh! now I'm going to find her, for my heart is full of woe,
And we'll sing the song together, that we sung so long ago;
We'll play the banjo gaily, and we'll sing the songs of yore,
And the yellow rose of Texas shall be mine for evermore.

(1) sic. The song is believed to have a minstrel origin. Cox, "Folk-Songs of the South," notes for song #128, refers to "Christy's Plantation Melodies No. 2," p. 52; "The Christy Minstrels Song Book (London) II, 84 (with music) and others. "J. K." has never been identified.
The song was popular during the Civil War. It is included in a little volume called "Songs of Love and Liberty," by "a North Carolina Lady," 1864, p. 35, same words as the sheet music.

The Traditional Ballad Index CUFresno repeats the tale (nonsense) told by James "Sparky" Rucker that the yellow Rose was Santa Anna's girl friend; others added to the story later, saying that she told Santa Anna's plans to the Texans, was a prostitute, etc. All of these stories seem to be modern. there is no evidence that the song existed at the time of the Mexican War, or during the Texas struggle.

"Songs of Love and Liberty," in the North Carolina series, "Documenting the American South: Yellow Rose of Texas
Levy Colection: THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
Also see thread 15359: Why Yellow
Thread 23549" yellow rose rhythm
For reference and comparison, here are the entries from the Digital Tradition and the Traditional Ballad Index.
-Joe Offer-

THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS

There's a yellow rose in Texas that I am going to see,
No other soldier knows her, no soldier only me;
She cried so when I left her, it like to broke my heart
And if I ever find her, we never more will part.

Cho: She's the sweetest rose of color this soldier ever knew,
Her eyes are bright like diamonds, they sparkle like the dew
You may talk about your dearest May and sing of Rosa Lee,
But the Yellow Rose of Texas is the only girl for me.

When the Rio Grande is flowing, and the starry skies are bright
She walks along the river in the quiet summer night
She thinks if I remember, when we parted long ago,
I promised to come back again and not to leave her so

Oh, now I'm going to find her, for my heart is full of woe
And we'll sing the song together, that we sang so long ago
We'll play the banjo gaily, and we'll sing the songs of yore,
And the Yellow Rose of Texas shall be mine forevermore.

Note: Tinsley, in He Was Singing This Song, states that the original Yellow Rose
was an indentured servant, the "high yellow" Emily Morgan, who kept Santa Ana
dallying in lascivious torment so long that his leaderless men lost the Battle
of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836. The song was published only in the late
1850s by Firth, Pond and Co., and credited vaguely to "J.K.", according to
Spaeth. EC

@love @America @Civil @army
filename[ YELLOWTX
TUNE FILE: YELLOWTX
CLICK TO PLAY
DC



PLEASE NOTE: Because of the volunteer nature of The Digital Tradition, it is difficult to ensure proper attribution and copyright information for every song included. Please assume that any song which lists a composer is copyrighted ©. You MUST aquire proper license before using these songs for ANY commercial purpose. If you have any additional information or corrections to the credit or copyright information included, please e-mail those additions or corrections to us (along with the song title as indexed) so that we can update the database as soon as possible. Thank You.

Yellow Rose of Texas, The

DESCRIPTION: The singer is going to see his "Yellow Rose" -- "The sweetest rose of color this (darkey) ever knew; Her eyes are bright as diamonds; They sparkle like the dew." He promises that "if I ever find her, we never more will part."
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1858
KEYWORDS: love courting separation reunion
FOUND IN: US
REFERENCES (7 citations):
RJackson-19CPop, pp. 253-257, "The Yellow Rose of Texas" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-CivWar, pp. 28-29, "The Yellow Rose of Texas" (1 text, 1 tune)
Gilbert, pp. 20-21, "The Yellow Rose of Texas" (1 text)
Silber-FSWB, p. 272, "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" (1 text)
JHCox 128, "The Yellow Rose of Texas" (1 text)
Fuld-WFM, p. 661+, "The Yellow Rose of Texas"
DT, YELLOWTX*

