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Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games

DigiTrad:
JUMP ROPE CHANTS
THREE SIX NINE


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Michael 02 Feb 03 - 03:35 PM
Nigel Parsons 02 Feb 03 - 03:47 PM
DMcG 02 Feb 03 - 04:52 PM
Willa 02 Feb 03 - 08:01 PM
Neighmond 03 Feb 03 - 01:57 AM
mouldy 03 Feb 03 - 02:59 AM
masato sakurai 03 Feb 03 - 03:15 AM
Abuwood 03 Feb 03 - 07:52 AM
Abuwood 03 Feb 03 - 07:56 AM
Declan 03 Feb 03 - 08:03 AM
Mr Red 03 Feb 03 - 09:47 AM
gnomad 03 Feb 03 - 11:42 AM
Abuwood 03 Feb 03 - 01:25 PM
Les from Hull 03 Feb 03 - 01:55 PM
gnomad 03 Feb 03 - 02:06 PM
GUEST,Q 03 Feb 03 - 02:24 PM
Neighmond 03 Feb 03 - 03:36 PM
Abuwood 03 Feb 03 - 04:12 PM
Michael 03 Feb 03 - 05:44 PM
Les from Hull 03 Feb 03 - 06:14 PM
Les from Hull 03 Feb 03 - 06:16 PM
Willa 03 Feb 03 - 06:31 PM
Rara Avis 03 Feb 03 - 09:24 PM
Neighmond 04 Feb 03 - 07:10 PM
mouldy 05 Feb 03 - 02:47 AM
Nigel Parsons 13 Apr 03 - 03:23 PM
Penny S. 13 Apr 03 - 03:47 PM
Penny S. 13 Apr 03 - 03:49 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Jul 04 - 08:27 PM
Flash Company 02 Jul 04 - 04:45 AM
GUEST,Longrope 06 Oct 06 - 09:11 AM
Sherbs 07 Mar 07 - 06:01 PM
GUEST,mg 07 Mar 07 - 06:18 PM
GUEST 27 Dec 07 - 10:50 PM
GUEST,worry wendy 20 Mar 09 - 11:04 PM
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Subject: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games (UK)
From: Michael
Date: 02 Feb 03 - 03:35 PM

Researching for local history project in Hull UK. Does anybody know any skipping rhymes or playground games peculiar to this area? Also any local words and phrases used by or about children?

Jumprope Hypertext Archives


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 02 Feb 03 - 03:47 PM

I don't know about Hull, but start with these threads.
Playground songs
Playground revisited-Actions
Children's rhymes and playground songs


Nigel


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: DMcG
Date: 02 Feb 03 - 04:52 PM

Neither 'The Singing Game' nor 'The Language and Lore of Schoolchildren, both by the Opies, list Hull as a major source, but both included nearby areas that are likely to have much in common with Hull.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Willa
Date: 02 Feb 03 - 08:01 PM

Reckitts' girls, Reckitts' girls, eyes like diamonds, teeth like pearls (X2), then start counting the skips. A common 'all in together' game with the rope stretched across the street. Reckitts was one of the major local employers and makers of Reckitts' blue.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Neighmond
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 01:57 AM

Well-a-day! As a poor kid, we had few toys and played outside games- "bunny run" and "touch hide-and-seek", or lotball and wallball (called lobo, in our slang-"You never looked sick...out playing lobo all day!"), and this was how we decided who was "it!" Pardon the length-I got fired up about this because it seemed so fun to do, and I seldom see children playing it nowadays.

We had a caller, who counted the rhyme and tapped our shoe toes with each accented word. The caller was usually the oldest or the one who said "I call picks!" or "I call!" first. All the players, including the caller, put their feet in a circle and hunkered down. The elimination went on until one last foot was left. The person that foot was attatched to then led off by being "it".

I. Engine, engine, number two!
   Coming down the C.B.Q.*
   If the train should jump the track-
   Would you get (want) your money back?

   (Answer: Either Yes, no, or maybe)

   Y-E-S spells "yes" and you are not it!
   N-O            "no"
   M-A-Y-B-E      "maybe"

* Chicago, Burlington & Quincy- a railway in eastern Iowa/northern Illinois

I have heard it:
Engine, engine, number nine (ten), (three)
Going down Chicago Line (the L. & N.), (the Santa Fe)

We always used The C. B. Q., and the Chicago line one. The caller touched toes on shoes with each accented word (sort of depended on the caller as to the accent) and the person who was ended up on chose the answer, and the caller spelled it out and whomever was landed on then was removed from the running.


