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Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman

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In Mudcat MIDIs:
The Alabama
The Anchor's A-Weigh (doerflinger)
Beware of Larry Gorman
The Boys of the Island
Burns's Log Camp
Byrontown
Call John the Boatman
Charles Gustavus Anderson
Come Down You Bunch of Roses
Corbitt's Barkentine
The Dark Eyed Sailor
The Donzella and the Ceylon
Duffy's Hotel
The Famous Light Brigade
The Female Warrior
The Flat River Girl
The Gale of August,'27
Gimme de Banjo
The Gull Decoy
Hanging Johnny
Harry Dunne
Hello, Somebody
I'm a Decent Boy from Ireland
Jack Haggerty
Jack Tar
The Jealous Lover
John Dameray
Let Go the Reef Tackle
A Long Time Ago (4)
A Long Time Ago (6)
The Maids of Simcoe
McCollam Camp
McKinley Brook
The Millman Song
Paddy, Get Back
The Red Light Saloon
Reuben Ranzo (1)
Reuben Ranzo (2)
Roll the Cotton Down (1)
Roll the Cotton Down (2)
Rufus' Mare
The Schooner Blizzard
The Schooner Kandahar
The Scow on Cowden Shore (version one and two use the same tune.)
The Scow on Cowden Shore (3)
Shallo Brown
The Silk Merchant's Daughter
So Handy
The Spring trip of the Schooner Ambition
Susiana
Tomah Stream
A Trip to the Grand Banks
Were you ever in Dumbarton
The Wife of Kelso
The Wily auld Carle
The Winter of '73
Young Forbest


Joe Offer 13 May 11 - 04:39 PM
shipcmo 07 Mar 11 - 07:11 AM
Charley Noble 31 Dec 06 - 11:47 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Dec 06 - 05:50 PM
EBarnacle1 16 Oct 03 - 04:30 PM
MMario 16 Oct 03 - 01:24 PM
MMario 07 Feb 03 - 09:17 AM
MMario 21 Jan 03 - 04:31 PM
MMario 21 Jan 03 - 11:09 AM
MMario 21 Jan 03 - 10:53 AM
MMario 21 Jan 03 - 10:43 AM
MMario 17 Jan 03 - 02:42 PM
MMario 17 Jan 03 - 01:12 PM
MMario 16 Jan 03 - 02:41 PM
MMario 16 Jan 03 - 01:18 PM
MMario 16 Jan 03 - 01:12 PM
MMario 16 Jan 03 - 12:20 PM
MMario 16 Jan 03 - 10:54 AM
MMario 15 Jan 03 - 04:02 PM
MMario 15 Jan 03 - 02:57 PM
MMario 15 Jan 03 - 02:15 PM
MMario 15 Jan 03 - 01:46 PM
MMario 15 Jan 03 - 12:49 PM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 02:10 PM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 01:38 PM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 01:30 PM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 11:34 AM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 11:08 AM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 10:49 AM
MMario 14 Jan 03 - 10:13 AM
MMario 13 Jan 03 - 04:34 PM
MMario 13 Jan 03 - 04:11 PM
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Susanne (skw) 11 Jan 03 - 05:27 PM
GUEST 11 Jan 03 - 04:27 PM
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MMario 10 Jan 03 - 11:54 AM
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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 May 11 - 04:39 PM

shipcmo sent me a pack of MIDI files, converted from the SongWright files MMario posted above. You'll note that MMario has posted links to a number of MIDI files above, so some of these may be duplicates of tunes MMario has already posted. Most seem to be at least somewhat different from the MMario MMidis. Here they are, all together.
Thanks, shipcmo.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: shipcmo
Date: 07 Mar 11 - 07:11 AM

It appears that the program "MusicEase" will accomodate MMario's "Songwriter" notation.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LUMBER (Cicely Fox Smith)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 11:47 AM

It's curious that no work songs have been collected related to loading or unloading lumber aboard the ships. This was very hard work, calling for a team effort, threading the larger beams through the bow or stern ports.

The only thing I've turned up is a poem by C. Fox Smith, appropriately titled "Lumber", which commemorates the experience as she observed it many times in Victoria, British Columbia, in the early 1900s. Here's her poem:

Words by Cicely Fox Smith ©
In ROVINGS, Elkin Mathews, London, UK, © 1921, pp. 33-34.

LUMBER

If I'd got to choose alone
One of all the freights I've known –
All my cargoes live and dead,
Bacon pigs and pigs of lead,
Cattle, copra, rice and rails,
Pilgrims, coolies, nitrates, nails,
Lima beans and China teas –
What do you think my pick would be?

If I'd got to name the best –
Take just one and leave the rest
Out of all the ports I've known –
Coral beaches white as bone,
All the hot lands and the cold,
Nights of stars and moons like gold,
Tropic smells and Spanish wine,
Whispering palm and singing pine,
All the isles of all the sea –
Where do you think I'd want to be?

Loading lumber long ago
In a ship I used to know,
With the bow-ports open wide
In her stained and rusted side,
And the saws a-screaming shrill
At the Steveston lumber-mill;
Where the Fraser floods and flows
Green and cold with melting snows,
And the tow-boats' wailing din,
As the booms come crawling in,
Fills the echoing creeks with sound,
And there's sawdust all around,
Deep and soft like drifted snow;
Nowhere much a man can go,
Nothing much to see or do,
Mouldiest burg you ever knew…

But I'd give the years between –
All I've done and all I've seen,
All the fooling and the fun,
All the chances lost and won,
All the good times and the bad,
All the memories sweet and sad,
Far and near, by shore and sea,
I would give them all to be
Loading lumber years ago
With the lads I used to know –

Loading lumber all day long
Stacks of scented deals among –
Loading lumber at the mill
Till the screaming saws were still,
And the rose-red sunset died
From the mountains and the tide,
And the night brought out its stars,
And the wind's song in the spars
Of that ship I used to know –
Loading lumber, long ago.

Notes: Cicely Fox Smith was based in Victoria, British Columbia, for much of the time that she was on the West Coast of Canada, roughly 1904 to 1913. She describes in vivid detail her experience there walking the docks, watching the sunsets, admiring the ships, listening to the yarns of ship-keepers and other sailors, and nosing around the waterfront. The Village of Steveston is located in Richmond, BC, adjacent to Vancouver where she likely visited. Curiously, there is no record of a "Steveston Mill" in Steveston Village. There were an abundance of Salmon canneries but apparently no lumber mill. However, there was a major railhead for shipping out lumber, and maybe that was the source of the poet's apparent confusion.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Dec 06 - 05:50 PM

A version of "Poor Old Man," collected by P. A. Hutchison in the late 1800's has been posted in 97546: Old Hoss
It is not combined with the 'floated in' "round Cape Horn" verses.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: EBarnacle1
Date: 16 Oct 03 - 04:30 PM

re: Anything attributed to Larry Gorman can be expanded upon by contacting Sandy Ives (died 2009) at the University of Maine, Orono. He established the department of folklore and department survives.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 16 Oct 03 - 01:24 PM

tune posted for "We'll have another drink before the boat shoves off" in another thread - see link above.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 07 Feb 03 - 09:17 AM

I've started putting the midi's up on the Mudcat Midi page


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 04:31 PM

That's most of it - I've shipped a "new" index off to Joe - that has links for most of the songs - either here in this thread or the DT - a few in the forum.

