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Lyr Req: Joe Coburn the Boxer

Brack& 23 Jun 98 - 08:10 PM
Back& 21 Jul 98 - 07:02 PM
Brack& 20 Oct 98 - 07:30 AM
Brack& 10 Dec 98 - 09:47 PM
Brakn 18 Mar 99 - 08:22 PM
Ian 19 Mar 99 - 11:34 AM
Brakn 20 Mar 99 - 07:14 AM
Brakn 25 Jan 00 - 03:05 PM
Brakn 27 Jan 00 - 02:58 AM
John in Brisbane 27 Jan 00 - 05:44 PM
Joe Offer 27 Jan 00 - 05:56 PM
John in Brisbane 27 Jan 00 - 06:58 PM
GUEST,Jim Dixon 27 Jan 00 - 07:15 PM
Brakn 27 Jan 00 - 08:01 PM
John in Brisbane 27 Jan 00 - 09:06 PM
GUEST,Murray on SS 27 Jan 00 - 10:08 PM
Áine 27 Jan 00 - 10:15 PM
GUEST,Murray on Saltspring 27 Jan 00 - 10:53 PM
John in Brisbane 27 Jan 00 - 11:21 PM
Brakn 28 Jan 00 - 03:29 AM
Joe Offer 28 Jan 00 - 03:38 AM
Áine 28 Jan 00 - 09:44 AM
Áine 28 Jan 00 - 10:47 PM
Joe Offer 29 Jan 00 - 02:39 AM
GUEST,Murray again 02 Feb 00 - 02:53 PM
John Moulden 02 Feb 00 - 03:09 PM
Joe Offer 06 Jun 06 - 03:04 PM
Peace 06 Jun 06 - 03:09 PM
weerover 06 Jun 06 - 03:12 PM
weerover 06 Jun 06 - 03:16 PM
Peace 06 Jun 06 - 03:36 PM
GUEST,weerover 07 Jun 06 - 05:49 AM
GUEST 10 Oct 11 - 10:25 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Oct 11 - 02:38 AM
Brakn 20 Oct 11 - 07:18 AM
Jim Dixon 25 Oct 11 - 10:10 PM
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Subject: LYR REQ Coburn ( The Boxer)
From: Brack&
Date: 23 Jun 98 - 08:10 PM

I heard about this song a few years ago. He apparently was an ancestor of mine, and was heavyweight champion of America c.1864 (Bareknuckles). Anyone know it?


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Subject: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Back&
Date: 21 Jul 98 - 07:02 PM

I heard about this song a few years ago. He apparently was an ancestor of mine, and was heavyweight bareknuckles champion of America c.1864. I think he died in the US c.1890 so it's probably an old one. Anyone know it?

No...Simon and Garfunkel didn't do it.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ Coburn ( The Boxer)
From: Brack&
Date: 20 Oct 98 - 07:30 AM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Brack&
Date: 10 Dec 98 - 09:47 PM

This a last try. Anyone know this?

Regards Mick Bracken


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Subject: RE: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Brakn
Date: 18 Mar 99 - 08:22 PM

This a last try. Definately!!!Anyone know this?

Regards Mick Bracken


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Subject: RE: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Ian
Date: 19 Mar 99 - 11:34 AM

From http://www.cyberboxingzone.com/boxing/coburn.htm

Coburn was an intelligent, crafty battler who was quick and agile; His footwork was good and he hit with two fast hands. BORN: Jul 29 1835; Middletown County, Armagh, Ireland DIED : Dec. 6 1890; New York, NY

HEIGHT : 5-9 1/4 WEIGHT : 154-190 lbs RACE : White; Irish-American

All I can find but the site has details of his fights.


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Subject: RE: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Brakn
Date: 20 Mar 99 - 07:14 AM

Thanks Ian, I've been to that site, though there seems to be some debate, within the family, about where he was born. It's the song I'm after.

Regards Mick Bracken


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Subject: Murray
From: Brakn
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 03:05 PM

Murray

You posted the following to a thread I started about 18 months ago....somehow I missed it...

There's 2 songs about Coburn in James N. Healy, The Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads, vol.3, "The People at Play", pp. 93-96, namely "The Cowardly Englishman" (begins "You gallant sons of Grania, pay attention for a while") and "Coburn's Challenge to Heenan", beginning :You gallant sons of Paddy's land I hope you will draw near".Does this help??