RECORDINGS:
New Lost City Ramblers, "Yellow Rose of Texas" [instrumental] (on NLCR07)
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Yellow Rose of Taegu" (tune)
SAME TUNE:
The Yellow Rose of Taegu (File: EM410)
Song of the Texas Rangers (NOT Laws A8; War Songs and Poems of the Southern Confederacy, pp. 175-176)
Notes: Extremely popular with Southern troops in the Civil War, and frequently parodied, the first known publication of this piece occurred in 1858 (published by William A. Pond). That version appears to be a minstrel piece; in it, both lovers are "darkeys." The only attribution is to "J.K.," who was and still remains unknown.
It is interesting that, in the Civil War, the troops often sang, "She's the sweetest rose of color this SOLDIER (or, later, FELLOW) ever knew." This would hardly have been acceptable to the Southern gentry; it was miscegenation. - RBW
James "Sparky" Rucker places this song in the period of the Mexican War, stating that the "Yellow Rose" was Santa Anna's mulatto (American) girlfriend, who stole his battle plans before the battle of San Jacinto and delivered them to the American army. - PJS
File: RJ19253

Yellow Rose of Taegu, The

DESCRIPTION: A reluctant soldier meets the Yellow Rose of Taegu, a good two-dollar whore, who makes him forget the perils of war.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE:
KEYWORDS: bawdy sex soldier whore
FOUND IN: US
REFERENCES (2 citations):
Cray, pp. 410-412, "The Yellow Rose of Taegu" (1 text, 1 tune)
DT, YLLOWTX4*

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Yellow Rose of Texas" (tune)
File: EM410

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2002 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 04:12 PM

Levy?? Click on "new search" box and type in yellow rose in top blank box.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: curmudgeon
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 04:19 PM

Skip Gorman sings, and has recorded, a really fine rendition of this song. Can't, right now, lay my hands on it -- Tom


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: MMario
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 04:22 PM

Q - for links to levy you can use the url of the cover of the particular piece...

just an fyi - no sense everyone having to go through the same discovery process of how to link into Levy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: masato sakurai
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 05:57 PM

From the Levy collection:

Title: The Yellow Rose of Texas. Song & Chorus.
Composer, Lyricist, Arranger: Composed and Arranged Expressly for Charles H. Brown by J.K.
J. K. Publication: New York: Firth, Pond, & Co., 547 Broadway, 1858.
Form of Composition: strophic with chorus
Instrumentation: piano and voice
First Line: There's a yellow rose in Texas that I am going to see, No other 'darkey knows her, no darkey only me
First Line of Chorus: She's the sweetest rose of color this darkey ever knew
Engraver, Lithographer, Artist: Quidor, Engvr.
Plate Number: 4449
Subject: Courtship & love
Subject: Pride
Call No.: Box: 016 Item: 147

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: masato sakurai
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 06:08 PM

From the Bodleian Library collection:

Printer: De Marsan, H. (New York, N.Y.)
Date: c.1860
    Imprint: H. De Marsan, Publisher, 60 Chatham Street, New-York
    Illus. Ballads on sheet: 1
    Note: Border: The fountain.   
Copies: Ballads: 1. The yellow rose of Texas ("There's a yellow rose in Texas that I am going to see ...")


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: JedMarum
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 06:09 PM

It is true that US historians discredited the Santa Anna link with Emily, (the Yellow Rose) because no creditable US documents contained first accounts of her being present at the battle of San Jacinto - but Mexican documents do detail first hand witness that Emily was indeed on the battle field with Santa Anna and had been his "guest' for some days - don't be too quick to discount the story.

What is commonly believed to be the original manuscript for this song is in a museum/library in Austin.

I'll go locate more info ...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: masato sakurai
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 06:11 PM

Correction:

Copies: Harding B 18(748)   
Ballads: 1. The yellow rose of Texas ("There's a yellow rose in Texas that I am going to see ...")


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 06:22 PM

The little Marsan broadside is unusual in pointing to the original publisher, Firth and Pond, as the source for the music. Very few give any information.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: Art Thieme
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 06:45 PM

This song is about the large staging area at Ohare Field in Chicago where hundreds of cabs wait to be sent to the various air terminals---a few at a time. Originally it was called "The Yellow Rows Of Taxis".

