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Lyr Req: The Cobbler

DigiTrad:
DICK DARBY THE COBBLER
FAGAN THE COBBLER
HABEN A BOO AND A BANNER
JIM SWAGGART, THE PREACHER
THE COBBLER


Related threads:
(origins) Origin: Dick Darby the Cobbler (66)
Dick Darby the Cobbler: songs with same tune (26)
Lyr Req: The Cobbler (from Sam Henry) (7)
Lyr Req: Wingo Wang Wingo (Applachian Ditty) (6)
req only: The Cobbler (Clancy/Makem) (4) (closed)


atechical@yahoo.com 26 Jul 98 - 12:31 PM
dick greenhaus 26 Jul 98 - 02:10 PM
27 Jul 98 - 07:26 AM
Sherbrooke 27 Jul 98 - 04:03 PM
alison 28 Jul 98 - 12:59 AM
harpgirl 28 Jul 98 - 07:11 PM
atechical@yahoo.com 29 Jul 98 - 08:05 AM
alison 29 Jul 98 - 08:58 AM
Jim 29 Jul 98 - 01:53 PM
Martin Ryan. 30 Jul 98 - 04:51 PM
skw@ 23 Oct 98 - 09:18 AM
Jack Hickman 24 Oct 98 - 12:11 AM
skw@ 25 Oct 98 - 01:38 PM
Bruce O. 25 Oct 98 - 04:08 PM
Boston Bill 12 Dec 99 - 02:14 AM
John in Brisbane 12 Dec 99 - 06:30 AM
Philippa 12 Dec 99 - 08:34 AM
Bruce O. 12 Dec 99 - 09:42 PM
Abby Sale 13 Dec 99 - 09:00 AM
Frank Maher 13 Dec 99 - 09:42 AM
Bruce O. 13 Dec 99 - 12:05 PM
GUEST,C6H12B26 (Youtube) 14 Sep 14 - 08:46 AM
GUEST,threelegsoman 14 Sep 14 - 08:14 PM
MGM·Lion 15 Sep 14 - 12:24 AM
GUEST,Dave Hunt 15 Sep 14 - 08:03 PM
GUEST,Guest ( Jimmy C.) 16 Sep 14 - 01:55 AM
MGM·Lion 16 Sep 14 - 02:09 AM
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Subject: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: atechical@yahoo.com
Date: 26 Jul 98 - 12:31 PM

I have a fragment of am autobiographical song about a tinker. It sounds British or Irish/Scottish. Can anyone come up with the whole thing? It's sung A Capella in the version I've heard, and sounds like something a tinker would have sung as he walked the alleys.

Chorus

It's an inkling of an i-doh... It's an inkling of an inkling of an i-day... with me roo-boo-boo-roo-boo-boo Randy, and my love-stone is sinking away.

verse

Well my wife she is lumpy, she's dumpy. My Wife she's the Divvil, she's black! And no matter what I might do with her, her jaws they go clickity clack.

Can anyone point me to the full lyrics?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 26 Jul 98 - 02:10 PM

Try a search for Cobbler


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From:
Date: 27 Jul 98 - 07:26 AM

Yep, sure enough that did the trick... thanks Dick!


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: Sherbrooke
Date: 27 Jul 98 - 04:03 PM

Tommy Makem sings this song called "The Cobbler" The Clancey Bros. also sing this.

Well for thirty long years I have travelled All by the contents of me pack. My hammers my awls and my pincers, I carry them all on me back.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: alison
Date: 28 Jul 98 - 12:59 AM

Hi,

If you do actually see Tommy Makem doing this live, he does spit all of the way through it..... YUCK!!!

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: harpgirl
Date: 28 Jul 98 - 07:11 PM

That first snippet of song sounds like a version of the Devil and the Farmer's Wife. The Cobbler, now is that A Kiss in the Morning Early? (I haven't looked it up in the DT, Yet) Aren't they two different songs? harpgirl And why does Tommy Makem spit during his song, Alison?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: atechical@yahoo.com
Date: 29 Jul 98 - 08:05 AM

No, Harpgirl, I'm sure we're all talking about the same song here. The spitting business is a rythmic accent to the song... I guess the cobbler should be imagined to be walking the alleys, hawking his trade and spitting.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: alison
Date: 29 Jul 98 - 08:58 AM

Hi,

Yes, that's it. He pretends to be threading a needle and hitting a shoe while he sings, and he spits to accent the end of each line.

Pretty gross eh??!!

