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Lyr Req: Rocky Road to Dublin & Dear Old Ireland

DigiTrad:
THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN


Related threads:
Tune Req: Love/Hate version Rocky Road to Dublin (9)
Lyr Req: An Bairille / Rocky Road to Dublin (5)
Lyr Add: Along the Rocky Road to Dublin (5)
(origins) Origins: Rocky Road to Dublin (34)
Tune Req: The Rocky Road to Dublin (10)
Rocky road to Dublin - mp3 (15)
Rocky Road to Dublin question (30)
Help: Rocky Road to Dublin: Fiddle part (8)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
The Rocky Road to Dublin (Gavan) [words were written by D K Gavan, 'The Galway Poet'] (Tune obtained from sheet music published for Harry Clifton, with words by Gavan. Composer of tune unknown, possibly traditional.)


Aus 06 Jul 98 - 12:22 PM
Jon W. 06 Jul 98 - 06:41 PM
06 Jul 98 - 07:34 PM
Frank Maher 06 Jul 98 - 11:49 PM
Murray@saltspring.com 07 Jul 98 - 02:42 AM
Mick Lowe 07 Jul 98 - 12:24 PM
Mick Lowe 07 Jul 98 - 12:28 PM
GUEST 16 Feb 08 - 12:33 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Sep 08 - 10:57 AM
Jim Dixon 29 Sep 08 - 11:43 AM
Malcolm Douglas 29 Sep 08 - 09:09 PM
Artful Codger 19 May 10 - 10:51 PM
Artful Codger 19 May 10 - 10:55 PM
Joe Offer 20 May 10 - 03:04 PM
Artful Codger 21 May 10 - 12:05 AM
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Subject: looking for Two old songs
From: Aus
Date: 06 Jul 98 - 12:22 PM

Looking for Two Old Songs The Rocky Road to Dublin And Dear Old Ireland If anyone has these Songs I would appreciate getting the Lyrics.


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Subject: RE: looking for Two old songs
From: Jon W.
Date: 06 Jul 98 - 06:41 PM

Searching the DigiTrad (DT) database gets you to this version of Rocky Road to Dublin.

A search on [dear old Ireland] brings up 5 hits, one of which might be the one you're looking for. Try it (in the box in the upper right hand corner) and see. Use the brackets or you'll be inundated.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SONG FROM THE BACKWOODS^^
From:
Date: 06 Jul 98 - 07:34 PM

Deep in the Canadian woods we've met,
From one bright island flown
Great is the land we tread,
But yet our hearts are with our own.
And ere we leave this shanty small,
While fades the autumn day,
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...

We've heard the faults a hundred times,
The new ones and the old.
In songs and sermons, rants and rhymes,
Enlarged some fifty-fold
But take them all, the great and small,
And this we've got to say
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...

We know that brave and good men tried,
To snap her rusty chain.
The patriots suffered, martyrs died,
And all tis said in vain
But no boy, no, a glance will show
How Far they've won their way
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...

We've seen the wedding and the wake
The patron and the fair
And lithe young frames at dear old games
In the kindly air
And the loud Hurroo we've heard it too
And a thundering "clear the way"
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...

And well we know in cool grey eyes,
When the hard days work is over
How soft and sweet are the words that greet
The friends who meet once more
With "Mary Machree" and "My Pat, 'tis he"
And "My own heart night and day."
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...

And happy and bright are the groups that pass
From peaceful homes for miles
Over fields and roads and hills to mass
When Sunday morning smiles
And deep the zeal their true hearts feel
When low they kneel and pray
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...

But deep in the Canadian woods we've met
And we never may see again
The dear old isle where our hearts are set
And our first fond hopes remain
But come fill up another cup
And with every sup let's say
We'll toast old Ireland, dear old Ireland, Ireland boys hurrah...


Another thread calls this SONG FROM THE BACKWOODS by T. D. Sullivan. -JoeClone, 17-Jul-01.

I don't know who wrote it, I learned it for an old guy from Winnipeg with whom I used to work who asked me to play it.