Any chance of you emailing me the lyrics to both songs or even posting them here.

Coburn may be a relation of mine.

Regards Mick Bracken


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Subject: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Brakn
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 02:58 AM

There are 2 songs in James N. Healy, The Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads, vol.3, "The People at Play", pp. 93-96, namely "The Cowardly Englishman" (begins "You gallant sons of Grania, pay attention for a while") and "Coburn's Challenge to Heenan", beginning :You gallant sons of Paddy's land I hope you will draw near".

Has anyone out there got this book?

These two songs are urgently needed!!

Mick Bracken


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 05:44 PM

Mick, I don't have access to a copy here, but I think I can get hold of this by mid Feb, about 1,600 kms away. I suspect that this may not meet your urgent timetable. I'll be on standby if you can't find it in the interim. Regards, John


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 05:56 PM

Darn it, Mick, I thought I had that book or knew where to get it, but I didn't have any luck. It made me think that maybe we should catalogue our collective library, and complie a list of who has what songbooks....not that I have time to even catalogue my own books in the near future... Luckily, we have the UTK Song Index (click) to help.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 06:58 PM

Joe, you crafty old coot. when did you locate such a marvellous site? Thank you for sharing it. I've just recently started copying the contents/index pages of some of my books, but alas I don't have the discipline to tackle a librarian's job. This site is definitely worth exploring. Regards, John


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: GUEST,Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 07:15 PM

Does this help? Irish-born Joe Coburn succeeded John Heenan as Heavyweight Champion of America in 1862 because Heenan refused his challenge. See:

http://www.cyberboxingzone.com/boxing/coburn.htm

I found this by using "Coburn Heenan" as search arguments in Google. Is the other song a ballad about boxing too? We might be able to find something if we knew the names of the boxers.


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Brakn
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 08:01 PM

Such wonderful help!!
I've waited for about 15 years for these songs and I know that they're in that book......I can wait a while longer.

They are only important because this guy Coburn (who the two songs are about) may be an ancestor of mine.

Thank you Aine, John and Joe for your interest

Jim, you can read a bit more about Coburn the Boxerhere,just look on the left hand side.

The first one to post the lyrics will get a prize.....Roy Keane's autograph.....I'm playing for him next and see everybody outside the UK and Ireland saying to themselves...Who's Roy Keane?

Do not start a thread "Who is Roy Keane?"

Regards Mick Bracken


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 09:06 PM

Mick, now that you've introduced an element of pathos and competition the game plans have certainly altered. I'm on the case right now. Regards, John

I'm so looking forward to getting Roy Rene's autograph.


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Subject: RE: Murray
From: GUEST,Murray on SS
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 10:08 PM

See the other thread - in a wee while.


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Áine
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 10:15 PM

Dear Mick,

I do hope that you'll share the lyrics and tune when you get them -- I'm watching this thread like a hawk.

-- Áine


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Subject: Lyr Add: COWARDLY ENGLISHMAN + COBURN'S CHALLENGE
From: GUEST,Murray on Saltspring
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 10:53 PM

A NEW SONG CALLED
THE COWARDLY ENGLISHMAN

You gallant sons of Grania, pay attention for a while,
I'm sure these verses I have here will cause you soon to smile,
Concerning this great battle we've expected to take place,
But the Englishman was cowardly and did not show his face.

chorus
So toasty to worthy Coburn, his praise we will sing,
He did defy the ENGLISHMAN as he approached the ring.

On the 4th day of October our Champion took his way,
With courage bold I will unfold his valour to display,
He gave three cheers for Ireland and the little Shamrock Green,
The English cried we are ashamed, Jem Mace cannot be seen.

The Englishmen bet five to one that Mace would gain the day,
But indeed they were mistaken for poor Jem he ran away,
Our champion boldly stood the ring without either dread or fear,
But he was disappointed Jem Mace did not appear.

There were many of our cousins got ready on that day,
And followed gallant Coburn in hopes to see some play
With gold and silver plenty both in pocket and in purse,
Jem Mace for his great cowardise [sic] got many a heavy curse.