There are a VERY few with no link - I should be able to get to them sooner or later; but I am *way* behind on stuff I've promised Philippa, and Bronson, and...


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Subject: Tune Add: CALL JOHN THE BOATMAN
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 11:09 AM

N-Call John The Boatman
C-
A-
T-
S-138
K-D
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5G-5 G-4 G-8 b-5 G-5 G-5 F-4 E-8 F-5 R-4 F-8 G-5 b-4 b-8
L-Call John the boat-man, call, call a-gain, For loud roars the
H-
M-5b-5 E-4 F-8 G-5 F-4 F-8 E-5 R-5 E-4 E-8 E-4 E-8 E-5 E-4 E-8
L-tem-pest and fast falls the rain. John-ny is a good man, he
H-
M-5E-4 E-8 D-4 C-8 B-5 R-4 B-8 E-5 E-4 E-8 E-5 E-4 E-8 E-5 D-4 C-8
L-sleeps so ve-ry sound, His oars are at rest and his boat is a-
H-
M-5B-5 R-5 b-5 b-4 a-8 G-5 E-4 E-8 b-4 b-8 b-4 c-8 d-3
L-ground. Red rolls the riv-er, so rap-id and so deep
H-
M-5R-5 d-4 d-8 e-5 G-4 a-8 G-5 b-4 b-8 b-5 a-4 a-8 G-5 R-5
L-Well the loud-er you call him, the fast-er he'll sleep!


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Subject: Lyr Add: CALL JOHN THE BOATMAN
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 10:53 AM

CALL JOHN THE BOATMAN
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p 173)

Call John the boat-man, call, call a-gain.
For loud roars the remp-est and fast falls the rain.
John-ny is a good man, he sleeps so ver-y sound,
His oars are at rest and his boat is a-ground
Red rolls the riv-er, so ra-pid and so deep;
Well the loud-er you call him, the fast-er he'll sleep!


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Subject: Tune Add: BYRONTOWN
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jan 03 - 10:43 AM

N-Byrontown
C-
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-4/4
F-
H-
M-4R-3 F-9 G-0 a-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-4 G-4 c-8_G-8 G-8 R-8 C-4 F-4 G-8_F-8 D-5 D-8
L-Oh, in By-ron-town of high re-known, That's where I do be-
H-
M-4D-2 R-4 D-9 E-0 F-4 F-4 F-8 R-8 a-0_c-9 c-0 c-5_c-0 a-8 R-8 c-4 d-4 c-8_a-8 F-4 G-4
L-long. And to speak my mind on wom-en-kind, Now, I've com-posed a
H-
M-4a-2 R-4 D-9 E-0 F-4 F-4 F-4 a-0_c-9 c-4 c-8_a-8 a-8 R-8 c-4 d-4 c-0_a-9 F-4 G-4
L-song. And I hope with me you'll all a-gree, Mind, what I say is
H-
M-4a-4 R-4 R-4 F-9 G-0 a-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-4 a-8 R-8 C-4 F-4 G-0_F-8 R-0 D-5 D-8
L-true. And young la-dies gay I will be-tray, and give them all their
H-
M-1D-4 R-3
L-due.


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Subject: Tune Add: THE ANCHOR'S AWEIGH
From: MMario
Date: 17 Jan 03 - 02:42 PM

N-The Anchor's Aweigh
C-
A-
T-
S-72
K-F
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-5 C-4 C-8 F-5 F-4 F-8 F-5 R-4 F-0_a-0 c-5 c-4 c-8 a-5 R-8 a-8_c-8
L-Oh, the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh, Fare-
H-
M-4d-5 d-8_b-8 G-8 F-8_D-4_C-4 D-8 a-5 G-4_F-8 F-5 R-4 C-8
L-well, fare you well, my own true love. At
B-4/4
H-
M-1B-5 F-8 a-0_G-0 F-8 D-8 F-8
L-last we part-ed on the
B-3/4
H-
M-4C-4 R-8 C-0 C-0 F-8 a-8 c-5 c-8 d-0_b-0 G-8 E-2 R-8 C-8 F-5 F-8 d-8 c-8
L-shore, As the tears rolled gent-ly from her eyes. Must you go leave me
H-
M-2c-8 b%0 b%0 b&5 G-0 G-0 T34aa-8_d-8 c-8_c-4 T34ab%8_a-8 b-8
L-now, she did say, That I x face this x all a-
B-6/8
H-
M-5c-5 R-8 C-8 C-8 F-5 F-4 F-8 F-5 R-4 F-0_a-0 c-5 c-8_a-8 a-8 a-5 R-8 a-8_c-8
L-lone? Oh, the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh, Fare-
H-
M-4d-5 d-8_b-8 G-8 F-8_D-4_C-4 D-8 a-5 G-4_F-8 F-5 R-5
L-well, fare you well, my own true love.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ANCHOR'S AWEIGH
From: MMario
Date: 17 Jan 03 - 01:12 PM

THE ANCHOR'S AWEIGH
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflilnger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p167)

Oh the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh,
Fare-well, fare you well, my own true love


At last we part-ed on the shore,
as the tears rolled gent-ly from her eyes.
Must you leave me now, she did say,
That I face this all a-lone?

Oh the anch-or's a-weigh, the anch-or's a-weigh,
Fare-well, fare you well, my own true love


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Subject: Lyr Add: BYRONTOWN
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 02:41 PM

BYRONTOWN
(from the singing of Jerry Hanley via the singing of Jared MacLean)
(collected by Louise Manny)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp260-262)

Oh, in By-ron-town of high re-nown,
That's where I do be-long,
And to speak my mind on wo-men-kind,
Now, I've com-posed a song.
And I hope with me you'll all a-gree,
Mind, what I say is true,
And young la-dies gay I will be-tray,
And give them all their due.

Now the first of all, there's big and small,
As you may understand;
The tall and slim, the thick and thin,
All in our glorious land.
The black and white, they lace up tieght
Our young men to beguile.
There's the young and ould, the hot and cold,
There's every shade and style.

Now, these girls you'll meet upon the street,
the seem so blithe and gay,
With a form and face that would disgrace
The blooming flowers in May.
And a ruby lip some nice young slip
They seem so gay and shy;
And they'll kindly speak and look so meek
Saying; I'm Mother's pride and joy.

