Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Chord Req: Danny Deever (Kipling/Bellamy)

DigiTrad:
A PRESENT FROM THE GENTLEMEN
ENGLAND HAS TAKEN ME
ENGLAND SWINGS
FRANKIE'S TRADE
GENTLEMEN-RANKERS
OAK, ASH, AND THORN
THE BASTARD KING OF ENGLAND
THE FRENCH WARS
THE LADIES
THE SONG OF THE BANJO
THE YOUNG BRITISH SOLDIER
WHEN 'OMER SMOTE 'IS BLOOMIN' LYRE


Related threads:
Lyr Add: On the Road to Mandalay (Kipling, Speaks) (83)
Kipling Kipling...all you need to know (8)
Lyr Req: A Smuggler's Song (Rudyard Kipling) (32)
Tune Req: Road to Mandalay (Kipling) (20)
vocabulary: We Have Fed Our Seas (13)
Gunga Din. Racist or just of its time? (50)
Peter Bellamy Kipling documentary (35)
Copyright laws on Kipling (47)
Tune Req: Gift of the Sea (Kipling) (6)
Tune Req: Bellamy-Kipling Blue Roses (3)
Lyr Add: Ballad of the Bolivar (Kipling) (25)
Lyr Req: Frankie's Trade (Rudyard Kipling) (46)
Lyr Add: Lowestoft Boat by Kipling (4)
Lyr Req: On the Road to Mandalay (Kipling) (61)
Lyr Add: Mullholland's Contract (Rudyard Kipling) (3)
Kipling with the Tradition (51)
tunes for kipling verses (5)
Pete Bellamy and Rudyard Kipling (19)
Happy! – Dec 30 (Kipling born 30 Dec 1865) (18)
Lyr Add: The Land (Rudyard Kipling) (11)
Lyr Req: Follow Me Home / Follow Me 'Ome (6)
Tune Req: SNARLEYOW, Kipling poem (4)
Lyr/Tune Req: The Way through the Woods (Kipling) (4)
Lyr Req: Young British Soldier (Kipling) (4)
ADD: Harp Song of the Dane Women (R Kipling) (5)


mg 25 Mar 03 - 10:54 PM
GUEST,Keith A 26 Mar 03 - 03:07 AM
ooh-aah 26 Mar 03 - 03:11 AM
GUEST 26 Mar 03 - 05:37 AM
GUEST,Guest 26 Mar 03 - 07:37 AM
The Walrus 26 Mar 03 - 06:20 PM
Desert Dancer 26 Mar 03 - 06:39 PM
GUEST,Greyeyes 27 Mar 03 - 02:42 PM
GUEST,Lighter 27 Mar 03 - 03:08 PM
Mrrzy 28 Mar 03 - 10:49 AM
GUEST,Leslie Fish 09 Aug 08 - 06:29 AM
Snuffy 09 Aug 08 - 08:30 AM
JeffB 26 Aug 08 - 06:16 AM
The Walrus 26 Aug 08 - 12:36 PM
JeffB 26 Aug 08 - 12:43 PM
Mark Ross 26 Aug 08 - 01:40 PM
tonyteach1 04 Sep 11 - 09:00 AM
MGM·Lion 04 Sep 11 - 09:21 AM
Mathew Raymond 15 Aug 13 - 06:33 PM
Leadfingers 15 Aug 13 - 06:50 PM
Joe Offer 15 Aug 13 - 07:24 PM
Reinhard 16 Aug 13 - 12:19 AM
GUEST,Musket between courses 16 Aug 13 - 03:10 AM
Leadfingers 20 Aug 13 - 05:54 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: mg
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 10:54 PM

is there a tune to the gas one? I sing it to Auld Lang Syne...

Also there is one called when you go to London town, grieving, grieving, take your flowers and set them down at the place of grieving...

as I suffered so have you and that will ease the grieving..I sing that to some version of Banorie??

