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Pop Lyrics 1886

JohnInKansas 11 Mar 03 - 09:35 PM
GUEST,Q 12 Mar 03 - 12:41 AM
Joe Offer 12 Mar 03 - 01:12 AM
JohnInKansas 12 Mar 03 - 03:12 AM
Joe Offer 12 Mar 03 - 03:36 AM
JohnInKansas 12 Mar 03 - 04:15 AM
GUEST,Q 12 Mar 03 - 03:05 PM
JohnInKansas 12 Mar 03 - 03:56 PM
JohnInKansas 12 Mar 03 - 04:21 PM
GUEST,Q 12 Mar 03 - 06:27 PM
Nathan in Texas 12 Mar 03 - 07:08 PM
GUEST,Q 12 Mar 03 - 07:56 PM
JohnInKansas 12 Mar 03 - 10:57 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Jan 08 - 09:48 PM
Bonnie Shaljean 05 Jan 08 - 09:56 PM
Joe Offer 06 Jan 08 - 01:10 AM
JohnInKansas 06 Jan 08 - 05:56 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Jan 08 - 11:26 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 07 Jan 08 - 11:44 PM
GUEST 08 Feb 13 - 02:10 PM
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Subject: POP LYRICS 1886
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 11 Mar 03 - 09:35 PM

I have just come into possession of a small booklet that was apparently a patent medicine advertisement. The front cover, and possibly some pages, are missing. There is no publisher's information or copyright.
The back cover, which is present, has a picture of a rather large "factory looking" building bearing the sign of "C.F. Simmons and Company – Laboratory," which I gather from what's inside was in St. Louis, MO.
The obverse of the first leaf present has calendars for the month of January, 1866 and 1867. Other pages do show the complete 12 months for both years.
The front of the first leaf carries what must be presumed to be an advertisement, rather than a scientific report, proclaiming:

Dr. M. A. Simmons LIVER MEDICINE,
CURES
INDIGESTION, COLIC, CONSTIPATION, LANGUOR,. JAUNDICE, SLEEPLESSNESS, SOUR STOMACH, SICK HEADACHE, NERVOUS HEADACHE, LOSS OF APPETITE, MALARIAL FEVER, BAD TASTE IN MOUTH, BILIOUSNESS, DROWSINESS, DYSPEPS1A, D1ZZINESS, RESTLESSNESS, HEARTBURN, NERVOUSNESS, DYSENTERY, FOUL BREATH, BILIOUS FEVER, LOW SPIRITS, TORPID LIVER, WEIGHT IN STOMACH AFTER EATING.
IT PREVENTS FEVER AND AGUE, CHOLERA, YELLOW FEVER,

It brings sleep to the sleepless.
It has saved thousands of lives.
It has saved millions of doctors' bills.
It is pleasant to take--children cry for it.
It is purely vegetable and perfectly harmless,
It has more certificates than any medicine in the world.
It sells at the rate of 5,000 packages and bottles every day.
It is recommended by the most eminent physicians in the world.
It is recommended and used by more druggists than any medicine in America.
It is endorsed and used by nearly all the bishops and noted ministers in the land.
PREPARED ONLY BY C. F. SIMMONS MEDICINE CO., ST LOUIS, MO.

It's apparently also good for the livestock.

TO THE POINT:

The booklet has lyrics for a number of presumedly popular songs of the era (mostly in the vernacular of the era, which is non-PC in a few places).