My age is nine-and-twenty and my weight eleven stone,
I'm five feet eleven and a half in height and Irish every bone,
I never met a bully yet or fifteen stone or more,
Was ever fit to conquer me all on Columbia's shore.

Jem Mace leave off your boasting you have no more to say,
The day that you were wanted like a coward you ran away,
Indeed it is a pity you should wear the English belt,
For when you came to Ireland, you got shy to show your pelt.

Our champion in great courage with his seconds faced the ring,
But Mace the cowardly bully to his fight they could not bring,
I'm sure he thought of Cooper, when his jaw was broke in two,
For Granua's sons were never beat in all that they went through.

Let Englishmen no longer boast nor Paddy's sons degrade,
For now they must surrender to our gallant Irish blade,
With honour now they wear the belt the English may deplore,
The day they challenged Coburn from Erin's shamrock shore.

Now to conclude and finish I mean to say no more,
But here's to every Irishman that loves the shamrock shore,
Three cheers for brave Joe. Coburn he's a son of Granuale,
To fame the English bullys that his courage may not fail.


A NEW SONG CALL'D
COBURN'S CHALLENGE TO HEENAN

You gallant sons of Paddy's land I hope you will draw near
Its of an Irish Champion brave I mean to let you hear,
His name it is Joe Coburn from Erin's fertile shore
He has now challenged Heenan for £10,000 and more.

My friends and fellow countrymen the truth I'll tell to you
To fight an Irishman like myself is a thing I don't wish to do!
But as he denied his country and sold the fight to King,
I must have satisfaction when we go into the ring.

Heenan my boy get ready and do not flinch from me
I'll show you the way that Cooper fell by Daniel Donnelly
Money will not buy me for gold I do not care
I'll fight in defence of Paddy's land and the laurel that I wear.

I came across the seas before for to fight Jemmy Mace,
But the cowardly dog he was afraid an Irishman to face,
I fought the bullt Hellard and made him for to rue
My copper-coloured gentleman I'll do the same to you.

My name it is Joe Coburn, I belong to Armagh town,
I never feared an Englishman, a black man or a brown
Its true I have fought their best and beat him manfully
I never was bribed by money for to sell my country.

I was trained by that Irish hero they call John Morrissey
Who always fought and conquered for his native country,
He always took old Erin's part to them he ne'er proved untrue
But you dirty dog you have done so for which I'll make you rue.

You deceived your fellow countrymen that bet their gold
And like all other traitors the battle you have sold,
I'll swear by him that made me when we go into the ring
I'll make you think upon the day you sold the fight to King.

Now to conclude and make an end and my pen I will lay down,
Prosperity attend brave Coburn a native of Armagh town
That victory may crown him upon the fighting day,
And soon may the traitor Heenan to his treachery fall a prey.


I hope this does. -- I hope I got those breaks right.
Cheers
Murray

(almost.... just needed an extra one at the end of each verse.... a joe clone)


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 11:21 PM

I guess that means that Murray has secured the prize - well done! Do you have the music as well? If you are able to copy or scan it I'm sure that one of us can perform the notation and satisfy our curiosity about the tunes.

I was fairly certain that this particular book was not in the local State Library, and had just confirmed that with them. Was your source the text by Healy?

Regards, John


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Brakn
Date: 28 Jan 00 - 03:29 AM

What can I say
Wonderful Murray!

The music would also be handy to have.

What shall I do with your prize?

Mick Bracken


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jan 00 - 03:38 AM

Murray, you've been holding out on us! I've been looking for those boxing songs, ever since Mick posted his first request. Isn't it great to finally come up with an answer to this one?
-Joe Offer-

(and when I called around to see if I could get the book, I found out my favorite music store has a 50% discount on books this week. You can guess where I'll be tomorrow.)


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Áine
Date: 28 Jan 00 - 09:44 AM

Well done, Murray! Now who has the tunes?

-- Áine

P.S. Joe - don't spend *too* much money at the music store today!


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Áine
Date: 28 Jan 00 - 10:47 PM

refreshing . . .

Anyone found the tunes yet?


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 Jan 00 - 02:39 AM

Nope. Spent $105 on songbooks and a couple of harmonicas at the half-price sale, but didn't find the books with these songs. I did get a Mercier book of Irish children's songs that looks interesting.
-Joe Offer, posting to refresh-

Murray, you got them tunes, eh?