Now, such thoughts as these, they do me please,
And set my heart on fire.
To be some man's wife, yes, all through life,
It is their whole desire.
But love has blinded all mankind,
From the days of Adam down,
so that's the way in the State of Maine,
Likewise in Byrontown.

Oh, it's now you know, to a dance they'll go,
Next day they can scarcely crawl,
And if our young men could see them then,
In love they'd never fall.
Like a lousy pup, they're all used up,
Their sex they do degrade;
They should lead their life as no man's wife,
But die a poor old maid.

They rise at nine, or dinner time
To get their morning meal.
Oh, Mother dear, I feel so queer.
You don't know how I feel!
My head does ache, it will surelye break;
My back it pains again.
I wished last night I was in my grave,
And the grass growing over me green!

But they'll marry a man, that's if they can,
And to keeping house they'll go.
They'll pile on style, yes, all the while,
Let the wages be high or low.
A loaf or cake they cannot bake;
You would laugh to see their pies,
They'd declare the flour was old and sour,
And the dough it would not rise.

It's an organ grand you must pursue,
All for your lady bright,
And a sewing machine to hem and seam
To keep her hands so white.
And a great big hat, sure she'll sport that,
No matter what you say,
And a brand new shawl she'll have next fall,
When you your debts can't pay.


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Subject: CORRECTION - the Dying Ranger
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 01:18 PM

DT songfile dyrangr
known in the south as Dying Ranger in Doerflinger as The Dying Soldier

DT file missing the first verse:

The sun was sinking in the west and fell in ling'ring rays
Through the branches of a forest wher a wounded soldier lay.
On the banks of the Potomac /neath the southron sultry sky,
Far from his loved New England home, they've laid him down to die.

tune in DT


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Subject: Tune Add: THE FAMOUS LIGHT BRIGADE
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 01:12 PM

N-The Famous Light Brigade
C-from the singing of Patrick Tayluer
A-
T-
S-69
K-C
B-2/4
F-
H-
M-8R-5 G-8 G-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 D-0 C-9 R-8 G-8 c-0 c-9 b-9 a-0 C-4 R-8 G-8 a-8 b-8 c-8 b-8 a-0 G-9 R-8 E-8 E-0 G-9 F-8 E-8
L-It was a fa-mous sto-ry, pro-claim it far and wide, And let you child-ren's child-ren re-ech-o it with
H-
M-4D-4 R-0 E-0 E-8 E-8 G-0 G-0_G-8 E-8 D-8 C-8 R-8 E-8 E-8 G-8 G-8 a-8
L-pride; When old Car-di-gan, the fear-less, his nam im-mor-tal
B-3/4
H-
M-1G-4_G-8 G-0 G-0 G-4
L-made, when he charged
B-2/4
H-
M-4c-8 c-8 b-8 a-8 G-0 E-9_E-8 D-0 C-0 E-0 D-9 C-8 B-8 C-2
L-through that Roosh-ian val-ley, with his fam-ous Light Brig-ade.


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Subject: Tune Add: I'M A DECENT BOY FROM IRELAND
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 12:20 PM

N-I'm a Decent Boy from Ireland
C-from singing of Charlie Chamberlin
A-
T-
S-92
K-C
B-3/4
F-Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
H-
M-5R-2 E-8 F-8 G-2 G-4 F-2 E-4 D-4 C-2_C-2 C-8_D-8
L-I'm a de-cent boy from Ire-land, I've
H-
M-5E-2 C-4 A-2 C-4 @-3_@-2 C-4 C-2 D-4
L-claimed it as my home Quite sor-ry
H-
M-5C-2 A-4 @-4 C-2 C-2 E-8 F-8 G-2 G-4 G-8_F-5 E-4
L-for to tell you, boys, I was forced from it to
H-
M-5D-3_D-2 E-8_F-8 G-2 G-4 F-2 E-4 D-4 C-2_
L-roam. Brought up by hon-est par-ents
H-
M-5C-2 D-4 E-8_E-5 C-4 A-4_C-4 C-4 @-3_@-2 C-4
L-_ who loved their Pad-dy dear, And
H-
M-5C-2 D-4 C-2 A-4 @-4_C-2 C-2 E-8 F-8 G-2 F-4
L-of-ten by the fire-side they would whis-per
H-
M-3A-2 B-4 C-3_C-2 R-4
L-"in my ear:


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Subject: Tune Add: RUFUS'S MARE
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 10:54 AM

N-Rufus's Mare
C-George Calhoun
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 F-8 G-8 a-8 c-8 a-4 G-8_F-8 D-8 D-8 D-4 F-8_D-8 C-8 C-8 c-4 b%8_G-8 a-8 c-8 d-8 R-4 a-8_d-8
L- Now, poor Ru-fus he has come to town. No won-der that he is cast down. It's
H-
M-1d-8 e-8 d-4 d-4
L-"the first time in
B-5/8
H-
M-3d-0 c-0 a-8 F-4 G-8 a-8 c-8 a-8 G-8_F-8 D-8 D-8 D-5
L-man-y's the day that he has walked here all the way.


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Subject: Lyr Add: RUFUS'S MARE
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 04:02 PM

RUFUS'S MARE
(George Calhoun)
(from the singing of David Alexander Smith)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp264-265)

Now, poor Ru-fus he has come to town.
No won-der that he is cast down.
It's the first time in man-y's the day
that he has walked here all the way.

Come listen to his tale of woe
And then the truth you soon shall know.
The reason why he walks today
Old Tozer stole his mare away.

When Tozer gave that mare to me
A useless brute she seemed to be
Upon three legs she had to go
The fourth one dangling to and fro.

Her hoofs then I did oil and pare.
I tended her with watchful care.
Before the year was at an end,
My little mare begin to men.

When she was well and free from pain
And fit to take the road again.
I lent her to that damned old clown
To go as far as Frederictown.

He drove to Estey's that same day
And there he traded my mare away.
A Central note that would not pass
He gave to bind the bargain fast.

It's when I heard what he had done,
I soon resolved to stop his fun.
I quickly followed on his track;
My little mare I soon brought back.

As I was in my field at work
It's there I saw this useless Turk
coming toward me through the field
His son-in-law was at his heels.

They never stopped to shake my hand;
My little mare they did demand.
Being two to one, I was forced to yield
And so they led her from the field.

Now I am cast down and sore oppressed
For the want of her I cannot rest.
I have no team to go to mill
Or haul my wood from off the hill.

Her empty stall, I view it now;
She used to stand besdie the cow.
No stall between them did divide;
To kick the cow she never tried.

Her harness hangs up by the wall.
I have no use for it at all.
The pung in which I took delight
It now seems hateful to my sight.