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: catspaw49
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 07:05 PM

Gee, and here I thought it was a song about Willie Nelson after the IRS nailed him...."The Fellow Knows His Taxes"

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Nov 02 - 07:37 PM

Art Thieme, I'm waiting to hear your lyrics!

(Thread creep- should be many good stories about Chicago taxis. In the 1920s,when the night shift got off at the telephone company, taxis, paid for by the company, would be lined up to take the girls home. Or so went the story. A Studs Terkel is needed to provide verification )


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: masato sakurai
Date: 15 Nov 02 - 04:24 AM

Another edition form Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920 (from Duke University):

Yellow rose of Texas. (The Southern musical boquet of favorite songs and ballads; no. 4. 186-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 15 Nov 02 - 05:34 AM

I remember this from my schooldays. Another uncredited version.

Oh the Yellow Rose of Texas
And the Man from Laramie
They went to Davy Crockett's house
To have a cup of tea.
The tea was so delicious
They had another cup.
And left poor Davy Crockett
To do the washing up.

(Amazing how these things stick in the mind over the years!)
Nigel


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 15 Nov 02 - 05:40 AM

Of course my all time favourite version must be the animated (Bendy rabit etc.,) version with Stan Freberg


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: Pooby
Date: 15 Nov 02 - 03:30 PM

Let's not forget the Allan Sherman version:

"Oh I'm Melvin Rose from Texas, my friends all call me Tex
When I live in old New Mexico they used to call me Mex
When I lived in old Kentucky they called me Old Kentuck
I was born in old Shamokin, which is why they call me Melvin Rose."

Poobs


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 01 Jan 07 - 04:59 PM

Last night, at an Irish Bar in Tulsa OK, I heard this tune sung by an Irish band with completely different lyrics. Did the original melody come from Ireland? Is anyone familiar with an Irish variant of this song?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 01:00 AM

The DT has two versions in the Database as well as discussion.

Yellow Rose of Texas
Yellow Rose of Texas 2

Lesley Nelson's Contemplator gives an earliest date the tune Yellow Rose of Texas is known to be published
The Session has info on the tune Yellow Rose of Texas, and gives some alternate names.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: katlaughing
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 01:11 AM

There's an interesting write-up about the song HERE. As the author says, "Editor's note: We get a lot of comments on this story, and we are not going to change it to suit individual theories. This is the original story as was published back in the 1980's, and it was based on research conducted then. Research today may change a lot of the facts. We do not know the truth and only present this story for your reading pleasure."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 01:19 AM

It was. I just finished reading it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: katlaughing
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 01:23 AM

Nice to *see* you, George!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: Acme
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 01:35 AM

There is still quite a tempest in the Texas teapot brewing about the Yellow Rose of Texas story. I'm adding a link to what you can consider the definitive story of Emily West, who was a free black woman employed by James Morgan at the time of San Jacinto. This article was written to counter a bunch of nonsense that was self-published (no peer review involved, and very shaky research all the way through) by a woman named McVea. She was (in so many words) casting doubt on the research and collection holdings we have in Special Collections at UT Arlington.

There have been a couple of other articles in the past few years that mention Emily West. Here is one (a brief mention) and a longer article here. This web version doesn't have the image of her signature, though it was included in the print article. The web version was usually put up as mostly text by someone who knew enough html to get the pages up but not enough to arrange photos throughout. Getting one in there was as much as she attempted.

SRS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: GUEST,Spot (without cookie for some reason!!)
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 07:38 AM

HNY everybody...

                Pleasant version by Hoyt Axton, John Hartford and friends...can't do clicky..sorry..

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyiEiUZAhPA

    or just search Hoyt Axton...

                            Hope you find/like it..

