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Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha

Seamus Kennedy 27 Feb 03 - 02:58 PM
Seamus Kennedy 28 Feb 03 - 01:10 AM
Seamus Kennedy 28 Feb 03 - 01:11 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 28 Feb 03 - 04:17 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 28 Feb 03 - 04:19 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 28 Feb 03 - 04:41 AM
Declan 28 Feb 03 - 05:02 AM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 28 Feb 03 - 11:33 AM
Seamus Kennedy 28 Feb 03 - 03:44 PM
Brían 28 Feb 03 - 04:57 PM
GUEST,sorefingers 28 Feb 03 - 06:47 PM
GUEST,JTT 01 Mar 03 - 04:24 AM
Seamus Kennedy 01 Mar 03 - 12:13 PM
Big Mick 01 Mar 03 - 12:56 PM
belfast 01 Mar 03 - 03:35 PM
Seamus Kennedy 02 Mar 03 - 01:37 AM
GUEST,ossonflags 02 Mar 03 - 03:58 AM
MartinRyan 02 Mar 03 - 06:43 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 02 Mar 03 - 10:28 AM
GUEST,Philippa 03 Mar 03 - 06:25 AM
Nigel Parsons 03 Mar 03 - 06:30 AM
belfast 03 Mar 03 - 06:52 AM
GUEST,Mikey joe 03 Mar 03 - 07:20 AM
Declan 03 Mar 03 - 08:03 AM
GUEST,Brendan Nolan 03 Mar 03 - 10:58 AM
GUEST,Mikey joe 03 Mar 03 - 11:03 AM
GUEST,Brendan Nolan 03 Mar 03 - 02:45 PM
Big Mick 03 Mar 03 - 03:49 PM
GUEST,Brendan Nolan 04 Mar 03 - 08:24 AM
ard mhacha 04 Mar 03 - 04:48 PM
John MacKenzie 04 Jan 05 - 07:18 AM
GUEST,Bill Kennedy 04 Jan 05 - 09:17 AM
Brían 04 Jan 05 - 11:59 AM
GUEST,JTT 05 Jan 05 - 09:28 AM
Noreen 05 Jan 05 - 07:00 PM
GUEST,Tommy 12 Apr 06 - 07:58 AM
GUEST,Margit from Denmark 06 May 06 - 06:18 AM
GUEST 06 Oct 07 - 05:53 AM
GUEST,Me ould segosha 07 Oct 07 - 05:19 AM
GUEST,Grimsley 19 Nov 07 - 11:00 PM
MartinRyan 20 Nov 07 - 04:27 AM
GUEST,Sean O'Smeara Dublin 01 Apr 08 - 09:07 AM
MartinRyan 01 Apr 08 - 06:34 PM
GUEST,Tara Munnelly 05 Nov 13 - 04:00 PM
MartinRyan 05 Nov 13 - 05:48 PM
GUEST,Patricia Conaghan 02 Dec 15 - 05:17 AM
GUEST,Gealt 02 Dec 15 - 04:15 PM
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Subject: Info Req. Dublin Term
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 27 Feb 03 - 02:58 PM

Maybe some Dublin 'Catters can help with this.
What is the proper spelling, precise meaning and origin of 'Segocia" generally used to mean "old friend," "buddy," or '"pal"?
I've seen it spelled "Segosha."
Has it been used in any Dublin songs that you know of?
Thanks for any help.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 01:10 AM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 01:11 AM

Usually prefaced with the words "me oul' "?
Any takers?
Thanks

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 04:17 AM

Let me check. Offhand, I can't think of an occurrence in a song. As far as performer's use is concerned, I associate the term with the actor Noel Purcell and some other, old generation Dublin comedians.

Wonder if O'Muirithe glossed it? I'll have a look

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 04:19 AM

BTW, I would spell it "segotia" - but I've no idea why!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 04:41 AM

Usage is almost invariably "me aul' segotia!" , basically as a slightly mocking term of endearment, used exclamatorially.
For example, at the end of a few sentences of argurmant or discussion:

....So there ye are, me aul segotia!" ...... as a clincher!

