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Lyr Req: Netherlands Leaguer? / Holland's Leaguer

Lurcio 14 Dec 02 - 06:26 PM
Crane Driver 15 Dec 02 - 12:23 PM
GUEST 15 Dec 02 - 03:45 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Jan 03 - 07:45 AM
Crane Driver 29 Jan 03 - 06:35 PM
Sorcha 29 Jan 03 - 09:23 PM
GUEST,Emily Stephenson 30 Oct 07 - 07:14 PM
Anglo 31 Oct 07 - 01:40 AM
Malcolm Douglas 31 Oct 07 - 03:11 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Jan 10 - 05:57 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leager ??
From: Lurcio
Date: 14 Dec 02 - 06:26 PM

About 30 years ago the Songwainers used to sing a song called Netherlands Leager - not sure about the spelling.
The tune is jammed in my head, but I can't remember the words, other than the first couple of lines which went:
All you the do seek ammuse, list to my story
Some it will cause to amuse, some to make sorry.

I seem to remember something about it being from an old broadsheet.

Can anyone help, it's driving me mad.

this is my fist ever post or reply, so sorry if my typing or technical input is wrong


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leager ??
From: Crane Driver
Date: 15 Dec 02 - 12:23 PM

"News from Holland's Leaguer" is the song - words adapted by the Songwainers from several broadsheets in the Pepys collection (c1632). Either a political song - "historical, on the Dutch Alliance", or else inspired by the closure and re-opening of a notorious brothel run by a Mrs Holland, in Southwark. I'm quoting from the Songwainers' LP notes - I'll try to get the words later, but I'm off to the club's Xmas party tonight, so it'll be later this week.

Cheers,

Andrew


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leager ??
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 02 - 03:45 PM

See ZN3117 in the broadside ballad index at www.erols.com/olsonw.
The ballad was written by Laurence Price, as noted in the index
and in the file on Price's ballads, and is about Elizabeth Holland's brothel.
    Bruce Olson's entry:
      You that desire newes/ ZN3117| Newes from Hollands Leager/ Tune: [When] Canons are roaring/ [by] L. P[rice]./ P1 98-9: I. W[right]. [Entd. May 24, 1632. ZB1925|.
      Holland's Leaguer was a brothel]
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leager ??
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 07:45 AM

From an article called Wrong Side of the River: London's disreputable South Bank in the sixteenth and seventeenth century, by Jessica A. Browner:
    In December and January of 1631-32 the most famous of London brothels, Holland's Leaguer, located in the old manor house of Paris Garden and run by "a woman of ill repute," Elizabeth Holland, successfully withstood what amounted to a state of siege by the forces of law and order -- a feat made possible, incidentally, by its fortified position, complete with moat, drawbridge, and portcullis. In the end, Bess Holland escaped the City authorities, in spite of two summons to the Court of High Commission, and re-established her business elsewhere.
Shakerley (or Shackerley) Marmion, a contemporary of Shakespeare, wrote a play called "Holland's Leaguer" in 1632.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leager ??
From: Crane Driver
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 06:35 PM

Sorry, but it's not as easy to transcribe the Songwainers as you might think - all those harmonies, plus a drum, plus what I assume are obsolete expressions which I can't even guess at. The first verse goes:

You who desire news, list to my story,
Some it will cause to muse, some will be sorry;
From every quarter have the gallants resorted,
To Holland's Leaguer, that fame hath reported.

(Chorus)
Yes it is certain, in truth it is spoken,
{Metalmans?} Leaguer just lately is broken.

Can't make any sense of the first word of line 2 in the chorus, but it's definitely not Holland, or Netherlands.

After that, you're on your own. Sorry.

Andrew


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leager ??
From: Sorcha
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 09:23 PM

If Guest referring us to errols.com has the lyrics, it can't be bothered to post them. Oh well.


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Subject: ADD: News from Holland's Leaguer
From: GUEST,Emily Stephenson
Date: 30 Oct 07 - 07:14 PM

I am guessing this is a long past question but in case anyone was still looking for lyrics these are the original ones from the broadsheet:

You that desire news, list' to my story;
Some it will cause to muse, some will be sorry;
From many quarters have gallants resorted,
Of Holland's Leager the fame heard reported.

Chorus: Yet it is certain, in truth it is spoken,
That Holland's Leager up lately is broken.

The flaunting Spaniard and boon Cavillera,
The bragging Dutchman, though't cost him a'dear-a;
Walloun and Switzer, both Jews, Turks and Neager,
Scots, Danes and French have been at Holland's Leager

Though many sought to invade the strong island,
And stratagems devised by sea and by land,
Bulwarks and batteries and other fences,
Daily maintained the island's expenses.

Blow for blow, shot for shot, still they returned;
But sliding cowards she ever disdained;
Those that gave onset, they put her so valiant,
She durst in battle join with any gallant.

But, since the Leager broke, there's a new order
For those that used to frequent-a this border;
That non shall thither some to work a violence,
Great and small, high and low, all must keep silence.

Yet youngsters, arm yourselves, here comes new anthem;
They have a refuge found that can defend them;
Drums, pikes and musketeers there doth attend you,
Fot for this company, gold and rich treasure.