Slainte

Rick


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN^^^
From: Frank Maher
Date: 06 Jul 98 - 11:49 PM

Go raibh maith agat, Rick
You beat me to it!
Here are the entire words to

THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN:

In the merry month of June, when first from home I started,
And left the girls alone, sad and broken-hearted,
Shook hands with Father dear, kissed my darling mother,
Drank a pint of beer, my grief and tears to smother;
Then off to reap the corn, and leave where I was born,
I cut a stout blackthorn to banish ghost and goblin.
With a pair of brand new brogues I rattled o'er the bogs,
Sure I frightened all the dogs on the rocky road to Dublin.
CHORUS: For it's the rocky road, here's the road to Dublin;
Here's the rocky road, now, fire away to Dublin.
In Mullingar, that night, I, my limbs so weary,
Started by daylight with spirits light and airy;
Took a drop of the pure to keep my spirits from sinking,
That's always an Irishman's cure whenever he's troubled with thinking,
To see the lassies smile, laughing all the while
At my comical style, set my heart a-bubblin';
They asked if I was hired, the wages I required
Until I almost tired of the rocky road to Dublin.

In Dublin next arrived, I thought it was a pity
To be so deprived of a view of that fine city;
'Twas then I took a stroll all along the quality,
My bundle then was stole in a neat locality,
Something crossed my mind, thinks I, I'll look behind,
No bundle could I find upon my stick a-wobblin;
Inquiring for the rogue, they said my Connaught brogue,
It wasn't much in vogue on the rocky road to Dublin.

A coachman raised his hand as if myself was wantin'
I went up to a stand full of cars for jauntin'
"Step up, my boy!" says he; "Ah! that I will with your pleasure,
And to the strawberry beds I'll drive you at your leisure,"
"A strawberry bed," says I—"faith! that would be too high,
On one of straw I'll lie, and the berries won't be troublin'"
He drove me out as far, upon an outside car,
Faith! such jolting never wor on the rocky road to Dublin.

I soon got out of that, my spirits never failing,
I landed on the quay just as the ship was sailing,
The captain at me roared, swore that no room had he,
But when I leapt on board, they a cabin found for paddy,
Down among the pigs I played with rummy rigs,
Danced some hearty jigs, with the water round me bubblin'
But when off Holyhead I wished that I was dead,
Or safely put in bed on the rocky road to Dublin.

The boys in Liverpool, when in the dock I landed,
Called myself a fool, I could no longer stand it,
My blood began to boil, my temper I was losin'
And poor old Erin's isle they all began abusin'
"Hurrah! my boys," says I, my shillelagh I let fly,
Some Galway boys were by, they saw I was a hobble in,
Then, with a loud "hurrah!" they joined me in the fray,
And then we cleared the way for the rocky road to Dublin....

There is another verse but I forget it at the moment. The last four lines are:

I did not sigh nor moan until I saw Athlone,
And a pain in my shin-bone, it set my pace a-troublin'
And fearing the big cannon, looking o'er the Shannon,
I very quickly ran on the rocky road to Dublin.


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Subject: RE: looking for Two old songs
From: Murray@saltspring.com
Date: 07 Jul 98 - 02:42 AM

"Dear Old Ireland" (alternative title "Ireland, Boys, Hurrah") is in Walton's New Treasury of Irish Songs and Ballads Part 1 (Dublin, 1968), p. 95, pretty close to the version above--main differ is the burden varies slightly each time. The author is given as T. D. Sullivan, 1857.


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Subject: RE: looking for Two old songs
From: Mick Lowe
Date: 07 Jul 98 - 12:24 PM

All the versions I know of the Rocky Road to Dublin leave the Girls of Tuam nearly broken hearted. As any Saw Doctors fans will know, Tuam is their place of origin as well. Enough drivel. Aus if you want music and lyrics try here Irish@Prof

Mick


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Subject: RE: looking for Two old songs
From: Mick Lowe
Date: 07 Jul 98 - 12:28 PM

Whoops ...finger trouble on that last thread

try here instead Irish at prof.co.uk

Cheers

Mick


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Subject: RE: Rocky Road to Dublin & Dear Old Ireland
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Feb 08 - 12:33 PM

WOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! IM TTLIY FROM IRELAND ND THIS SONG IS
HHHHHHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOOOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT!!!!!!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Sep 08 - 10:57 AM

The Universal Irish Song Book, A Complete Collection of the Songs and Ballads of Ireland. New York: P. J. Kenedy, 1898.


THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN.
Air—Irish Jig.

1. In the merry month of June, when first from home I started,
And left the girls alone, sad and broken-hearted,
Shook hands with Father dear, kissed my darling Mother,
Drank a pint of beer my tears and grief to smother:
Then off to reap the corn and leave where I was born,
I cut a stout black-thorn, to banish ghost or goblin:
With a pair of bran new brogues I rattle o'er the bogs:
Sure I frightened all the dogs on the rocky road to Dublin.