             Regards to all...Spot


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: oldhippie
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 11:52 AM

Another version

Yellow Rose of Texas
By: Johnny Lee and Lane Brody

Key of F

There's a yellow rose in Texas
I'm going home to see
Though other men have held her
Her heart belongs to me


You've traveled down some dusty roads
You've slept out in the rain
But this yellow rose is always here
When you come home again

Chorus:
She knows I've done some hard time
You stumbled then you fell
I just kept your pride from dying
You saved my soul from hell
She's the diamond of the desert
She's the golden flower of spring
She's the yellow rose of Texas
She can make a man a king


There's a yellow rose in Texas
She knows the dues I've paid
And I'm going home to tell her
I wish I'd never strayed

You couldn't see beyond yourself
Your pain and wounded pride
But now you know the truth is
in the way you feel inside

Repeat Chorus

Yes, the yellow rose of Texas
Can make a man a king


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 02 Jan 07 - 03:59 PM

Well, folksingers have to say something while they're tuning.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Hrothgar
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 06:33 AM

Now I'm going southward, for my heart is full of woe,
I'm heading back to Georgia to find my Uncle Joe.
You can talk about your Beauregard and sing of General Lee,
But gallant Hood of Texas played hell in Tennessee.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 02:56 PM

The verse to Yellow Rose of Texas" posted by Hrothgar is often cited as having been written by soldiers fighting with General Hood. I believe that this is so, but documentation is hard to find. A march also exists.
Any information would be appreciated.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST,Spot(sans cookie again-wossup wi' it?)
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 03:24 PM

Allo everybody...

                Dick - I guess you not impressed with Axton version!!!   :-)
                Must admit I loved it's simplicity!! Wish I could help with the song's history...sadly not...sorry!!

                  Regards to all....Spot


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: oldhippie
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 06:35 PM

The Hrothgar lyrics are the ones Johnny Horton recorded; Q - do you want the mp3?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 07:28 PM

Well, we're getting tons more info on the Yellow Rose, but nobody's been able to tell me if the tune is of Irish origin or if it has been appropriated by the Irish. Ahwell, I'll do some searchin on me own and let yes know.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 07:36 PM

Thanks, Old Hippie, but no. I would like to know where the stanza originated. It may be more recent than Civil War era. (Most versions I have seen use Lee's nickname 'Bobby Lee.'
The song does not appear in Allan's "Lone Star Ballads" (1874) except as a tune for "Song of the Texas Rangers" (about the Eighth Texas Cavalry or 'Terry's Texas Rangers,' not the law enforcement Rangers).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 07:50 PM

Alright then...
at the risk of re-kindling the Mudcat Green-Orange Wars, I did find some info on an Irish variant of Yellow Rose. It's called 'The Union Cruiser', and appears on an album by Houl Yer Whisht called "On Boyne's Red Shore". The date shown for it is "circa 1912". It seems that many American folk tunes were adapted into the Unionist Song Canon with new lyrics, another example being "Sweet Betsy from Pike". If anyone has the lyrics to Union Cruiser, I'd love to see them.
Odd that this was performed at an Irish Bar in Tulsa Oklahoma in the same set with "A Nation Once Again".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 08:25 PM

I understand the Oxford journal, Past and Present, 1992, has the lyrics. Anyone subscribe?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Hrothgar
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 04:18 AM

I think I first heard this on a Win Stracke LP of Civil War songs made in the early 60s - seemingly part of the activities related to the centenary of the Civil War.

It is an obvious reference to the contrast between Joseph E Johnston's careful campaigning, preserving the lives of hs troops, and John B Hood's more attacking style, which culminated in the defeats of Franklin and Nashville, in which Hood's army became the only one in the whole war to be totally destroyed as a fighting force.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lighter
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 11:56 AM

Silber's usually reliable "Songs of the Civil War" (1961) gives the Hood stanza this way:

And now I'm going Southward,
For my heart is full of woe,
I'm going back to Georgia
To find my Uncle Joe.
You may talk about your dearest May
And sing of Rosalie,
But the gallant Hood of Texas
Played hell in Tennessee.

Silber's source appears to be Richard B. Harwell's "Songs of the Confederacy" (N.Y.: Broadcast Music, Inc., 1951), but I haven't been able to check this. I may be able to dig an older and better source from my chaotic files.

I knew a Civil War re-enactor who told me in 1974 he'd heard the (post-war) song "I'm a Good Ol' Rebel" sung to this tune. (The more trad melody is "Joe Bowers.")