DARLING NELLY GRAY, BY B. R.HANBY
OVER JORDAN.
THE OLD CABIN HOME
TRABLING BACK TO GEORGIA, BY C. D. BLAKE.
GENTLE ANNIE., BY S. C. FOSTER.
WHERE IS MY WANDERING BOY
UNCLE NED, BY S. C. FOSTER
IN THE MORNING BY THE BRIGHT LIGHT, BY JAMES BLAND.
MASSA,'S IN DE COLD GROUND, BY S. C. FOSTER.
LITTLE OLD CABIN IN THE LANE, BY WILL S. HAYS.
SHALL WE MEET BEYOND THE RIVER
KINGDOM COMING, BY HENRY C. WORK.
OLD FOLKS AT HOME, BY S. C. FOSTER,
ELLIE RHEE, OF CARRY ME BACK TO TENNESSEE, BY SEP. WINNER.
GOOD-BYE, LIZA JANE, BY EDDIE FOX
WE'LL WORK TILL JESUS COMES
THE LITTLE BROWN JUG.
THE OLD HOME AIN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE, BY C. A. WHITE.
BEAUTIFUL RIVER
DIXIE'S LAND, BY D. EMMETT
OH! DEM GOLDEN SLIPPERS!, BY JAMES A. BLAND,
OLD BLACK JOE, BY S. C. FOSTER
I'SE GWINE BACK TO DIXIE, BY C. A. WHITE
NINETY AND NINE
KEEP IN DE MIDDLE OB DE ROAD, BY WILL S. HAYS.
LISTEN TO THE MOCKING BIRD, BY ALICE HAWTHORNE.
JORDAN IS A HARD ROAD TO TRABEL, BY DAN EMMET.
NEARER, MY GOD, TO THEE.
LITTLE MORE CIDER, BY AUSTIN HART.
OLD DAN TUCKER.

My question: Is it of interest to anyone to have apparently authentic ca. 1886 lyrics to these?

As they are mostly well known, and have been discussed, I rather hate to waste the bandwidth to post them if there's no real use for them. (The full lyrics are about 35 pages in Word.)

John


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 12:41 AM

Many of them are well-known songs from the 1830s to the 1850s.
Some of them have been posted and discussed in detail in Mudcat. Most are available as original sheet music from American Memory and Levy sheet music so there is no point in repeating them. The first step would be to eliminate those at these two sites, then check other sites to eliminate those that are easily found. The remainder would be candidates for posting.

All Foster, Blake, Bland, Emmett, Hays, Winner, Work, Hawthorne songs can be eliminated. Sheet music exists at sites accessible on the web.

Always of interest are previously unposted verses of old standbys like Old Dan Tucker, Little Brown Jug, etc. and those withour listed authors.

I checked a few that I didn't recognize, like Little More Cider, by Hart- in American Memory; This Old Home... by White, in American Memory; Ellie Rhee (1865), in American Memory. No point in posting these.


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 01:12 AM

Hi, John - I have to say I'm a little jealous. Sounds like a real treasure you have there. I have mixed feelings on posting that stuff, I guess. I think I'd go through it and compare what you have to what we've got, and post any corrections or alternate versions you come up with. I don't think I'd be as restrictive as Q - if there's sheet music and no lyrics, how can you search the lyrics of a place like Levy or American Memory Collection?
At one time, I thought it would be good to post every song in every book I have if it hasn't been posted already. Now, I'm not so sure. If there is a discussion of a particular song, I post every version I have if it's significantly different - this appllies most to songs where no songwriter is known. For composed songs that are readily available elsewhere, maybe it's not always necessary to post them.
I think it's darn helpful for you to post the index like you did, because those songs will now turn up in a search, and we know we can beg them from you if we need them.
In conclusion, I guess I'd have to say, "I dunno. Ask Dick."
-Joe Offer-
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 03:12 AM

Joe & Q:

I think I'll hold off posting until I can check what's already there. I've scanned them, and made rough corrections, so I have the lyrics if anyone asks.

Meanwhile, the same fistfull of old stuff has:

Songs for the Loyal Temperance Legion © 1928, National Women's Christian Temperance Union. (Some really maudlin stuff, but maybe something some of our folk need(?).)

Favorite Radio Songs © 1937, Virgil Stamps, Stamps-Baxter Music Co. (Mostly Religious.)

Radio and Revival Special © 1939, R. E. Winsett. (Hymns and Evangelical Songs)

and

True Blue Republican Campaign Songs for 1888 © 1888, S. Brainard's Sons. (Includes the classic(?) "All on account of the Mugwumps.")

The last one had a separate single sheet of what looks like "piano tab(?)" inserted. Something I've never seen before - 3 songs, "Plantation Echo," "Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!" and "Silver Threads Among the Gold." (The last is the only one with lyrics.)