CHORUS. For, it is the rocky road, here's, the road to Dublin;
Here's the rocky road, now fire away to Dublin!

2. The steam-coach was at hand, the driver said he'd cheap ones,
But sure the luggage van was too much for my ha'pence.
For England I was bound, it would never do to balk it:
For every step of the road, be dad! says I, I'll walk it.
I did not sigh nor moan until I saw Athlone—
A pain in my shin bone, it set my heart a-bubbling;
And fearing the big cannon, looking o'er the Shannon,
I very quickly ran on the rocky road to Dublin.
    For, it is the rocky road, &c.

3. In Mullingar that night I rested limbs so weary—
Started by daylight, with spirits light and airy:
Took a drop of pure, to keep my spirits from sinking,
That's always an Irishman's cure, whenever he's troubled with thinking.
To see the lasses smile, laughing all the while
At my comical style, set my heart a-bubbling;
They axed if I was hired, the wages I required,
Until I was almost tired of the rocky road to Dublin.
    For, it is the rocky road, &c.

4. In Dublin next arrived—I thought it was a pity
To be so soon deprived of a view of that fine city.
'Twas then I took a stroll all among the quality—
My bundle then was stole in a neat locality.
Something crossed my mind—thinks I, I'll look behind—
No bundle could I find upon my stick a-wobbling.
Inquiring for the rogue, they said my Connaught brogue
It wasn't much in vogue on the rocky road to Dublin.
    For, it is the rocky road, &c.

5. A coachman raised his hand, as if myself was wanting—
I went up to a stand full of cars for jaunting.
Step up, my boy, says he, ah, ah! that I will with pleasure—
And to the strawberry beds I'll drive you at your leisure.
A strawberry bed, says I, faith that would be too high.
On one of straw I'll lie, and the berries won't be troubling.
He drove me out as far, upon an outside car—
Faith such a jolting never were on the rocky road to Dublin.
    For, it is the rocky road, &c.

6. I soon got out of that, my spirits never failing—
I landed on the quay just as the ship was sailing.
The Captain at me roared, swore that no room had he,
But when I leaped on board, they a cabin found for Paddy.
Down among the pigs I played such rummy rigs,
Danced some hearty jigs, with the water round me bubbling.
But when off Holyhead, I wished that I was dead,
Or safely put in bed, on the rocky road to Dublin.
    For, it is the rocky road, &c.

7. The boys in Liverpool, when in the dock I landed,
Called myself a fool—I could no longer stand it;
My blood began to boil, my temper I was losing,
And poor Old Erin's Isle they all began abusing.
Hurrah! my boys, says I, my Shillelah I let fly:
Some Galway boys were by, they saw I was a hobble in:
Then, with a loud hurrah, they joined me in the fray;
Faugh-a-ballagh! clear the way for the rocky road to Dublin.
    For, it is the rocky road, &c.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN (from Bodleian)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Sep 08 - 11:43 AM

From the Bodleian Library allegro Catalogue of Ballads
Harding B 11(454), Harding B 11(3304), and Johnson Ballads 2804
(these 3 are nearly identical):

THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN.

1. In the merry month of June from my home I started,
Left the girls of Tuam nearly broken-hearted.
Saluted father dear, kissed my darling mother,
Drank a pint of beer my grief and tears to smother.
Then off to reap the corn, and lave where I was born,
I cut a stout black-thorn, to banish ghost or goblin,
In a brand new pair of brogues, I rattled o'er the bogs,
And frighten'd all the dogs, on the rocky road to Dublin.
    Whack fal, &c.

2. In Mullingar that night, I rested limbs so weary,
Started by daylight, next morning bright and airy;
Took a drop o' the pure, to keep my spirits from sinkin',
That's an Irishman's cure, when he's on for drinkin';
To see the lasses smile, laughing all the while,
At my curious style, 'twould set your hearts a-bubblin'
They ax'd if I was hired, the wages I required,
Till I was almost tired of the rocky road to Dublin.
    Whack fal, &c.

3. In Dublin next arrived, I thought it such a pity,
To be so soon deprived a view of that fine city;
Then I took a stroll all among the quality,
My bundle it was stole in a neat locality;
Somethin' crossed my mind, then I look'd behind,
No bundle could I find on my stick a-wobblin',
Enquirin' for the rogue, they said my Connaught brogue
Wasn't much in vogue on the rocky road to Dublin.
    Whack fal, &c.