II. Bubblegum, Bubblegum in the dish
    How many pieces do you wish?

    (Answer is a number.)

The person who got landed on picks a number, and the caller spells out the number, followed by "...and you are not IT!" The person whose foot is landed on last is out of the running.


III. One...two...three! NOT IT!

The caller counted slowly, and all yelled "NOT IT!" The last one to finish saying "NOT IT!" was "it". This one could start a nasty fight, causing disputes over who had in fact called "NOT IT!" and how fast they had done it.


IV. Doggie, doggie diamond
    Step...right...OUT!

The caller tapped the toes of the shoes in time with the words, and the foot the caller ended up on was out of the running. This, too, was a questionable one to use, as any caller could control it so they could put themselves out of the running, or put the ones they chose on purpose out of the running. We only used it if nobody called: "No doggie diamond!", which was very seldom indeed.

V. My momma, your momma, hanging out clothes
   Your mom hit my momma right in the nose
   What color was the blood?*

   (Answers with a color)

   (Caller spells color) and (optional: my momma says) you are not it!

The person landed on picks out a color and the caller spells it and proceeds as usual, eliminating the last one landed on.

*The po-leace took your momma straight to jail
how many days to pay her bail?

Proceeds as above only using numbers in leu of letters. This last version showed up as I was becoming too old for tag hide-and-seek, and seemed to start with some kids from Fort Dodge. From time to time "momma" was replaced by "grannie".

VI. One, two, three, four!
    I ain't being "it" no more!

VII. My momma told me to pick the very best one
    and you are not it!

VIII. One, two, three,
      You're O-U-T!

On all three of these, whomever the caller landed on was out of the running. Like "Doggie diamond" they were often a bone of contention.


I used to spend recesses against the wall for jumping out of the swings in mid-air, and playing tag on the tornado slide, and the girls jumped the rope on the wide walkway there. Here are a few that I recall hearing, but the words may be out of order, as this was a while ago.

I. Apples on a stick, make me sick(slick?).
   make my arms (heart?) go two-four-six!
   It's not because i'm dirty
   It's not because i'm clean
   It's not because I kiss the boys
   behind a magazene (behind a _____ machine?)
   Hey girls, let's have fun!
   Here comes a cop with his (vest?) undone!
   He can shammey he can shake
   He can do the hoochie-koo
   But I bet a dollar he can't catch you!
   One, two, three, etc.....

Chanted to a double jumprope, I heard this on the schoolyard in Spirit Lake, Iowa around 1982-5. The count continued untill the jumproper missed a lick.

II. I went to the chinese grocer
    to buy a loaf of bread
    He wrapped it up in wax-paper
    And here is what he said:
    My name is Kay-eye-pickel-eye
    Humble berries, wild cherries
    Chinese chop sticks-
    Chow Chow!

In this little chant, the girls sat facing each other and clapped hands on each others palms, and their shoulders and laps. They went on until someone goofed in the clapping order. I heard this one in an apartment complex, growing up in Spirit Lake, Iowa in the early '80's.

III.Miss Lucy had a steam boat,
    The steam boat had a bell.
    Miss Lucy went to heaven,
    The steam boat went to
    Hell-o operator,
    Give me number nine,
    If I get disconnected,
    I'll kick you from-
    Behind the 'fridgerator
    There sat a piece of glass,
    Miss Lucy sat upon it
    And cut her big fat
    As-k me no more questions,
    Tell you me more lies,
    The boys are in the bathroom,
    Zipping up their flies-
    Are in the kitchen,
    The're buzzing everywhere
    I got a can of fly spray
    And sprayed it in the
    Airplane is in the air,
    The trucks are on the ground,
    And I get on the carosell
    Go 'round and round and
    'Round King Arthur's table
    There was a dozen knights.
    There was a lot of fighting
    At dinner every
    Night time in the city
    Night time in the park
    Miss Lucy's on the park bench
    Kissin' in the Dark!