Haven't really started looking at these, so it may be a while before I can post what's there - if anything.

John


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 03:36 AM

John, we've never had a really good temperance thread....
I'd sure like to see some of those songs. Can you send me tunes to post?
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 04:15 AM

Joe

It's a fairly small "pamphlet," - about 30 pages, and I think it should lay flat enough to scan; but it may be a few days before I get a chance to get with it.

I've got an email addy for you (ya been talking to her). I'll see what I can 'gin up.

John


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 03:05 PM

Can't find "All...Mugwumps" or Plantation Echo at American Memory or at Levy.
There are always requests for "revival" material.


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 03:56 PM

Q -

I'm sending Joe some scans of the WCTU thing, in hopes he may be able to "mine" it before I have time to get to it.

The other stuff is likely to get sidelined for a while due to some family stuff, but I'll try to get into it as soon as I can and see what's actually there.

The revival stuff looks like mostly well known songs, but there may be a few that have slipped out of sight and would be worth documenting.

Incidentally, the True Blue Republican Campaign Songs has an advert inside the front cover for the Democrat version for the same year. I may see if I can get back to the shop where I found the ones I got, with enough time to look a little deeper; but nearly all of the ones I just picked up had the same old lady's name penciled in - the the other side may not be there.

John


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 04:21 PM

Q - addenda

The "Plantation Echo" is on a single loose sheet that was inserted in the Republican Songbook. There are no lyrics to it, and it's in some sort of strange notation I've not seen before.

A dotted line horizontally through the middle.
Vertical bars apparently mark off measures and beats.
Numbers above the dotted line, I would guess are "pitches" of a sort - probably something like "Nashville" notation.
Numbers below the dotted line, similarly, would "complete" a two-note "chord"(?)

Some numbers in the upper row are underlined, which I'm guessing means "up an octave," and some in the lower row have a thicker underline - maybe down(?).

The number in the lower row that's at the beginning of a measure has a large "dot" under it, unless it's underlined (a rhythm mark?).
Some of the numbers in the upper row have a small circle and a dot above them in two of the three songs/tunes.

"Plantation Echo" says it's "four-quarter time", and the spacing used would probably allow indication of 16th notes, although this tune is mostly halves and quarters, with one or two possible eighths if I'm reading it right.

All of the numbers - all three tunes - apparently are between 1 and 7.

Unless someone familiar with this notation wants to take a try at it, I'll probably try to convert it by guess to standard notation to see if I can make a midi that sounds like a tune.

"All on Account of the Mugwumps" says it's to the tune "All on Account of Eliza." Maybe that was a familiar tune in 1888? Credited to an "R. Campaign," as are virtually all of the songs in this book.

John


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 06:27 PM

"All on Account of Eliza" is in American Memory. Sheet music without words. By "Solomon" 1881. Music for piano, flute, violin, etc.


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: Nathan in Texas
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 07:08 PM

The Temperance Songbook (by Emmett C. Coleman,1907), containing 61 songs, was reprinted in 1971 by American Heritage Press, with a new copyright by David Hoffman. [Can he really do that?!] I found one on e-bay a while back - don't know how hard it is to find. You can see some of the songs at http://www.oberlin.edu/~rvillafa/UStemperance.htm


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 07:56 PM

I believe John in Kansas has a different temperance handbook -there were several. Would like to see a list of titles.
The Loyal Temperance Union (1877) is sponsored by the WCTU and still active. Their pledge may be found here: Pledge
Click on publications and an address is given from which a catalog may be obtained. Do they still have a temperance songbook? sigpress@variomail.com


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Subject: INDEX: Songs for the Loyal Temperance Legion
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 10:57 PM

INDEX from Songs for the Loyal Temperance Legion © 1928, National Woman's Christian Temperance Union.