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lighter
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 01:28 PM

The "gallant Hood" stanza appears in Gen. Bromfield L. Ridley's "Battles and Sketches of the Army of Tennessee" (Mexico, Mo.: Missouri Printing & Publishing Co., 1906), p. 439. Ridley's version has "dearest maid" for "dearest May." Ridley appears to have heard the song himself in 1864.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 01:48 PM

The "Handbook of Texas." in its article on General Hood, states, " As the remains of the Army of Tennessee retreated toward Tupelo, Mississippi, it sang, to the tune of the 'Yellow Rose of Texas,' "You can talk about your Beauregard amd sing of General Lee, but the gallant Hood of Texas Played hell in Tennessee."
"Relieved of command at his own request on January, 23, 1865, Hood was attempting to make his way to Edmund Kirby Smith's army in Texas, when the Confederacy collapsed."

The Editors of the Handbook are quite careful, and I presume that they have documentation in the form of contemporary writings.

Hood


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 02:07 PM

Lighter, thanks for the Ridley reference.

While checking the "Handbook of Texas," I found more information on "The Yellow Rose of Texas."
"One of the earliest versions of the "Yellow Rose of Texas" dates back to the first administration of Sam Houston, who became president of the Republic of Texas in 1836. A handwritten manuscript of the song, now in the A. Henry Moss Papers in the Center for American History at the University of texas at Austin, was allegedly delivered to one E. A. Jones. This early version, possibly written around the time of the battle of San Jacinto, tells the story of a black man who yearns for his sweetheart. During that era, "yellow" was used to describe people of mixed-race origins, especially mulattoes, and the rose was a common symboy of young womanhood. Because the song was poorly written and full of spelling errors, at least one scholar believes that is could have been composed by an uneducated person, possibly one of Morgan's slaves."
The article goes on to mention the published edition of 1858, arranged and composed for vaudeville performer Charles H. Brown. "The lyrics are almost identical to those in the handwritten manuscript."
The verse about the 'gallant Hood' is discussed, and it is noted that "soldier" was substituted for "darky."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lighter
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 03:32 PM

The _Handbook_ may be quite scrupulous most of the time, but experience suggests that when it comes to "folk lyrics," few nonspecialist sources cling to their historical scruples. "Beauregard" and "General (or 'Bobby'!)Lee" sure sound more "Civil War" than "dearest maid" and "Rosalie," don't they ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:39 PM

Entries in the "Texas Handbook" regarding the Yellow Rose verse about Hood, and the 1858 sheet music (at head of this thread). offer no problems- by making selective quotes I may have distorted their intent.

I am not satisfied, however, about 1., the date assigned to the MS copy (ca. 1836), or the interpretation of it, and 2., how did the text of this MS copy come to be issued as sheet music in 1858?
The entry speculatively credits the MS to a slave because of the mis-spellings, but many Whites, as well as free Blacks, were barely literate in mid-19th c. Anyone going through letters written by the common people of the time will find many mistakes.

What is the basis for the ca. 1836 date assigned to the MS? The entry is speculative. It seems equally likely (if not more so) that the penciller of the MS was making a personal note of the song, as he had heard someone sing it, and the MS thus would belong to the time it appeared in minstrel shows (ca. 1858).
"Allegedly delivered to one E. A. Jones-" when, by whom, and who was Jones?
What could be the path of the song from a poorly writted personal MS to minstrel sheet music some 20 years later? This is difficult to visualize.

That the song became popular during the Civil War is evident from use of the tune for other Civil War songs, as well as its citation in writings by Ridley (see Lighter, above) and others.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Acme
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 01:30 AM

The Handbook of Texas is quite a remarkable document, and the fact that it appears as it does online is a testament to how seriously Texans take their history.

I think you'll find that each author is listed in the item they wrote, and it might be possible to contact them. (I've met a few of them at conferences here--they do like to talk about history!) Why not try writing to the author of the pieces you have questions about? If you need me to help track them down, just PM the names and I'll ask around or look them up. I work for a fellow who has been involved with that group for about 25 years.

SRS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 12:55 PM

I agree that the "Handbook of Texas" is very useful; I consult it first where Texas history is involved. Would that every State had something similar online. I also agree with Lighter that a few items such as the one on "Yellow Rose..." veer toward romanticism.

