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Lyr Req: The Fishermen of England

GUEST,Kevin Wilson 18 Mar 03 - 01:18 AM
greg stephens 18 Mar 03 - 03:07 AM
Nigel Parsons 18 Mar 03 - 04:56 AM
GUEST 18 Mar 03 - 06:10 AM
IanC 18 Mar 03 - 06:15 AM
Dave Wynn 18 Mar 03 - 12:21 PM
GUEST,Kevin Wilson 18 Mar 03 - 12:54 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Mar 03 - 01:10 PM
Anglo 18 Mar 03 - 09:05 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Mar 03 - 09:16 PM
Anglo 19 Mar 03 - 01:59 AM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Mar 03 - 09:47 AM
IanC 19 Mar 03 - 10:13 AM
ooh-aah 20 Mar 03 - 02:48 AM
MikeofNorthumbria 20 Mar 03 - 08:46 AM
GUEST,Kevin Wilson 20 Mar 03 - 12:45 PM
GUEST 20 Mar 12 - 04:59 AM
Nigel Parsons 20 Mar 12 - 07:07 AM
GUEST,Ian B 23 Sep 12 - 05:29 PM
GUEST,B.scott 16 May 17 - 06:39 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: GUEST,Kevin Wilson
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 01:18 AM

I'm looking for the words of a song my father in the UK used to sing. I can remember some of them but there are gaps. Can't find it in the DT. This is what I remember:

Around the shores of England
something something...
There lives a something something
And they labour mightily

(chorus)
With merry oaths and laughter
And a smile upon their lips
The fishermen of England
The fishermen of England
Go down, go down
To the sea, in ships

(more verses that I don't remember)

I suspect this is some kind of Victorian era parlour song originally.

Thanks for any help

Kevin
(Vancouver, BC, Canada)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: greg stephens
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 03:07 AM

Not only can I not remember the whole song, I can't remember the very funny parody of it I heard once, either. So I'm not much help I'm afraid. But I hope you find it and sing it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 04:56 AM

Last verse (from Here

"And when the foes of England
Assail in fury blind,
The children of the storm arise
And leave their nets behind.
With merry oath and laughter
And a smile upon their lips
The fishermen of England
Go down to the sea in ships."

Nigel


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 06:10 AM

Written in 1921 by Montague Phillips for the opera "The Rebel Maid".

A v. popular concert number, but I haven't found tghe words on the web yet.

:-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: IanC
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 06:15 AM

Sorry. That was me ... lost my cookie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Dave Wynn
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 12:21 PM

My Sis sings it when she is bored on long drives. It's a very patriotic blood and thunder type of song not current in most folk clubs over this side of the pond (UK).

If you really really want the words I will ask her to get them for me.

Spot


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: GUEST,Kevin Wilson
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 12:54 PM

Well that's 2 verses anyway :-) now I see those words, I remember them. Thanks to all! It was interesting too to see where it comes from.

Spot, it's not exactly a life-or-death thing, but if you have the opportunity to ask your sister for teh words, I would appreciate it.

Patriotic blood-and-thunder would just fit my Dad :-)

Kevin


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 01:10 PM

Trivia corner: there is a folk music connection. Lady Mary Trefusis, who played the lead in the original production, was the first President of the English Folk Dance Society (which later became EFDSS) from its establishment in 1913 until her death in 1927. A room at Cecil Sharp House is named after her.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Anglo
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 09:05 PM

How the hell did you know that, Malcolm ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Mar 03 - 09:16 PM

I'm cursed with a very good memory for useless information. Can't remember what I did the day before yesterday, mind.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Anglo
Date: 19 Mar 03 - 01:59 AM

But nonetheless I am confused. According to the synopsis linked above, Lady Mary Trefusis was the (presumably fictional) heroine of the piece, assisting William of Orange.

(It now being Wednesday, I can report that the day before yesterday I spent twelve hours playing music in an Irish bar in a band with fellow Mudcatter George Ward).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Mar 03 - 09:47 AM

It's me that was confused, as it turns out! You are of course right, and I was talking nonsense, having read the cast list the wrong way around. Oh well; the information, if it can be called that, turns out to be even more useless than I had imagined. The coincidence of names is mildly interesting, though; the writer must have been aware that his heroine had a contemporary namesake, I'd think, as she was to some extent "in the trade".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: IanC
Date: 19 Mar 03 - 10:13 AM

BTW the words are by Gerald Dodson. I got it wrong above. Music by Montague Phillips though.

:-)


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE FISHERMEN OF ENGLAND
From: ooh-aah
Date: 20 Mar 03 - 02:48 AM

THE FISHERMEN OF ENGLAND
From the opera "The Rebel Maid"
Words by Gerald Dodson, music by Montague F. Phillips, ©1941.
As sung by Peter Dawson

Around the shores of England, that stretch toward the sea,
There dwell an ancient people, and they labour mightily.
In havens unfrequented that the busy life forgets,
The fishermen of England are working at their nets.

In tiny vessels they defy the perils of the deep
And scan the waters' dreary waste with eyes that never sleep,
And when at night you safely lie in blankets snug and warm,
The fishermen of England are riding out the storm.

And when the foes of England set sail in fury blind,
The children of the storm arise and leave their nets behind.
With merry oath and laughter, and a smile upon their lips,
The fishermen of England, the fishermen of England
Go down, go down, to the sea in ships.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: MikeofNorthumbria
Date: 20 Mar 03 - 08:46 AM

When I was a youngster (a very long time ago) this song was often heard on the BBC, usually sung by the great Australian Bass-Baritone, Peter Dawson. Dawson's repertoire was not particularly folky - though it included a classic version of that song about the Cornish Floral Dance. However, he did have a superb voice, and a very natural delivery (no sign of the rather strained manner in which some classically trained singers tend to attack traditional material). Many of Dawson's old 78 rpm records have been reissued on CD for the nostalgia market, and singers looking for inspiration, or even for fresh items for their repertoire, might care to give them a listen.

Wassail!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Fishermen of England
From: GUEST,Kevin Wilson
Date: 20 Mar 03 - 12:45 PM

Huzzah indeed - thanks ooh-ahh!

(Any advance on three verses?... do I hear four?... gentleman in the back row?... :-) )

Kevin


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Fishermen of England
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Mar 12 - 04:59 AM

around the shores of england that stretch toword the sea
there dwell an ancient people and they labour mightily
in havens unfrequented that a busy life foregets
the fishermen of england are working at their nets

in tiny vessels they defy the perils of the deep
and scan the waters dreary waste with eyes that never sleep
and when at night in bed you in blankets snug and warm
the fishermen of england are rideing out the storm

and when the foes of england set sale in fury blind
the children of the storm arrise and leave their nets behind
in merry outh and laughter and a smile upon their lips
the fishermen of england go down go down to..the..sea..in..ships.

I would like to hear this sung by, Paol Robison







































to the sea in ships


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Fishermen of England
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 20 Mar 12 - 07:07 AM

How the internet has evolved since 2003!
Peter Dawson

"The Fishermen of England" now gets thousands of hits. I've yet to spot one with the tune though!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Fishermen of England
From: GUEST,Ian B
Date: 23 Sep 12 - 05:29 PM

Paul Robeson (note the spelling) was a Bass. This song is for a Baritone. I know as I sing it all the time in my repertoire!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Fishermen of England
From: GUEST,B.scott
Date: 16 May 17 - 06:39 AM

Been singing this to myself for the last 2days,don't know why, remember all the words fro 68 years ago but can't remember why I went upstairs 2mins ago.lol


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