At length I heard this villian preach,
His words my heart could never reach.
Of going to Heaven I've heard him boast,
But down in Hell he'll surely roast!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE FAMOUS LIGHT BRIGADE
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 02:57 PM

THE FAMOUS LIGHT BRIGADE
(from the singing of Patrick Tayluer)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp276-277)

It was a fa-mous sto-ry, pro-claim it far and wide,
And let your child-ren's chidl-ren re-ech-o it with pride;
When old Car-di-gan, the fear-less, his name im-mor-tal made,
When he charged through the Rooosh-ian val-ley,
with his fa-mous Light Brig-ade.

Brave Nolan brought the order, Good God, can it be true?
For me to charge those massive gunds with this brigade so few!
It is the order given, sir, and you must obey.
So take my tip and ride away, and go to hell with them all.

Then is was a famous story, proclaim it far and wide
And let your children's children re-echo it with pride;
When old Cardigan, the fearless, his name immortal made,
When he charged through the Rooosh-ian valley,
with his famous Light Brigade.


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Subject: Lyr Add: I'M A DECENT BOY FROM IRELAND
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 02:15 PM

I'M A DECENT BOY FROM IRELAND
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp278-279)

I'm a de-cent boy from Ire-land, I've claimed it as my home.
Quite sor-ry for to tell you, boys, I was forced fro it to roam.
Brought up by hon-est par-ents, who loved their Pad-dy dear,
And of-ten by the fire-side they would whis-per in my ear:

Be kind to your old par-ents when their locks are turn-ing gray.
Re-mem-ber boys, in child-hood they have nursed you man-y's the day.
they have treat-ed you with kind-ness, with man-y* and man-y's* the smile.
You'll nev-er know their val-ue till they lay be-neath the soil.

At first I did not notice that I had led a desperate life,
And a couple of years after, I got myself a wife.
But Fortune proved unknow-m; Death came to my cabin door
And stole away my bonny bride I was forced to roam once more.

Kind friends, don't be offended; I would like to please you all.
If ever I pass this dear old town I will make another call.
We will sing the same songs over as we did in days of yore.
Be kind to your old parents, although they're old and poor


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Subject: Tune Add: THE MILLMAN SONG
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 01:46 PM

N-The Millman Song
C-from the singing of Herbert Hinchey
A-John Calhoun?
T-
S-180
K-Eb
B-6/4
F-
H-
M-2R-1 R-4 @-4 C-4 R-4 C-4 D-4_E-4 F-4
L-You ten-der heart-ed
H-
M-2G-2_F-4 E-8_C-4 R-8 D-4 C-8_@-5 B-4 C-2 B%4
L-Chris-tians, I pray you lend an
H-
M-2C-2 R-2 F-4 F-4 G-2 a%8_b%8 c-2 c-4
L-ear To a sad and mourn-ful
H-
M-2c-2_b%4 G-2 G-4 E-8_C-5 D-4 C-2 C-4
L-sto-ry you air a-bout to
H-
M-2C-2 R-2 R-4 F-4 G-2 G-4 c-2 d-4
L-hear. 'Twas of a love-lye
H-
M-2e-2 e-4 d-5 R-8 d-4 c-2 C-4 E-2 F-4
L-coun-try girl, young, in-no-cent and
H-
M-2F-3 R-2 G-8_a%8 b-4 b-2 F-4 R-4 G-4
L-fair. Con-tent and free she
H-
M-3F-4_C-4 D-4 B-2 D-4 F-2 E-4 C-2 C-4 C-4 R-2 R-2 R3
L-seemed to be, with-out one thought or care.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MILLMAN SONG (John Calhoun?)
From: MMario
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 12:49 PM

THE MILLMAN SONG
(John Calhoun?)
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - -pp285-286)

You tender hearted Christians, I pray you lend an ear
To a sad and mournful story you air about to hear.
'Twas of a love-lye country girl, young, innocent and fair
Content and free she seemed to be, without one thought or care.

Just blooming into womanhood, that pure and holy state,
And God ordained should be sustained in purity complete;
But alas, how often do we find, as down life's streams we glide,
Some gentle maid that's been betrayed away from virtue's side.

This was the sin that turned the tide of Mary Cuplon's life,
And truthfully she was to be a mother, not a wife.
And him that she has trusted to protect her through the strife,
To hide his shame and save his name took this poor creature's life.

As evening shadows gently fell o'er streamlets and o'er hill,
Young Mary went with purpose bent a meeting to fulfill.
Young Millman on that evening was waiting for her near,
With a murderous heart to do his part and end this girl's career.

They talked a while on matters; 'twas formless to their view,
This trusting maid seemed not afraid to walk some distance, too,
Until they came to a lonely spot well suited to the deed.
His murderous heart then did act its part; his victim there did bleed.

He clasped her then within his arms and hast unto the shore,
And soon afloat within a boat prepared by him before,
A rope he tied around her waist, and after tied a stone,
One gentle splash, and like a flash the murderer was alone.

Alone? Oh, no. All-seeing eyes was watching from on high
And God is just; the murderer must from His great vengeance fly.
The brand of Cain upon his brow, no rest again he'll find
Until upon the gallows high he'll expiate his crime.

Now, the river's searched, the body found; Now, Millman, hold your own,
For the best-laid plans of mice and men are oft-times overthrown.
The very means that you've employed to ward suspicion off,
And her sad end will surely tend to cut your young life short.

The rope, the rock, the pistol shot, the meeting at the gate,
Will help to hang the guilty man and end this sad estate,
Now. an inquest and a verdict next in quick succession came,
And to this awful tragedy they coupled Millman's name.

Now when the judge he read the sentence, a tear bedimmed his eye.
On the twenty-second day of June, Young Millman you must die.
...
...

Now, parents, here a warning take: no matter what in rue
You know you must discard the trust that God hath given you,
Until upon that rising day you're called before the throne
To answer for your children's sins as well as for your own.