And of course there is one that is obviously to the tune of we'll rant and we'll roar...we'll duck and we'll dive like little tin turtles??

and one that is obviously maid of amsterdam..in Lowestoff? the keel was laid and she was made for the ___trade..

the leading stoker's _____
the ____ stoker's 17..he don't know what the judgment means..
mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: GUEST,Keith A
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 03:07 AM

Re Gethsemane, Thanks Kevin.
Kippling's only son was killed in WW1. He spent years vainly searching for his grave.
It didn't pass.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: ooh-aah
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 03:11 AM

I'm afraid I don't love Chesterton at all, though I admit his writing is of high quality. If he didn't constantly introduce setentious Catholic propaganda in so much of his stuff I might like him better. A further point about Kipling is that he learned some hard lessons in WW1, when his beloved son John died - he wrote perhaps his most moving and deeply felt story 'The Gardener' afterwards. Chesterton on the other hand continued with his bombastic 'Soldiers of the Lord' rubbish, long after the war when he should have known better - reading 'The Eternal Man' leads one to believe that he learned nothing at all from the carnage. 'The Gardener' also has a Christian conclusion, but it is introduced in a way that does not insult the intelligence of the audience, or distort the story.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 05:37 AM

Mary, If no one posts another tune, I think I will try Derwentwater Farewell ,as Easter approaches and the war goes on.
Keith.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 07:37 AM

Well cheers for some bloody brilliant websites, and an excellent thread on Kipling. I'm a comparitively young folky (20 yrs old) and have been mad on the poem's that have been set to tunes.

I find that for an unaccompanied singer like me, many of the songs are suitable, even if the words sometimes take some remembering. These new websites will keep me busy while i'm finishing this year of university working in Vietnam.

Thanks again
Chris


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: The Walrus
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 06:20 PM

Mary,

Ihave been known to sing "Gethsemene" to the tune of the hymn "There is a Green Hill" - I suppose it's the Easter connection, - I do like the idea of it to "Derwentwater's Farewell" though.

Walrus.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 06:39 PM

Guest Chris, here's one more: John Roberts & Tony Barrand (English expats in New England) did an album called Naulakha Redux. Lyrics, notes, and ordering info are at the Golden Hind website. Mostly Peter Bellamy's settings, but a few others, as well.

~ Becky in Tucson


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: GUEST,Greyeyes
Date: 27 Mar 03 - 02:42 PM

Story of the origin of Tommy Atkins can be found here. Blicky
However it may not be entirely valid, despite Wellinton's biographers, as there are several references to Tommy Atkins in War Office documents as early as 1743.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 27 Mar 03 - 03:08 PM

In the late 1950s, I heard someone on TV utter the phrase, "They're hangin' Danny Deever for the wearin' of the green." When I encountered Kipling's poem in school I immediately set it to that tune, and it works very well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: Mrrzy
Date: 28 Mar 03 - 10:49 AM

They say that in the Army, the Kipling's mighty fine
But if you try to kipple me I'll jump on your behind! Oh, I don't want no more of Army life....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: GUEST,Leslie Fish
Date: 09 Aug 08 - 06:29 AM

Oh yes, plenty of folkies and filkers have put tunes to Kipling's poems -- including me. And yes, he was far more than an Imperial apologist; his poems are as singable, and his prose as readable, today as more than a century ago.

There are MP3s of Kipling poems set to my tunes at my website (www.lesliefish.com) and Joe Bethancourt's (link). Joe does an especially haunting version of "Helen All Alone".

I have three albums of my tunes to Kipling's poems, and a fourth in the works. Enjoy!


--Leslie Fish <;)))><
www.lesliefish.com


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Elegy in a Country Churchyard (Chesterton)
From: Snuffy
Date: 09 Aug 08 - 08:30 AM

Oo-aah thinks Chesterton learned "nothing at all from the carnage". I, however, find this as powerfuland as relevant today as "Recessional"

ELEGY IN A COUNTRY CHURCHYARD
(G. K. Chesterton)

THE men that worked for England
They have their graves at home:
And birds and bees of England
About the cross can roam.