The article on "Yellow Rose of Texas" was written by Juan Carlos Rodriguez. He cites Martha Anne Turner, "The Yellow Rose of Texas: Her Saga and Her Song," 1976, Shoal Creek.
His article is useful, but his second paragraph, about the alleged MS copy from 1836, although qualified, would lead many readers to ascribe more validity to the story than perhaps is justified.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Mr Happy
Date: 22 Jan 09 - 08:33 AM

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=EXyVENc05_c

Any words from this version?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Mr Happy
Date: 22 Jan 09 - 08:47 AM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Yellow_Rose_of_Texas


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Jan 09 - 02:11 PM

Nothing in wikipedia not covered in the early posts and "The Handbook of Texas."

The 'J. K.' cited as author in the Firth, Pond 1858 sheet music is Joseph Philip Knight according to pdmusic; Fuld in his book says 'J. K.' is unknown.

The song was published with other 1860s favorites (inc. Lorena and Juanita) in a sheet music folio called "The Southern Musical Boquet,"
186-, in Macon, GA, and on song sheets by De Marsan and Johnson (probably several others). See American Memory. The 1858 sheet music may be seen in the Levy Collection.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Jan 09 - 08:10 PM

I don't find any substantiation of Knight's supposed connection with the song. The credit at pdmusic includes a question mark, so *my* guess is that he's just *their* guess.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST,Nigel Gatherer
Date: 06 Jul 11 - 04:22 AM

I recently heard a version similar to Nigel Parsons' above:


There's a Yellow Rose in Texas
And a man from Laramie
They went to Davy Crockett's
To buy a cup of tea;
The tea was one and eightpence
And the biscuits one and three
There's a Yellow Rose in Texas
And a man from Laramie.

This was from Fife about sixty years ago, told to me by Margaret Gardiner, now resident in Edinburgh.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: banjoman
Date: 06 Jul 11 - 05:24 AM

Just spotted this thread and had a read of it. I first heard this song on a Gene Autry record a long time ago. I have since heard lots of versions and stories, most noted in this thread, but I am interested in the tune. I have been told that the most popular tune to which its sung is called "Little Log Cabin" but can't find anything to confirm or otherwise. Any ideas?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Lighter
Date: 06 Jul 11 - 09:02 AM

That's the first I've heard of it, and I've been reading about "The Yellow Rose of Texas" since the Centennial.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 06 Jul 11 - 05:44 PM

About 1955 my friend Robin, a little boy across the road, had a wind-up gramophone and only one record, which was The Yellow Rose of Texas. We played it over and over again, but it used to wind down to a deeper and deeper voice, slower and slower, until we wound it up again. I remember that song so well!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST,Jon Dudley
Date: 07 Jul 11 - 08:03 AM

Sadly our non-pc primary school version (circa 1957) had it thus -

The Yellow Rose of Texas and The Man from Laramie,
They caught poor old Sabrina and tied her to a tree,
They lifted up her jumper - and guess what they saw?
The biggest pair of mountains from here to Singapore.

Note: 'Sabrina' aka Norma Sykes, was a voluptuous British actress of the 50s and 60s.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 07 Jul 11 - 08:51 AM

My school had this version.

Oh the yellow rose of Texas,
The man from Laramie,
Invited Davy Crocket,
To have a cup of tea,
The tea was so delicious,
They had another cup,
And poor old Davy Crocket,
Was left the washing up.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 12:55 PM

That 'Man from Laramie/Davy Crockett/cup of tea' version was widespread ~~ lots of variants in several threads. The irrationality, as I have remarked elsewhere, is that a second cup of tea is generally poured into the same cup as the first, so the total amount of the washing-up would not increase ~~ the then about 8-yr-old nephew from whom I learnt it in about 1957 made that point himself.

But Keith's version above has an additional shock & frisson ~~ what kind of hospitality is it to invite someone to tea and then leave him with the washing-up. Fine hosts they were!

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST,Susie
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 05:55 PM

My old and dearly loved departed friend, Hamish Imlach, used to sing a version of this, beginning...

"Oh, the yellow dose that wrecks us
Is what she gave to me
I got the itch at half past nine,
the drip at half past three
I dipped my wick in turpentine
But still I couldn't pee
Oh! the yellow dose that wrecks us
Is what she gave to me".