Usually two girls swung one long rope, which had some bits tied to to make it snap on the cement, and the third girl jumped double-time. The two end girls sang this, and they NEVER had the same verses as the last lot that sang it-there must be a million! When the girl in the middle missed a lick, one of the end girls would switch places. I remember hearing this in Mankato, Minnesota, as far back as 1980, only I don't recall all the verses they were using. This version is the verses a lady friend and I recall from the apartment complex and school yard in Spirit Lake in the early '80's.

IV. Cinderella, dressed in yella
    Tell me, have you got a fella?

The girls holding the rope chanted this and the jumper kept time. She answered with a name and spelled it ("P-A-U-L spells 'Paul'") and this went on untill the jumper missed a lick.

V. (One time?)
   goose drank wine
   monkey chewed tobacco
   on the street car line.

There is some counting pattern to this one-and it was double-dutch (with two ropes) but I can't recall anymore of it. I heard it in Mankato in 1980 or thereabouts.

VI. Hopedy hop, hoppedy hop
    How many jumps until you stop?

Just like it looks. The jumper counts off untill she misses a lick, and they change jumpers. This comes from Emmetsburg, Iowa about 1985 or so.

VII. 'way down in the (gichee goo?)
    the girls and boys all coochie coo
    _______________cooties
    _________Baby booties

I can't recall that one too well, but that I heard Carolyn Steinocher's kid's chant it in Mankato. I was too young. I don't think they jumped the rope, I think they hopped the sidewalks.

VIII. I like coffee,
      I like tea.
      I like the boys
      And the boys like me.

IX. ___________and___________, sitting in the tree
    K-I-S-S-I-N-G!
    First comes love, next comes marrage
    Last comes__________with the baby carrage.
    (Some girls sang: Get the diapers, get the pins,
    Oh my word they just had Twins!)

X. I have a little brother
   his name is Tiny Tim.
   We put him in the bathtub
   To see if he could swim.
   He drank up all the water.
   He ate up all the soap.
   He tried to eat the bathtub
   But it won't go down his throat.

XI. My brother's as mean as he can be!
    He broke a plate and he blamed me!
    But I told Ma
    And Ma Told Pa
    And Brother got a whupping so Ha! Ha! Ha!

These didn't seem to be used in jumping the rope, they were clapping and cat's cradle (with yarn?) games, as I recall. I heard them in Spirit Lake and Arnold's Park in the early '80's.


There are a billion more but I would put everyone to sleep saying them, and they pretty much all follow the lines of the ones I said. I hope this does someone some good-it was sure fun to remember them!

For what it's worth
Chaz


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: mouldy
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 02:59 AM

I got hold of a facsimile copy of "The Traditional Games of England, Scotland and Ireland" by Alice B. Gomme. Originally published in 2 volumes 1894-1898. The edition I have is introduced by Fr. Damian Webb OSB, a folklorist, in 1984. He was living at St. Benedict's Priory at Garforth, nr. Leeds at the time. (Only about 30 mins drive from me!)
The book lists the 19th century sources for the information (people), and which county they refer to, but the few places that are listed do not include Hull. The book is very thorough with its comparisons of regional differences in some of the games, even going so far as to do line by line variations across several regions for some. There are also little drawings and diagrams, where appropriate, as well as a few tune notations. Lady Alice also published a book on singing rhymes.
(Lady Alice Gomme's husband, George Laurence, was the founder and president of the Folklore Society).

Ironically the edition of this book which I got from a second hand bookshop in Scotland, was published in the States! I doubt it's still in print, but the details, if anyone's interested, are:

The Traditional Games of England, Scotland and Ireland
Alice B. Gomme
(Introduced by Fr. Damian Webb, OSB)
Thames & Hudson 1984
ISBN 0-500-27316-2

Andrea


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: masato sakurai
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 03:15 AM

The Traditional Games of England, Scotland and Ireland was also reprinted in 2 volumes by Dover Publications in 1965 (probably out of print).

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Abuwood
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 07:52 AM

My Mum is from Hull and she taught me this rhyme for picking out who was going to be it (like the one potato, 2 potato 3 potato 4, 5 potato 6 potato 7 potato MORE rhyme)

I can say it but I don't know if I can spell it, or do the line breaks on this thing..