4. From there I got away, my spirits never failin',
Landed on the quay, as[or "before"] the ship was sailin';
Captain at me roared, said that no room had he,
When I jumped on board, a cabin found for Paddy,
Down among the pigs; I played some funny rigs,
Danc'd some hearty jigs, the water round me bubblin',
When off Holyhead, I wish'd myself was dead,
Or, better far instead, on the rocky road to Dublin.
    Whack fal, &c.

5. The boys in Liverpool, when we safely landed,
Called myself a fool, I could no longer stand it;
Blood began to boil, temper I was losin',
Poor ould Erin's Isle they began abusin'.
"Hurrah, my soul!" sez I, my shillalagh I let fly;
Some Galway boys were by, saw I was a hobble in,
Then with a loud hurrah, they joined in the affray.
    SPOKEN.—Faugh-a-ballagh!
We quickly clear'd the way, for the rocky road to Dublin.
    Whack fal, &c.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocky Road to Dublin & Dear Old Ireland
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 29 Sep 08 - 09:09 PM

As stated in other discussions here (see links above) the words were written by D K Gavan, 'The Galway Poet', for the English music hall performer Harry Clifton (1824-1872), who popularised the song. Jack Campin pointed out in another discussion that the tune is basically a 9/8 version of the old 3/2 hornpipe 'Cam Ye Ower Frae France', also known as 'The Keys of the Cellar'.


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Subject: Re: Rocky Road to Dublin
From: Artful Codger
Date: 19 May 10 - 10:51 PM

Steve Gardham sent me scans of (I believe) the original published sheet music for "The Rocky Road to Dublin"--it was published by Hopwood and Crew, Clifton's primary publisher. As such, it can be considered as close to the source as is generally available.

Although famous as a slip jig (9/8 time), this music is arranged as a simple jig (6/8). I will not transcribe the lyrics because they are essentially as in the broadside Jim Dixon transcribed, with only these minor differences (ignoring presentation, punctuation and capitalization and "n'" vs "ng/nd"):

V1 L5: lave -> leave

Chorus: (Supplied in full)
Whack fal lal le ral
Whack fal lal le ral
Whack fal lal le
Whack fal lal le ri-do

V2 L4: when he's on -> whenever he's on
V3 L6: on my stick -> upon my stick
V4 L2: as the ship
V5 L1: in Liverpool -> of Liverpool
V5 L3: boil -> broil
V5 L7: hurrah -> Hurragh

Shortly, you should see my MIDI of the full arrangement appearing either here or at the top of this thread (thanks to Joe Offer). The basic tune is so well-known, it didn't seem necessary to provide an ABC as well.

I can provide a score, prepared with Finale PrintMusic, in either Finale, PDF or MusicXML--PM me if you need one. So far, it has only the stuff that affects MIDI generation (i.e. not all the slurs, markings or lyrics), and that may be where I leave it.

Click to play


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Subject: Rocky Road to Dublin - Gavan version
From: Artful Codger
Date: 19 May 10 - 10:55 PM

I should also mention that the Lester S. Levy Collection has a piece of music called "On the Rocky Road to Dublin"--it bears no relation to the Gavan song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocky Road to Dublin & Dear Old Ireland
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 May 10 - 03:04 PM

Here's the MIDI, thanks to Artful Codger:

Click to play



But I'm confused about the lyrics. Malcolm Douglas and others say the words were written by D K Gavan, 'The Galway Poet', for the English music hall performer Harry Clifton (1824-1872), who popularised the song. Are there other songs with this title, or do all the lyrics posted with this title - I would guess that all the "in the merry month of May/June" songs are the same, but we see various attributions.

This is what I put above for the source of the tune: Tune obtained from sheet music published for Harry Clifton, with words by Gavan. Composer of tune unknown, possibly traditional - is that accurate?

Click here

for the tune for this song from the Digital Tradition. I'd say it's more-or-less the same tune - isn't it?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocky Road to Dublin & Dear Old Ireland
From: Artful Codger
Date: 21 May 10 - 12:05 AM

Malcolm is correct: D.K. Gavan wrote the words, Clifton popularized it, and the tune is a variant of "Cam Ye Ower France"/"Keys to the Cellar". Gavan, Clifton or one of their unspecified crones just came up with an arrangement of an existing tune. The major point of interest is that, while "Rocky Road" is now mostly sung as a slip jig (9/8, like the DT tune), the original arrangement for the song was as a jig (6/8). Timing apart, only one phrase leaps out at me as being notably different.


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