Equivalent to some uses of "mate", "buddy" etc. - but not all.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Declan
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 05:02 AM

Me auld segotia Martin has said it already. I've no idea where the phrase came from. I've often heard the term used, but not so often lately. Off hand I can't think of any Gaelic word or phrase that it might be derived from.

The phrase is part of what was Dublin in the rare auld times.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 11:33 AM

Martin is right.

It could be a coining that has no valid etymology. Equally, as part of the oral tradition, there may be no valid spelling.

Irish people like playing with words (now there's an earth-shattering revelation for you), including making up nonce-words. Malapropisms are also a characteristic of Dublin speech from the rare oul' times, so the chances are that it was either a conscious coining or a mistaken transmogrification of a word like "sagacious".


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 03:44 PM

T'anks, lads. Yer blood's worth bottlin'.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Brían
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 04:57 PM

I have a Dictionary of Hiberno-English that although admits its originn is obscure, says it might possibly be a corruption of seo dhuit, or "There you are", a very common expression, although, "There y'are me aul sagotia" sounds redundant in that context.

Brían


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,sorefingers
Date: 28 Feb 03 - 06:47 PM

Segotias? Probably Spanish.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 01 Mar 03 - 04:24 AM

segotia [n., lr. seu dhuit-se, this [is] for you, is not gecepted] as in old segotia [. phr.] Close friend (male usage). 1977 Myles na gCopaleen, The Hair of the Dogma: 'a side door [in the Scotch House]... through which shall be admitted all persons being... Old Segotias of the said Myles na Gopaleen'. 1987 Vincent Caprani, Vulgar Verse & Variations, Rowdy Rhymes & Rc-im-itations, 'Wayzgoose'; "Faire dues [q.v.] to all the members what don't forget old mates;/ But I have one final question, if you'll bear with me awhile..." "Oh, fire away, sagosha [sic]," he answered with a smile. 1995 Aidan Higgins, Donkey's Years: "Ah, cummere to me now me old segoshia [sic]," Grogan coaxed me in the yard..."

All from Slanguage, by Bernard Share, a dictionary of Irish slang now in its second edition.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 01 Mar 03 - 12:13 PM

Three different spellings, the same meaning.
I've only ever heard it around Dublin, never up North or any where else in Ireland for that matter.
Thanks, everyone. You've been very helpful.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Big Mick
Date: 01 Mar 03 - 12:56 PM

Brendan Nolan, a Dublin man currently working out of Florida, calls his label "Old Sagousha" if I am not mistaken. Same thing?

Mick


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: belfast
Date: 01 Mar 03 - 03:35 PM

A search brought me to this site -Click here. It's something to do with the discovery of some old coins in Spain but I think the word "segotia" there is only a typo for "Segovia". And indeed I remember an aspiring guitarist in a Dublin pub being addressed as "Me oul' Segovia".

I have only heard the word used by Dubs and only in a self-conscious, self-mocking kind of way - like Dubs pretending to be Dubs.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 01:37 AM

Actually, Mick I'm trying to get a standardized definition and spelling for Brendan. His label is "Segosha". and he'd never heard of the alternate spelling. That's how this whole thing got started.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,ossonflags
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 03:58 AM

I have only once seen the phrase in print and it was used as
" me ou'l segotia". That was in the excellant play by Sean O'Casey "Juno and the Paycock"


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: MartinRyan
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 06:43 AM

I've seen that "seo dhuit-se" sugestion alright. It sounds rather like a reverse etymology to me. I've never heard it as a toast in natieve-speaker Irish and know of no evidence that it was ever common enough to have been transferred into English. The strong Dublin link also makes it unlikely.

I think its just one of life's little mysteries (As distinct from Leif's little ups an downs - an even more obscure Dublin in-joke!).

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 10:28 AM

ossonflags, if you heard in Juno and the Paycock, it must have just crept in. I'm pretty sure it's not in the original script. Possible opportunities would be where Boyle calls Mrs Madigan "me oul' sport" and near the end where she calls him "me bucko."

Based on nothing I can think of, I veer towards "segocia". I've certainly seen the word in print a few times, but this was not necessarily how it was spelt - I can't remember. Anyway, it has had a lively career independent of "segovia" and seems to pre-date that guy who had a guitar. (I think both Segovia and Segocia are place names in Spain.)