  • Rah Rah Chickerah, chickerah rony
  • Pony, Ping Pang Piny,
  • Alla Calla witchwood,
  • Ching Chang Choo,
  • (circa 1920)


I remember ( in the 1950's) hearing the rhymes Chaz wrote 4, 5 & & 10, in the last numberings on his post we definitely did the numner 2 in that list the chinese Grocer skipping rhyme but like this:-

  • I went to a chinese grocer
  • To buy a loaf of bread bread bread
  • He wrapped it up in a brown paper bag
  • and this he what he said said said
  • My.....
  • name......
  • is....
  • bend down and touch your knees
  • Legs like a japanese
  • Bend down and touch your toes
  • Show us your underclothes

The rhyme then went in to something abot the colour of the underwear but I can't remember what.

For skipping with a big rope accross the street we used to do

  • All in together girls
  • This Fine weather girls
  • One two three and out

repeated constantly next one having to jump in at the start of the rhyme.

Then there was a ball game we used to play which I wonder if it is peculiar to Hull as I have never seen it anywhere else.Played in the centre of the playground, you stand in a group, the person who is 'it' throws the ball high in the air and shouts re- alley- o when it is caught. All the group run away from the centre until they hear the call. The leader is then allowed 3 large paces and must throw the ball to hit one of the group who is then 'it'.

Hope all this helps
Love Alison


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Abuwood
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 07:56 AM

Hmm - I didn't intend bullet points, but they will do. I need to do an HTML course..
I noticed an error in the post, Chinese Grocer was a clapping rhyme.
Cheers
Ali


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Declan
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 08:03 AM

9green bear bottles, hanging on the wall.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Mr Red
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 09:47 AM

I put one in a pdf of collected bits on my website cresby.com in the songs page. My sister used to recite it as a skipping song/rhyme. It's the one about Nebukadnezah King of the Jews ('cos Sumarians don't scan nor rhyme with shoes)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: gnomad
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 11:42 AM

One seasonal "game" took place after 12 noon on April 1st, known as legging down.

As the name might imply you simply went around tripping people up, behaviour normally punishable in various ways which would (for a few hours anyway, and provided it wasn't TOO vicious) be tolerated by most adults as long as it wasn't them or their own offspring on the floor.

Sometimes great chains of kids arm in arm would sweep across a playground with the chant "Anybody in the road GETS KNOCKED DOWN!", but this wasn't the norm, and would get broken up P.D.Q.

This seems to be peculiar to Hull9, I have questioned natives of the surrounding area, but not found any who remember it outside the City.

My memory of the business is from the late 50's to about '66.

I suppose it gave the more physically inclined kids a chance of revenge for some of the more subtle and sneeky tricks which might have been played on them in the morning, and the thought of the revenge acted as a brake on us weedy types when planning our tricks.

Horrid little savages we were, but I don't think that was peculiar to Hull9.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Abuwood
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 01:25 PM

Oh yes I remember that, I was never allowed to do it and I was always frightend of the big girls on our street who would try to get me.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Les from Hull
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 01:55 PM

Yes, legging down - a Hull speciality. You had to notice the change from April Fool jokes (only valid in the morning) to legging down in the afternoon. It was certainly not the 'done thing' to do the opposite.

We had 'anybody in the road gets a BIG KICK'.

Games - we played block, and eggity budge mainly.

One word (apparently from East Hull only) was chudding, which other kids would call scrumping (stealing apples). Skipping off school is still called 'twagging'.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: gnomad
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 02:06 PM

Adding to my earlier post, I also remember kids singing "Here we go Looby Loo", which according to the Esperance movement handbook pre WW1 had a dance to it which had a strong resemblance to the Hokey Cokey. No dance involved in my day though.

Thinking of twagging, Les, did the other little dears "sprag" on you? And if so did you retaliate with the lines:

"Tell-tale tit, yer tongue will split. All the little doggies will have a little bit" ?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 02:24 PM

Wrong area, but interesting to all playground collectors- Alice Kane and Edith Fowke, 1983, "Songs and Sayings of an Ulster Childhood," 254 pp., M&S, Toronto.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Neighmond
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 03:36 PM

Me again! I am watching a friend's three kids today, and I heard them in the basement (playroom) skipping rope. They were doing a version of IV that went like so:

Cinderella, dressed in yellow
Went upstairs to kiss a fellow
Made a mistake and kissed a snake
How many doctors did it take?