America Is Free
Children's Prayer
Fight the Wrong
Good Night
Hear the Brooklet
Kindergarten Song
Little Crusaders
Loving-Kindness To All
Make the World More Bright
March of the Loyal Legion
Never Drink Whiskey or Brandy
Our Heroes
Our Secret
Our Wonderful House
Pledge Song
Prohibition Echo Song
Ring! Bells, Ring!
Round For Boys
Temperance Pilgrim's Marching Song
The Bubbling Spring
The Children's Jubilee
The Fairy in the Well
The Flag of Stars
The Triumph of Truth
Water-Drinkers
The Windmill
This Is My Father's World
Total Abstinence Round
Victory Bells
We'll Turn Down Our Glasses
Whoever Heard of a Poor Old Horse?
Work and Play
World Campaigners
Who Bought the Beer?

A loose single sheet tucked into the book has 5 songs on one side:
"Goodby, Auto!," – Tune: "Goodby, My Lover, Goodby"
I" Want to Drive!," – Tune "Auld Lang Syne"
"Our Glasses Upside Down," – Tune: "Auld Lang Syne"
"What's the Matter with Whiskey," – Tune: "What's the Matter with Father?
"Radio," – Tune: "Farmer in the Dell"
"Children's Benediction" is at the bottom of the page

Reverse of the sheet is titled "Sing and Yell with the L T L - L T L Song Sheet"
"Freedom" – (to the music of America)

Yells:
"No! No! No!" – Humpy
"Seeing Straight" – F.E.M.
"To Market, to Market" – F.E.M.
"Diller – Dollar" – I.I.G."

A notation at the bottom of the page states:
"Songs and yells used here by definite grant. Must not be reprinted, in State WCTU papers or elsewhere, except by special permission."

The single sheet bears pricing information, (35 cents per hundred) from the National WCTU Publishing House, Evanston, Illinois, implying - butnot stating - that it is their copyright.(?)

John


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Jan 08 - 09:48 PM

I've copied the list of songs in JohnInKansas' first message, and looked up sheet music for as many as I could find, and present them here as links. In a couple of cases, I couldn't find sheet music, so I linked to a page at CyberHymnal.

DARLING NELLY GRAY, by B. R. Hanby

OVER JORDAN.

THE OLD CABIN HOME by T. Paine.

TRABLING BACK TO GEORGIA, by C. D. Blake.

GENTLE ANNIE, by S. C. Foster.

WHERE IS MY (WANDERING) BOY TO-NIGHT?, by Rev. Robert Lowry.

UNCLE NED, by S. C. Foster.

IN THE MORNING BY THE BRIGHT LIGHT, by James Bland.

MASSA'S IN DE COLD GROUND, by S. C. Foster.

LITTLE OLD CABIN IN THE LANE, by Will S. Hays.

SHALL WE MEET (BEYOND THE RIVER), by Horace L. Hastings & Elihu S. Rice.

KINGDOM COMING, by Henry C. Work.

OLD FOLKS AT HOME, by S. C. Foster.

ELLIE RHEE, OR CARRY ME BACK TO TENNESSEE, by Sep. Winner.

GOOD-BYE, LIZA JANE, by Eddie Fox.

WE'LL WORK TILL JESUS COMES, by Elizabeth Mills & William Miller.

THE LITTLE BROWN JUG by Betta.

THE OLD HOME AIN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE, by C. A. White.

BEAUTIFUL RIVER by Rev. R. Lowry.

DIXIE'S LAND, by D. Emmett.

OH! DEM GOLDEN SLIPPERS!, by James A. Bland.

OLD BLACK JOE, by S. C. Foster.

I'SE GWINE BACK TO DIXIE, by C. A. White.

NINETY AND NINE by Elizabeth C. Clephane and Ira D. Sankey.

KEEP IN DE MIDDLE OB DE ROAD, by Will S. Hays.

LISTEN TO THE MOCKING BIRD, by Alice Hawthorne.

JORDAN IS A HARD ROAD TO TRABEL, by Dan Emmet.

NEARER, MY GOD, TO THEE, by Sarah Frances Adams, S. Glover, and Dr. Lowell Mason.

LITTLE MORE CIDER, by Austin Hart.