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Subject: Tune Add: THE JEALOUS LOVER
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 02:10 PM

N-The Jealous Lover
C-from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin
A-
T-
S-88
K-G
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 F-9 F-0 G-2 F-9 a-0 b-2 D-4 F-4 E-2_E-5 R-8 E-9 E-0
L-It was down in a lone green val-ley Where the
H-
M-5D-2 D-4 F-4_E-4 F-4 G-3_G-4 R-5 G-8 G-2_G-9 a-0
L-ro-ses bloom and fade, There lies a
H-
M-5b-2 D#4 F-4 E-2_E-4 R-4 E-4 D-2 D-9 E-0 F-4 E-4 F-4
L-jeal-ous lov-er In love with a beau-ti-ful
H-
M-5G-3_G-4 R-5 G-8 a-2 R-8 a#8 d-2 c-4 b-4 G-2_
L-maid. One night the moon shone bright-ly
H-
M-5G-4 R-5 b-8 c-2 E-4 G-2 E-4 D-3_D-4 R-4 G-4
L-The stars were shin-ing too, and
H-
M-5G-2 a-4 b-2 D#4 F-4 E-2_E-4 R-4 E-4 D-2 D-4
L-to the maid-en's cot-tage This jeal-ous
H-
M-2F-8_E-5 F-4 G-3
L-lov-er drew.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE JEALOUS LOVER
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 01:38 PM

oops!

see DT for additional versions:

THE JEALOUS LOVER
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp287-288)

It was down in a lone green val-ley
Where the ro-ses bloom and fade,
there lies a jeal-ous lov-er
In love with a bea-ti-ful maid.
One night the moon shoe bright-ly
The stars were shin-ing too,
And to the maid-en's cot-tage
This jeal-ous lov-er drew.

Come love and we will wander
Down where those woods are gay.
While wandering we will ponder
And plan our wedding day.
So arm in arm they wandered,
The night birds sang above.
This jealous lover grew angry
With the beautiful girl he loved.

The night was dark and dreary.
She said I'm afraid to stay.
I've grown so tired and weary,
I must retrace my way.
Retrace your steps? No, never,
For you have met your doom!
So bid farewell forever
To Parents, friends and home.

Down on her knees before him
She pleaded for her life,
But deep within her bosom
He plunged a dreadful knife.
Oh Willie, my poor Willie,
Why have you taken my life?
You know I've always loved you
And wanted to be your wife.

I have never deceived you*
Was her last and dying cry.
I will forgive you Willie
then she closed her eyes and died.


* use second half of melody for last verse.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE JEALOUS LOVER
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 01:30 PM

see DT for additional versions:

THE JEALOUS LOVER
(from the singing of Charlie Chamberlin)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp287-288)

It was down in a lone green val-ley
Where the ro-ses bloom and fade,
there lies a jeal-ous lov-er
In love with a bea-ti-ful maid.
One night the moon shoe bright-ly
The stars were shin-ing too,
And to the maid-en's cot-tage
This jeal-ous lov-er drew.


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Subject: Tune Add: CHARLES GUSTAVUS ANDERSON
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 11:34 AM

N-Charles Gustavus Anderson
C-from the singing of Herbert Hinchey
A-
T-
S-198
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 C-4 E-2 F-4 G-2 a#4 b-2 a#4 G-4 E-4 F-4
L-Now, Charles Gus-ta-vus An-der-son is my
H-
M-5E-8_C-5 D-4 E-2 D-4 E-5 R-5 R-2 G-4 b-2 b-4
L-right and prop-er name. Al-though I
H-
M-5c-4_d-4 e-4 e-2 d-4 e-4 R-4 d-4 c-2 F-4 F-4_G-4 a-4
L-lie in cus-to-dy, I'll ne'er de-ny the
H-
M-5b-5 R-5 R-2 G-8 G-8 b-2 G-4 b-2 c-8_d-8 e-3
L-same. I was raised by hadn-est par-
H-
M-5d-2 e-4 e-2 e-4 G-2 b-4 c-5 R-5 e-2 d-4
L-ents, al-though I die in scorn. Oh, bud-
H-
M-5b-2 b-4 G-8_F-8 R-4 G-4 E-8_D-5 E-4 F-2 G-4 G-8_E-5 F-4
L-lieve me, now I much la-ment the hour that
H-
M-2E-2 E-4 E-4 R-2
L-I was born!


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Subject: Lyr Add: CHARLES GUSTAVUS ANDERSON
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 11:08 AM

see DT - Saladin Mutiny; The Saladin Mutiny (sldnmtny & sldnmty2)

CHARLES GUSTAVUS ANDERSON
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp291-292)

Now, Charles Gus-ta-vus An-der-son is my right and proper name.
Although I lie in cus-to-dy, I'll ne'er deny the same.
I was raised by hodn-est par-ents, although I die in scorn.
Oh, Bud-lieve me, now I much lament the hour that I was born!

Now my father was a shipwright; I might have been the same.
He taught me good examples, on him I lay no blame.
And for my poor old mother, for me she has wept sore.
Whedn she hears of my misfortune she cadn but grieve the more.

Note: per Doerflinger the added consonants in words were typical of many older singers.


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Subject: Tune Add: THE SILK MERCHANTS DAUGHTER
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 10:49 AM

N-The Silk Merchant's Daughter
C-from the singing of Archie Lant
A-
T-
S-120
K-G
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 D-9_G-0 G-4 G-4 a-8_G-8 F%4 F-4 G-8_a-8 c-4 c-4 d-8_c-8 a-5 R-8 c-4
L-They lots were got read-y and in a bag put, And
H-
M-5b-4_a-4 G-4 F-4 D-4 F-4 G-4 E-4 C-4 D-5 R-8 D-8_c-8 c-4 c-4 c-0_e-9
L-Each one of us our own lot we drew; This in-no-cent
H-
M-5d-0_b-9 b-2 a-8_G-8 G-4 G-4 a-0_b-9 D-5 R-8 D-9_G-0 G-2 F%9 G-0 a-4 d-4
L-fair one, the short lot she drew; She was to be killed for
H-
M-5b-4 c-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-5 R-8 a-8_b-8 c-4 c-4 c-0_e-9 d-8_b-8 b-4_b-4 a-8_G-8 G-4
L-to feed the whole crew. This in-no-cent fair one, the short
H-
M-5G-4 a-0_b-9 D-4_D-8 R-8 D-9_G-0 G-4_G-4 F%9 G-0 a-4 d-4 b-4 c-4 a-0_G-9 F-4 G-4_
L-lot she drew, She was to be killed for to feed the whole
H-
M-1G-4 R-2
L-crew


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SILK MERCHANTS DAUGHTER
From: MMario
Date: 14 Jan 03 - 10:13 AM

See also - slkmrcht - DT The Silk Merchant's Daughter

THE SILK MERCHANTS DAUGHTER
(from the singing of Archie Lant)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' -pp296-297)

Oh hold your hand, butcher! the fair one she cried.
Indeed and I'm only an innocent main.
I'm a rich merchant's daughter, from London I be,
And you see what I've come to by the loving of thee.**

Oh, it's then the hot blood to his head it did pour,
Saying Since you are the loved on that I do adore,
Since you are the loved one that I do love best,
With my sweet, happy life, love, it's I wid I die first.

They lots were got ready and in a bog put,
and each one of us our own lot we drew,
The innocent fair one, the short lot she drew;
She was to be killed for to feed the whole crew.

They lots were got ready and in a bag put,
And each one of us our own lot we drew,
Be quick in lyou motion; let the bus'ness be done.
But before the blow was struck, oh we all heard a gun.