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: GUEST,Murray again
Date: 02 Feb 00 - 02:53 PM

I don't know what happened there. Anyhow: sorry, folks, no tunes in Healy (my source, as you may expect). In fact it's not unlikely that there _are_ no tunes. So the field may be wide open for someone to make them up. As for my prize, see it goes to a good home.
Cheers
M


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Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: John Moulden
Date: 02 Feb 00 - 03:09 PM

I don't know of any recorded performance of these two songs.

The usual process in Ireland, and probably everywhere that ballads were printed and sold, was for each singer to sing the song to whatever tune came to mind. Sometimes there is a generic tune for certain rhythms - in Ireland nearly every hunting song can be sung to some variation of the same tune. If you are unable to think of one try the tunes for the fight songs in Colm O'Lochlainn's Irish Street Ballads or More ISB.

Ulstersongs currently has a copy of Vol 4 of the Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads and a copy of More Irish Street Ballads. Proposals will be received at jmoul81075@aol.com


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Subject: RE: Lyr req: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 03:04 PM

Murray's gone now, and we never got an answer to this. Does anybody have the The Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads, vol.3, and can you post the two Coburn songs Murray mentioned (or the additional two Mick named)?
I have volumes 2 and 4, darn it.
I thought there were other threads on Coburn, but I couldn't find them. I combined three threads into this one.
-Joe-


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE COWARDLY ENGLISHMAN
From: Peace
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 03:09 PM

The below are from

brakn.com/boxer1.htm



Michael Byron's Family Tree.
Joe Coburn "The Boxer".
Info

Picture

Fights


A report from the New York Times 7th March 1877.

THE COWARDLY ENGLISHMAN

You gallant sons of Grania, pay attention for a while,
I'm sure these verses I have here will cause you soon to smile,
Concerning this great battle we've expected to take place,
But the Englishman was cowardly and did not show his face.

Chorus
So toast to worthy Coburn, his praise we will sing,
He did defy the ENGLISHMAN as he approached the ring.

On the 4th day of October our Champion took his way,
With courage bold I will unfold his valour to display,
He gave three cheers for Ireland and the little Shamrock Green,
The English cried we are ashamed, Jem Mace cannot be seen.

The Englishmen bet five to one that Mace would gain the day,
But indeed they were mistaken for poor Jem he ran away,
Our champion boldly stood the ring without either dread or fear,
But he was disappointed Jem Mace did not appear.

There were many of our cousins got ready on that day,
And followed gallant Coburn in hopes to see some play
With gold and silver plenty both in pocket and in purse,
Jem Mace for his great cowardise [sic] got many a heavy curse.

My age is nine-and-twenty and my weight eleven stone,
I'm five feet eleven and a half in height and Irish every bone,
I never met a bully yet or fifteen stone or more,
Was ever fit to conquer me all on Columbia's shore.

Jem Mace leave off your boasting you have no more to say,
The day that you were wanted like a coward you ran away,
Indeed it is a pity you should wear the English belt,
For when you came to Ireland, you got shy to show your pelt.

Our champion in great courage with his seconds faced the ring,
But Mace the cowardly bully to his fight they could not bring,
I'm sure he thought of Cooper, when his jaw was broke in two,
For Granua's sons were never beat in all that they went through.

Let Englishmen no longer boast nor Paddy's sons degrade,
For now they must surrender to our galland Irish blade,
With honour now they wear the belt the English may deplore,
The day they challenged Coburn from Erin's shamrock shore.

Now to conclude and finish I mean to say no more,
But here's to every Irishman that loves the shamrock shore,
Three cheers for brave Joe Coburn he's a son of Granuale,
To fame the English bullys that his courage may not fail.




COBURN'S CHALLENGE TO HEENAN


You gallant sons of Paddy's land I hope you will draw near
Its of an Irish Champion brave I mean to let you hear,
His name it is Joe Coburn from Erin's fertile shore
He has now challenged Heenan for £10,000 and more.

My friends and fellow countrymen the truth I'll tell to you
To fight an Irishman like myself is a thing I don't wish to do!
But as he denied his country and sold the fight to King,
I must have satisfaction when we go into the ring.