There is actually a one-act play called "Me Oul' Segocia" but with so many spelling variables I've not managed to track it down, if indeed it ever made it into print. But as Joxer definitely did say (about something else): "It's a darlin' word, a daarlin' word."


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 06:25 AM

I associate the term with "me oul' segocia" with Ronnie Drew, so I thought it must be in something he sings ...Since my recollection on this point is vague, I've been waiting for someone else to mention Ronnie Drew or the Dubliners, but no-one has


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 06:30 AM

Belfast: is it kind to refer to natives of that other city as 'Dubs' in a thread related to slang usage?
I have only heard 'Dubs' used as slang for toilets!

Nigel


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: belfast
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 06:52 AM

It was certainly not my intention, on this occasion, to be unkind to the good citizens of our fair captial. It was from Dubliners that I picked up the word "Dubs" and I was not acquainted with it as a word for toilets. As for the citizens of Dublin I have much more vulgar terms of abuse when I want to insult them. Better not go down that road.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Mikey joe
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 07:20 AM

I known the term as a Cork term and have heard it quite a bit, although not commonly. It is mentioned in the Song "The Maid from Ballinure" as


"And there was me bould Segosha

And he mousin' her about

And there she was and she out of her mind

On pints of Beamish Stout




My tuppence worth

Mj

(from the real capital)


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Declan
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 08:03 AM

By coincidence I've just started reading a book called At Swim Two Boys by Jamie O Neill in which the term Segotia (spelled like that) is used. The character speculates as to where the name comes from, and wonders is there a flower of the same name - from what I can make out so far the character is actually not too bright and has already misused a number of big words, so I'd take this definition with a grain of salt. If there's any further enlightenment further on in the book (I'm only on Chapter 1) I'll let you know.

As for Dubs being slang for toilets, I hadn't heard that one before, but we Dublin people often refer to ourselves as Dubs but also as The Jacks - which is definitely a slang word for toilets, so there seems to be a theme running here.

Instinct tells me that Seo dhuit é is a red herring as a source for the word. The phrase litterally means "Here it is for you", which wouldn't make sense, and the pronunciation of the phrase as Segotia is a bit far fetched as well.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Brendan Nolan
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 10:58 AM

Howyis all

It seems I am the one who is responsible for starting this discussion. My thanks to Seamus Kennedy that it has reached far and wide.
My fear in the beginning was that I had been mis-spelling the word.
I had heard it a lot growing up in Dublin but I had never seen it written down. I'm somewhat ashamed to say I've never read 'Juno and The Paycock' but that's another story.
I've used the phrase and still use it as my label name. I spell it "Ould Sagosha" with a fada or accent on the 'o'. Since I could find no spelling at the time I thought it might be derived from Gaelic. In that case the spelling would have to have the 'sha' syllable at the end and an accent on the 'o'. As one of the writers pointed out, Dubliners love to have fun with the English language and at times satirize it. This is not just the domain of Dubs but of Irish people in general. I'm sure we could go at length for historical explanations for this.
I'm glad to see that Micky Joe from Cork has found a song with 'sagosha' in it. Having said that, it could be that whoever wrote the song, and I'm assuming it was a Corkman, might just have wanted to spell it differently than the Dubliner. This would be understandable!
In the end there seems to be no definitive way of spelling the word. In a way I'm glad and I appreciate all the input.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Mikey joe
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 11:03 AM

The song was written by a Corkman called Don Murphy, it can be found on the album Sex, Sca and Sedition. I'm not sure of the spelling as there are no lyrics on the tape


Mj


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Brendan Nolan
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 02:45 PM