(Jumper counts off until they miss a lick.)

Here is one that is new on me:

Texico, Texico, all the way to Mexico
Do the splits, splits
Chinese Kicks, kicks
Turn around, round
Touch the Ground, ground!

This one is chanted while jumping.

Thanks to Theresa and Amanda,

Chaz


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Abuwood
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 04:12 PM

Yes Les we played Block and eggity budge - but I can't remember how.
T never twagged off school, so there was no need fro anyone to sprag on me for that.
Gnomad - this was our North Hull version
" Tell tale tit, your mother can't knit, your father can't walk without a walking stick"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Michael
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 05:44 PM

Can anybody give me the 'rules' to eggity budge, never heard of this one.
Thanks for all the info everyone, keep it coming!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Les from Hull
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 06:14 PM

As far as I remember one kid throws a ball (an old tennis-ball) in the air and calls another kid's name. Everyone else runs away. When the kid who was named retrieves the ball and calls out 'eggity budge' and everyone else freezes. He can then throw the ball at another kid, usually being allowed to advance by moving as far as he can spit (three times?). The target kid cannot dodge the ball - 'bad egg if you budge' = eggity budge. But it's been a long time. Any of the Hull 'catters know if it's still played?

Of course we also 'larked' (played) marbles - two main games. One was played along the street going to and from school. The other was played on open ground, making an indentation in the ground (called a 'tell') with your heel. The first player to get a marble into the tell was allowd a free shot at another kid's marble. If he hit it he won it.

During the conker season conkers were called 'hongkongs'.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Les from Hull
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 06:16 PM

Perhaps one of the 'ull lasses will explain the mystery of 'double-ball'. Or perhaps you are up for larking 'kiss-catch!'


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Willa
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 06:31 PM

Alison, Les and gnomad
Ah yes, memories are flooding back.
Block, eggity budge (your description is spot on, Les), marbles,re- alley- o and legging-down day(and Mischief night). We had clay marbles and glass alleys, plus some ball-bearings. Our tell-tale-tit version was slightly different.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Rara Avis
Date: 03 Feb 03 - 09:24 PM

Oh my goodness, Neighmond! Did you play on my street (southern NJ, mid 1950s)? We were "engine engine number nine" children. This is the first I've heard the other variants. Anna Banana played the piana. All she could play was the Star Spangled Banna. Anna Banana SPLIT! Do you remember the one about throwing the baby down the elevator?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Neighmond
Date: 04 Feb 03 - 07:10 PM

I doubt it- I was hatched in 1977-bt I DO know about the baby in the elevator:

Miss Sue *clap, clap*
Miss Sue *clap, clap*
Miss Sue from Alabama
Her real name is Susy-Anna
Playing her piana
Sittin' in the rocker eatin' Betty Crocker
Watchin' the clock go
Tick, tock, tick tock Hip-hop
Tick, tock, tick tock Hip hop
A b c d e f g
Wipe them spiders off of me
Daddy, he is crazy
Mama's havin' a baby
If it's a boy give him toys
If it's a girl give her pearls
If it's twins, wrap 'em up in paper
Throw them over the escalator (is this your elevator?)
First elevator says "STOP"
Second elevator says "STOP"
Third elevator says "Keep on going till your shoes got hot."

The rope swingers chanted the words and the jummper clapped while jumping. Sometimes they peppered it, as well. The girls used to double dutch to this all the time. Some of them it was all they knew!

Here is one my mother knew after I told her this weekend I was posting these:

Ten little babes jumping on the bed,*
One fell off and cracked his head!
Momma called the doctor
the doctor called the nurse
the nurse called the lady
with the alagator (!) purse!
The babies are cryin' and momma said
that's what you get for jumping on the bed!
Broke! said the doctor
Strained! said the nurse
A headache! said the lady with the alagator purse!

* Each verse after, the number counts down. After there are no little babies there is a new jumper. If you are jumping yourself you start over. If the jumper messed up they were out.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: mouldy
Date: 05 Feb 03 - 02:47 AM

Les, not being from 'ull, I don't know if it's the same, but generally two-ball was played as a type of basic juggling: throwing the balls against a wall and catching them. Sometimes you could attempt to slip in an overhand or underhand throw, if it was the opposite to the way you were doing it. The really skilled ones could do it one-handed. I think there may have been rhymes, but they weren't always used. I wasn't all that good at it, really. I was better at skipping.

