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BS: Cornish Pasty recipe

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GUEST,James 31 Mar 03 - 10:08 AM
MMario 31 Mar 03 - 10:11 AM
GUEST,James 31 Mar 03 - 10:26 AM
Beccy 31 Mar 03 - 10:55 AM
Eric the Viking 31 Mar 03 - 04:49 PM
Beccy 31 Mar 03 - 05:04 PM
greg stephens 31 Mar 03 - 05:28 PM
greg stephens 31 Mar 03 - 05:30 PM
GUEST,Q 31 Mar 03 - 06:03 PM
GUEST,Q 31 Mar 03 - 06:10 PM
Bev and Jerry 01 Apr 03 - 12:28 AM
greg stephens 01 Apr 03 - 01:53 AM
GUEST,gourmand 01 Apr 03 - 03:41 AM
Dave Bryant 01 Apr 03 - 03:43 AM
Gurney 01 Apr 03 - 06:01 AM
GUEST,Penny S. (elsewhere) 01 Apr 03 - 06:10 AM
GUEST 01 Apr 03 - 08:28 AM
GUEST,James 01 Apr 03 - 08:30 AM
GUEST 01 Apr 03 - 08:30 AM
Bev and Jerry 21 May 03 - 04:28 PM
greg stephens 21 May 03 - 05:59 PM
Uncle_DaveO 21 May 03 - 06:04 PM
Bat Goddess 21 May 03 - 06:10 PM
Penny S. 21 May 03 - 06:16 PM
wysiwyg 22 May 03 - 09:26 AM
Beccy 22 May 03 - 09:31 AM
M.Ted 22 May 03 - 10:19 AM
Beccy 22 May 03 - 12:28 PM
GUEST,Q 22 May 03 - 12:53 PM
M.Ted 22 May 03 - 04:30 PM
TheBigPinkLad 22 May 03 - 06:21 PM
GUEST,Q 22 May 03 - 10:51 PM
Seamus Kennedy 22 May 03 - 10:56 PM
Uncle_DaveO 22 May 03 - 11:06 PM
GUEST,Q 23 May 03 - 12:31 AM
M.Ted 23 May 03 - 12:56 PM
GUEST,CS 18 Mar 12 - 10:55 AM
GUEST,Eliza 18 Mar 12 - 01:44 PM
Deckman 18 Mar 12 - 03:10 PM
Penny S. 19 Mar 12 - 06:59 AM
maeve 19 Mar 12 - 07:11 AM
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Subject: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,James
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 10:08 AM

Can anyone give a good recipe for Cornish Pasties. I'll do it with mince or chicken or the traditional way.

Thank you in advance

James


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: MMario
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 10:11 AM

yes! I have found recipes all over the web - but to get one here on the cat would be great; especially if it comes from someone's family tradition - rather then just a cookbook recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,James
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 10:26 AM

Me too. I have a lot of cook book versions, but would like to hear from some traditional pasty makers. I lived in Cornwall for awhile and became addicted to them. Now I would like to have a go at making my own.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Beccy
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 10:55 AM

Mine isn't terribly traditional for Cornish pasties, but it's what my yooper family has always made...

I can give you some approximations and more details later if you need them.

You want enough butter tart pastry dough for 8 pies (single crust, that is...) Fanny Farmer's recipe for the butter tart dough is darned close to my Grandmum's. She says she uses the tart dough because it's nice and sturdy.

In a huge bowl, mix 1 1/2 to 2 lbs lean finely chopped or ground beef or a mixture of beef and ground pork. Put in about 4 cups potatoes, peeled and small cubed, 2 cups similarly prepared rhutabaga, 2 cups similarly prepared carrots, 1 very large onion, medium chopped, salt and pepper to taste.

Preheat oven to 425F.

Divide dough evenly into 8, 8" circles. Divide the filling evenly between the circles, placing the filling on one half of the circle. Fold the other half of the circle over the filling, and crimp edges firmly together with a fork. Slice a couple of slits into the top of each pasty to allow steam to escape.