Thanks Mikey Joe for clarifying that. Course it does muddy the waters a little more since there was no lyric sheet. Sounds like a good album though.
The word sagacious has been put forward as a possible source for sagosha/segotia or whatever the spelling. Given the Dublin penchant for a play on words, how about this. The words 'precocious' and 'sagacious' are not too far apart in meaning. Could it possibly be that it is a combination of the two, making it 'sagocious' and hence 'Me Oul Sagocia' which would not necessarily be a term of endearment. I supppose it would depend on who was saying it and who they were saying it to.
My father sometimes used a phrase 'don't be so stroctamocious.' It is not in any dictionary I have. To be honest we were never sure what the hell the word meant, but we knew what he meant. He was saying "don't be annoying me" or "don't be a pain in the neck", or a clip on the ear was surely on it's way.
As Martin Ryan has pointed out the whole thing is probably just one of life's mysteries. Still, it makes for an interesting discussion.
By the way, I have never heard 'Dubs' used in reference to toilets. 'The Jacks' yes, but the other one is a bit far-fetched.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Big Mick
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 03:49 PM

Great to see you here, Brendan. Stick around. And while you are at it, stick your name in the search engine at the top of the page and you will see discussions of your "Far From Their Homes". As I told you when I saw you last in Milwaukee, or was it Conklin, anyway I believe it to be the finest song ever written about the coffin ships. I hate to pump you up so, but you have been a major influence on my music.....and you a Dub and all..........hahahaha.

Hope you stick around. See you down the road.

Mick from Michigan

PS. I heard you met Seamus Kennedy in person. Did you shake hands? If so, check for your rings and watches, cause he is one quick little devil.........LOL.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Brendan Nolan
Date: 04 Mar 03 - 08:24 AM

Howya Mick


Did not realize it was yourself. I did indeed meet Seamus and he is great performer with a wonderful sense of humour. Off the stage he is a gentleman and it was a pleasure to be in his company.
He will be at Milwaukee this year and I'm sure he will knock their socks off.

All the best, maybe see you in Michigan in May
Brendan Nolan


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: ard mhacha
Date: 04 Mar 03 - 04:48 PM

The late Eamonn Mac Thomais when compering the RTE programme " Hands", used "me ould Segocia" to refer to the old Dublin market traders. Ard Mhacha.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 04 Jan 05 - 07:18 AM

The serial reading on Woman's Hour BBC Radio 4 is 'Letters of a Country Postman' by John B Keane, who was the father of Feargal Keane the BBC correspondant. The main character signs his letters 'From yer ould segocia' I wonder if it's a nonsense variation of sagacious, in the same way contagious is used in 'A Sailor Courted a Farmer's Daughter' to mean contiguous.
Giok


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Bill Kennedy
Date: 04 Jan 05 - 09:17 AM

here is a possible derivation, if it is from Irish it would have the spelling as in the first word 'Broad with Broad, Slender with Slender' remember

seadhgosa, segosha, segasha add/view comments (0)

// n. pleasure, joy, delight; 'Me ould segosha' < Ir. seaghais n. (genitive singular: seaghsa or seaghaise, cf. Ir. seaghaiseach, pleasant, joyful. 'Come over here to me, me old seadhgosa, it's been a long time since I've seen you'. This word has attracted many fanciful and improbable explanations (e.g, the Irish phrase 'Seo dhuit é' = Here, take it) because of its literary associations, e.g., it is used by James Joyce in F.W., 215.12: "Ah, but she was the queer old skeowsha anyhow, Anna Livia, trinkettoes".


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Brían
Date: 04 Jan 05 - 11:59 AM

Well, that is an interesting explaination.

Go raibh maith agat, a Liam.

Brían


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 05 Jan 05 - 09:28 AM

Pleasure, joy or delight would certainly be the meaning as it's used in English - sounds like a likely deriivation ok. It was certainly used (and is, indeed) in my family, and "my old segotia" would be equivalent to "my old darling".


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: Noreen
Date: 05 Jan 05 - 07:00 PM

Sorry to only contribute to this thread with a correction, but John B. Keane from Listowel, Co. Kerry was Fergal's uncle, not his father, Giok.
(I didn't know that until I heard the piece on Radio 4 as you did!)


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Tommy
Date: 12 Apr 06 - 07:58 AM

Joining the thread a bit late since I have just discovered it.