I can hear that chuckle down the years...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Mark Ross
Date: 02 Aug 11 - 11:47 AM

When I was very young, my father was called to active duty (he was in the Medical Corps, Reserve) at Fort Sam Houston. He was gone for about 6 months, and every week or so, he would send us postcards , usually with pictures of The Alamo. I did some research on the story, and when he finally came home I asked him how if every one of the Texans fighting the Mexican Army were wiped out, how did we know the story about Travis drawing a line in the sand and calling for all those who would stay to save Texas crossed the line, including Bowie, who had to be carried over on a cot. My Dad told me that there was one man, a French trader by the name of George Rose, who respectfully declined the honor of dying for Texas and made his escape over the wall the night before the final battle. He went on to explain that this was the origin of the song THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS.


Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Sep 13 - 12:12 PM

The old minstrel song, "Belle Ob Tennisee," has some lines reminiscent of "Yellow Rose of Texas."

Posted in new thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Sep 13 - 07:02 PM

Earliest version found is in Christy's "Plantation Melodies #2." 1853.

Lyr. Add: YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS 1853

1
There's a yellow girl in Texas
That I'm going to see;
No other darkies know her,
No darkey, only me;
She cried so when I left her
That it like to broke my heart,
And if I only find her,
We never more will part.

Chorus-
She's the sweetest girl of colour
That this darkey ever knew;
Her eyes are bright as diamonds,
And sparkle like the dew.
You may talk about your Dearest Mae,
And sing of Rosa Lee,
But the yellow Rose of Texas
Beats the belles of Tennessee.

2
Where the Rio Grande is flowing.
And the starry skies are bright;
Oh, she walks along the river
In the quiet summer night;
And she thinks if I remember
When we parted long ago,
I promised to come back again,
And not to leave her so.

Chorus-

3
Oh, I'm going now to find her,
For my heart is full of woe,
And we'll sing the songs together
That we sang so long ago.
We'll play the banjo gaily,
And we'll sing our sorrows o'er.
And the yellow Rose of Texas
Shall be mine forever more.

Chorus-

"Dearest Mae" and "Rosa Lee" are both titles of two songs appearing in Christy's Minstrels songbooks.

From "The Handbook of Texas Online."
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/xey01


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 01:26 AM

"Darkie"; "Banjo on knee"; "Rio Grande flowing" ~~ very much minstrel-show types of locution; and it seems to have strong Emmett or Foster influence; very likely a reworking of the "Belle ob Tenisee" so usefully drawn attention to by Q: the dates fit, as that thread demonstrate. Anyone any idea of authorship?

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Mr Happy
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 03:49 AM

In 1853, would American vernacular have included terms such as 'person of colour' ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Greg F.
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 09:00 AM

CLICK HERE


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 09:31 AM

That certainly answers the question, Greg F. But I can't see why Mr Happy asked the question. What point were you making, Mr Happy?

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 10:21 AM

Greg & Mr Happy: but only in legal usage. It sounded odd and affected to me when I first began hearing it often around 1990.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 11:14 AM

It was just out of fashion for a while. I remember it being used in the 1930s for the Chinese café owner in town (the sole Chinese family in town). There were no Blacks.

According to the Oxford Dictionary, it was first used in the 18th C.

(One of the children sold me two white rats for a nickel when I was in the second grade. A bit later, I suckered and bought a cat from him. I think the cat was feral; it was very independent.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Greg F.
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 12:23 PM

It sounded odd and affected to me when I first began hearing it often around 1990.

Only because it hadn't been used much since the civil rights era of the 1960's.

It was in common use in the US for most of the 19th century & the first half of the 20th.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Greg F.
Date: 03 Sep 13 - 12:24 PM

Ooops. Day late & a dollar short.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Sep 13 - 11:21 PM

Google's Ngram Viewer is a wonderful tool for exploring the history of language.

person of color


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Yellow Rose of Texas
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Feb 14 - 01:32 AM

Hi,
sorry if this is too unrelated, but does anyone else think the Gene Autry version of this song sounds similar to the Vernon Dalhart recording of "The Sinking of the Titanic"?


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