Oh, hold your hand, butcher, our captain he cried,
Some port or some harbor we are drawing nigh.
And while we were a-sailing with a sweet, pleasant tide,
We came to a city close by the sea side.

This couple got married, as I've heard the people say,
There was great rejoicing on their wedding day.
The bells of the village did echo and ring,
The boys they did dance, and the girls they did sing.


** last two lines of each verse repeat


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Subject: Tune Add: THE DARK EYED SAILOR
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 04:34 PM

N-The Dark Eyed Sailor (3)
C-
A-
T-
S-120
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-5 D-8 a-8 a-8 a-4 G-8 G-8 F-8 G-8 D-5 D-8 D-8 D-8 c-4 a-8 a-8 c-8 d-8 a-5 c-8 c-8 F-8
L-'Twas of a maid-en both young and fair, Whilst walk-ing out for to take the air. She met a
H-
M-5E-8 D-4 D-8 F-8 G-8 a-5 a-0 a-0 a-8 C-8 D-8 C-4 D-0 D-0 a-8 c-8 d-8 c-4 d-8 G-4 a-4 F-4 E-4
L-Sail-or all on her way, And I paid at-ten-tion, And I paid at-ten-tion to hear what they might
H-
M-1F-4 R-2
L-say.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE DARK EYED SAILOR
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 04:11 PM

see also DT songfiles darkeyed; darkeye2

THE DARK EYED SAILOR
(tune from singing of J. E. Shepard)
(verses compiled from multiple sources)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp300-301)

'Twas of a maid-en both young and fair,
Whilst walk-ing out for to take the air.
She met a sail-or all on her way,
And I paid at-ten-tion,
And I paid at-ten-tion
to hear what they might say.

He says, Fair maid, why roam alone?
For the day's far spent and the night's coming on.
While crystal tears from her eyes did flow
It's for my dark-eyed sailor,
Oh, me dark-eyed sailor
That proved my overthrow!

Then three long years since he left this land;
A new gold ring he took off his hand,
He broke a token, gave one half to me,
While the other half's lying
While the other half's lying
At the bottom of the sea.

Oh, he says, fair maid, drive him from off your mind
For as good a sailor as him you'll find!
Love turns aside and cold does grow
Like a winter's morning
Like a winter's morning
When the hills are covered with snow

His coal-black eyes and curly hair,
His flattering tongue did my heart ensnare
Genteel he was, no rake like you,
to advise a maiden
to advise a maiden
to slight the jacket blue!

A tarry sailor I'll ne'er disdain,
But keep always true till he comes again.
So drink his health, here's a piece of coin,
But my dark-eyed sailor
But my dark-eyed sailor
Still claims this heart of min.

When William did the ring enfold
She seemed distracted idst joe and woe
You're welcome, William; I have lands and gold
for my dark-eyed sailor
For my dark-eyed sailor
So manly ture and bold!

Down in a cottage by a river side
In peace and harmony they now reside,
So girls, prove true whilst your lover's away
Oft a cloudy morning
Oft a cloudy morning
Brings forth a pleasant day.


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Subject: Tune Add: SALLY MONROE
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 03:32 PM

N-Sally Monroe
C-from the singing of Mary Grieve
A-
T-
S-100
K-G
B-2/2
F-
H-
M-1R-3 B-4 E-2 E-4 F-4 G-2 G-4 a-4 b-2 b-4 c#4
L-Come all ye young fe-males. I pray you'll at-
H-
M-4b-3 R-8 B-8 E-5 E-8 E-4 F-4 G-2 G-4 R-8 a-8 b-5_c#8 d-4 c-4
L-tend To these twa or three let-ters that I've new-ly
H-
M-4b-2 R-4 a-4 b-5 a-8 b-4 c#4 d-2 d-4 b-4 a-4 R-8 a-8 b-8_c#8 d-4
L-penned, To let you un-der-stand the hard-ships I un-der
H-
M-4e-2 R-4 e-4 d-4 c#4 d-4 e-4 b-8_a-5 G-4 E-4 F-2 E-4 E-4
L-go, When first I fell in love wi' young Sal-ly Mon-
H-
M-1E-2 R-2
L-roe.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SALLY MONROE
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 02:59 PM

see DT salmunro (Sally Munro)

SALLY MONROE
(from the Singing of Mrs. Mary Grieve)
(collected by Samuel P. Bayard)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp303-304)

Come all ye young fe-males, I pray you'll at-tend
To these twa or thress let-ters that I've new-ly penned,
To let you un-der-stand the hard-ships I un-der-go,
When first I fell in love wi' young Sal-ly Mon-roe.

I wrote her a letter, a letter I did send;
I sent it with a comrade I thought to be a friend.
Instead of bein' a friend to me, he proved to be a foe,
and he never gave that letter to young Sally Monroe.

It was on a Sunday morning about six o'clock,
'Twas all in a sudden our ship did strike a rock,
Three hundred and fifty were all sank below,
And out among that number I lost Sally Monroe.

'Twas from her aged parents I stole her away,
And that will grieve my conscience till my dying day,
It was not for to injure her that I did do so,
And all my life I'll mou-rn for young Sally Monroe!


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Subject: Tune Add: WERE YOU EVER IN DUMBARTON
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 12:22 PM

N-Were You Ever in Dumbarton?
C-from the singing of Archie Lant
A-
T-
S-120
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-1R-2 A-8 C-8 E-9 E-0 E-9 E-0 G-8 E-8 b-9 b-0 b-9 b-0 G-8 b-8 c-9 c-0 c-9 b-0 a-8 E-8
L-Were you ev-er in Dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tar-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan,
B-4/4
H-
M-1F-7 F-7 F-7 F-9 E-0 C-4 B-9 B-0
L-lit-tle a-bove the knee? Were you
B-3/4
H-
M-4E-9 E-0 E-9 F-0 G-8 E-8 b-9 b-0 b-9 b-0 G-8 b-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 b-8 G-8 E-7 E-7 E-7 E-9 F-0 D-4
L-ev-er in Dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tar-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan lit-tle a-bove the knee?
B-2/4
H-
M-5R-4 b-4 b-9 d-0 e-9 d-0 c-8 b-8 G-9 b-0 b-9 e-0 d-9 e-0 c-5 d-8
L-My love she is so neat and small, she won't have me at all. But
B-3/4
H-
M-5e-8 f-8 e-0 c-9 b-8 G-8 a-8 F-8 G-0 E-9 C-9_B-0 E-4 E-8 E-8 G-0 E-9 b-5 b-8 G-0 b-9 c-4 c-8 c-8 b-0 G-9
L-try to get her full and then she'll mar-ry me. Oh, if I had her, if I had her, Oh, if I had her,
H-
M-4F-8 G-8 F-8 E-8 D-4 E-4 E-8 E-8 G-0 E-9 b-5 b-8 G-0 b-9 c-4 c-8 c-8 b-8 G-8
L-hap-py would I be. Oh, if I had her, if I had her, Oh, if I had her,
B-4/4
H-
M-1F-8 G-8 F-8 G-8 E-4 B-9 C-0
L-hap-py would I be! Were you
B-3/4
H-
M-3E-8 E-8 E-9 E-0 G-8 E-8 b-8 b-8 b-9 b-0 G-8 b-8 c-9 c-0 c-9 c-0 b-8 G-8
L-ev-er in Dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tar-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan,
B-4/4
H-
M-1F-7 F-7 F-7 F-9 E-0 C-4 B-9 C-0
L-lit-tle a-bove the knee? Were you
B-3/4
H-
M-5E-8 E-8 E-9 E-0 G-8 E-8 E-9 b-0 b-9 a-0 G-8 b-8 c-8 c-8 c-9 c-0 b-8 G-8 F-7 F-7 F-7 F-9 G-0 E-4_E-3
L-ev-er in dum-bar-ton, where they wear the tart-tan, Where they wear the tar-tan, lit-tle a-bove the knee?