Bake for about 1 hour. Serve with whatever you like. In the U.P., we served it with chow-chow, ketchup and/or brown gravy. Yum, yum, yum. It makes me want to put on some snow shoes, grab some hard cider and pull out the instruments.

Beccy


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 04:49 PM

Ah, but real cornish pasties use the skirt of the beef-that is the flap that fits along the bottom of the rib cage-it's quite difficult to get. I knoze coz I's livin with a Cornish lass (18 years plus).Don't know what Rhutabaga is tho-try turnip or sweed and don't cube them. Small about 3/4 - 1 inch slices, 1/8th inch thick slices is proper. And ye don't crimp the edges together with a fork- you roll them together to make a very thick crust roll-wot was thrown away after the miner held it in their fingers when eating it down the mines.

If'n you want to make them really real/traditional you put one half meat and veg-Main course the other half sweet-apple or plum and fruit. They are the size of a 12 inch plate (proper) with the roll of pastry.Propoer lard is needed as well.(Though very bad for you)

Good eatin.

Cheers

Eric-Viking conquerer of cornish woman.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Beccy
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 05:04 PM

Rhutabaga is (taste-wise) like a potato crossed with a turnip crossed with a carrot. It's quite tasty and keeps incredibly well in yooper cellars through the long winter.

Like I said, I know mine's not traditional- but it's awfully tasty and it's the one I grew up eating. :-)

Beccy


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: greg stephens
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 05:28 PM

Well. I can speak with some family backing here, I can count seven generations back in Cornwall Plenty of variety is allowed, I make what I consider is a masterful pasty with bacon bits. But I think the classic mainstream oggie should have lamb or mutton as the meat ingredient, in chunks, not minced. The onion not cut too fine. The spuds quite chunky. likewise. Loads of black pepper ( add what you think is reasonable, then double it).I don't bother with salt, but most do. I tend to throw in a little smoked bacon instead And some swede(which I think is the American rutabaga).Lay the onions on the pastry, then the meat, then the potatoes and swede. Make your little jam bit at one end if you want a tourist gimmick(it's fun). Glaze with egg and milk when youve sealed it up if you like, looks good. Crimp it down the side or along the top, who cares...your decision.

Half a pound of flour and marge
Makes a lovely clagger
Just enough for you and me
Cor bugger jagger
Chorus:
O how happy us'll be
When us gets to the west country
Where the oggies grow on trees
Cor bugger jagger


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: greg stephens
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 05:30 PM

Sorry, I forgot the last bit of the instructions(I mostly hang out up in music these days, not down in BS).
When cooked, drop them on Bagdhad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 06:03 PM

Yep, rutabaga is a swede which is a kind or turnip. Rutabaga is close to the Swedish word. Political correctness has eliminated the swede, and turnip is not upscale enough, hence rutabaga.
Thanks for the bacon suggestion, Greg.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 31 Mar 03 - 06:10 PM

Just wanted to emphasize Greg's stricture- never use ground meat, always use small chunks. This holds for all pot pies, meat pies, chili, stews, etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 12:28 AM

Hey, these postings are making us drool all over our keyboard. We'll be in Cornwall one month from today and we can hardly wait. Any tips on where we can sample some of these critters?

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: greg stephens
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 01:53 AM

Try some in Devon on the way in, Bev and Jerry. Cornwall hasn't got a monopoly.As to where to find them...everwhere. Except chemists and clothes shops. My principle when touring in Cornwall is to live on pasties, because you need to taste as many as possible, because I, like everyone else, am always searching for the perfect pasty.
   The first place for a cornish pasty for the traveller is the van in the layby at the bottom of the hill on the A30, shortly after the Cornish border. You can't miss it, you turn in left at the bottom of the steep hill, there is a bit of the old road with public toilets and an oggie-van. And the old bridge to lean over and look at fish and dragoflies while you eating the food of the gods.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,gourmand
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 03:41 AM

Barnicutts make the seminal Cornish pasty, the cheese and onion vegetarian one is delish. Launceston and Bodmin i think.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 03:43 AM

You need some sage and basil too !