The "tell-tale tit, your tongue will split.." is the version we used in the Midlands and also N. Derbyshire. Kids that sulked were "mardy mardy mustard, can't eat a custard." Although round here in Yorkshire thay tend to use "maungy". I've not heard the rhyme here, either.

Andrea


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 03:23 PM

Eggity Budge From: (Les from Hull Date: 03 Feb 03 - 06:14 PM )was being played in Cardiff in late 50s early 60s, but known as "Bad Eggs"

Neighmond (3 Feb)Skipping rhyme No 'V' was recorded by Aaron Carter as "The Clapping Song", however, the numerous versions I find on the net do not seem to match my recall of it, and most have been cross-posted as they nearly all include the same typos (e,g 'Partner£s' for 'partner's'

One recently heard playground rhyme from my (15y.o.) daughter:
"Row Row Row your boat
Gently down the stream
If you see a crocodile
Don't forget to scream
Aaaargh!"

Nigel


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Penny S.
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 03:47 PM

I don't know how I missed this, but there is an Opie book, "Children's Games with Things", published quite recently, which includes ball games, skipping games, fivestones etc. I can't give any more info at the moment as the book is in school, and it is not the holidays. I don't know if it includes Hull, though.

Penny


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Penny S.
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 03:49 PM

Opie book link

Penny


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jul 04 - 08:27 PM

Website with lots of rhyme variations. Copy before it disappears.
clapping games


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Flash Company
Date: 02 Jul 04 - 04:45 AM

I remember;-
Cowardy cowardy custard,
Dipped his nose in mustard!

Usually reserved in the 1940's for anyone who resorted to kicking in a fight. Interestingly, my observations suggest that , since the advent of TV Kung-fu films, kicking has become the norm!

FC


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Longrope
Date: 06 Oct 06 - 09:11 AM

Mrs D, Mrs I, Mrs F F I,
Mrs C, Mrs U, Mrs L T Y!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Sherbs
Date: 07 Mar 07 - 06:01 PM

On Skipping rhymes, I remember this one and wonder if anyone else doers too

Not last night but the night before
twenty four robbers came knocking at the door
I went around to let them in
And this is what they started to sing

Spanish lady turn around
Spanish lady touch the ground
Spanish lady do the kicks
Spanish lady show your knicks


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 07 Mar 07 - 06:18 PM

I do sort of...Longview Washingotn in the 1950s...23rd street, St. Rose School...

Not last night but the night before
24 Spaniards came knocking at my door
Ask them what they wanted and this is what they said

Spanish dancers turn around
Spanish dancers touch the ground
Spanish dancers leave the town

------

There's a place in Mars where the women are cigars
As you walk through the ashes think of these darling lasses

There's a place in France where the alligators dance

There's a place in France where the women wear no pants

---

Charlie Chaplin went to France to teach the girls how to hula hula dance...

----

.....for dear old Peggy
susan's knocking at the door
Peggy is a lady and she's going to have a baby
So we won't need Peggy any more..and next girl jumps in..

----

I am a pretty little Dutch girl
Pretty as pretty can be
And all the boys around my house
Are crazy over me me me

My boyfirend's name is Patty
He comes from Cincinatti
With 28 toes and a pickle in his nose
And that's the way my story goes

First he gave me peaches
And then he gave me pears
And then he gave me fifty cents
And kissed me on the stairs

My father he was .>>>>>>>>>>
My mother she was too
My sister was so jealous that
She didn't know what to do....

--------------


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Dec 07 - 10:50 PM

I thought it went like this...
I went to a chinesse grocery store to buy a loaf of bread bread bread
He put it in a half pound bag and this is what he said said said:
My.. name.. is.. chim chimmey charlie, chuga-wuga whiskey, chineese chopsticks, CHOW WOW POW (you dap the person on the head)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,worry wendy
Date: 20 Mar 09 - 11:04 PM

My Grandma (Lancashire) taught my dad (now 82)
'Ar Rar Chickerah, chickerah rooney
Rooney pooney sting stong stiney
aragaraweskey chinese choo' as a counting or clapping game
My mum knows a version- she's from manchester.
I did read a version where 'aragara'was changed to 'albaster' in a story set in Wigan.
No help, but more info


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Son of a Skowser
Date: 18 Jan 10 - 10:02 AM

My Grandfather from Liverpool taught me this version about 40 years ago.