There are, as you might well guess - several spellings of SEGOTIA - including SAGOSHA and SHEGOSHIA.   As everyone has said its meaning is "close friend" in male usage. Used in "The Hair of the Dogma" by Myles na gCopaleen.   A dictionary of Irish Slang "SLANGUAGE" by Bernard Share, 2nd edition published in 2003 by Giles and McMillan - which has its own web site.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Margit from Denmark
Date: 06 May 06 - 06:18 AM

So funny to have come across this place when I was looking for the correct meaning of Segocia. Actually, I was going to use the term "Me Oul Segocia" on a birthday card I'm writing to one of my best and oldest (male) friends, and since he has Irish roots and his birthday falls on the very day we have "Irish Day at the Races" on Klampenborg where he is a professionel trainer, I found this term appropriate. Also there once was a racehorse here called "Me Oul Segocia", and I've often used the term in a loving way when I've talked to him... I just hadn't been able to find it in any dictionary.... and so I just "googled" the term and ended up here! Great... I'll still call him "Me Oul Segocia" meaning my old darling!


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Oct 07 - 05:53 AM

Try Google put in Segosha 5th site down ,and Bobs your uncle !!I have tried for ages for a definition of this word indeed both my parents frequently used this word , my Mother died 3 years ago at the ripe old age of 94 so it was obviously a word of old , What a pity this lingo seems to be almost lost to common usage.
Patti.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Me ould segosha
Date: 07 Oct 07 - 05:19 AM

I wrote very poor instruction on how to obtain the meaning on "Me ould Segosha " in fact the word is segotia ,look it up in doubletongued dictionary and there you will find your answer .Incidentally this saying was also uses in Bagenalstown by a very old man who had been in the army for years and lived next door to me as a child .H e would borrow a half crown on a Wednesday from my Mother repay it on Friday and borrow again the same amount the following Wednesday, and this went on for years, he would click his heels tap the walking stick on the ground doff his cap and always said the same sentence" Thanks me ould segostia." I'll see you on Friday.
Patti.


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Grimsley
Date: 19 Nov 07 - 11:00 PM

I'm a yank school teacher in Arkansas and my high school students are reading Angela's Ashes,which they love. They are keeping reading journals and have to include unfamiliar terms and and idioms. We have been unable to solve "segosha" (McCourt spelling) until now. Thank-you!


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: MartinRyan
Date: 20 Nov 07 - 04:27 AM

Anyone know which site GUEST of Oct. 6 meant?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Sean O'Smeara Dublin
Date: 01 Apr 08 - 09:07 AM

hows it going me auld flower? is a very common greeting we use in dublin by many on both sides of the liffey.

Sagotia is the name of a plant or flower. so people use sagotia instead of flower to add that extra individual warmth to the greeting or endearment.

Now hope that answer all your questions!


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: MartinRyan
Date: 01 Apr 08 - 06:34 PM

Let the innocent check on the meaning of "sméara"!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Tara Munnelly
Date: 05 Nov 13 - 04:00 PM

Dublin Fusiliers term of endearment for children' ma cher gosse'. Any takers?


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: MartinRyan
Date: 05 Nov 13 - 05:48 PM

Hi Tara! DId your father suggest that one? ;>)>

Regards


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Patricia Conaghan
Date: 02 Dec 15 - 05:17 AM

Séan O'Smeara:
Thanks for clearing that up!
An old Dublin Lady, friend of my mother's (Circa 1960) always used "Me Auld Segotia" as a term of endearment and your explanation of Auld Flower evolving into Auld Segotia makes perfect sense!
I love the exchange of abundant theories ...
I'm a Dubliner by birth and education, however, left (sadly) in 1976 for further shores.
I have never heard the word Dub used as Dublin slang for toilet ("Rub-a-DubDub. 3 Men in a tub"???????
;-)


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Subject: RE: Info Req. Dublin Term: Segocia/Segosha
From: GUEST,Gealt
Date: 02 Dec 15 - 04:15 PM

https://books.google.ie/books?id=RN0p1uienWMC&pg=PA207&lpg=PA207&dq=donn+s+piatt+-+segotia&source=bl&ots=BbO2rNiiEo&sig=wyImBXqL

A Dictionary of Hiberno English, edit. Terence Patrick Dolan,
Gill & MacMillan, Dublin, 1998.


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