I usually make a batch of pasties to take to folk festivals. The best sessions always seem to be at lunchtimes, so it's useful to have a portable meal with me - to soak up the beer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Gurney
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 06:01 AM

I used to sell them for Bowyers, back in the days before they recruited 12year-olds for policemen. I remember one batch when a new manufacture-hand crimped them ON TOP!!! This was the ultimate sin, and sales in Cornwall were less than half the usual. Times change.
Still remember those big trays of clotted cream with greed. White pudding. And pork pies with eggs in the middle.
We ate well then, and hadn't heard about cholesterol.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Penny S. (elsewhere)
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 06:10 AM

The Lizard - Anne's Pasty Shop - see them being made. And in Helston High Street, there's a shop with a name involving Horses and Hay or something, can't remember it. Portreath has a baker, back from the sea a bit, in a row of shops with a small supermarket. In summer there are queues outside, can't miss it.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 08:28 AM

The best Pasty I ever had was from a shop. the names escapes me, in Falmouth. I believe the owner wrote a book about Pasties. The second best one ever was in Swanage, Dorset of all places.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,James
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 08:30 AM

Thank you ALL SO musch. I am going to have a go at this at the week end. The recipes and tips are grand. I will let you know how things turn out. Thanks again. James


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Apr 03 - 08:30 AM

Apparently old Sid used his false teeth to crimp the edges of the pasties,---- i wonder what he used to make the holes in doughnuts!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 21 May 03 - 04:28 PM

Well, we've been to Cornwall to try the pasties. Following Greg's advice, we stopped at the first layby in Cornwall on the A30 and found the Oggie Man (actually, it was an Oggie Woman). Unfortunately, her oven was not working so she had no pasties. When we expressed our dissapointment at having travelled 6000 miles to try her pasties, she confessed that she buys them from Barnicutt's Bakery in Bodmin, a name we recognized instantly thanks to Gourmand's post.

We could not get to Bodmin that day (even though it's only a few miles from the layby) but we tried our first pasties in an obscure shop in Newquay and we were not impressed.

The next day we were in Padstow for the May Day Festival and what did we see but a Barnicutt's Bakery. We were about to try a pasty there when we noticed that it was a Kieth Barnicutt's Bakery, not a Malcom Barnicutt's Bakery as in Bodmin. So, we passed.

During our three weeks in Cornwall and Devon we had many a pasty, some good, some not so good. Eventually, we made it to Malcom Barnicutt's Bakery in Bodmin and had their specialty, cheese and onion, and it was excellent.

Is it true that the Cornish National Anthem translates as God Save the Pasty?

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: greg stephens
Date: 21 May 03 - 05:59 PM

Well I'm sorry I sent you 6000 miles to an oggie van with no oggies, but such is life. Hope you enjoyed Padstow.."Unite and unite"


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 21 May 03 - 06:04 PM

For those few who wouldn't know otherwise, "pasties" is NOT PAY-stees, but PASS-tees.

As to rutabaga, I can't stand rutabaga in anything except pasties. In pasties it's got enough other flavors that the pure rutabaga flavor is sort of balanced away.

When I was a kid, my grandmother, with whom we lived, knew she would make me cry by serving mashed rutabaga. I knew I would be required to eat some, which seemed like poison to me. And it would today, too, I think. Everyone else in the house thought it a treat, for some unfathomable reason.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 21 May 03 - 06:10 PM

Mom and I made pasties for Curmudgeon's and my wedding feast 21 years ago -- from Mom's old Yooper recipe. (I was born in Stambaugh, MI)

Washed down with Narragansett Porter and to the tune of bagpipes and banjos. (Oh, and we cut our wedding cake with a 16th century main gauche.)