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Subject: Lyr Add: WERE YOU EVER IN DUMBARTON
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jan 03 - 11:22 AM

Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?
Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
Where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?

My love she is so neat and small, she won't have me at all
But try to get her full and then she'll marry me.
Oh if I had her, if I had her,
Oh if I had her, happy I would be.
Oh if I had her, if I had her,
Oh if I had her, happy I would be.

Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?
Were you ever in Dumbarton, where they wear the tartan,
Where they wear the tartan, little above the knee?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 11 Jan 03 - 05:27 PM

MMario, you're a treasure!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Jan 03 - 04:27 PM

Joe,

How could you forget "I'm a Lumberjack?"

wdyat24


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Subject: Tune Add: THE WIFE OF KELSO / THE WILY AULD CARLE
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 04:18 PM

N-The Wife of Kelso /the Wily auld carle
C-
A-
T-
S-189
K-C
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 c-8 e-8 d-8 c-8 d-8 d-8 b-8 c-5 a-4 G-8 e-4 c-8 d-4 b-8 c-4 R-8 R-4 G-8
L-There was an old wo-man in Ire-land, in Ire-land she did dwell; She
H-
M-5e-4 e-8 d-4 d-8 c-5 b-8 b-8 b-8 a-8 b-8 d-8 c-4 a-8 G-4 R-8 E-4 F-8 G-8 E-8 G-8 a-4 b-8
L-dear-ly loved her hus-band, and an-oth-er man twice as well! Sing fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle
H-
M-5G-8 E-8 R-8 R-4 G-8 G-8 G-8 c-8 b-4 d-8 c-5 E-4 F-8 G-8 E-8 G-8 a-4 b-8 G-8 E-8 R-8 R-4 G-8
L-ad-dy fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle-day; Sing Fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle ad-dy fa-
H-
M-2G-8 G-8 c-8 b-4 d-8 c-5 R-5
L-lad-dle-ee doo-dle day!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WIFE OF KELSO /THE WILY AULD CARLE
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 03:45 PM

THE WIFE OF KELSO /THE WILY AULD CARLE
(from the singing of 'Duke' Neilson)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p281)

There was an old woman in Ire-land, in Ire-land she did dwell;
She dear-ly loved her hus-band, and an-other man twice as well!
[Sing fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle ad-dy, fa-lad-dle doo-dle day;
Sing fa-lad-dle-ee doo-dle ad-dy, fa-lad-dle doo-dle day]

She went unto a doctor to see if she could find,
To see if she could find anything to make the old man blind

Now, the doctor give three marrowbone, for him to suck them all,
And after he had sucked them, he couldn't see any at all.

Now the doctor met the old man, and to him explained the scheme.
Be jappers, says the old man, I'll act upon the scene!

She gave to him the marrowbones for him to suck them all,
And after he had sucked them he couldn't see any at all.

Oh, wifie, dearest wifie, on land I cannot stay.
I'd gladly go and drown myself if I only could find the way.

Oh husband, dearest husband, you shall not go astray,
For I will go along with you and gladly show you the way.

They toddled on and on and on, until the came to the brim
Oh, wifie, dearest wifie, you'll have to push me in.

the old womand got back a step or two and suddenly made a spring.
The old man side-stepped and she went tumbling in!

She swam around and round and round and then in front of him
the old man grabbed a long pole and shoved her head within.

The old man grabbed a long pole and shoved her head within
Now , wasn't she a darned old fool, to think that I was blin'.


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Subject: Tune Add: DUFFY'S HOTEL
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 02:48 PM

N-Duffy's Hotel
C-from the singing of Willis Norrad
A-
T-
S-189
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 G-8 F-8 E-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-4 R-4 c-8 c-8
L-If your're long-ing for fun or en-joy-ment, If you
H-
M-5c-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 a-4 G-4 F-3_F-4 R-4 G-8 F-8 E-4 G-4 F-4
L-want to go out on a spree, Come a-long with me
H-
M-5E-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-2 c-8 c-8 c-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 a-4 F-4
L-o-ver to Boies-town On the banks of the Mi-ra-mi-
H-
M-5E-5 R-5 R-2 c-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 e-4 d-4 c-4 c-4 b-2_
L-chi. You'll meet with a roy-al re-cep-tion,
H-
M-5b-2 b-4 b-4 G-4 b-4 c-4 b-4 G-4 F-3 R-2 G-8 F-8
L-The truth un-to you I'll re-late. On the
H-
M-5E-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 F-4 G-4 a-4 c-2_c-2 c-4 c-4 b-4 G-4
L-eight-eenth of May I ar-rived here, From Fred-'ric-ton
H-
M-2b-4 a-4 F-4 E-3
L-came by the freight.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DUFFY'S HOTEL
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 12:34 PM

DUFFY'S HOTEL
(from the singing of Williis Norrad)

If you're long-ing for fun or en-joy-ment,
If you want to go out on a spree,
Come a-long with me o-ver to Boies-town
On the banks of the Mi-ra-mi-chi.
You'll meet with a roya-al re-cep-tion,
the truth un-to you I'll re-late.
On the eight-eenth of May I ar-rived here,
from Fred-'ric-ton came by the freight.

I'm employed by a man named E. kenney,
A gentleman you all know well,
J.P. for the parish of Stanley
And he puts up at Duffey's hotel.
...
...
...
...

The other night I was out on a racket,
I tell you 'twas something immense
We collared a Shanghai rooster,
And he just cost us seventeen cents.
He was sick with the croup and the measles,
They said he was too poor to sell,
But I guess he'll make hash for the boarders
That hang out at Duffy's Hotel.