Heenan my boy get ready and do not flinch from me
I'll show you the way that Cooper fell by Daniel Donnelly
Money will not buy me for gold I do not care
I'll fight in defence of Paddy's land and the laurel that I wear.

I came across the seas before for to fight Jemmy Mace,
But the cowardly dog he was afraid an Irishman to face,
I fought the bull Hellard and made him for to rue
My copper-coloured gentleman I'll do the same to you.

My name it is Joe Coburn, I belong to Armagh town,
I never feared an Englishman, a blackman or a brown
Its true I have fought their best and beat him manfully
I never was bribed by money for to sell my country.

I was trained by that Irish hero they call John Morrissey
Who always fought and conquered for his native country,
He always took old Erin's part to them he ne'er proved untrue
But you dirty dog you have done so for which I'll make you rue.

You deceived your fellow countrymen that bet their gold
And like all other traitors the battle you have sold,
I'll swear by him that made me when we go into the ring
I'll make you think upon the day you sold the fight to King.

Now to conclude and make an end and my pen I will lay down,
Prosperity attend brave Coburn a native of Armagh town
That victory may crown him upon the fighting day,
And soon may the traitor Heenan to his treachery fall a prey.


Both songs obtained from James N. Healy's, The Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads, vol.3, "The People at Play"


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Subject: Lyr Add: COBURN'S CHALLENGE TO HEENAN
From: weerover
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 03:12 PM

There's this one (can't remember where I got it):

COBURN'S CHALLENGE TO HEENAN

You gallant sons of Paddy's land I hope you will draw near
Its of an Irish Champion brave I mean to let you hear,
His name it is Joe Coburn from Erin's fertile shore
He has now challenged Heenan for £10,000 and more.

My friends and fellow countrymen the truth I'll tell to you
To fight an Irishman like myself is a thing I don't wish to do!
But as he denied his country and sold the fight to King,
I must have satisfaction when we go into the ring.

Heenan my boy get ready and do not flinch from me
I'll show you the way that Cooper fell by Daniel Donnelly
Money will not buy me for gold I do not care
I'll fight in defence of Paddy's land and the laurel that I wear.

I came across the seas before for to fight Jemmy Mace,
But the cowardly dog he was afraid an Irishman to face,
I fought the bullt Hellard and made him for to rue
My copper-coloured gentleman I'll do the same to you.

My name it is Joe Coburn, I belong to Armagh town,
I never feared an Englishman, a blackman or a brown
Its true I have fought their best and beat him manfully
I never was bribed by money for to sell my country.

I was trained by that Irish hero they call John Morrissey
Who always fought and conquered for his native country,
He always took old Erin's part to them he ne'er proved untrue
But you dirty dog you have done so for which I'll make you rue.

You deceived your fellow countrymen that bet their gold
And like all other traitors the battle you have sold,
I'll swear by him that made me when we go into the ring
I'll make you think upon the day you sold the fight to King.

Now to conclude and make an end and my pen I will lay down,
Prosperity attend brave Coburn a native of Armagh town
That victory may crown him upon the fighting day,
And soon may the traitor Heenan to his treachery fall a prey.

wr


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Subject: RE: Lyr req: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: weerover
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 03:16 PM

The Bodleian library collection has "The Great Fight Between Coburn and Mace"

wr


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Subject: RE: Lyr req: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: Peace
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 03:36 PM

Seem to have repeated some stuff. The lyrics are also posted at

Subject: RE: Mercier Book of Old Irish Street Ballads
From: GUEST,Murray on Saltspring - PM
Date: 27 Jan 00 - 10:53 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyr req: Joe Coburn.......The Boxer
From: GUEST,weerover
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 05:49 AM

Now I remember where I got the Coburn song: it was from that previous thread, I recognise the typo in the first line!

wr


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Joe Coburn the Boxer
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Oct 11 - 10:25 PM

to the first person who responded- we very well may be related! joe coburn was an ancestor of mine, as well.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ...MATCH BETWEEN JEM MACE & JOE COBURN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 02:38 AM

Another song about Coburn, from the Bodleian ballad collection, 2806 c.8(214):


THE FIGHTING MATCH BETWEEN JEM MACE & JOE COBURN

All you who delight the manly art of self defence to see,
The praises of a hero brave I mean to sing to thee.
He is a true bred Irishman though long he's been away,
And for to fight he has come o'er all from America.