Nothing upscale about rutabagas at all -- at least not in my youth. And they were usually referred to as "beggies." I think I was in my twenties before I realized that there were other varieties of turnips than the big (waxed) "beggies" with the yellow flesh that inhabited our boiled dinners and pasties.

Dinner well in hand. (Pasties, not the boiled dinner.)

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Penny S.
Date: 21 May 03 - 06:16 PM

I hated it as a child - I always thought it was off carrot - at school it was probably off swede. It is not a vegetable to eat simply boiled. Mashed with butter and black pepper to taste it is good. Or added to potato mash. Or grated raw in a salad. I can't believe I like it now.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: wysiwyg
Date: 22 May 03 - 09:26 AM

Rutmus, boiled rutabaga and boiled potato, mashed up coarsely together with tons of butter and pepper and a little salt. Mmmm! Cut the swede in half with a cleaver to get an edge to start peeling from-- BAMM! I tap the cleaver in with a hammer, they're tought buggers.

Isn't it funny how all the cuisines of the world seem to have certain techniques in common... pasties sound quite similar to what we call stromboli or calzones, here in the hill country of PA. But I have always wondered what goes into them, and now I see-- it seems it's actually another variation of the old "Using Up Leftovers" thing! :~)

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Beccy
Date: 22 May 03 - 09:31 AM

Okay- now here's the important question. With what do you serve your pasties? As a Yooper by birth, I was raised with loads of ketchup on the side(please don't shoot me.) My poor step-Mum, horrified by the site of a large group of grown people pouring ketchup all over a perfectly innocent pasty (she's from NY) demurely chose brown gravy. Some folks I know choose chow-chow.

Also- I have a sister and brother who are both vegetarian. I made theirs with chopped up Grillers or nature's burger crumbles and a touch of olive oil for moisture. They swore they were as good as they remembered the meat ones to be. Hmmmmm....

Beccy


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: M.Ted
Date: 22 May 03 - 10:19 AM

We always had pasties plain. Before my father retired, he made frequent trips to the Yoop, and brought back cases of pasties, frozen and ready to bake. I never quite figured out where he got them, but they were very much the same as yours, Beccy--

I hope that someday, Bev and Jerry will make the trek across the the Big Mac and do a comparison of the Yooper pasties with the Cornish--

For those who don't know, Michigan's Upper Penninsula is "The Yoop" and, at least as far as I am able to determine, the only food that they have up there are pasties.

Years ago, I shared a house with a guy whose father, when sufficiently relaxed, would rail for hours on the vile and despicable nature of the Cornish. This amazed me, because generally, Americans have never heard of the Cornish, much less cultivated an abiding hatred for them. However, the Cornish went to the Yoop to work in mines, and, since they spoke English, they were supervisors and formen. My housemate's father's family were German.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Beccy
Date: 22 May 03 - 12:28 PM

Oh come on... we had more 'n pasties... We had, um, hard cider and, let's see here, um, LOADS of church potlucks with such delicacies as pickled green beans and chili pie (for the exotic minded amongst us), and jello with fruit cocktail suspended in it.

But seriously- the UP is filled with loads of good game recipes. Deer are plentiful and some of my best venison recipes come from (no laughing) church auxillary ladies' club cookbooks.

Beccy

P.S. The Cornish population in the mines was eclipsed by that of the Finnish population. My Dad's boss was a Finnish guy who'd drink coffee hot enough to give a normal human being a serious second degree burn. My Mom's boss was a Finnish guy who poured his coffee into his saucer before drinking it. Lots of Finns in the UP, yeah, eh?


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 22 May 03 - 12:53 PM

Lots of pasties are sold across Canada, some fair to good, some mediocre and some downright ycck! The best, of course, are made at home. There is something about a nice lard crust and a top browned with brushes of butter that covers up a mess of sins.