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: Jim
Date: 29 Jul 98 - 01:53 PM

Jolly old Roger the Tinmaker man leaved in a Garret in NewAmerstam Jim Douglas a local folksinger sings have words if needed at home


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 30 Jul 98 - 04:51 PM

Just came across this in an Amazon.com review of a book called "Twas only an Irishman's dream":

Dr. Williams takes what may at first seem like a narrow subject---Irish-American song lyrics---and uses it to tell not only the story of the Irish in America, but of American popular culture as well. This book is full of revelations. Readers unfamiliar with the subject matter will be surprised to learn that not too long ago in our history, Irish-American music and popular culture were practically synonymous. Others with a more sophisticated knowledge of Irish American history will be delighted at all sorts of surprises---e.g., "The Cobbler" and "The Real Old Mountain Dew," two songs popularized by the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Maken early in their career, were actually written by Ned Harrigan, a 3rd-generation Irish-American New Yorker.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: skw@
Date: 23 Oct 98 - 09:18 AM

Very pleased to find Martin's info - till I turned to my own database and found Colm O'Lochlainn saying: "I first heard this song at a meeting of newly released political prisoners in December, 1916. I am told it was written by Phil O'Neill of Kinsale." Help, anyone??? - Susanne


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: Jack Hickman
Date: 24 Oct 98 - 12:11 AM

Let's not get our knickers in a knot over Tommy Makem's spitting. As he sings this song, he sits crosslegged on a stool, imitating the pose of a cobbler at work. His gestures represent the cobbler running the thread through his hands before inserting the needle into the sole of the shoe. He spits into his hands and rubs them together to increase the friction on the thread.

I sing this song this song with the group I'm in, but I haven't been able to perfect the spitting aspect like T.M. does.

Keep the Faith.

Jack Hickman


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: skw@
Date: 25 Oct 98 - 01:38 PM

I'd still like to know, though:
Colm O'Lochlainn says 'The Cobbler'was written by Phil O'Neill of Kinsale, according to his information. But Martin Ryan says it was written by Ned Harrigan. Any help, anyone? - Thanks, Susanne


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Subject: RE: Lyrics Needed: Song about a Tinker
From: Bruce O.
Date: 25 Oct 98 - 04:08 PM

"The Cobbler", of which there are many traditional versions, appears to be a descendent of "My Name is Old Hewson the Cobbler". The tune is in Chappell's PMOT, and the song is reported to be in 'The Vocal Miscellany', Dublin, 1738. No one has confirmed this, or given the a text of it. [I've seen the earlier London edition of 1734, both volumes, and the song is not in those.] A traditional version of the "The Cobbler" in 'The New Green Mountain Songster', 1939, is entitled "Old Hewson, the Cobbler". [See Ed. Cray's 'The Erotic Muse', 2nd ed., pp. 112-3, 1992, for some bibliography of the song.]


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Subject: LY REQ: THE COBBLER
From: Boston Bill
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 02:14 AM

I have a CO. Wexford friend who wants "The Cobbler" but not the one in DT. I don't have a clue. If not easy to find I'll get him to write some of the words. Anyone? Boston Bill


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Subject: RE: LY REQ: THE COBBLER
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 06:30 AM

It's not the one about Harold Wilson (ex British PM) perchance?


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Subject: RE: LY REQ: THE COBBLER
From: Philippa
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 08:34 AM

Is it Dick Darby the Cobbler?[click on the blue title] That's on the database as well as a different song simply called the Cobbler.


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Subject: RE: LY REQ: THE COBBLER
From: Bruce O.
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 09:42 PM

"Dick Darling the Cobbler" {having a lot of other names)is on the Bodley Ballads website, and a search on keywords 'cobbler' and 'cobler' there will turn up several similar ones. It's probably a reworking of "Old Hewson the Cobbler", but I still don't have a copy of that, but hope to have it in a few weeks.


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Subject: RE: LY REQ: THE COBBLER
From: Abby Sale
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 09:00 AM

I've been following this most interesting bawrdy for a while. All its incarnations seem interesting & singable.

Bruce, I'm mis-reading something, I think. You said you had this:

Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 17:41:37 -0500
From: "W. B. OLSON"
To: Ballad-L
Subject: The Cobbler

(Old Hewson) The Cobbler

'The Jovial Crew', 1731, has the tune, "My Name is Old Hewson the Cobbler", reprinted in modern notation in Wm. Chappell's PMOT. [I have made an independent copy of the tune.] The text is said by James Dick ('Songs of Robert Burns', p. 415) to be in the Dublin, 1738, edition of 'The Vocal Miscellany', p. 338. The two known copies of this book are both at Yale, according to the National Union Catalog. NUC listed another copy in Eire County, New York State, but I tracked this down and was told that they do not have it and never did.
[The song is not in either of the two volumes of the last (2nd) London edition of 1734.]
Has anyone every tried to verfiy this or get a copy of it?
========================================

Ballad Index Bob W. cited:
Randolph 102, "Dick German the Cobbler" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Randolph-Legman I, ppp. 516-517, "Dick Darlin' the Cobbler" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Flanders/Olney, pp. 176-177, "Hobson, the Cobbler" (1 text, 1 tune)
Kennedy 222, "Fagan the Cobbler" (1 text, 1 tune)
Cray, pp. 111-113, "(My Name Is) Dick Darby, the Cobbler" (1 partial text, 1 tune)
DT, DICKDARB*

Earliest precise date I have on record for this is 1731 (ballad opera, "The Jovial Crew").
==================================

Per Dick, as Bruce above, the actual Hewson was knighted by Cromwell, c.1650. Is there any way to get better detail on that?