But they that fought for England,
Following a falling star,
Alas, alas for England
They have their graves afar.

And they that rule in England,
In stately conclave met,
Alas, alas for England
They have no graves as yet.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: JeffB
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 06:16 AM

In the last verse of "Follow me 'ome" the funeral squad form up on the command "Thirteen rank". Anyone know just what this means?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: The Walrus
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 12:36 PM

In the 1914 Drill Manual (itelf based on earlier editions), there is the following:-

"...The firing party, consisting of 1 serjeant, 1 corporal and 12 privates, will be drawn up two deep, one pace interval between files, facing the building where the body is placed. The corporal will be on the right of the front rank. The serjeant will give all words of command, and be posted in rear of the centre. Arms will be at the slope..."

So there is a firing party of 13 men -

I assume this is the
..."Three rounds blank" an' follow me,
An' it's "Thirteen rank" an' follow me...


Any help?

Tom


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: JeffB
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 12:43 PM

Yep, that's it. Thanks very much Tom.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: Mark Ross
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 01:40 PM

Leslie Fish, where are you? I'd like to get in touch with you.

Mark Ross


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: tonyteach1
Date: 04 Sep 11 - 09:00 AM

One of the nice aspects of Kindle ownership is the ability to download stuff quickly and very cheaply I have got the Barrack Room Ballads on my E book

We have the Peter Bellamy stuff - some of the tunes are good but (takes deep breath) cannot stand his voice for any length of time


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Meanings, Kipling army song
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 04 Sep 11 - 09:21 AM

Belatedly ~~ Peter Bellamy set 'Danny Deever' to Derwentwater's Farewell. He also wrote an effective tune for Kipling's moving lament for his dead son,'My Son John', despite its rambling and irregular metre. Both originally on the Barrack Room Ballads vinyl LP.

~Michael~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Chord Req: Danny Deever
From: Mathew Raymond
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 06:33 PM

Great song can anyone help?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Chord Req: Danl wiuny Deever
From: Leadfingers
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 06:50 PM

The tune is Derwentwaters Farewell - Not that much time now , but CAN post after the weekend .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Danny Deever (Rudyard Kipling)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 07:24 PM

I don't see the lyrics posted anywhere at Mudcat, and that's a shortcoming that ought to be remedied. Please note, however, that Mathew requested chords.

DANNY DEEVER
(Rudyard Kipling)

"WHAT are the bugles blowin' for?" said Files-on-Parade.
"To turn you out, to turn you out", the Colour-Sergeant said.
"What makes you look so white, so white?" said Files-on-Parade.
"I'm dreadin' what I've got to watch", the Colour-Sergeant said.
For they're hangin' Danny Deever, you can hear the Dead March play,
The regiment's in 'ollow square-they're hangin' him to-day;
They've taken of his buttons off an' cut his stripes away,
An' they're hangin' Danny Deever in the mornin'.

"What makes the rear-rank breathe so 'ard?" said Files-on-Parade.
"It's bitter cold, it's bitter cold", the Colour-Sergeant said.
"What makes that front-rank man fall down?" said Files-on-Parade.
"A touch o' sun, a touch o' sun", the Colour-Sergeant said.
They are hangin' Danny Deever, they are marchin' of 'im round,
They 'ave 'alted Danny Deever by 'is coffin on the ground;
An' 'e'll swing in 'arf a minute for a sneakin' shootin' hound-
O they're hangin' Danny Deever in the mornin'!

"'Is cot was right-'and cot to mine", said Files-on-Parade.
"'E's sleepin' out an' far to-night", the Colour-Sergeant said.
"I've drunk 'is beer a score o' times", said Files-on-Parade.
"'E's drinkin' bitter beer alone", the Colour-Sergeant said.
They are hangin' Danny Deever, you must mark 'im to 'is place,
For 'e shot a comrade sleepin'-you must look 'im in the face;
Nine 'undred of 'is county an' the regiment's disgrace,
While they're hangin' Danny Deever in the mornin'.