Then there are all of the bottomless pot pie relatives- steak and kidney, chicken and turkey, etc. Won't refuse any of them- unless they use ground meat and lack texture.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: M.Ted
Date: 22 May 03 - 04:30 PM

Growing up, I was friends with a Finnish/American family whose Grandfather had been the Socialist candidate for Governor--never won, but you knew that. Good union people. Heck of a sense of humor as well, which is as important to surviving the winters as pasties and firewood. You Betcha!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 22 May 03 - 06:21 PM

Where I come from in North East England we had a pasty called a miner's foot -- coz of the shape -- and it had meat at one end and apple at the other.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 22 May 03 - 10:51 PM

Rather intrigued by Wysiwyg note on calzoni. Means trousers in Italian.
There is an Italian pasta place here that serves calzones, a sort of rolled wedge open at one end (like the foot of a slipper) filled with the stuff one usually puts on a pizza or a mixture of meat and olives, cheese, etc. Sometimes go there for a quick lunch.
I can't see a relationship to a pasty, however.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 22 May 03 - 10:56 PM

Try this. Make the pasty and instead of baking it, deep-fry it in hot oil.
Thinly slice some potatoes, rinse them in cold water, pat them dry, and deep-fry them in the same hot oil.
Freeze a Snickers or Mars bar, dip it in batter and deep-fry it as above.
Now for the main course.....

Seamus


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 22 May 03 - 11:06 PM

Calzone in my experience over many years is not open at the end; it's sort of a turnover closed-face pizza. It may have more or less traditional pizza sausage/tomato (etc.) filling, may have spinach and cheese, and so on.

Looking at it from the outside, it is rather like a pasty, and is similar in concept and construction.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 23 May 03 - 12:31 AM

Dave is closer to correct than I was. Checked with the place that makes calzones here. The owner says they are a kind of popover (today they were filled with lamb, black olives, feta cheese and minced hard sausage (salami type)). The shape is oval, like a rather flat loaf of bread. They are cut in half when served, hence the pocket or slipper appearance that I saw.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: M.Ted
Date: 23 May 03 - 12:56 PM

Calzone is made with a raised dough, pasties are made with pastry dough. Don't ya know freakin' nuttin'?


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 10:55 AM

I've made these a couple of times recently, albeit non-traditional and veggie, the addition of Marmite/yeast extract makes them as savoury as anything from a self-styled Ye Oldey Granny's Kitchen high-street bakery chain. Mr likes pasties with mash and baked beans or mash, peas and gravy.

http://www.veganfamily.co.uk/pasty.htm


Lynn's Cornish Pasty

I should point out that if it was a vegan version of a 'traditional' Cornish pasty it would not have carrot in it - but I think it's tastier with it in there.

Ingredients:

To make 4 medium to large pasties:

for the pastry:

10 oz/275g/2 cups plain flour (I use a mixture of 3 oz white & 7 oz wholewheat/wholemeal)

5 oz/130g/ 3/4 cup hard margarine (I grate it - it's easier to rub in!)

pinch salt

water to mix

for the filling:

1 tablespoon oil or margarine

1 onion, roughly chopped

1 small Swede chopped (about 1/2inch dice)

4 medium/large carrots chopped as above

1 medium/large potato chopped as above

1 tsp yeast extract

black pepper to taste

Pastry: Mix flours and salt together. Rub in grated marg until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Add cold water a tablespoon at a time until the mixture holds together and a firm dough is formed. Knead lightly. Put in fridge

Filling: Melt the margarine or heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the vegetables and stir well. Put lid on saucepan and cook, on a low heat for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally until vegetables are nearly cooked. Stir in yeast extract and add black pepper, and allow the mixture to cool. Remove pastry from fridge and cut into four equal pieces. Roll out each piece roughly into a circle of about 7 inch (this is very roughly - I never actually measure it!). Place 1/4 of the veg mix along the centre of each circle and wet edges, bring them together above the veg mix and seal and 'crimp'. Brush with soya milk and cook (in a preheated oven!) at 180C/375F on the middle shelf for about 40-45 minutes.