My name it is Joe Coburn; I was reared in Middletown,
All in the county of Armagh of fame and high renown.
For to contend with Mace I came all from America.
I will die with honor on the sod or boldly(?) gain the day.

The word has been challenged when our hero heard the news.
Said he, "For to oblige you, sir, I never will refuse."
The challenge being accepted, he unto Mace did say,
"I'll fight you in old Ireland for one thousand pounds, hurrah!"

When I arrived in the ring the brigade begun to slander me,
And said I could not post the stakes but came in poverty.
But they were quite mistaken; I have dollars bright galore.
I mean to take their English gold unto Columbia's shore.

My age is nine and twenty, my weight's eleven stone.
I am five feet eleven ...[illegible]... every bone.
I never met a bully yet of fifteen stone or more
Was ever fit to conquer me all on Columbia's shore.

They thought I'd fight in England but they'll have no green in me.
Likewise on the battle ground I'll choose the referee.
See how they served John Heenan but I mean to get fair play.
I trust to prove a credit to my native country.

Mace, my friend, get ready and for you I will prepare.
I will fill the steps of Donnelly and Cooper on Kildare.
It was a champion like yourself that fought for England.
All his wings were clipt by Donnelly, a true bred Irishman.

When we meet on the Curragh plains it's then we will agree.
I will show you where bold Cooper fell that day by Donnelly.
He strove to win for England but alas that would not do,
For he found a soft spot in him and I might find one in you.

I never was a coward, no, nor one I ne'er will be.
In battle often it's well known I've gained a victory.
I will let them see an Armagh … his country won't disgrace.
They'll find I am no chicken when I toe the scratch with Mace.

With heavy bets on Mace I'm sure John Bull he will advance,
But I will teach him on Kildare to foot an Irish dance.
In him they were too confident and vainly they did boast.
Our Irish boys we'll drink their health; it will be to their cost.

Hibernia never reared a son that never would refuse
To fight an English champion no odds if he should lose,
And if I gain the victory each Irish heart will beat with joy.
[illegible] Coburn our county Armagh boy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Joe Coburn the Boxer
From: Brakn
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 07:18 AM

Thnaks for that Jim.


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Subject: ADD: The Great Fight Between J.Coburn and Jem Mace
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Oct 11 - 10:10 PM

Another broadside from the Bodleian collection, 2806 c.8(102):


A much-admired Song
CALLED
The Great Fight,
BETWEEN
J. Coburn & Jem Mace
For the Championship of Ireland


Attention pay, dear Irishmen, to what you shall hear
Concerning Coburn's challenge to England on this year.
That gallant Irish hero, may the heavens on him smile.
He's loved by all both great & small around old Erin's isle.

CHORUS: Hurrah! Hurrah, for Coburn, boys, a son of Granuaile.
John Morrissy will stand his seconds while he's walloping Jem Mace.

Our noble champion Coburn bet £600 and more—
That he'll wallop any English & leave him in his gore.
At the Curragh of Kildare I'll show some fun & that without delay.
I'll let them know before I go the belt I'll take away.

You all heard tell of the English giant that burst from Stiley's Bridge.
He was walloped in 8 rounds by Mace & he also walloped King;
But Coburn swears to all his might before he do go home,
He'll make him dance to that old tune they call'd sweet Garryown. [sic]

I'll have Jem Mace for to be ready and tell him in a crack—
That as soon as he enters the Curragh of Kildare, I'll surely break his back.
The place appointed for the fight I'm sure you all well know.
It was there that brave Dan Donnelly left Couper in his gore.

I was challenged in the ring all by John Morrissy,
But I being of the Irish blood to that I wouldn't 'gree.
But now I'll fight this bully, and that I'll let ye know.
J. Morrissy will tell me where I'll give him every blow.

To sound his praises more, and the truth I'll relate,
He is in form and in fashion, in every way complete. [sic]
He is six and twenty years of age and accordingly he is strong.
As for strength and activity, he is a clever man.


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Mudcat time: 23 October 10:48 PM EDT

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