"What's that so black agin' the sun?" said Files-on-Parade.
"It's Danny fightin' 'ard for life", the Colour-Sergeant said.
"What's that that whimpers over'ead?" said Files-on-Parade.
"It's Danny's soul that's passin' now", the Colour-Sergeant said.
For they're done with Danny Deever, you can 'ear the quickstep play,
The regiment's in column, an' they're marchin' us away;
Ho! the young recruits are shakin', an' they'll want their beer to-day,
After hangin' Danny Deever in the mornin'.


There's an interesting study of this poem at Wikipedia. I particularly liked this part:
    The Barrack-Room Ballads, as the name suggests, are songs of soldiers. Written by Kipling, they share a form and a style with traditional Army songs. Kipling was one of the first to pay attention to these works; Carrington noted that in contrast to the songs of sailors, "no-one had thought of collecting genuine soldiers' songs, and when Kipling wrote in this traditional style it was not recognised as traditional". Kipling himself was fond of singing his poetry, of writing it to fit the rhythm of a particular tune. In this specific case, the musical source has been suggested as the Army's "grotesque bawdy song" Barnacle Bill the Sailor, but it is possible that some other popular tune of the period was used. However, the ballads were not published with any music, and though they were quickly adapted to be sung, new musical settings were written; a musical setting by Walter Damrosch was described as "Teddy Roosevelt's favourite song", and is sometimes encountered on its own as a tune entitled They're Hanging Danny Deever In The Morning. To date, at least a dozen published recordings are known, made from 1893 to 1985.
    The tune "They're Hanging Danny Deever in the Morning" was played from the Campanile at UC Berkeley at the end of the last day of classes for the Spring Semester of 1930, and has been repeated every year since, making it one of the oldest campus traditions.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Chord Req: Danny Deever (Kipling/Bellamy)
From: Reinhard
Date: 16 Aug 13 - 12:19 AM

Kipling himself was fond of singing his poetry ?

This paragraph in Brian Mattinson aeticle on Kipling and Music says something else:

It is said that Rudyard Kipling was tone deaf, 'my ears being wavering', and, as his daughter has affirmed, completely unmusical. According to Andrew Lycett , singing in the choir at Westward Ho! 'was a struggle; in a letter to a family friend, Rudyard complained that, in preparation for a concert, he was forced to attend choir practice for an hour every Thursday, Friday and Sunday. 'The constant la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la brings out all sorts of queer notes. I can't make out where I get 'em from.' 'He admitted towards the end of his life that Allah had excluded all music from his 'make-up except the brute instinct for beat, as necessary for the manufacture of verse'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Chord Req: Danny Deever (Kipling/Bellamy)
From: GUEST,Musket between courses
Date: 16 Aug 13 - 03:10 AM

My good friend Mitch used to sing this to the Peter Bellamy tune. I used to find it haunting then, 30 odd years ago and reading the words now takes me back.

Mitch sang comedy and parody mainly but his military past did cause the odd delve into thoughtful song.

Thanks for reviving this Joe.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Chord Req: Danny Deever (Kipling/Bellamy)
From: Leadfingers
Date: 20 Aug 13 - 05:54 PM

Chords in C (Just the way I do it)

DANNY DEEVER
(Rudyard Kipling)
C                   G C               F    Dm   Am
"WHAT are the bugles blowin' for?" said Files-on-Parade.
    C                G   C             F                            To turn you out, to turn you out", the Colour-Sergeant said.
       C                F                      C    Dm   Am
"What makes you look so white, so white?" said Files-on-Parade.
      C                  F                  C      G       C   
"I'm dreadin' what I've got to watch", the Colour-Sergeant said.
                           G C            F
For they're hangin' Danny Deever, you can hear the Dead March play,
    C             G C                  F
The regiment's in 'ollow square-they're hangin' him to-day;
         C            F             C         Dm    Am
They've taken of his buttons off an' cut his stripes away,
             C             F             G C   
An' they're hangin' Danny Deever in the mornin'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 21 January 8:02 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.