These are good hot or cold, and I sometimes add herbs to the mixture (fresh or dried whatever I have to hand) just for a change! Hope you enjoy them as much as my children have over the years.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 01:44 PM

I always thought the true pasty was made with lamb. But I'd like to know if you need to cook the meat first, as I've never put raw meat into a pastry pie, 'cos the pastry cooks long before the meat does! Totally agree about masses of pepper, essential IMO for the true Cornish Pasty Flavour.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Deckman
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 03:10 PM

Being Finnish, my father was raised in a Finnish speaking community, in Minnesota, U.S.A. The other half of the town were all Swedes. And the Swedes preffered turnips to any other vegetable. He often told me how his mother would send him to the local store to get "some swedes" ... meaning turnips.

Once in a while I will see an older produce man in a grocery store and ask him if he has any "swedes." Often they will answer: "The turnips are over there!". bob(deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Penny S.
Date: 19 Mar 12 - 06:59 AM

When I saw the shops making the pasties, the meat went in raw - which surprised me for the reason Eliza gives. But it works. And it was chunks of skirt of beef - as it was in the recipe given me by a colleague from Cornwall.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: maeve
Date: 19 Mar 12 - 07:11 AM

Eliza- all the traditional recipes I've seen use the meat raw, cooking it inside the pasty shell. The flavors should meld nicely as a result.

Here's a link to one:
http://www.crantocks.com/cornish-pasty-recipe/


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 19 Mar 12 - 07:51 AM

Guest CS. if it ain't got meat in it, it AIN'T a Cornish pasty.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: theleveller
Date: 19 Mar 12 - 08:02 AM

Here's an excellent traditional recipe from my cousin Liz's blog (soon to be published as a book), Feasts and Festivals:

http://feastsandfestivals.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/5-march-st-piran-again.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Cats
Date: 19 Mar 12 - 03:15 PM

Layers of potato, onion, a small bit of turnip [swede], raw skirt on the top and lots of pepper. If you have it a teaspoon of clotted cream on the top before sealing the shortcrust pastry.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 19 Mar 12 - 05:22 PM

Ever since the American Public discovered fajitas, other traditional skirt steak recipes have had to find other meat---the price of skirt has gone up tenfold in the past 20 years.Bad news for pasty makers and lovers or Romanian Steak.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Mark Ross
Date: 20 Mar 12 - 03:07 PM

I lived in Butte for 11 years, and I was told the proper way to prepare the meat for the pasty filling was skirt steak, cut into pieces the size of the last joint on a Cornishwomans' little finger.


Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Nick
Date: 20 Mar 12 - 06:05 PM

The Crantocks recipe is the same as I make. Meat definitely goes in raw. If you are concerned cut it thin and small. The knob of butter and juices from the meat make it moist. Lots of pepper.

Personally I like making them with flaky pastry rather than shortcrust, so not a purist.

NO CARROTS. And it's the only time that I will willingly eat a swede.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 03:08 PM

Was motivated by this thread to make some Oggies, using minced lamb, and have to say they were very nice. BUT we went into town today and decided to try the West Cornwall Pasty outlet. They had a selection of different fillings, so we chose 'traditional' and they were so ghastly we didn't finish them. Mostly gristle, far too much potato, and... greasy puff pastry! Groo! Yuk! Homemade only for us in future.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: Bert
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 08:08 PM

...Try this. Make the pasty and instead of baking it, deep-fry it in hot oil...

Seamus, A fried pasty is called a samosa;-)

We always used only meat, potatoes peas and onions in ours, and we cook them all together and season and taste the mixture before we make the pasties.

AND we crimp them at the top like giant clams.

Any left over filling gets spiced and, as I said above, used for samosas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cornish Pasty recipe
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Mar 12 - 09:03 AM

My poem "Tin-Miners' Lunch".


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