Chickerah, chickerah, chickerah rooney
Rooney, pooney, ping pong piney
Vester, vester, Chinese choo


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST
Date: 15 May 10 - 06:03 AM

My Australian father taught us this

r r chickera
chickera rooney
rooney pooney ping pong piney
cally cally wesco
wesco rooney
rooney pooney chinaman's tuney

I've never met anyone else who's heard it


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Caroline Stockport England
Date: 30 May 10 - 09:40 AM

Hi, we used to sing this on the way to watch Stockport County football team, I'll ask my dad to see if he knows its origins, he's 82 now and has been going to the football for about 75 years.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST
Date: 31 Oct 10 - 10:37 PM

Hello My mum now 71 from newton le willows taught me the
Ara chickera chickera rooney rooney pooney ping pong piney alabalaraster chinese chinks
to play with two balls up against the fence.
There is one other my mum taught me that I cant find any reference to. It sounds like this.
A B C D koora weena thona theena bishi kreena kot.
Does any body remember that one .
My mum said her grandfather taught her them.
Im in Australia and my husband thought I made up the ara chickera one till we saw it here.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 12:19 PM

I'm looking for verses for bounciong an indian rubber ball,
you bounced the ball up and down and said

one two three a kurtzie,
one two three a kurtzie and on

then= it was
one two three a lari=e=o
and then on.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Nov 11 - 07:29 PM

this is one I remember my mother gave me fifty cents to see the elephant jump the fence he jumped so high he reached the sky and never came back til the fourth of july you bounced the ball and put your leg over on the words cent,fence and on the words high,sky,you made the bounce as high as you could and still catch the ball without missing a beat


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Curious
Date: 29 Dec 11 - 06:22 PM

Who wrote doggy diamond rhyme?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Maige
Date: 07 Mar 12 - 12:14 AM

Hi, I've been trying to find the ending to a rhyme my mothers been trying to remember. I came across this site and thought someone here might know. My mom's 59 now, so the rhyme is from the late 1950's in Lancashire, and it wasn't "bawdy" but one they thought was "funny". The rhyme begins with either: In days of old, when knights were bold, or In days of yore, when knights were poor. If someone could help put my mothers mind at ease, that'd be wonderful!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: Snuffy
Date: 07 Mar 12 - 09:27 AM

In days of old
When knights were bold
And women weren't invented
They used a hole
In a telegraph pole
And went away contented.

50s/60s East Cheshire


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Subject: RE: Chinese Skipping (using elastic bands)
From: GUEST,Rhian
Date: 13 Mar 12 - 08:51 AM

i'm looking for rhymes to sing while playing this game i'm a childminder and thought it was a good idea to pass on what we played as children but can't remember any of the tunes


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,clappity
Date: 21 Oct 12 - 11:35 AM

The version of Chinese Grocer we used went like this:
I went to a Chinese grocery to buy a loaf of bread bread bread
He put it in a five pound bag and this is what he said said said.
*Here the clapping game changed. Players put their hand together, pointed them at the other player, and hit the back of fingers like a fishtail* My name is... (hit left, hit right, hit left)
*Then players joined left hands like for a hand shake and would hit back of hands, above hands, back of hands, below hands* Kay-nine-piccolo, Piccolo-kay-nine, Humbleberry, Wadalada-wutchki, chinese chopsticks
*hands break apart- one hand goes up one hand goes down* says
*Clap both hands together with the other person* Chow
*No clapping* What's his name?- asks whoever was singing.
Answer is Chow.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,Nobody
Date: 14 Apr 18 - 08:33 AM

In days of old
When knights were bold
And toilets weren't invented
They'd wipe their arse
on a piece of grass
And went away contented.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 15 Apr 18 - 08:55 AM

If you're actually in Hull, maybe ask permission to bring a few cakes to a series of old people's homes and get the people talking about their childhood games and record them?


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