But I like Arthur Argo's "Haban a Boo" best, I think.
=========================================


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Subject: ADD: Dick Darlin' the Cobbler
From: Frank Maher
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 09:42 AM

Dick Darlin',The Cobbler

My Name is Dick Darlin' the Cobbler
My Time I served down There in Kent,
Wid the Wimmen I was always a Squabbler,
But now I'm resolved to repent.

For Twenty Years I'd been a Rover,
And wasted the Prime of My Life,
One Day,I resolved to give over,
And settle Myself down to a Wife.

My Wife She was Blinkin' and Blearin'
My Wife She was Humpy and Black,
The worse all over for Swearin',
And Her Tongue is kept goin' Click Clack.

My Troubles of Wedlock bein' over,
This country I thought I would try,
Once more I've become a Free Rover,
And Single I'll Stop
'till I Die.........


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Subject: RE: LY REQ: THE COBBLER
From: Bruce O.
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 12:05 PM

Subsequent search has shown that there were 2 Dublin editions of 1738. One was a 2 volume edition (extant in several copies not listed in the British Union Catalog or the National Union Catalog) which circumstantial evidence indicates did not contain |"Old Hewson". Whether James Dick was correct that the song is in the other remains to be seen. Jeff Kallen checked the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, and they have no volumes of any edition.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cobbler
From: GUEST,C6H12B26 (Youtube)
Date: 14 Sep 14 - 08:46 AM

Looks partly like the old lute tune The Cob(b)ler ... with many versions.
For instance the lute solo found here :
the Folger Dowland manuscript(around 1610) The Cob(b)ler of Bordeaux
9r
Videos on Youtube.

Great thanks,
All the best


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cobbler
From: GUEST,threelegsoman
Date: 14 Sep 14 - 08:14 PM

I uploaded my own version of this song which includes lyrics and chords for guitar accompaniment based on Tommy Makem's version:

The Cobbler

The Cobbler
Traditional
                  
Oh, me name is Dick Darby, I'm a cobbler
I served my time at ould camp
Some call me an old agitator
But now I'm resolved to repent

With me ing-twing of an ing-thing of an i-doe
With me ing-twing of an ing-thing of an i-day
With me roo-boo-boo roo-boo-boo randy
And me lab stone keeps beating away

Now, my father was hung for sheep stealing
My mother was burned for a witch
My sister's a dandy house-keeper
And I'm a mechanical switch

It's forty long years I have travelled
All by the contents of me pack
Me hammers, me awls and me pinchers
I carry them all on me back

Oh, my wife she is humpy, she's lumpy
Me wife she's the devil, she's cracked
And no matter what I may do with her
Her tongue, it goes clickety-clack

It was early one fine summer's morning
A little before it was day
I dipped her three times in the river
And carelessly bade her "Good day"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cobbler
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 15 Sep 14 - 12:24 AM

I first heard Tommy Makem do this at Cambridge Folk Festival of 1965, and got a recording of his doing it to learn it. He distinctly sang in those days "My wife, she's the devil, she's black", rather than 'cracked'. Wonder when he changed it. One scarcely has to ask why, tho it seems a bit PC-gone-mad to me. YMMV.

≈M≈


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cobbler
From: GUEST,Dave Hunt
Date: 15 Sep 14 - 08:03 PM

`'black' means.bad tempered....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cobbler
From: GUEST,Guest ( Jimmy C.)
Date: 16 Sep 14 - 01:55 AM

I have not been on this site for a long time, but I remember this song being discussed some years ago. I learnt the song from my mother, her father was a cobbler and he sang it to her when she was a child. The only difference from her version and Tommy Makem's is the bit of the chorus, Tommy sang " With me robo, robo randy , and me lap stone keeps beating away". The words I learnt are " Ould wax-end and heel-ball your boozing again , and me lap stone keeps beating away.
Wax end was a cube of hard wax that a cobbler would use to make the twine stiff and water resistant. The wax cube was held in one hand while the thread was drawn through it with the other. It was about the size of a piece of billiard chalk. Heel-ball was a larger piece of harder wax, it was heated over a candle to soften it a little and used to burnish the heels by pressing the wax through the layers of leather that made up the heel of the shoe or boot. As a child I helped both my grandfather and uncle in the shop and prepared the twine many times. My grandfather also inserted (using glue) a little stick of wood into the centre of the sole about the thickness of a match. This little piece of wood attracted any water to one spot on the sole preventing water damage to the entire surface. It did not make the sole waterproof but water resistant..

I did discuss this with Tommy Makem himself when I met him in Toronto, he was not aware of these lyrics,but I don't think he changed his version anyway.

Hope this is useful.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Cobbler
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 16 Sep 14 - 02:09 AM

Indeed, Dave Hunt -- as in to give someone a black look. That's why the change was so stupidly otiose. But that's the way, these days, innit; so that we can't even use an almost homophone of entirely different provenance like 'niggardly'.

Bah! Humbug!

≈M≈


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