OLD DAN TUCKER, by Dan. D. Emmit.


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 05 Jan 08 - 09:56 PM

WOW Jim. That's absolutely magnificent - thanks so much.


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Jan 08 - 01:10 AM

Since Jim found sources for all the others, could you post the lyrics for "Over Jordan," John? I came across Helen Schneyer's "Crossing Over to the Other Side of Jordan" today, and wonder if it's the same song.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 06 Jan 08 - 05:56 PM

I have the scans from the book filed as ALMANAC1886, for reference. As previously indicated, there's no "source data" or even a publisher ID found in the old book.

OVER JORDAN.

With His dear and loving care,
Will the Savious lead us on,
To the hills and valleys fair
Over Jordan?
Yes, we'll rest our weary feet
By the crystal waters sweet,
When the peaceful shore we greet
Over Jordan.

CHO.—Over Jordan? Over Jordan!
Yes, we'll rest our weary feet
By the crystal waters sweet,
Over Jordan, over Jordan;
When the peaceful shores we'll greet
Over Jordan.

Through the rocky wilderness,
Will the Saviour lead us on
To the land we shall possess
Over Jordan?
Yes, by night the wondrous ray,
Cloudy pillar by the day
They shall guide us on the way
Over Jordcn.

With His strong and mighty hand.
Will the Savior lead us on,
To that good and pleasant land
Over Jordan?
Yes, where vine and olive grow,
And the brooks and fountains flow,
Thirst nor hunger shalt we know
Over Jordan.

In the Promised Land to be,
Will the Saviour lead us on,
Till fair Canaan's shore we see
Over Jordan?
Yest to dwell with Thee, at last,
Guide and lead us, as Thou hast,
Till (t)he parted wave be passed
Over Jordan.

John


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Subject: Lyr Add: OVER JORDAN (Frank M. Graham)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Jan 08 - 11:26 PM

The Cyberhymnal has a song called OVER JORDAN. Except for the phrase "over Jordan," the lyrics are completely different from those posted by JohnInKansas above.

The tune of the MIDI file at Cyberhymnal perfectly fits the lyrics given by JohnInKansas, but it doesn't quite fit the lyrics given by Cyberhymnal! I suspect the editor of Cyberhymnal accidentally conflated the lyrics of the refrain with one of the verses. Here's what Cyberhymnal has:

OVER JORDAN
(Frank M. Graham, circa 1904.)

O come and go with me,
If from sin you would be free;
You will find it good for thee,
Over Jordan.
'Tis a land of corn and wine,
And there's fruit of every kind;
You will find it is sublime,
Over Jordan.

Refrain

Over Jordan, over Jordan,
O it is a pleasant place,
For I have the "second grace."
Over Jordan's rolling sand
Into happy Beulah land,
'Tis a pleasant place to live,*
Over Jordan.

Refrain

Many will not enter in,
For they want to cling to sin,
And their journey won't begin,
Over Jordan.
And they see the giants there,
For their vision is not clear,
And they will not go for fear,
Over Jordan.

Refrain

Our leader is the Lord,
And we have His precious Word;
We will use it for our sword,
Over Jordan.
So you need not ever fear,
For He's promised to be near,
And you'll find Him very dear,
Over Jordan.

Refrain

Now won't you come and go,
While He's pleading with you so,
Where the milk and honey flow,
Over Jordan.
If you'll get the "second grace,"
You'll be talking face to face,
While you're running in the race,
Over Jordan.

Refrain

[*Note this line doesn't rhyme with anything, which makes me suspect a transcribing error.]


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1886
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 07 Jan 08 - 11:44 PM

(persoanl opinions regarding previous posters removed by .gargoyle on "self editing to Mudcat standards")

This has potential to evolve into an "MC-classic" thread

POP - of the "Gay Ninties" evolved from Folk Roots.

Perhaps, the best example would be Stephan Foster
http://www.stephenfoster.info/

Read, Heed, Reflect.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: POP LYRICS 1888
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Feb 13 - 02:10 PM

I have a pamplet no jacket
entitled True Blue Republican Campaign Songs


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