So bravely march away gallants in clusters,
Arrive at Bewdley, where they keep their musters;
Though certain horses were left, be not daunted,
All for your pleausre's there, as Holland vaunted.

So, if my news in this song may content you,
Buy it and try it and never repent you;
For recreation, in love, I have penned it,
Trusting no creature I have here offended.

Phew!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leaguer ??
From: Anglo
Date: 31 Oct 07 - 01:40 AM

Oh well done Emily. I never understood what this song was about - and had forgotten it long sonce - now in the US - but born and raised 3 miles from Bewdley.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Netherlands Leaguer ??
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 31 Oct 07 - 03:11 AM

Images of the broadside itself, with full citation, can be seen at  The Pepys Collection::

Pepys 1.98-99: Newes from Hollands Leager:/ OR,/ Hollands Leager is lately up broken,/ This for a certaine is spoken.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NEWES FROM HOLLANDS LEAGER
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 05:57 PM

This setting is easier to read than the original broadside, but it keeps the original spelling, punctuation, and line breaks.

From A Pepysian Garland: Black-Letter Broadside Ballads of the Years 1595-1639 edited by Hyder E. Rollins (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1922), page 399:

Newes from Hollands Leager:
OR,
Hollands Leager is lately up broken,
This for a certain is spoken.

To the tune of, Canons are roaring.

[1] You that desire newes,
  list to my story;
Some it will make to muse,
  some will be sorry,
Some will reioyce thereat,
  others will wonder,
To see the barke and tree
  parted asunder.
This of a certaine
  for truth it is spoken,
That Hollands Leager,
  up lately is broken.

[2] Such Ensignes were displaid
  to amaze Holland,
The like hath seldome been,
  I thinke in no land.
From many parts there hath
  gallants resorted;
Because the fame thereof
  they heard reported:
Yet some their labour lost,
  for it is spoken,
That Hollands, &c.

[3] The flaunting Spaniard,
  and boone Cauillera,
The bragging Dutchman
  Though't cost him deare a:
Wallouns and Switzer,
  both Iewes, Turke and Neager,
Scots, Danes and French,
  haue been at Hollands Leager.
Yet all would not auaile,
  for it is spoken,
That Hollands, &c.

[4] Though many sought to
  inuade the strong Iland,
And stratagems deuised
  by sea and by land,
Rumors were spred abroad,
  fames Trumpet sounding,
Their Sconce so firmely stood,
  they fear'd no wounding:
But yet for all their pompe,
  thus it is spoken,
That Hollands, &c.

[5] The great god Iupiter
  did well affect her:
And Mars the god of warre,
  did so protect her,
His martiall discipline
  made her so valiant,
She durst in battell ioyne
  with any Gallant:
Yet though she valour had,
  thus it is spoken,
That Hollands, &c.

[6] Belloniaes blustring shot,
  they neuer feared,
But brauely face to face,
  the Champions dared:
She seldome tooke the foyle
  by friend or stranger,
Unlesse a backe recoyle
  put her in danger,
But yet for all their pomp,
  thus it is spoken,
That Hollands, &c.

[7] Blow for blow, shot for shot
  still they returned,
But sliding Cowards
  she euer disdained:
If any younker
  the Island doe venter,
Without admittance
  no partie could enter.
But tho they were so stout
  thus it is spoken,
That Hollands Leager
  is lately up broken.

[8] The draw-bridge being
  up taken they durst to,
Stand to push of pike
  and giue a thrust too:
Those that gaue onset
  sometimes got th' worst ont,
And at their parting
  most dearly haue curst ont.
But howeuer it is spoken
  that Hollands Leager
Vp lately is broken.

The second part. To the same Tune.

[9] Bulworkes and batteries
  and other fences
Daily manteined
  the Iland expences:
Store of musition,
  and all things at pleasure,
Fit for this company
  gold and rich treasure
They had at her command
  yet it is, &c.

[10] Now since the Leager broke
  and they are excluded
The chiefe Commander
  by fate is subdued,
Those that did them assault
  thought it small purchase,
The Lion scornes to prey
  on a dead carkas.
This we heare certainly
  by many spoken,
That Hollands, &c.

[11] All those that vsed to
  frequent this border
Are backe retired for
  there's a new order:
That none shall thither come
  to worke a violence,
Great and small, high and low,
  all must keepe silence,
For it is by many spoken,
  that Hollands, &c.

[12] Yet youngsters arme your selues,
  here comes new tidings
Allthough the Campe be broke,
  for their abidings,
They haue a refuge found,
  that can defend them,
Drummes, pikes and musketers
  doth there attend them
Then brauely march along,
  gallants in clusters,
Arrive at Bewdly,
  where they keep their musters.

[13] There front garded is
  with such strong forces
Only they left behind
  some certaine Horses,
Yet for a trifle
  they will not be daunted,
When once their Colors
  o'th' wall is aduanced.
Feare to march away,
  gallants in clusters,
To Bewdly heigh, where
  they keep their musters.

[14] Now if my newes in
  this song may content you,
Buy it and try it
  and neuer repent you,
For your recreation
  in loue I haue pend it:
Trusting no creature I
  haue here offended,
With telling of the newes
  which I heard spoken,
That Hollands Leager
  is lately up broken.

London, printed for I.W. FINIS. L.P.


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