One night I was out to a party;
'Twas held in the Mansion below,
A row was kicked up in the kitchen
I tell you it wasn't too slow.
They upset the chairs and the tables
cause the Pleasant Ridge pigs for to yell
the row was kicked up by Delaney,
A sucker from Duffy's hotel.

Kind friends, I must bid you good evening,
Or else you will fear I'm a turk,
If I loiter 'round here any longer
some fellow might give me a jerk!
I'll go back to the place of my childhoord,
In peace and contentment to dwell,
Bid adieu to the kind friends and boarders
That hang 'round at Duffy's Hotel!


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Subject: Tune Add: BEWARE OF LARRY GORMAN
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 12:14 PM

N-Beware of Larry Gorman
C-Larry Gorman - from singing H.Hinchey
A-
T-
S-114
K-G
B-6/8
F-
H-
M-5R-2 R-8 E-8 G-4 a-8 b-4 c-8 d-5 d-8 R-8 d-8 c-4 c-8 G-8_a-8 b-8 c-4 R-8 b-8 b-8 c-8
L-And when they see me com-ing, Their eyes sticks out like prongs, Say-in', Be-
H-
M-4d-4 d-8 G-4 F%8 F%8 D-8 R-8 D-4 C-8 D-8_E-8 F-8 G-4 F-8 G-5 R-5
L-ware of Lar-ry Gor-man; He's the man that makes the songs!


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Subject: Lyr Add: BEWARE OF LARRY GORMAN
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 12:04 PM

BEWARE OF LARRY GORMAN
(Larry Gorman)
(from the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' p 258)

And when they see me com-ing,
their eyes sticks out like prongs,
Say-in' Be-ware of Lar-ry Gorman;
He's the man that makes the songs!

I told here that her bread was good,
Likewise her teas was strong;
But little she knew I was Gorman,
The make who made the songs!


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Subject: Tune Add: THE GULL DECOY
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 11:54 AM

N-The Gull Decoy
C-Larry Gorman
A-
T-
S-92
K-F
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-2R-2 R-8 F-8 G-8 a-0_b-0 c-4 R-8 b-0 c-0
L-I take no books, Nor I
B-4/4
H-
M-1d-8 d-8 c-8 a-8 R-5 c-8
L-read no pa-pers, I
B-3/4
H-
M-1d-8 d-8 c-0 c-9 R-8 c-8
L-Have no mon-ey to
H-
M-2c-9 b-0 G-8 R-4 G-8 b-8 c-0_d-0 d-4 T34ad-8 R-8 c-8
L-spend or lose, But ev-'ry Sun x day a
H-
M-4d-8 a-8 F-4 G-8 R-8 a-8 b-8 c-8 b-4 R-8 a-8 G-8 G-8 F-4 R-8 R-3
L-mong my neigh-bors, I run a-round to hear the news!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE GULL DECOY
From: MMario
Date: 10 Jan 03 - 10:03 AM

THE GULL DECOY
(Larry Gorman)
(From the singing of Herbert Hinchey)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - pp255-256)

I take no books, nor I read no pa-pers,
I have no mon-ey to spend or lose,
But ev-'ry Sun-day a-mong my neigh-bors,
I run a-round to hear the news!

'Twas all for spite and satisfaction
I set my dog on an orphan boy,
And all those other dirty actions
That adds more grief to the Gull Decoy,

When I stand up and begin to whistle,
the gulls they all begin to fly,
And for this occupation
they call me the Gull Decoy.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 12:28 PM

Tom Dixon


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RED LIGHT SALOON (Oscar Brand)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 11:49 AM

Couldn't resist adding some more verses for the above, courtesy of Oscar Brand:

Anon
From Singing of Oscar Brand
Tune: Sweet Betsey from Pike

The Red Light Saloon


D-----------------------A----------D
It was early one morning I walked into town.
------------------------A--------D
In sweet recreation I was strolling a-round,
-------G----------------------------D
When I spied this hotel in the fore after-noon,
------------------------------A-----------D
It was sporting a sign said "The Red Light Sa-loon."


I boldly walked in and stepped up to the bar,
Where a pretty young lady said, "Have a cigar."
Well, I took that cigar saying, "Thanks for the boon."
But she said, "That's our way in the Red Light Saloon."

She mussed up my hair and sat down on my knee,
Saying, "You are a logger, that's easy to see."
Saying, "You are a lumberjack, that we all know,
For your muscles are hard from your head to your toe."

She proceeded to test if my muscles were right,
Till I smoked that cigar without striking a light;
My head it was rising just like a balloon,
From the treatment I got at the Red Light Saloon.

It was early next morning I bade her good bye,
She waved from the window, a tear in her eye,
And I did not find out till the middle of June,
I was carrying a keepsake from the Red Light Saloon.

I cursed that young lady till the heavens turned blue,
And with whiskey and women I swore I was through,
But with all of my swearing I'd give my fortune,
Just to be back in bed at the Red Light Saloon.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: Tune Add: THE RED LIGHT SALOON
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 11:48 AM

N-The Red Light Saloon
C-from the singing of Willis Norrad
A-
T-
S-207
K-E
B-3/4
F-
H-
M-5R-2 b-4 E-4 G-4 b-4 E-4 G-4 G-4 F-4 D-4 D-4 E-4 R-4 b-4
L-A trip down to Bang-or, The Fourth of Ju-ly: To
H-
M-5d-4 e-4 e-4 E-4 G-4 b-8 b-8 c-8 c-8 c-8 b-8 R-8 b-8 e-4 e-4 e-4 E-4 G-4 b-4
L-make my con-nec-tion with a train I did try. The train it being
H-
M-5c-4 c-4 c-4 b-4 R-4 b-8 b-8 E-4 G-4 b-8 b-8 E-4 G-4 G-4 F-4 E-4 D-4
L-late, as you all will know soon, I was forced to take a trip to the Red light Sa-
H-
M-1E-4 R-2
L-"loon


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RED LIGHT SALOON
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jan 03 - 11:27 AM

THE RED LIGHT SALOON
(From the Singing of Willis Norrad)
(Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' pp249-250)

A trip down to Bang-or, the Forth of Ju-ly:
To make my con-nect-tion with a train I did try.
The train it being late, as you all will know soon,
I was forced to take a trip to the Red Light Sa-loon.

I boldly walked in and stepped up to the bar,
When a saucy young damsel says, "Have a cigar"
A cigar I did take, in a chair I sat down,
When a saucy young damsel came tripping around.

She boldly came over, sit down on my knee,
Saying Jack you're a woodsman, that I plainly see.
Saying, Jack you're a woodsman, and that we all know.
Your muscle is hard from your head to your toe.


Per Doerflinger - "a song that will never be printed in full"


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